Page 1

Idea for Center for Catholic Education gaining steam In November, Gonzaga Education Dean Vincent Alfonso walked the streets of Rome where leaders of the Catholic Church have passed for centuries, and he couldn’t help but be inspired. Then he attended the World Congress on Catholic Education, which included a session with Pope Francis, and he came away more convinced than ever that Gonzaga can fill a niche in providing multiple education experiences for teachers and administrators who work or aspire to work in Catholic schools. The Gonzaga Center for Catholic Education is still in concept stage. But at its root is building an educational foundation to support teachers who want to teach in Catholic schools, kindergarten through high school.

How does this shape our future?

Alfonso says as part of the School of Education’s strategic plan, the creation of a Center for Catholic Education places Gonzaga at the forefront of Catholic education initiatives in the region. “In addition, the CCE will provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to serve Catholic elementary and secondary school students, families, teachers, administrators and religious. The World Congress and CCE are consonant with the School’s and University’s mission of preparing men and women to serve the greater good,” Alfonso says.

“The CCE is not a brick and mortar building, but a concept whose focus is on Catholic education. The mission of the CCE is to renew and strengthen our “We need to address a number of issues for Catholic K-12 Catholic schools so they may flourish through schools, including low salaries and a shortage of a community that nurtures the heart, mind and teachers that are entering the pipeline,” Alfonso says. soul. This community inspires faith formation and “We need to help fund teachers working in Catholic intellectual inquiry within our Catholic tradition,” schools, provide teacher development opportunities Alfonso says. and work directly with children – many who need counseling and academic intervention.”

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS M-F, 7:30 am-2:30 pm Bagels, bagel sandwiches & coffee bar

ASTOR

ADDISON

THE ZAGGIN’ WAGGIN M-F, 11 am-1:30 pm Spring-early Fall Burgers, featured specials

What are we doing?

The schools of Education and Business Administration are already assisting the Spokane Catholic Diocese and its schools in myriad ways. For example, the School of Education has hosted the Celebration of Catholic Schools breakfast for more than 12 years and has been hosting professional development days for teachers and administrators the past two years. In addition, Education and the Diocese have established an annual day of reflection that takes place at the Bozarth Mansion. Together with the Business school, Education has been providing services to two Catholic elementary schools, including teacher in-services and professional development, principal consultation, and financial management guidance and consultation. “We expect these services to expand over time with financial support from donors,” Alfonso says.

MARKETPLACE M-F, 9 am-10 pm S-S, 10 am-7 pm One-stop convenience shopping that also includes fresh daily soups

SHARP AVE.

COG M-F, 7 am-8:30 pm Sat, 9 am-7:30 pm Sun, 9 am-8:30 pm BOONE Lots of choices

CAT

ROSAUER

COLLEGE HALL

BARC

WELCH

TILFORD

THE BULLDOG Open daily at 11 am Close M at 8 pm S/T/Th at 9 pm F/Sat at midnight Full menu, beer, wine, spirits

STARBUCKS M-F, 7 am-10 pm S-S, 9 am-10 pm Full menu coffee bar

THOMAS HAMMER COFFEE M-Th, 7 am-6 pm F, 7 am-2 pm Coffee bistro

Food options have changed across campus over the last year, prompting Spirit to outline for readers where they can eat or enjoy a beverage. Hours may vary on holidays and school breaks.

DESMET

CROSBY

HEMMINGSON

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS

M-F, 7 am-5:30 pm Bagels, bagel sandwiches & coffee bar MARTIN

CAFÉ LAWTE FUEL CELL M-F, 7:30 am-7 pm M-Th, 7:30 am-4 pm Coffee bar, pastries S-S, 10 am-3 pm & to go items Fresh smoothies, protein shakes and bars

COUGHLIN

HAMILTON

JUNDT

CROSBY CAFE M-F, 7:30 am-4:30 pm Coffee bar, pastries and to-go items

spirit GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

• Senior ingenuity, 2 • Eradicating hate, 3 • Where to eat on campus, 4 APRIL 2016 | VOL 17 | #7

TURN AROUND

Chuck Salina, associate professor in Education, and collaborators worked with Sunnyside High School to turn around graduation rates from under 50 percent to nearly 90 percent in just a few years.

