Page 1

spirit

SPIFFY CALENDAR COUNTS DOWN TO CHRISTMAS In just a few short years, the online Gonzaga Advent Calendar has become a Zag family tradition. The award-winning project bridges the gap between the physical and virtual in a way that connects Zags around the globe during the season of Advent in a spirit-filled and environmentally conscious way. Many think of it as a virtual Christmas present, with a variety of daily features: from prayers to printables, games to service opportunities, contests to recipes and so much more. It offers something for the entire GU family with activities for all ages. “The Advent Calendar came about (in 2010) through the desire to bring an Advent and Christmas countdown message to our alumni and friends that aligned with Gonzaga’s mission and connect Zags during this most wonderful time of year,” says Stephanie Rockwell, director of Individual Giving. “We all thought sending some Christmas cheer through an interactive web platform would be a welcome addition to the Gonzaga experience, and it certainly has been.”

GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

Find the Advent Calendar at www.gonzaga.edu/Christmas

The calendar has won several marketing, public relations and higher education industry honors. It launches yearly on Advent Sunday and runs through Christmas. It has evolved over the years. Gonzaga community members have expressed their enjoyment of features such as computer wallpapers, games (such as “Snowball Spike” and “Battle in Seattle”), as well as prayer and spiritual video messages.

A lot of work goes on here overnight, but Foley Library might be the best source of unusual stories. Foley stays open weeknights until 2 a.m., and sometimes it’s hard to get students to leave, especially during finals week. Library staff have resorted to broadcasting annoying earworms over the intercom after 2 a.m. to get students to leave (Achy Breaky Heart, I Think We’re Alone Now). One night last year, the student worker on duty threatened to give out Game of Thrones spoilers over the intercom at 2 a.m “I’ve never seen the library empty out so quickly,” says evening Reference Assistant Laura Hutton. Others work the swing and graveyard shifts in a variety of capacities, cleaning McCarthey Athletic Center after a game, shoveling and de-icing sidewalks, receiving food shipments and baking for the next day’s meals, counseling students who might need some encouragement in making sure parties don’t get out of hand, reset Hemmingson rooms for meetings the next morning, and hosting trivia, karaoke, movies, pumpkin carving, paint nights, improv groups, casino nights for SpikeNights on the weekends.

“In October we hosted Real Life C.L.U.E. which brought a committed group of students to test out their sleuthing skills while acting their own parts,” says Kayla Zobel, Center for Student Involvement. Take the custodial staff alone, which, by the way, is the largest individual staff on campus numbering more than 70 employees.

“The toughest nighttime assignment is when we have games in McCarthey back-toback-to-back-to back, as we did in November. It’s a little tougher when we have the Kennel Club in place for a men’s game one night, then we have to make that seating area pristine for the next night with women’s basketball season ticket holders occupying those seats,” says Edin Jusic, custiodial shift supervisor. “Overall, our custodial staff has shifts 24/7. The most important assignment is keeping the Hemmingson Center clean. It’s our flagship,” Jusic says.

IT’S ALL ABOUT LOVE

Happy 94th birthday Father Bernard J. Coughlin, S.J. The year was 1974 and Spokane was hosting a world’s fair less than a mile from campus. Back along Boone Street, Gonzaga was in search of a new president during very difficult times.

“And know that Hemmingson staff are on duty well into the wee hours to keep the building running smoothly, especially on the weekends when the building doesn’t close until 2 a.m.,” says Director Chuck Faulkinberry.

homes when the library shuts down. One night a student left his backpack, laptop and jacket in a study room, and the officer on duty tracked down the owner of the items and brought them all to his dorm room to make sure the student was okay.

So let’s go back to the library where many good stories reside: “Often times we have to wake students at 2 a.m. to get them to leave . . . also some community users,” says Hutton. “We deal with students accidentally discharging tasers, racing rolling chairs across the basement floor, and putting together jigsaw puzzles on the library floor for study breaks.

“There is a sense of late night community between library staff and students, campus security and the maintenance team, especially when we are all equally exhausted and delirious,” Hutton says.

“Campus Security is helpful to library staff and students, and they give us all rides to our cars/

But it’s all in a night’s work. Student Clubs Coordinator Krista Mather’s night work on campus involves sleeping in a tent. See her story only at www.gonzaga.edu/Spirit.

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

›› Night moves, 4 DEC. 2016 | VOL 18 | # 4

This man of great stature and abiding care for people had both bark and brawn in higher education leadership circles. But at home on campus, cura personalis, care for the individual, exemplifies everything good about the man who saved Gonzaga University, preserved Gonzaga’s Jesuit heritage and continues to share his love with so many colleagues, students, friends, alumni and associates.

For Father Coughlin, the bottom line has always been relationships, like the one he built with Harry Magnuson, the Trustee chair who invited Gonzaga’s longtime president to campus in 1974.

Laura Hutton helps students during late nights in the library; even waking them up so that they can go home.

›› New, Young ideas, 3

Brooks Fields, a former Gonzaga Trustee, now deceased, was one of them. He always wondered how a college president could have such an “awkward name. You ought to get rid of that name. That’s a name for a dog, not a college president.” But it always drew a laugh from “Barney,” who had no intention of changing his name.

