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“To educate is an act of love, it is to give life” - POPE FRANCIS

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 2017-2018 | YEAR IN REVIEW


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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NEW FACULTY

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AN ARCH TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150TH

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CELEBRATING CATHOLIC EDUCATION

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LEAVING THEIR MARK!

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EARLY CHILDHOOD LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

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IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MISSION

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BUILDING SECURE ATTACHMENTS

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GARRY MIDDLE SCHOOL

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TOOLS FOR THE MODERN WORKPLACE

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

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GONZAGA EXCEPTIONAL BULLDOGS HOCKEY TEAM!

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DAY OF SERVICE

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TIME FOR OTHERS AND OURSELVES

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ART EXHIBITION — CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE

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RECOGNITIONS & ACHIEVEMENTS

EDITOR: CAROL BRADSHAW | ASSISTANT EDITOR: TAYLOR TYRELL (’19) PROJECT MANAGER: CARA HOAG | DESIGNER: HENRY ORTEGA CONTRIBUTORS: LUKE CAIRNEY, GINA FRERICHS (’12), JENNA WHITE (’16) PHOTOGRAPHER: ZACK BERLAT (’11)

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THE DEAN’S PERSPECTIVE

As you read this short introduction to the School of Education (SOE) Year in Review (YIR), I am sure that the world is changing in ways many of us would not have believed years ago. For example, we have had mass shootings, devastating wildfires, and chaos that has the country experiencing high levels of anxiety. Sometimes it is difficult to find hope and the motivation to carry out our mission as men and women for others and to make this world a better place. However, the Holy Spirit influences us in subtle and not so subtle ways to carry on and serve our brothers and sisters in need at home and abroad. This past summer I traveled to several national parks including Glacier and Yellowstone and marveled at the beauty of our land and diversity of our people. This excursion inspired me to deliver a message of hope to the SOE faculty and staff at the beginning of the school year. I believe, as stated by President Woodrow Wilson in Robert Reich’s The Common Good, that “To work for the common good is the greatest creed.” In the SOE we believe in the common good and demonstrate this belief day in and day out from saying hello in the morning to meeting with

students to teaching classes to engaging in difficult yet necessary conversations about our fears and change. In this edition of the YIR we highlight the myriad ways that the faculty, staff, students, and alumni are serving all people regardless of race, ethnicity, creed, sexual orientation, ability, or disability. I hope that you enjoy reading and learning about what we did in the SOE last year and what we are planning and doing in this 90th year of the SOE and 25th year of the Rosauer Center for Education. We take great pride in our work especially when we see that we are making a difference in the lives of children, youth, and families. Please visit us whenever you like and share your thoughts, ideas, and feelings with us as we love to hear from you. Until next time, I leave you with a quote attributed to Voltaire: Perfect is the enemy of good.

Dr. Vincent C. Alfonso Professor and Dean, School of Education

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NEW FACULTY Boe Burrus, Ph.D.

IN EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY, SPRINGFIELD COLLEGE

Assistant Professor, Department of Sport and Physical Education

This year the School of Education (SOE) welcomes six new faculty members to prepare our students to serve as teachers, counselors, administrators, managers, school psychologists, and leaders for others. It is evident in the answers to a few questions that they want to be here, effect change, and embrace the mission.

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The opportunity to work at a studentcentered institution is not one that I could turn down. I hope to bring a vibrant colleague who is able to grow the Kinesiology and Physical Education major while preparing our students to achieve their professional ambitions. I plan to develop a Kinesiology Lab to serve Gonzaga students and the greater Spokane communities. When I grow up…I wanted be the short stop for the Seattle Mariners.

Joseph Engler, Ph.D. IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY, THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH DAKOTA

Nicole Lustig, Ph.D. IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Lecturer, Department of Special Education

Associate Professor and Director, School Psychology program

The highlight for me as a professional is the opportunity to work alongside Dr. Alfonso. There is a critical shortage of school psychologists in the nation and within the state of Washington. I feel that this is part of my professional responsibility to help give back to the profession through the new School Psychology program that will better serve students and the community. As a child …, I wanted to be a professional baseball player (think Ken Griffey, Jr.).

I received my B.Ed. and M.Ed. in Special Education from Gonzaga University and came back to Gonzaga as a Lecturer. I am hoping as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Doctorate level, I can help grow the Special Education master’s program. I also hope to bring diversity to the SOE as a person with a disability. As a child… I wanted to be a smokejumper, which is a wildfire firefighter who jumps out of airplanes for the U.S. Forest Service.


Rob McKinney, Ph.D.

Kathy Nitta, Ph.D.

Catherine Zeisner, Ed.D.

IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION, KENT STATE UNIVERSITY

IN MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, WESTERN UNIVERSITY, ONTARIO, CANADA

Assistant Professor, Department of Counselor Education

Assistant Professor, Department of Teacher Education

Assistant Professor, Department of Educational Leadership & Administration

It is evident... that they want to be here, effect change, and embrace the mission. I wanted to work with a great group of professional educators who had teaching at the heart of what they were doing and I found that at Gonzaga. Also, I previously worked at another Jesuit university and I greatly appreciated the Jesuit principles incorporated into higher education. One of my professional passions is multicultural counseling considerations and I hope to share this within my teaching, service, and research. As a child… I wanted to be a paleontologist.

I have been a Lecturer at Gonzaga for over 7 years and as a new tenure-track faculty member, I desire to continue working to prepare teachers to be transformative educational leaders in K-12 schools and communities. I hope to share my expertise in research-based pedagogies in teacher education, which support preservice teachers in acquiring the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to teach. As a child…I always wanted to be a teacher.

The Gonzaga mission statement brought me out west from Ontario, Canada. I knew that I wanted to effect change in education at the undergraduate and graduate level with people who are passionate about supporting student learning. I wanted a platform to teach and research with amazing faculty, and a community passionate about improvement. As a child…I wanted to be radiologist but my parents had another idea for my profession: teaching. I always listen to my parents.

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AN ARCH TO CELEBRATE CANADA’S 150TH

Gonzaga University graduate, Stephen Larsen (‘17), was attracted to the M.Ed leadership and administration program in Fernie, British Columbia (BC). As an educator, a cohort model program offered access to a collaborative learning community that would continue to exist after completing the program. After graduation, in recognition of Canada’s 150-year anniversary, Stephen hoped to create a lasting symbol of the land and the people in his community, which

would welcome tourists to the Elk Valley. This symbol, later named the Arch, would be installed in conjunction with Canada’s sesquicentennial and the conversion of the TransCanada trail to the Great Trail. The Arch project was a direct result of the inspiration and collaboration offered through the leadership and administration program. While the Arch project was not directly linked to any one class or project, it became a theme in many of the Fernie cohort’s projects

and was the result of the collaborative efforts of a quarter of the members in the cohort. The Arch was constructed from three local cedar logs, each weighing roughly 1000 kg (over 2200 lbs) and placed at the three-way intersection of the Alberta/BC border, TransCanada trail, and the high point of the Elk Pass. Assembled by a team of students from school districts in Fernie, Sparwood, and Elkford, the Arch is a symbol of the

students’ work, collaboration, and service contributions to their community, and it represents their connections to the local environment. The sculpting of the arch was facilitated by chainsaw sculptor Michael Penny and was made possible by the ArtStarts in Schools grant. The unassembled logs were delivered by truck to the Elk Lakes Provincial Park. Grade 12 student, Dana Barclay, reported, “Everyone helped bring the logs 5 km and 300m up to the top of the Elk Pass by pulling them on a cart designed and constructed by students.” At the time of the Arch Project’s inception, the curriculum in BC was changing to encourage more projectbased learning. This project provided the engagement piece that can be so challenging in a project-based environment. Stephen explained that the, “…project is intended to be the first step by a regional service learning team that will create in-class, curriculum-linked, PBL tasks that support extra-curricular outdoor education events yearly. The Arch Project just completed its second phase; a second group of students from Fernie, Sparewood and Elkford returned to the Arch this past June to reroute the trail, replace signage over 70 kilometer stretch of trail, and continue geo caching in the area.

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CELEBRATING CATHOLIC EDUCATION

The annual Celebration of Catholic schools luncheon was hosted by the School of Education (SOE) and the Catholic Diocese of Spokane on Gonzaga’s campus in fall 2017. The 200 guests included Bishop Thomas Daly, principals, teachers, students, clergy from the 16 Diocesan schools, the Nazareth Guild, University President, Dr. Thayne McCulloh, and SOE Dean, Dr. Vincent Alfonso. The K–12 students held an interactive education fair displaying class projects incorporating Lego robotics, apps development, music and art, anatomical models of the human body, and the intricacies of party planning. The event, which is in its 13th year, celebrates the long-standing collaborative relationship among the Diocese, the University, and the SOE. This relationship allows myriad opportunities for our faculty and students to work in the Catholic schools through placements for student teaching and field experience, and field-based programs. The SOE faculty, principals, and teachers at the Catholic schools collaborate on initiatives across the disciplines developing curriculum that enriches the educational experience of Gonzaga students and supplementing the schools’ needs. Faculty and students

are working with teachers in Catholic schools delivering a sport ministry and nutrition program; offering support for learning and behavior difficulties and crisis intervention; guiding lessons in K–8 classrooms where they cover topics such as emotional regulation, teamwork, and respect; and providing situated learning experiences for teacher candidates in secondary math. Currently, the SOE has begun a teacher pipeline to where our students carry out their student teaching in a Catholic school and then continue to work in a Catholic school for three years. In addition, in collaboration with the Nazareth Guild, we are funding two Catholic school teachers to earn their principal certification with us. Plans are under way to provide teacher professional development for all Spokane diocesan teachers in spring 2019 and for all Anchorage archdiocesan teachers in summer 2019. We plan to continue to serve the Catholic schools at home and beyond in the years ahead.