From powerless to powerful Chuck Salina still gets a little choked up when he thinks about the power of positive relationships and their potential to raise our society to new heights.

When Salina left Sunnyside High after two years, he noticed a new swagger and a sense of hope. “The students, teachers and administrators had a ‘Together We Will!’ attitude. The support they received made them feel powerful to make a difference,” Salina says.

“Students say, ‘The teachers care about us now.’ Of course, the teachers always cared about the students, but In a partnership between Gonzaga, the federal it’s more apparent now due to intentional supports given government and the state of Washington, Salina was at all levels of the team approach,” says Suzann Girtz, loaned to the Sunnyside School District as a researcher GU associate professor. Her research allowed Gonzaga and then as principal of Sunnyside High School from to share lessons learned with the state Superintendent 2010-12. When he began, the graduation rate was 49 of Public Instruction’s office to scale this work on the percent in this low-income community. Now, little state and national levels. Salina, Girtz and then-Assistant more than three years later, the Sunnyside graduation rate has reached nearly 90 percent, which leads the Yakima Valley, and continues to grow.

Professor Joanie Eppinga wrote one book on the turn around, “Powerless to Powerful,” and a second book is in the works. Meanwhile, the same Sunnyside leadership team is in place. Salina’s assistant principal Ryan Maxwell is now the principal, who, by the way, was just named Washington state’s Principal of the Year. “The staff wouldn’t let the district hire from outside and mess up what we had begun,” Salina says. Salina also passed on kudos to AVP Patricia Killen, former Education Dean Jon Sunderland and Dean Vincent Alfonso for their support of the program.

GU grads making most of their degree

JEPSON

CINCINNATI

MARGIE’S M-F, 8 am-2:30 pm Coffee bar, pastries & to-go items

RUBY ST.

PEARL

DAILY BREAD EXPRESS DUFF’S BISTRO M-Th, 11 am-1:30 pm M-F, 7 am-10 pm Sandwiches, soup S-S, 11 am-10 pm Hot sandwiches, soup SHARP AVE. cart, F’real milkshakes & to-go items PANDA EXPRESS M-F, 10:30 am-9 pm KENNEDY S-S, 11 am-8 pm Chinese cuisine

SUB CONNECTION M-Th, 11 am-11 pm F, 11 am-2:30 pm Sub sandwiches, soups & chips

STANDARD

Where to eat on campus

“We will be an international leader in transforming lives through faith formation and intellectual inquiry,” he says.

BARNEY’S M-F, 7:30 am-2 pm Coffee bar, pastries & to-go items

LAW

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

Salina says what he brought to the district was a belief system founded upon his Jesuit, Catholic, humanistic foundation. Three things helped turn this program around: 1. the power of positive relationships and the trust they build, 2. the use of data to support positive change rather than as punishment, and 3. the creation of systems that support teachers in their work. “Too often the blame for lack of success falls upon the teachers,” Salina says. “That’s backwards. We need to look at responsibilities differently, and focus on improving systems that better support teachers in their work. Thus, their work becomes more intentional.”

More than 92 percent of Gonzaga graduates who received their bachelor’s degrees with the class of 2015 reported they are either employed (full- or part-time), continuing their education, serving as volunteers or serving in the military.

degrees between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015. The report was developed by Gonzaga’s Career and Professional Development Center using guidelines developed by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Gonzaga’s 2015 first Destination Survey Report found nearly two-thirds (65.6 percent) of those graduates were employed, while nearly a quarter (23.7 percent) either were continuing their education (17 percent), performing volunteer service (5.5 percent) or serving in the military (1.2 percent). A total of 7.6 percent of the graduates were still seeking employment or acceptance into a graduate or professional school.

Ray Angle, Gonzaga’s assistant vice president for career and professional development, said the University’s “success rate” of 92.4 percent for the class of 2015 underscores the value of a Gonzaga degree in an increasingly competitive national job market.

The report includes data from 1,103 of the 1,153 undergraduates (95.7 percent) who received their bachelor’s

The NACE has not yet issued its success rate report for 2015, but the national average success rate for the class of 2014 was 80.3 percent. For more, visit www.gonzaga.edu/ spirit.