The 2015 home page featured a beautiful, animated, interactive, multimedia Gonzagathemed manger scene with gently falling snowflakes, done in the look-and-feel of stained glass, with an instrumental version of O come, O come, Emmanuel playing in the background. Visit Advent Calendar 2016 to see what’s new this year. - By Jeff Bunch

IT’S ALL IN A NIGHT’S WORK

›› Christmas parties & events, 2

Then chair of the Board of Trustees, Harry Magnuson, along with University President Father Richard Twohy, S.J., invited the dean of Social Welfare at St. Louis University, Father Bernard (burr-nerd) J. Coughlin, S.J., to campus and offered him the 23rd presidency of the University.

West, and soon-to-be Woldson – to name a few. “Finances were very problematic,” Fr. Coughlin recalls. “So I began doing what I thought was the right thing to do, and not everybody liked it. As time went on, a band of people came forward and helped me – many of them – for which I am very thankful. I was fortunate to establish wonderful

To send birthday wishes to Father Coughlin, go to www.gonzaga.edu/coughlinbirthday

It wasn’t until Fr. Coughlin had moved his meager relationships. I believed then, and still do, that belongings to Spokane that Harry dropped the the president’s job was to engage people who had bomb: “By the way, Father, we’re broke.” thoughtfulness and generosity and wanted to Fr. Coughlin knew that the only way to dig out of see the University succeed, and in time, Gonzaga debt was to meet, build relationships with, and became very much a part of this community. engage business and civic leaders in promoting It was a happy place. Over the years, it has a vision and mission for a strong, morals-based developed into an extremely powerful University, university. With their business acumen and with wonderful people, wonderful students, and resources, they helped right the ship. One only a wonderful set of values the people who worked needs to stroll across campus to see the names here incorporated into their own lives and into of Fr. Coughlin’s many friends on our buildings, the life of the University.” rooms and scholarships – Kennedy, Tilford, It would be impossible to count the people who Jundt, Jepson, Burch, Herak, Magnuson, call Barney Coughlin their best friend. Foley, Cowles, Rosauer, McCarthey, Clute,

Fr. Coughlin is the longest serving president in University history, 22 years, from 1974-1996. He has served as Gonzaga’s first and only chancellor for the past 20 years. “I guess I have felt so involved that I never realized that I have been at Gonzaga for 42 years. That’s almost half of my life,” he says, a slight smile creeping over his face, which is etched by both trials and great accomplishments. It is near impossible for people to visit with Fr. Coughlin and not leave with a smile in their heart and on their face. His graciousness, and joy for life and the Lord, are downright contagious. Turning 94 years old on Dec. 7, he still gets out to walk the campus whenever he can. And it’s not uncommon to see him stop and strike up a conversation with a student. Being active is something that has always made him feel good. “I appreciate the students coming up and introducing themselves and establishing those associations with me,” he says. “It’s good for the students to feel at home, and I enjoy seeing their smiling faces.” Students are one primary cog that makes Gonzaga such a fine place, Fr. Coughlin says. “I’m not trying to put any gold on my shoulders for making it a fine place, but our students want to be good scholars, get a good education and succeed in life (not just in the job market); their values and the quality of what they are doing, the families that they’re raising, the things they are teaching, are in keeping with Gonzaga’s values as a Jesuit university. To me, that’s a very important thing.”

continued page 2

DEC 2016


AROUND CAMPUS >> Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra with special guest Amit Peled, cello soloist, performs Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., at the Fox. Directed by Kevin Hekmatpanah. Admission is free to anyone with a GU ID card, $14 for the public.

>> Gonzaga Choir’s annual Candlelight Christmas Concert, “Love Came Down at Christmas,” is Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m., and Dec. 10, 2 p.m., at St. Aloysius Church. Gonzaga’s Brass Choir and Spokane Brass Quartet are guest performers. Directed by Timothy Westerhaus, Keith Whitlock and Robert Spittal. For ticket information, call ext. 6733.

>> Gonzaga Day 2017 is Feb. 11. All Zag fans are invited to celebrate at the women’s basketball game vs. St. Mary’s, 2 p.m. in the Kennel, and at alumni chapter events worldwide during the men’s basketball game vs. the Gaels, 7 p.m. on ESPN. The Spokane game watch event is in the Hemmingson Auditorium for staff, faculty, students and friends.

>> Sophomore biology major Victoria Shaw received a $5,000 study abroad scholarship from the School for Field Studies: River Ecosystems & Environmental Ethics to study in Cambodia, and junior psychology major Kyra Elam received a $1,000 American Institute for Foreign Study scholarship to study in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

>> The Institute of International Education ranks Gonzaga’s Study Abroad program ninth among like colleges and universities for number of students abroad this semester (181), and 22nd for the percentage of undergrads studying abroad by the time they graduate (46.9 percent).

>>The Staff Assembly Open Meeting is 9-11 a.m., Dec. 6, with breakfast at 8:30 a.m. in the Hemmingson Ballroom. It feature updates, discussion of new benefits and a community service challenge, words from CIO Borre Ulrichsen, recognition of Chancellor Bernard Coughlin, S.J. the day before his 94th birthday, presentation of Mission Awards, and judging of the ugliest sweater worn by staff that day.