Bishop Thomas Daly’s closing remarks at the Celebration of Catholic Schools answer the question, “why Catholic education?”

Our curriculum exposes our students to the richness of our Catholic faith, but also to the beauty of the curriculum that speaks of music, art, literature, and drama—each built on a belief that our individual gifts and talents are God given and meant to be shared— and we are each entrusted, families and students alike with the mission of our community to be the best that we can.”

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LEAVING THEIR MARK!

Gonzaga University awarded Dr. Tim McLaughlin Professor Emeritus, and Dr. Chuck Salina, Associate Professor Emeritus at the 2018 Academic Convocation. The School of Education (SOE) also honored Dr. McLaughlin and Dr. Salina who retired after many years of service to the University. Each of these faculty has held himself to the highest standards impacting their colleagues, students, the community they serve, and are highly respected in their academic fields throughout the country. We are so grateful for their work but most importantly, for who they are.

Tim McLaughlin, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus, Department of Special Education As shared by Dr. Mark Derby, Professor: This is a big day for Tim, and I am happy, but sad for the students, teachers, children with disabilities, and the greater community he serves. After many years

working in the public schools, Tim came to Gonzaga in 1976 to lead a program that did not exist. He would serve as faculty in the Department of Special Education to provide a career path for Gonzaga students, with a united mission, to practice their craft with the highest standard of kindness. Throughout his career, he established his leadership by staying firmly grounded in his ideals. Chief among his beliefs was always, “what was best for the student, the child, the community, the fish, the goose, and so on-and so on. For the special education students, Tim remained an active educator in the public schools throughout his 50-year career. His innovations in behavior management and teaching methods will continue to shape the field well beyond all of our careers. As a mentor and teacher, he has published more than 400 research articles with Gonzaga undergraduates and graduate students, and as a senior faculty member in the SOE he has hired and mentored multiple faculty members through the tenure and promotion process. Tim’s criteria were simple, work hard, help others work hard, and he would go to the end of the earth to help you achieve every goal you had. Speaking for myself, I owe him my gratitude

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for his guidance and support. For the community, Tim loved special education and special education students. So Tim, there are fish to catch and geese to hunt. We all wish you well in your retirement.

Chuck Salina, Ph.D. Associate Professor Emeritus, Department of Educational Leadership and Administration As shared by Dr. Cynthia Johnson, Associate Professor and Chair: Back in the day, Dr. Chuck Salina shut down traffic on I-5 to increase people’s awareness of the absurdity of the war in Vietnam; he volunteered at Camp Field in Leavenworth; had a 97-mile-per hour fastball, and instead of joining Major League Baseball he chose the seminary. With these skills and background, he decided to go into K–12 education. Dr. Salina is a man of many accomplishments. Chuck’s scholarly work has included two books and consulting for schools and school districts in the State of Washington. He turned around a struggling high school in Sunnyside,

Washington and helped a school in Spokane make enormous strides in the area of academics and school culture. He has been instrumental in the sustainability of the master’s degree programs in Canada, and a key advocate in the SOE’s initiative for the Center for Catholic Education. He has taught all of us about the importance of relationships and relational trust, and every day he has done the heavy lifting, helping organizations work better for everyone they serve. Chuck has always used the term “garden” for the work that each individual did in the department. It was about tending the garden and watching it grow. Thank you for what you have done for the department, the SOE, and the University. Your commitment has never gone unnoticed. You are the epitome of the values and mission of Gonzaga.


EARLY CHILDHOOD LEADERSHIP SUMMIT

In April, the School of Education (SOE) hosted the 4th Annual Early Childhood Leadership (ECL) Summit. As in the past, the main purpose of the summit was to convene major stakeholders in Washington State to discuss ways that we can increase the quality of early childhood learning and child care, and ensure access to high quality early childhood resources. Three years ago, the group collectively began discussions around what is important to us, how we are going to address our needs and those of young children and families, and who is going to lead the way. The outcomes and subsequent discussions indicated a call to action by us.