APRIL 2016


AROUND CAMPUS >> Mathematics Associate Professor Vesta Coufal received the 2016 Award for Distinguished College or University Mathematics Teaching by the Pacific Northwest Region of the Mathematical Association of America. Coufal started GU’s Math Teaching Circle in which faculty discuss lesson plans and other ideas for the classroom. >> Gonzaga welcomes eight new Act Six Scholars in the fall: Larissa Caldeira and Dean Sarenac, both Rogers High School, Kimiko Hirota, Shadle Park, Rayanna Smith, Mead, and four from western Washington. The program supports diverse, community minded individuals and inspires them to become the next generation of community leaders. >> U.S. News recently released a number of national rankings for graduate programs: GU accounting program 16th best in the nation; GU nurse anesthesia program 18th best; and GU MBA program 78th best. >> Endowed professor of journalism at North Dakota, Mark Trahant, presents “Living in History: For Indian Country the 2016 Election Will Be One for the Books.” His talk is April 7, 12:15 p.m. in the Hemmingson Center Auditorium. >> Tony Anselmo, CEO of ChemBioPower, will speak on Global Carbon Reduction and the Fuel Sector in the Pigott Entrepreneurship Lecture, April 13, 6:30 p.m. in Jepson’s Wolff Auditorium. A reception precedes the lecture at 5:30. The event is free and open to the public. >> The series “Gonzaga Writes!” features Meagan Ciesla and the winners of the Michael and Gail Gurian Award for Gonzaga student writers, April 19, 7:30 p.m. in Jepson’s Wolff Auditorium. Assistant English Professor Ciesla teaches creative writing, 20th century American literature, and working class studies.

PAGE 2

ARMORED HUT

NOTEWORTHY

Design makes military safer

New Hires

When Hank Thurston served in combat outposts of Afghanistan and other middle Eastern sites as a U.S. Marine, he seldom saw more than dirt. Worked in dirt, slept on the dirt. But on occasion, his troop would find itself in ‘bigger’ places. Large metal containers, called Connex, would provide space for kitchens, lavatories and even sleeping quarters.

Yu Jen Wang, budget assistant, Education; Mary Mealey, assistant to associate VP and Core director, AVP; Sam Groth, custodian, Plant; Lacey-De Olson, receptionist, Health Center; Shannon Emrey, clinical placement coordinator, Nursing; Kathy Gaia, communications officer, Switchboard; Jesse Glaves, Enterprise web developer II, ITS

New Positions/Promotions

So when it was time for the senior engineering student and his teammates to design a senior project, Thurston and U.S. Navy vet T.J. Bosler came up with an idea to armor these combat shelters to make them safer for our country’s service men and women.

Jennifer Peplinski, project research analyst, University Advancement; Coral Pruitt, senior director of strategic projects, University Advancement; Krista Fuller, enrollment specialist, Virtual Campus; Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts; Cathy Carter, project management specialist, Virtual Campus; Emily Wirth, assistant director, Financial Aid; Dori Sonntag, associate vice president, University Advancement; Kim Brus, assistant director of donor relations, University Advancement; Frank Case, S.J., vice president of the University; Bryn Boorman, program coordinator, Law student events and activities

It was sheer coincidence that Berg Co. in Spokane was one of the manufacturers of the combat shelter. Bosler made contact, and Berg was “very gracious and willing to take on this project with us,” Thurston said. The five-student team has been working diligently to prepare design drawings after compiling research and taking direction from a myriad of sources. “Our drawings are 90 percent complete. We’ve really had two issues to solve: create a better ballistic panel, and determine how best to attach it to the shelter.” The students have worked under the supervision of adjunct faculty members Anthony Schoen (’12) and Aaron Zwanzig. The students will present their project during the public’s Senior Design Expo, April 27, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in and around Herak Center. More than 40 teams will display their efforts at this public exhibition.

Goodbyes Sherri Peterson, assistant director, Financial Aid; Cheree Adams, program assistant II, Financial Aid; Mark Bodamer, associate professor, Psychology; Sally Hommel, medical receptionist, Health Center

Senior engineering students determined to design a safer shelter (under them), Carney Devereux, T.J. Bolser, Hank Thurston, Elizabeth Hassebrock and Ty Partington.