DOING CHRISTMAS RIGHT . . . THE ZAG WAY Alumni Christmas Celebration Dec. 4, Mass 8:30 or 11a.m., at St. Aloysius Church; then alumni, faculty, staff, families and friends are invited to head to the Hemmingson Rotunda for pictures with Santa and Spike (noon-1:30 p.m.), cookies, cocoa and coffee. RSVP: zagsonline.org/christmascelebration

White Christmas Open House Dec. 10, noon-3 p.m., Crosby House Cider and cookies hosted by Advocates for Bing Crosby, Crosby Christmas music

Foley Center Christmas Party Dec. 14 – Rare Book Room, 2-4 p.m. Featuring the usual appetizers and desserts/cookies. Donate canned food items for 2nd Harvest Food Bank in exchange for a raffle ticket for a goodies basket.

ROTC Staff/Faculty Christmas Party – ‘Come Celebrate… That’s an Order!’ Dec. 15 – ROTC, College Hall 045, 2-5 p.m. Serving Gluhwein, eggnog (leaded and unleaded), smokies/kielbasa, cream puffs, spinach dip and assorted desserts.

President’s ‘Progressive’ Christmas Party Dec. 16 – Hotel RL Spokane at the Park 6:30-7:30 p.m.: “Cocktails and Cheer” in Hotel lobby and bar (reserved for Zags). Carolers, appetizers and beverages. 7:30-9:00: “A Feast with Friends” in the main ballroom with a variety of food stations, including seafood/sushi, street tacos and a signature party drink. This portion of the party will also include a raffle, including prizes from a variety of local businesses, including (but not limited to) Spokane Chiefs tickets, signed GU basketballs, Mt. Spokane lift tickets, hotel vouchers, Bulldog Bucks credit, and gift cards to a variety of restaurants. NOTE: Only those GU employees who have RSVP’d by Dec. 9 will be included in the raffle prize drawing. A formal invitation/ RSVP card was distributed through Intercampus mail. On this card is a place to request a song for the dance. 9:00-11:00: “Jingle and Mingle” – the dance party in the Skyline Ballroom with drinks and merriment. Employees are encouraged to use the “group code” GONZ1216 to book a room at the Hotel RL and stay the night for a reduced rate of $72 plus tax.

>>For Season of Light events in December, go to www.gonzasga.edu/seasonoflightevents

Coughlin continued

grade – teaching right from wrong, good from bad, doing His accomplishments many, he has remained a very what’s just, seeking truth in humble man. “Right after I became chancellor, I all things. was at a luncheon hosted by my wonderful friend Perhaps Father’s most Kerm Rudolf (former corporation counsel). In the poignant moment in his middle of our conversations, Kerm says, ‘Father, storied career at Gonzaga could you tell us what a chancellor is?’ That was was on a visit to a local an easy one for me to answer. I said, ‘Kerm, a hospital to see his friend, chancellor is just a worn out president.’” Harry Magnuson, who was so But there has never been anything ‘worn out’ about instrumental in supporting Fr. Coughlin has always enjoyed striking up conversation with his this Irish Texan, who always draws his humor and Fr. Coughlin in his early days colleagues around campus. his search for truth from his Irish heritage, and his as president. toughness in doing what’s right even if unpopular love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and “He reached out and took my from his years growing up in Texas. hand. He said ‘Father (he always called me Father), God abides in him.’ As it turns out, it was Harry’s final day on Earth.” The best advice he ever received was quite simple: it’s all about love. It is ALL about love.’ I’d never Do what’s right. And if he could change anything to seen this side of the man. Fr. Coughlin knew exactly what Harry was saying, make the world a better place, he would place more for in his soul, Fr. Coughlin himself is all about love. “It meant so much to me to hear him say those attention on early education – first, second, third words. ‘It’s all about love.’ As St. John said, ‘God is - By Dale Goodwin

PAGE 2

NOTEWORTHY

FOCUS ON... NEW, YOUNG IDEAS

New Hires

Sean Joy, case manager, Center for Cura Personalis; Carissa Outen, event operations specialist, GUEST; Kim Sellars, program coordinator, Law School; Macklen Scribner, program coordinator, Faith & Reason Institute; William White, records management, Admissions; Piper Newby, records management, Admissions; Shannon Clark, program assistant - healthy relationships, Center for Cura Personalis; Monica Frank, admissions operations specialist I, Admissions; Elizabeth McIntyre, records management, Admissions; Kathleen Nollenberger, program coordinator, Center for Global Engagement

New Positions/Promotions

Through NSF grants and work through the Institute of Transportation Engineers, Young and colleagues across the nation have helped develop curriculum to assist universities in meeting the needs of the marketplace

As a kid, Rhonda Young didn’t play with Matchbox cars nor have an electric train set in her basement. But she did imagine how roadways work, and how transportation moves people to the places they need to go.

through campus. “How would you allocate space? Would it include bike lanes, what types of parking, bus stops, number of lanes, safety measures?” She has also done work in the area of ‘connected vehicles.’ “It’s a complicated thing. Think about getting into a car, and the car drives itself. It would create greater safety and provide the would-be driver more leisure time. By 2018, there will be federal rules governing the transmission signals of connected vehicles. Through technology, cars will know where all other nearby ‘connected cars’ are. Down the road it may eliminate stop lights . . . but not until all cars are ‘connected,’” she says. “It certainly will make us rethink traffic systems.”