At this year’s summit, we welcomed three very important and knowledgeable panelists: Mr. Nick Gillon from the Washington State Professional Educators Standards Board, Ms. Robin Lester, Chief Executive Officer from Child Care Aware-Washington, and Washington State Senator Andy Billig. The panelists responded to fundamental questions and concerns on professionalizing the field; recognizing that ECL is basic to education; preparation by schools and colleges of education; and defining the role of government, state and local agencies. The consensus of the panelists was that early learning teachers have more influence than any others and are

key to educational success. It is evident that there is a need to create new degree programs for the ECL profession—a professional teacher with the required qualifications and competencies expected of K–8 educators (kindergarten was not always considered basic education either).

Today’s ECL professionals serve our children and their families, especially those living in poverty, those who are neglected and abused, and those who are underserved for one reason or another. In Washington State, we are fortunate to have preschools, full day kindergartens, day-care centers, and Head Start centers. The organizations, schools and colleges of education, and lawmakers play a role in ECL and each of us needs to lead the way to create stronger continuity and bridge the divide. At this time, the action for us is to support early learning, build awareness, create conversations, identify educational requirements, ensure safety, and establish high quality ECL teacher preparation programs.

The consensus of the panel was that early learning teachers have more influence than any others and are key to educational success.”

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IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MISSION

Gonzaga University is an exemplary learning community that educates students for lives of leadership and service for the common good. In keeping with its Catholic, Jesuit, and humanistic heritage and identity, Gonzaga models and expects excellence in academic and professional pursuits and intentionally develops the whole person— intellectually, spiritually, culturally, physically, and emotionally. Through engagement with knowledge, wisdom, and questions informed by classical and contemporary perspectives, Gonzaga cultivates in its students the capacities and dispositions for reflective and critical thought, lifelong learning, spiritual growth, ethical discernment, creativity, and innovation. The Gonzaga experience fosters a mature commitment to dignity of the human person, social justice, diversity, intercultural competence, global engagement, solidarity with the poor and vulnerable, and care for the planet. Grateful to God, the Gonzaga community carries out this mission with responsible stewardship of our physical, financial, and human resources.

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WHO WE ARE AND WHY WE ARE During the last two academic years, the review of the Gonzaga University Mission Priority Examen was piloted with the School of Education (SOE) under the direction of Fr. Pat Lee, S.J., Vice President of Mission and Ministry, and Michelle Wheatley, Assistant Vice President for Mission and the Director of University Ministry. Throughout the school year, the faculty and staff attended several mission sessions in which they engaged with Wheatley and Lee and one another about the University mission, their role in it, and its purpose. Over the course of the meetings, Ms. Wheatley discussed how the mission identity comes to life in the educational experiences of our students and the spiritual tradition that grounds our educational model. The “why,” as shared by Ms. Wheatley, is her belief that the “mission is about who and why we are, and what we are here to accomplish together.” As something that is lived together, she believes, “it requires time set aside to reflect, converse, and share in creating a unified vision.” The “how” was identified in several activities to prepare for and engage in the mission priorities exam experience. These activities included multiple SOE Assembly sessions with Fr. Lee and Ms. Wheatley where we held small group discussions, large group “shout outs,” listening and reflecting exercises, and reviewed information. Ms. Wheatley referred to Fr. Lee “as a wisdom person with a great deal of knowledge and experience in the Jesuit Mission.” A huge part of his role currently is helping prepare the University community as a whole as the Jesuit presence on campus decreases. Thus, it is important for the lay faculty and staff of the University to grow in their knowledge, ability, and leadership to carry the mission forward. Ms. Wheatley said, “I hope the best legacy of the time with the SOE is a sense of empowerment and inspiration to show leadership in new ways.”


In spring 2018, the SOE held its annual retreat at the Bozarth Mansion and all members responded to the five examen questions. Below is Dean Vincent Alfonso’s summary of the SOE’s thoughts and feelings on the questions. The members believe that the term “mission” is what guides our work on a day-to-day basis. It is akin to a compass that directs our goals and is the ultimate “why” we do what we do. We are committed to being a servant leadership SOE, and we exemplify or operationalize this in many ways from our high quality academic programs, to University service, to community service, to service to each other. As has been said many times in many meetings, the succinct mission of the University and thus of the SOE is to educate students in the Jesuit, Catholic, and humanistic tradition. To demonstrate that, we in the SOE walk the talk and live the mission each and every day in the ways we talk, behave, think, and feel. We believe the SOE has an impact on the community/society at large by graduating students who are transformational leaders in educational settings including special education, mental health agencies, and sports and athletics.