Anniversaries

5

Laurie Ferguson, custodian, Plant; John Johnston, lead security officer, Campus Security

Cradle Call

Neighborhood Café links faculty, community April 23 An idea that hatched during Gonzaga’s 125th anniversary celebration three years ago is continuing under different nomenclature this month. The Gonzaga Faculty Neighborhood Café, formerly Transformation Café, features four presentations, open to the Spokane community, engaging area residents in conversation with GU faculty. Assistant Physics Professor Adam Fritsch presents Secrets of the Atomic Nucleus, and Communications Professor Tony Osborne discusses Focus and High Performance, both sessions at 9:30 a.m. on April 23.

Then, at 11 a.m., Political Science Lecturer Sean Swan features the Future of Europe, while Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice Al Miranne presents The Cost of Corrections. All four lectures are designed for 20 minutes, leaving plenty of time for discussion among the groups. Previously held in coffee shops around town, this year’s presentations are being held in Hemmingson Center in an effort to introduce our community to Gonzaga’s new gathering place. Go to www.gonzaga.edu/spirit for more detail on each presentation.

Students present original research April 23 The Spokane Intercollegiate Research Conference, April 23 at Whitworth University, will feature a number of original research projects by students from Gonzaga and other area colleges. For example, Assistant Professor Suzanne Ostersmith is leading a session featuring three interdisciplinary student researchers and 11 additional students: Diana Fisher (engineering design and choreographic process), presenting a research paper on engineering as well as a piece of choreography she presented at a regional dance conference at University of Wyoming in March called Fem; Kaitlyn Anson (writing and choreography),

FOCUS ON . . . ERADICATING HATE

presenting her research in creating a dance called Driving the Pastoral from a creative writing travel log presented at Wyoming, as well; and Miranda Heckman (biology, education and dance), sharing research, choreographed lesson plan and performance that uses dance to teach Spokane River science. Another of many GU presenters is Lydia Rush (Biochemistry), under the direction of Associate Bio-Chem Professor Matt Cremeens, who will present her research in creating an analysis that would be able to predict which reactions may possess non-statistical behavior, which would allow the scientific community to bypass expensive dynamics calculations.

Emily Wirth, assistant director, Financial Aid, and spouse Jeff had a baby girl, Alice. Tim Fitzgerald, assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering, and spouse Stacey had a baby girl, Charlotte. Jennifer Nyland, head athletic trainer, and spouse Esau had a baby girl, Nora.

COMMENCEMENT 2016 Saturday, May 7 (Ceremonies at McCarthey) 8:30-10 a.m. Law Ceremony Reception at Law School until 11:30 a.m. Noon-2 p.m. Graduate Ceremony Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 3 p.m. 3:30-5 p.m. Commencement Mass Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 6 p.m. Sunday, May 8: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Undergraduate Ceremony at Spokane Arena Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 2 p.m. Best-selling New York Times author Father James Martin, S.J., who wrote “The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything,”

Fr. James Martin, S.J.

Kristine Hoover looks to support faculty in their teaching and scholarly work.

-Evan Olson photo

Hoover’s passion for justice perfect fit for Institute

guarantees success,” Albert says. “She is a highownership person and will always make a class, project, program or initiative better.”

What draws a highly successful business professor at Bowling Green State University out west to Gonzaga University and the Organizational Leadership program?

Hoover has included service-learning in many of her classes and it is also a part of her research stream. Social justice and the ‘human first’ approach is what drew Hoover to this position as director.