Audrey Minton, senior transfer admissions counselor, Admissions; Theresa Malarkey, admissions operations specialist II; Kelly Jo Dunham, admissions operations specialist II; Athlyn Hose, admissions operations specialist II; Christine Miranda, admissions operations specialist II; Ann Price, administrative assistant & budget officer, Center for Global Engagement; Kari Elgee Sanders, talent acquisition specialist, HR; Gregory McGuire, event operations tecnology specialist, GUEST; Luke Cairney, assistant director-graduate admissions & marketing, School of Education; Becky O’Connell, event operations manager, GUEST; David FauntLeRoy, manager - Bozarth Retreat Center, GUEST

So she became a civil engineer, and now is one of the country’s leaders in helping improve transportation engineering education in colleges and universities.

Goodbyes

GU joins community forces to fight hate

Dwight Smith, lead security officer; Shannon Reader, academic coordinator, Athletics; Leanne Stockton, trainer, Athletics; Patrick Ross, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus

Anniversaries

15

Matthew Gerdes, parking enforcement and transportation officer, Security; Nihad Suljic, custodial specialist, Plant Services

10 5

Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts

Tomson Spink, maintenance and grounds manager, Plant Services

Cradle Call

Luke Cairney, program specialist, graduate admission, Education, and spouse, Catherine had a baby girl, Sarah. Kelly Jo Dunham, admission operations specialist, Admissions, and spouse, Aaron had a baby boy, Declan.

Always inquisitive, Young chose a profession for people who want to figure out how things work. “Transportation is something people care about; it affects their daily lives,” says Gonzaga’s multiple grant award-winning professor. “It’s a great equalizer in that it allows most people to get to their job and to their recreation. Transportation has tremendous community impact.” Every semester she asks her junior civil engineering class to design a plan for the Sharp Street corridor

In response to recent bigotry and hateful defacing of the Martin Luther King Jr. Outreach Center, Gonzaga Institute for Hate Studies has joined forces with community organizations to develop the Good Neighbor Conference: Addressing Hate through Advocacy & Action, Dec. 3, 6-9 p.m., at Jepson Center. All are welcome. “This is a time for a community to come together in rallies and vigils,” says Kristine Hoover, Institute director. “There is a deep need in our community to mobilize and act in a clear, respectful manner to stand against all forms of bigotry, intolerance and defamation.” Program Coffee/Tea Service in Lobby donated by Umpqua Bank 6 p.m. Welcome and Opening Wolfe Auditorium • David Condon, Spokane Mayor; Skyler Oberst, Spokane Interfaith Council; Dean Lynch, Spokane County Task Force on Human Rights; Tracy Simmons, Spokane Faith & Values; Kristine Hoover, Gonzaga Institute for Hate Studies 6:20 p.m. Session One • Hate Crimes Panel Discussion: Reporting Strategies: Chief Craig Meidl, Spokane Police; Tony Stewart, Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations; Community Advocates. Wolfe Auditorium • Social Media & Addressing Hate Online: Tracy Simmons, Spokane Faith & Values, Room 122

For Young, it’s more about the system than the mode of transportation. “People will make decisions about their modes. We are trying to connect people with where they need to go. There are different stages from young kids to elderly, so having a transportation system that meets the needs of all ages and populations, and is environmentally friendly, will lead to healthy communities,” she says. “That’s the ultimate goal.”

• LGBTQ Community & Advocacy: Michael Jepson, INBA; OutSpokane Advocates. Room 123 • Dear World Project: Spokane Chase Youth Commission. Room 124 7 p.m. Session Two • Spokane Rising Panel Discussion: Mark Richard, Downtown Spokane Partnership; Ben Stuckart, Spokane City Council; John Lemus, Spokane Human Rights Commission. Wolfe Auditorium • Addressing Anti-Semitism: Rabbi Malino, Temple Beth Shalom; Skyler Oberst, Spokane Interfaith Council. Room 122 • Your Muslim Neighbor & Addressing Islamophobia: Arsalan Bukhari, CAIR-WA. Room 123 • Cultural Competency: Tara Dowd, D&F Consulting. Room 124 8 p.m. Session Three • “Gracism” Discussion: Phil Tyler, NAACP Spokane; local faith leaders. Wolfe Auditorium • Immigrants in America: The Dreamer Coalition. Room 122 • Standing Together: Ozzie Knezovich, Spokane County Sheriff. Classroom 123 • Courageous Conversations & Listening to Respond: Tracy Simmons, Spokane FAVs. Room 124 8:40 p.m. What’s Next? Wolfe Auditorium

PAGE 3


AROUND CAMPUS >> Gonzaga Symphony Orchestra with special guest Amit Peled, cello soloist, performs Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., at the Fox. Directed by Kevin Hekmatpanah. Admission is free to anyone with a GU ID card, $14 for the public.