The SOE continues to grow in engaging the mission as exemplified in our adoption of a vision and strategic plan in the past few years. However, the operationalization of the plan needs to be a top priority as we move forward. In addition, increasing the voice of all SOE members needs to take place and the divide between faculty and staff needs to decrease so we can grow and build capacity in all employees as they work for the common good, which is to educate. In addition, given that the SOE educates myriad graduate students via 16 programs, we need to find ways to support better these students as we support undergraduate students. Finally, (for now) we need to influence University administration to consider service more formally in the evaluation process for faculty and staff.

The SOE believes a University priority in the immediate future should be to include attention to mission and service to others in job descriptions and hiring of new employees. In response to the consideration of formal values of the institution, the SOE identified community, integrity, trust,

and cura personalis (care of the person). In addition, the members discussed service and social justice, the valuing of individuals, and exploration of the truth. Soon, we will revisit our shared values as we continue to change our culture to be more inclusive, equitable, and loving.

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BUILDING SECURE ATTACHMENTS

In March of 2018, Dr. Elisabeth Bennett, Professor in Counselor Education and students in Gonzaga’s M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling programs travelled to Thailand to study elephant attachment. During Dr. Bennett’s sabbatical travels, she visited

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an elephant hospital and sanctuary in Thailand, and observed the way elephants parent their “babies.” She realized that the elephant’s behavior looked very much like the behavior she teaches mothers of young children to build secure attachment. Based on this, she created a field experience

for her students that would create a hands-on view of the development and maintenance of attachment for elephants. This research and professional development trip at the Maesa Elephant Camp in Thailand provided the opportunity for the students to observe and interact with the elephants to study the similarities and differences in respect to how humans raise children and how elephants raise calves. There were four sets of calves and mothers and Bennett and groups of students rotated from early morning to early afternoon, playing

with the elephants, watching them bathe, and feeding them. Most importantly, the students were able to observe the elephants’ attachment behaviors and strong drives to protect their young. As might be expected, the students were beside themselves with excitement and curiosity about the animals. In addition to observing the elephants, the trip provided a well-rounded educational opportunity as Bennett and her students presented at the International Family Therapy Association’s Annual Congress in Bangkok, Thailand, to family therapists from around the world on attachment, working with couples and families, and creative development of counseling techniques. Dr. Bennett and a few of her students travelled to Hong Kong and then Macao to meet Professor Jacky Ho from City University of Macao. Dr. Ho is the program coordinator for Social Work—the first of its kind in that area. Global engagement was a key aspect in this professional development trip, and Dr. Bennett hopes this will lead to an opportunity for a sister program between the universities to provide students of each country with cultural experiences as well as projects that will shape the profession in a positive manner.


GARRY MIDDLE SCHOOL

Education is unfolding as advanced research and effective methods of teaching transform the classroom. Students enrolled in Dr. Suzannn Girtz’s Differentiated Instruction and Assessment course no longer take a separate class at Gonzaga University then approach their field experience. Instead, they spend part of their day in Garry Middle school and the other part debriefing with Dr. Girtz and draw connections from their experience at Garry and their class lessons. These two aspects are no longer separated but intentionally linked in a way that students receive a more holistic experience. At Garry, there is a cooperating teacher who is always in the classroom with them. They are typically paired up in a classroom and work their way up to teaching a full lesson. They begin with a small experience such as an opening or closing task, then they teach a segment of a lesson, and finally they are ready to teach a full lesson. Together the students learn to co-teach, build things together, and look out for one another. Garry’s Principal Assistant and Student Supervisor, Julia Rendall, not only assesses the students but also ensures that their course and teaching

experiences are in line with the middle school’s initiatives. If Garry is working on close reading, then the Gonzaga students are teaching it with the same methods the Garry teachers are learning and using themselves. The program is unique in the state of Washington. Dr. Girtz, an Associate Professor in Teacher Education, credits the success of the program to its application of the most current research. Hard work was put into initiating this program, starting with Gonzaga’s Dr. Anny Case, Associate Professor in Teacher Education, who developed and taught the course last year, and to Julia Rendall, at Garry. Dr. Girtz hopes the School of Education and the greater Gonzaga University continue to support this new concept of teaching and learning because it is different from most fields. It is evident that this course is changing the landscape of education for the better. Dr. Girtz often hears from students in the Teacher Education program that they feel have to validate their career path to friends and family. Lately, her students have said that they point directly to the program at Garry to explain why they are doing what they are doing and why they are doing it through Gonzaga.

Delaney Boyes, Gonzaga University This class has been the most influential, inspiring, meaningful, and amazing experience I have had at Gonzaga, and my entire education experience. I have learned a lot about the history behind teaching, different theories in education, and things like that in my other EDTE courses, but actually teaching is something we cannot be taught sitting in a desk chair listening to a lecture.