>> Gonzaga Choir’s annual Candlelight Christmas Concert, “Love Came Down at Christmas,” is Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m., and Dec. 10, 2 p.m., at St. Aloysius Church. Gonzaga’s Brass Choir and Spokane Brass Quartet are guest performers. Directed by Timothy Westerhaus, Keith Whitlock and Robert Spittal. For ticket information, call ext. 6733.

>> Gonzaga Day 2017 is Feb. 11. All Zag fans are invited to celebrate at the women’s basketball game vs. St. Mary’s, 2 p.m. in the Kennel, and at alumni chapter events worldwide during the men’s basketball game vs. the Gaels, 7 p.m. on ESPN. The Spokane game watch event is in the Hemmingson Auditorium for staff, faculty, students and friends.

>> Sophomore biology major Victoria Shaw received a $5,000 study abroad scholarship from the School for Field Studies: River Ecosystems & Environmental Ethics to study in Cambodia, and junior psychology major Kyra Elam received a $1,000 American Institute for Foreign Study scholarship to study in Stellenbosch, South Africa.

>> The Institute of International Education ranks Gonzaga’s Study Abroad program ninth among like colleges and universities for number of students abroad this semester (181), and 22nd for the percentage of undergrads studying abroad by the time they graduate (46.9 percent).

>>The Staff Assembly Open Meeting is 9-11 a.m., Dec. 6, with breakfast at 8:30 a.m. in the Hemmingson Ballroom. It feature updates, discussion of new benefits and a community service challenge, words from CIO Borre Ulrichsen, recognition of Chancellor Bernard Coughlin, S.J. the day before his 94th birthday, presentation of Mission Awards, and judging of the ugliest sweater worn by staff that day.

DOING CHRISTMAS RIGHT . . . THE ZAG WAY Alumni Christmas Celebration Dec. 4, Mass 8:30 or 11a.m., at St. Aloysius Church; then alumni, faculty, staff, families and friends are invited to head to the Hemmingson Rotunda for pictures with Santa and Spike (noon-1:30 p.m.), cookies, cocoa and coffee. RSVP: zagsonline.org/christmascelebration

White Christmas Open House Dec. 10, noon-3 p.m., Crosby House Cider and cookies hosted by Advocates for Bing Crosby, Crosby Christmas music

Foley Center Christmas Party Dec. 14 – Rare Book Room, 2-4 p.m. Featuring the usual appetizers and desserts/cookies. Donate canned food items for 2nd Harvest Food Bank in exchange for a raffle ticket for a goodies basket.

ROTC Staff/Faculty Christmas Party – ‘Come Celebrate… That’s an Order!’ Dec. 15 – ROTC, College Hall 045, 2-5 p.m. Serving Gluhwein, eggnog (leaded and unleaded), smokies/kielbasa, cream puffs, spinach dip and assorted desserts.

President’s ‘Progressive’ Christmas Party Dec. 16 – Hotel RL Spokane at the Park 6:30-7:30 p.m.: “Cocktails and Cheer” in Hotel lobby and bar (reserved for Zags). Carolers, appetizers and beverages. 7:30-9:00: “A Feast with Friends” in the main ballroom with a variety of food stations, including seafood/sushi, street tacos and a signature party drink. This portion of the party will also include a raffle, including prizes from a variety of local businesses, including (but not limited to) Spokane Chiefs tickets, signed GU basketballs, Mt. Spokane lift tickets, hotel vouchers, Bulldog Bucks credit, and gift cards to a variety of restaurants. NOTE: Only those GU employees who have RSVP’d by Dec. 9 will be included in the raffle prize drawing. A formal invitation/ RSVP card was distributed through Intercampus mail. On this card is a place to request a song for the dance. 9:00-11:00: “Jingle and Mingle” – the dance party in the Skyline Ballroom with drinks and merriment. Employees are encouraged to use the “group code” GONZ1216 to book a room at the Hotel RL and stay the night for a reduced rate of $72 plus tax.

>>For Season of Light events in December, go to www.gonzasga.edu/seasonoflightevents

Coughlin continued

grade – teaching right from wrong, good from bad, doing His accomplishments many, he has remained a very what’s just, seeking truth in humble man. “Right after I became chancellor, I all things. was at a luncheon hosted by my wonderful friend Perhaps Father’s most Kerm Rudolf (former corporation counsel). In the poignant moment in his middle of our conversations, Kerm says, ‘Father, storied career at Gonzaga could you tell us what a chancellor is?’ That was was on a visit to a local an easy one for me to answer. I said, ‘Kerm, a hospital to see his friend, chancellor is just a worn out president.’” Harry Magnuson, who was so But there has never been anything ‘worn out’ about instrumental in supporting Fr. Coughlin has always enjoyed striking up conversation with his this Irish Texan, who always draws his humor and Fr. Coughlin in his early days colleagues around campus. his search for truth from his Irish heritage, and his as president. toughness in doing what’s right even if unpopular love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and “He reached out and took my from his years growing up in Texas. hand. He said ‘Father (he always called me Father), God abides in him.’ As it turns out, it was Harry’s final day on Earth.” The best advice he ever received was quite simple: it’s all about love. It is ALL about love.’ I’d never Do what’s right. And if he could change anything to seen this side of the man. Fr. Coughlin knew exactly what Harry was saying, make the world a better place, he would place more for in his soul, Fr. Coughlin himself is all about love. “It meant so much to me to hear him say those attention on early education – first, second, third words. ‘It’s all about love.’ As St. John said, ‘God is - By Dale Goodwin