Makenna Morris, Gonzaga University Thank God for Garry Middle School, because never have I been so sure about becoming a teacher. The kids there not only made me excited and confident in my career choice, they also changed my mind about working in a middle school.

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TOOLS FOR THE MODERN WORKPLACE

Dr. Jimmy Smith, Assistant Professor in the Department Sport and Physical Education, holds the world of networking in high regard and he works to expose his students to a variety of networking opportunities. This exposure to the professional realm is eye opening and helps students know what to expect after graduation. Dr. Smith recently met with a company that connects sports education to the sport business field and discussed the curriculum of Gonzaga’s Sport and Fitness in the Digital Age course that focuses on the use of technology in the

sports industry. This meeting afforded an opportunity for Dr. Smith to meet with the Director of Cultural Development for the Kansas City Royals and is responsible for preparing prospects from other countries to make the jump to the Major League in the United States. Dr. Smith saw this as an opportunity to present a one-semester project to his undergraduates to create instructional video content for Royals’ athletes who are transitioning from the Dominican Republic to help them understand better the cultural differences in the United States.

Collaboration with organizations and companies in the sports and business world, like the Kansas City Royals, is the best way to make sure Gonzaga students have the tools and skills they need to find success in the modern workplace.”

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Dr. Justin Marquis, Director of Instructional Design, who is another faculty teaching the course instructs his students how to use graphic design and social media effectively to improve students’ skill working with audio. The Royals project was “a great opportunity for students because it results in a real professional portfolio piece, and one of my objectives for the class is that they will walk out with a portfolio of real projects,” said Dr. Marquis. The end result of the project were videos that the players can watch to prepare for the transition and to ensure that these

baseball players do not face significant barriers when they arrive in the United States. This project is an exclusive one: Gonzaga is the only university involved. There are more topics to be addressed, and the Royals organization is committed to having Gonzaga fulfill them over the coming years. Networking with organizations, such us the Kansas City Royals, and other companies in the sports and business world, is a good way to ensure that Gonzaga students have the right tools and skills to find success in the modern workplace.


ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Q&A SCOTT KASENGA Principal Certification,’16

After finishing the principal certification program, Scott was the first Assistant High School Principal at College Place High School in College Place, Washington. In 2018, College Place Public Schools, named Scott as the Principal for John Sager Middle School. Why did you choose Gonzaga University? A graduate of the program introduced me to Gonzaga. He spoke highly about the program standards that holds its students accountable, the support given to the students, and the program’s leadership. How did the faculty support your educational success? The instruction from Dr. Cynthia Johnson [Associate Professor and Program Director] and Jim Whitford [Program Supervisor] helped me tremendously during my adjustment out of the classroom and into the front office. As a first year administrator, I benefitted greatly from Dr. Johnson’s care in reaching out to assist with this year’s

cohort, and from Jim Whitford’s visits to make sure I was settling into my new position with relative ease. What is the most rewarding aspect of working in your field? One of the greatest lessons learned while attending Gonzaga is how to work collaboratively, because education’s greatest resource is others in our field. We can solve all our current issues if given enough time first to analyze an issue, create a definition, imagine possible solutions while building a prototype, and finally, testing and evaluating our results. If we can provide the resource of time mixed with the experience of other educators most educational issues can be contained. Working with my colleagues for the betterment of the students has become the best part of my day, because the most challenging aspect has always been a meeting to set up. Any system can be infected with the bureaucracy. Part of my vision as an educational leader is to support those with a great idea. The idea needs to get into the classroom while the burning inspiration is still ablaze.

school districts in my career, and in both always felt overworked, but this is the profession we have chosen. I want acknowledgement through accolades and compensation through funds showered on our current educators. Only then will the profession be viewed on the same level as other occupations in our society. However, this vocation can offer the most rewards you could ever imagine!

What advice do you have for future education professionals? Once a professional educator develops relational trust with all their stakeholders, colleagues, students, and parents, true success follows. Know what your strengths are and play to them while recognizing and developing your areas of concern.

Once a professional educator develops relational trust with all their stakeholders, colleagues, students, and parents, true success follows.”

What critical issues do you see that need to be addressed in your field? I want to raise the public perception of teachers in our society. I have worked with two highly dedicated and motivated

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GONZAGA EXCEPTIONAL BULLDOGS HOCKEY TEAM!

TIME FOR OTHERS AND OURSELVES

On February 19, 2018 members of the Gonzaga Exceptional Bulldogs Hockey team held a scrimmage during halftime of the Spokane Chiefs game. Playing for about 10 minutes, the team showed off their hockey skills to a cheering arena.

Day of service

Boys and girls aged three thru 21 with Down syndrome, autism spectrum disorder, sensory processing disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are encouraged to participate under the belief that “hockey is for everyone.” Mark Derby, Ph.D., who played hockey for more than 20 years, is a Professor in Special Education and the coach of the Gonzaga Exceptional Bulldogs Hockey team. “It’s very rewarding for the kids,” said Derby. “I think one of the big things that the parents talk about with the kids is that they can have a niche that’s theirs. We provide these kids to have something that’s theirs.”

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Dr. Derby’s students and other students on campus volunteer to participate in hockey practices every Friday, which gives them an opportunity to practice what they’re learning outside of the classroom. Dr. Derby said, “A secondary goal of the program from the onset has been to provide research opportunities for Special Education students. To date, we have published two research reports that demonstrate the benefits of our hockey program to the children and families we serve. Gonzaga Exceptional Bulldogs hockey team is part of the American Special Hockey Association and partner with Gonzaga University, the Spokane Youth Hockey Association, and the Spokane Parks Department to provide an enriching and exciting experience for all participants.

Service to others is a key component to Jesuit Education and a main pillar of the School of Education (SOE). The SOE’S first day of service was held on November 4, 2017 at Shaw Middle School, bringing together more than 30 students, faculty, staff, and alumni volunteers for a service project. The event was was coordinated by Jenna White, the Scheduling and Events Coordinator in the SOE, and Gonzaga’s Center for Community Engagement. The volunteers were joined by six students from Shaw who were part of the VIP program at the school that recognizes students who do well in their classes, have good attendance, are involved and emerging as student leaders. Groups

worked on spirit and Veterans’ Day posters to brighten up Shaw’s empty gym; worked in a classroom kitchen making dog treats to be donated to the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service; and transformed a large wall with chalkboard paint in the Northeast Community Center across from the school. This service project for the Shaw students introduced them to service right in their own neighborhood and the experience of working with an outside community. We hope that this will inspire them to continue serving others throughout their lives.

Time for Us The School of Education (SOE) had a number of events last year that were solely for faculty and staff to enjoy time together. In fact, we had an event almost every month: fall conference, Octoberfest, Giving Thanks, Christmas luncheon, Mardis Gras, and an Easter reflection led by Fr. Steve Hess, S. J.

The SOE inaugural “Wiffle After Work” picnic was a great way to celebrate the end of the academic year. Faculty, staff, and their families enjoyed wiffle ball and bounce houses, and over half of the attendees were children and dogs.


ART EXHIBITION— CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE The School of Education (SOE) continues to enliven the landscape in the Rosauer Center for Education. In 2017-2018, the Active Learning Center was completed, new carpeting installed, and the interior of the building was painted. Cynthia Smutny, Director of Budget and Operations, and the campus architects discussed creating an art exhibit that could be changed out on a regular basis. In recent years, a large push was made to encourage students to pursue the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math). However, a counter part of that is equally important: the arts. Without one, the other cannot exist. To serve as a reminder to this, the SOE now features a Rosauer Center School of Education Art Exhibition. The SOE hopes that this exhibition will stretch the minds of students in a creative capacity and build stronger relationships between the SOE and the schools it works with. The art exhibit is displayed in the east wing on the first and second floor of the Rosauer Center. The exhibit features work from K–12 schools in the greater Spokane area each semester. Recently an exhibit featured 13 oil paintings created by 11 year old Lucas Sizov. Currently, the school is displaying “Anti-violence Project II.” Students created works of art in response to serious issues that students face every day. The exhibition celebrates courage, as it requires courage to create.

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RECOGNITIONS & ACHIEVEMENTS

2017-2018 HONOR SOCIETY INITIATES:

FACULTY RECOGNITION AND AWARDS • Kathy Nitta, Teacher Education, University Teaching Excellence Award (Non-Tenure Track) • Dr. Cynthia Caniglia received the Jeanne Foster Wardian Leadership in Education Award • The President’s Anniversarian Dinner recognized the following SOE faculty: Diane Tunnell (30 years), Deborah Nieding (25 years), Dan Mahoney (25 years), and Mary Jeannot (25 years) • Dr. Suzann Girtz, Critics Choice Award, American Educational Studies Association • Dr. James Hunter was awarded a Civic Engagement Grant for his “Community Engaged Learning Project or Program” proposal • Dr. Cindy Johnson was named the incoming president of the Washington Council for Education Administration Programs • Dr. Jimmy Smith received $3,285.00 in funding from the Gonzaga University Research Council to support the Sports Initiative Outreach

KAPPA DELTA PI—International Honor Society for Education Lillianne Barberis, Samantha Basco, Richard Betts, Madeleine Blackburn, Delainey Boyes, Kelly Clement, Deidra Dunbar, Rachel Gress, Kayla Kim, Megan Lavagnino, Adriana Marrero, Terence McLure, Clarissa Ramey, Abigail Tarantino, Lauren Uhl, Ilene Drobny, Abigail Mills, Julie Novis, and Baylee Robertson