PAGE 2

NOTEWORTHY

FOCUS ON... NEW, YOUNG IDEAS

New Hires

Sean Joy, case manager, Center for Cura Personalis; Carissa Outen, event operations specialist, GUEST; Kim Sellars, program coordinator, Law School; Macklen Scribner, program coordinator, Faith & Reason Institute; William White, records management, Admissions; Piper Newby, records management, Admissions; Shannon Clark, program assistant - healthy relationships, Center for Cura Personalis; Monica Frank, admissions operations specialist I, Admissions; Elizabeth McIntyre, records management, Admissions; Kathleen Nollenberger, program coordinator, Center for Global Engagement

New Positions/Promotions

Through NSF grants and work through the Institute of Transportation Engineers, Young and colleagues across the nation have helped develop curriculum to assist universities in meeting the needs of the marketplace

As a kid, Rhonda Young didn’t play with Matchbox cars nor have an electric train set in her basement. But she did imagine how roadways work, and how transportation moves people to the places they need to go.

through campus. “How would you allocate space? Would it include bike lanes, what types of parking, bus stops, number of lanes, safety measures?” She has also done work in the area of ‘connected vehicles.’ “It’s a complicated thing. Think about getting into a car, and the car drives itself. It would create greater safety and provide the would-be driver more leisure time. By 2018, there will be federal rules governing the transmission signals of connected vehicles. Through technology, cars will know where all other nearby ‘connected cars’ are. Down the road it may eliminate stop lights . . . but not until all cars are ‘connected,’” she says. “It certainly will make us rethink traffic systems.”

Audrey Minton, senior transfer admissions counselor, Admissions; Theresa Malarkey, admissions operations specialist II; Kelly Jo Dunham, admissions operations specialist II; Athlyn Hose, admissions operations specialist II; Christine Miranda, admissions operations specialist II; Ann Price, administrative assistant & budget officer, Center for Global Engagement; Kari Elgee Sanders, talent acquisition specialist, HR; Gregory McGuire, event operations tecnology specialist, GUEST; Luke Cairney, assistant director-graduate admissions & marketing, School of Education; Becky O’Connell, event operations manager, GUEST; David FauntLeRoy, manager - Bozarth Retreat Center, GUEST

So she became a civil engineer, and now is one of the country’s leaders in helping improve transportation engineering education in colleges and universities.

Goodbyes

GU joins community forces to fight hate

Dwight Smith, lead security officer; Shannon Reader, academic coordinator, Athletics; Leanne Stockton, trainer, Athletics; Patrick Ross, admissions counselor, Virtual Campus

Anniversaries

15

Matthew Gerdes, parking enforcement and transportation officer, Security; Nihad Suljic, custodial specialist, Plant Services

10 5

Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts

Tomson Spink, maintenance and grounds manager, Plant Services

Cradle Call

Luke Cairney, program specialist, graduate admission, Education, and spouse, Catherine had a baby girl, Sarah. Kelly Jo Dunham, admission operations specialist, Admissions, and spouse, Aaron had a baby boy, Declan.

Always inquisitive, Young chose a profession for people who want to figure out how things work. “Transportation is something people care about; it affects their daily lives,” says Gonzaga’s multiple grant award-winning professor. “It’s a great equalizer in that it allows most people to get to their job and to their recreation. Transportation has tremendous community impact.” Every semester she asks her junior civil engineering class to design a plan for the Sharp Street corridor

In response to recent bigotry and hateful defacing of the Martin Luther King Jr. Outreach Center, Gonzaga Institute for Hate Studies has joined forces with community organizations to develop the Good Neighbor Conference: Addressing Hate through Advocacy & Action, Dec. 3, 6-9 p.m., at Jepson Center. All are welcome. “This is a time for a community to come together in rallies and vigils,” says Kristine Hoover, Institute director. “There is a deep need in our community to mobilize and act in a clear, respectful manner to stand against all forms of bigotry, intolerance and defamation.” Program Coffee/Tea Service in Lobby donated by Umpqua Bank 6 p.m. Welcome and Opening Wolfe Auditorium • David Condon, Spokane Mayor; Skyler Oberst, Spokane Interfaith Council; Dean Lynch, Spokane County Task Force on Human Rights; Tracy Simmons, Spokane Faith & Values; Kristine Hoover, Gonzaga Institute for Hate Studies 6:20 p.m. Session One • Hate Crimes Panel Discussion: Reporting Strategies: Chief Craig Meidl, Spokane Police; Tony Stewart, Kootenai County Task Force on Human Relations; Community Advocates. Wolfe Auditorium • Social Media & Addressing Hate Online: Tracy Simmons, Spokane Faith & Values, Room 122

For Young, it’s more about the system than the mode of transportation. “People will make decisions about their modes. We are trying to connect people with where they need to go. There are different stages from young kids to elderly, so having a transportation system that meets the needs of all ages and populations, and is environmentally friendly, will lead to healthy communities,” she says. “That’s the ultimate goal.”