Aleksey Chavez, Katalina Chacon, Taylor Tweedy, Amelia Evans, Micayla SantaCruz, Austin Portch, Ali Johnson, Nina Wizner, Tara Brown, Conne Guerrereo, Kelly Phipps, Brooklyn Beeler, Elise Dunlap, Rachel Frickleton, Katie Stephano, Ashlee Andersen, Payton Bruland, Katie Matous, and Hanna Meier

HONORS CONVOCATION – EXCELLENCE - Mary Armstrong, Elementary and Special Education - Elana Zykan, Secondary Education SOE GRADUATES 2018 The SOE awarded 181 master’s degrees, 67 undergraduate degrees, and 97 Certifications.

JEANNE FOSTER WARDIAN LEADERSHIP IN EDUCATION AWARD

Awarded to students who demonstrate evidence of excellent scholastic achievement, disciplinary competence, commitment to education through service, and integrity of character. NATHAN NELSON B.Ed. in Theatre Arts KAILEY RICE MIT in English Language Arts JACQUELYN BROOKE HATZKE B.Ed. in Kinesiology and Physical Education SEAN DORSEY B.Ed. in Sport Management

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT

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CHI SIGMA IOTA—Counseling Academic & Professional Honor Society International

MADISON ROSE B.Ed. in Special Education AMELIA EVANS M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling LAUREN MILLS M.A. in School Counseling

ALEXANDER DAY M.A. in Clinical Mental Health Counseling JACIE WHITE M.Ed. in Special Education AARON VAUGHN M.A. in Sport and Athletic Administration


STAFF RECOGNITION LUKE CAIRNEY, director for Graduate Admissions received the Jeanne Foster Wardian Leadership in Education Award for staff. MINDY SMITH, program assistant in Sport and Physical Education served as a sustainability ambassador for the University, and she created four beautiful terraria for the Rosauer Center for Education.

OUTREACH Professors in Counselor Education joined current and former students, along with mental health professionals as crisis counselors at Freeman High School. Counselors were at the school when it reopened and provided followup services to teachers, staff, students, parents, and community members. Dr. Nichole Calkins represented the Department of Sport and Physical Education on a four-person panel that presented a proposal to the Professional Educators Standards Board (PESB). PESB voted in favor of the proposal, changing the Health and Fitness endorsement from Pathway 1 (test only) to a Pathway 3 (test + approved program). This change

will ensure that teachers with the endorsement receive specialized training and preparation to deliver health and physical education in schools. The Gonzaga English as a Second Language (ESL) Community Outreach is a student-run program within the M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Language (MA/TESL) that combines community outreach and professional development. The program offers free ESL classes to adult immigrants and refugees. MA/TESL also hosted the Gonzaga/Spokane Public Schools summer language program, now in its 20th year, attracted over 450 participants during the summer.

OUR 90TH/25TH, A YEAR OF CELEBRATION The School of Education at Gonzaga University will have a year of celebration in honor of the 90th anniversary of our founding and the 25th anniversary of Rosauer Center for Education.

In 2018–2019 academic year will honor our past, present, and future with a variety of events.

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SOE EVENTS IN 2018-2019 SEPTEMBER 2018 Legislative Lunch Rededication of the Rosauer Center for Education OCTOBER 2018 School Safety Forum 90/25 Speaker Series, Rob McCann, President and CEO Catholic Charities

NOVEMBER 2018 Day of Service FEBRUARY Colleagues of Color Luncheon MARCH Assessment Confererence APRIL Distinguished Alumni Awards and 90/25 Speaker Series

DEGREE AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS B.Ed. in Kinesiology and Physical Education

M.Ed. in Educational Leadership (Alberta site-based)

B.Ed. in Special Education

M.Ed. in Educational Leadership (British Columbia site-based)

B.Ed. in Sport Management

M.Ed. in Educational Leadership (online) M.A. in Clinical and Mental Health Counseling M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling M.A. in School Counseling Master of Counselling (Alberta site-based) Master of Counselling (British Columbia site-based) M.A. in Sport and Athletic Administration M.A. in Sport and Athletic Administration (online) M.A. in Teaching English as a Second Language Master of Initial Teaching (Elementary and Secondary Certification) 20

M.Ed. in Educational Leadership (Washington site-based) M.Ed. in Special Education

Doctor of Educational Leadership Education Specialist in School Psychology

Elementary and Secondary Certification Principal Certification 502 E. Boone Ave Spokane, WA 99258-0025

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