• LGBTQ Community & Advocacy: Michael Jepson, INBA; OutSpokane Advocates. Room 123 • Dear World Project: Spokane Chase Youth Commission. Room 124 7 p.m. Session Two • Spokane Rising Panel Discussion: Mark Richard, Downtown Spokane Partnership; Ben Stuckart, Spokane City Council; John Lemus, Spokane Human Rights Commission. Wolfe Auditorium • Addressing Anti-Semitism: Rabbi Malino, Temple Beth Shalom; Skyler Oberst, Spokane Interfaith Council. Room 122 • Your Muslim Neighbor & Addressing Islamophobia: Arsalan Bukhari, CAIR-WA. Room 123 • Cultural Competency: Tara Dowd, D&F Consulting. Room 124 8 p.m. Session Three • “Gracism” Discussion: Phil Tyler, NAACP Spokane; local faith leaders. Wolfe Auditorium • Immigrants in America: The Dreamer Coalition. Room 122 • Standing Together: Ozzie Knezovich, Spokane County Sheriff. Classroom 123 • Courageous Conversations & Listening to Respond: Tracy Simmons, Spokane FAVs. Room 124 8:40 p.m. What’s Next? Wolfe Auditorium

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spirit

SPIFFY CALENDAR COUNTS DOWN TO CHRISTMAS In just a few short years, the online Gonzaga Advent Calendar has become a Zag family tradition. The award-winning project bridges the gap between the physical and virtual in a way that connects Zags around the globe during the season of Advent in a spirit-filled and environmentally conscious way. Many think of it as a virtual Christmas present, with a variety of daily features: from prayers to printables, games to service opportunities, contests to recipes and so much more. It offers something for the entire GU family with activities for all ages. “The Advent Calendar came about (in 2010) through the desire to bring an Advent and Christmas countdown message to our alumni and friends that aligned with Gonzaga’s mission and connect Zags during this most wonderful time of year,” says Stephanie Rockwell, director of Individual Giving. “We all thought sending some Christmas cheer through an interactive web platform would be a welcome addition to the Gonzaga experience, and it certainly has been.”

GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

Find the Advent Calendar at www.gonzaga.edu/Christmas

The calendar has won several marketing, public relations and higher education industry honors. It launches yearly on Advent Sunday and runs through Christmas. It has evolved over the years. Gonzaga community members have expressed their enjoyment of features such as computer wallpapers, games (such as “Snowball Spike” and “Battle in Seattle”), as well as prayer and spiritual video messages.

A lot of work goes on here overnight, but Foley Library might be the best source of unusual stories. Foley stays open weeknights until 2 a.m., and sometimes it’s hard to get students to leave, especially during finals week. Library staff have resorted to broadcasting annoying earworms over the intercom after 2 a.m. to get students to leave (Achy Breaky Heart, I Think We’re Alone Now). One night last year, the student worker on duty threatened to give out Game of Thrones spoilers over the intercom at 2 a.m “I’ve never seen the library empty out so quickly,” says evening Reference Assistant Laura Hutton. Others work the swing and graveyard shifts in a variety of capacities, cleaning McCarthey Athletic Center after a game, shoveling and de-icing sidewalks, receiving food shipments and baking for the next day’s meals, counseling students who might need some encouragement in making sure parties don’t get out of hand, reset Hemmingson rooms for meetings the next morning, and hosting trivia, karaoke, movies, pumpkin carving, paint nights, improv groups, casino nights for SpikeNights on the weekends.

“In October we hosted Real Life C.L.U.E. which brought a committed group of students to test out their sleuthing skills while acting their own parts,” says Kayla Zobel, Center for Student Involvement. Take the custodial staff alone, which, by the way, is the largest individual staff on campus numbering more than 70 employees.

“The toughest nighttime assignment is when we have games in McCarthey back-toback-to-back-to back, as we did in November. It’s a little tougher when we have the Kennel Club in place for a men’s game one night, then we have to make that seating area pristine for the next night with women’s basketball season ticket holders occupying those seats,” says Edin Jusic, custiodial shift supervisor. “Overall, our custodial staff has shifts 24/7. The most important assignment is keeping the Hemmingson Center clean. It’s our flagship,” Jusic says.

IT’S ALL ABOUT LOVE

Happy 94th birthday Father Bernard J. Coughlin, S.J. The year was 1974 and Spokane was hosting a world’s fair less than a mile from campus. Back along Boone Street, Gonzaga was in search of a new president during very difficult times.

“And know that Hemmingson staff are on duty well into the wee hours to keep the building running smoothly, especially on the weekends when the building doesn’t close until 2 a.m.,” says Director Chuck Faulkinberry.

homes when the library shuts down. One night a student left his backpack, laptop and jacket in a study room, and the officer on duty tracked down the owner of the items and brought them all to his dorm room to make sure the student was okay.

So let’s go back to the library where many good stories reside: “Often times we have to wake students at 2 a.m. to get them to leave . . . also some community users,” says Hutton. “We deal with students accidentally discharging tasers, racing rolling chairs across the basement floor, and putting together jigsaw puzzles on the library floor for study breaks.

“There is a sense of late night community between library staff and students, campus security and the maintenance team, especially when we are all equally exhausted and delirious,” Hutton says.

“Campus Security is helpful to library staff and students, and they give us all rides to our cars/

But it’s all in a night’s work. Student Clubs Coordinator Krista Mather’s night work on campus involves sleeping in a tent. See her story only at www.gonzaga.edu/Spirit.

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

›› Night moves, 4 DEC. 2016 | VOL 18 | # 4

This man of great stature and abiding care for people had both bark and brawn in higher education leadership circles. But at home on campus, cura personalis, care for the individual, exemplifies everything good about the man who saved Gonzaga University, preserved Gonzaga’s Jesuit heritage and continues to share his love with so many colleagues, students, friends, alumni and associates.

For Father Coughlin, the bottom line has always been relationships, like the one he built with Harry Magnuson, the Trustee chair who invited Gonzaga’s longtime president to campus in 1974.

Laura Hutton helps students during late nights in the library; even waking them up so that they can go home.

›› New, Young ideas, 3

Brooks Fields, a former Gonzaga Trustee, now deceased, was one of them. He always wondered how a college president could have such an “awkward name. You ought to get rid of that name. That’s a name for a dog, not a college president.” But it always drew a laugh from “Barney,” who had no intention of changing his name.

The 2015 home page featured a beautiful, animated, interactive, multimedia Gonzagathemed manger scene with gently falling snowflakes, done in the look-and-feel of stained glass, with an instrumental version of O come, O come, Emmanuel playing in the background. Visit Advent Calendar 2016 to see what’s new this year. - By Jeff Bunch

IT’S ALL IN A NIGHT’S WORK

›› Christmas parties & events, 2

Then chair of the Board of Trustees, Harry Magnuson, along with University President Father Richard Twohy, S.J., invited the dean of Social Welfare at St. Louis University, Father Bernard (burr-nerd) J. Coughlin, S.J., to campus and offered him the 23rd presidency of the University.

West, and soon-to-be Woldson – to name a few. “Finances were very problematic,” Fr. Coughlin recalls. “So I began doing what I thought was the right thing to do, and not everybody liked it. As time went on, a band of people came forward and helped me – many of them – for which I am very thankful. I was fortunate to establish wonderful

To send birthday wishes to Father Coughlin, go to www.gonzaga.edu/coughlinbirthday

It wasn’t until Fr. Coughlin had moved his meager relationships. I believed then, and still do, that belongings to Spokane that Harry dropped the the president’s job was to engage people who had bomb: “By the way, Father, we’re broke.” thoughtfulness and generosity and wanted to Fr. Coughlin knew that the only way to dig out of see the University succeed, and in time, Gonzaga debt was to meet, build relationships with, and became very much a part of this community. engage business and civic leaders in promoting It was a happy place. Over the years, it has a vision and mission for a strong, morals-based developed into an extremely powerful University, university. With their business acumen and with wonderful people, wonderful students, and resources, they helped right the ship. One only a wonderful set of values the people who worked needs to stroll across campus to see the names here incorporated into their own lives and into of Fr. Coughlin’s many friends on our buildings, the life of the University.” rooms and scholarships – Kennedy, Tilford, It would be impossible to count the people who Jundt, Jepson, Burch, Herak, Magnuson, call Barney Coughlin their best friend. Foley, Cowles, Rosauer, McCarthey, Clute,

Fr. Coughlin is the longest serving president in University history, 22 years, from 1974-1996. He has served as Gonzaga’s first and only chancellor for the past 20 years. “I guess I have felt so involved that I never realized that I have been at Gonzaga for 42 years. That’s almost half of my life,” he says, a slight smile creeping over his face, which is etched by both trials and great accomplishments. It is near impossible for people to visit with Fr. Coughlin and not leave with a smile in their heart and on their face. His graciousness, and joy for life and the Lord, are downright contagious. Turning 94 years old on Dec. 7, he still gets out to walk the campus whenever he can. And it’s not uncommon to see him stop and strike up a conversation with a student. Being active is something that has always made him feel good. “I appreciate the students coming up and introducing themselves and establishing those associations with me,” he says. “It’s good for the students to feel at home, and I enjoy seeing their smiling faces.” Students are one primary cog that makes Gonzaga such a fine place, Fr. Coughlin says. “I’m not trying to put any gold on my shoulders for making it a fine place, but our students want to be good scholars, get a good education and succeed in life (not just in the job market); their values and the quality of what they are doing, the families that they’re raising, the things they are teaching, are in keeping with Gonzaga’s values as a Jesuit university. To me, that’s a very important thing.”

continued page 2

DEC 2016

Spirit December 2016  

Gonzaga University Staff & Faculty Newsletter

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