“I saw the job announcement come across my computer, I came for an interview and was compelled by the mission of Jesuit education, packed up with my husband and our kids and moved to Spokane,” explains Kristine Hoover, associate professor of Organizational Leadership since 2009. And her commitment to Jesuit education is carrying over into her newly-accepted assignment as director of the Gonzaga Institute of Hate Studies. “Kristine is a collaborator,” says Joe Albert, acting dean of the School of Professional Studies. “I believe that increased connectedness and collaboration are exactly what the Institute needs at this time. What Kristine will bring is not only increased collaboration, but an extension of the mission of the Institute to include peace building. “Her commitment to any project pretty much will speak and be conferred an honorary degree at Sunday’s undergraduate ceremony. Local author and mental health counselor Michael Gurian (’80) will deliver the Graduate Michael Gurian Commencement address and receive an honorary Doctor of Letters. Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson will deliver the Law Commencement address, and Professor of Law Emeritus Gary Randall will receive the Law Bob Ferguson Medal. Gonzaga officials expect to confer 1,146 undergraduate degrees, 767 graduate degrees and 112 law degrees. For a complete list of commencement events, click on www.gonzaga. edu/commencement.

“I want our work to add value to the conversation,” Hoover says. “There is currently valuable research in social justice, equity and inclusion, looking at barriers to social justice. One of those barriers very well may be hate. Maybe if we can combat hate we can create greater social justice.” The Institute is already collaborating on a number of projects around campus: supporting a Leadership Studies symposium last week featuring Larry Spears, Jim Kouzes and Howard Behar, publishing Volume 13 of the Journal of Hate Studies, preparing an international call for submissions to Volume 14 of the Journal, planning for the Fourth International Conference on Hate Studies, and partnering with University Advancement and CCASL to fully endow the Eva Lassman Student Research Award. “Many people here are doing important work. The president’s recent appointment of the Council on Equity, Inclusion and Intercultural Awareness is a good example. The Institute can provide support for teaching and research by extending the reach of these distinctive contributions through presentations and publications,” Hoover says. “Ultimately, we want to empower students and faculty on issues related to understanding the capacity to dehumanize others and interventions to combat those capacities in our communities today.” Hoover lauded founding members George Critchlow, Raymond Reyes and many others for creating a distinctive catalyst toward greater knowledge of the human condition, the advancement of human dignity and human rights, and fulfillment of the hope for a just, inclusive public life. For more information, contact hatestudies@gonzaga.edu.

Gary Randall

PAGE 3


AROUND CAMPUS >> Mathematics Associate Professor Vesta Coufal received the 2016 Award for Distinguished College or University Mathematics Teaching by the Pacific Northwest Region of the Mathematical Association of America. Coufal started GU’s Math Teaching Circle in which faculty discuss lesson plans and other ideas for the classroom. >> Gonzaga welcomes eight new Act Six Scholars in the fall: Larissa Caldeira and Dean Sarenac, both Rogers High School, Kimiko Hirota, Shadle Park, Rayanna Smith, Mead, and four from western Washington. The program supports diverse, community minded individuals and inspires them to become the next generation of community leaders. >> U.S. News recently released a number of national rankings for graduate programs: GU accounting program 16th best in the nation; GU nurse anesthesia program 18th best; and GU MBA program 78th best. >> Endowed professor of journalism at North Dakota, Mark Trahant, presents “Living in History: For Indian Country the 2016 Election Will Be One for the Books.” His talk is April 7, 12:15 p.m. in the Hemmingson Center Auditorium. >> Tony Anselmo, CEO of ChemBioPower, will speak on Global Carbon Reduction and the Fuel Sector in the Pigott Entrepreneurship Lecture, April 13, 6:30 p.m. in Jepson’s Wolff Auditorium. A reception precedes the lecture at 5:30. The event is free and open to the public. >> The series “Gonzaga Writes!” features Meagan Ciesla and the winners of the Michael and Gail Gurian Award for Gonzaga student writers, April 19, 7:30 p.m. in Jepson’s Wolff Auditorium. Assistant English Professor Ciesla teaches creative writing, 20th century American literature, and working class studies.

PAGE 2

ARMORED HUT

NOTEWORTHY

Design makes military safer

New Hires

When Hank Thurston served in combat outposts of Afghanistan and other middle Eastern sites as a U.S. Marine, he seldom saw more than dirt. Worked in dirt, slept on the dirt. But on occasion, his troop would find itself in ‘bigger’ places. Large metal containers, called Connex, would provide space for kitchens, lavatories and even sleeping quarters.

Yu Jen Wang, budget assistant, Education; Mary Mealey, assistant to associate VP and Core director, AVP; Sam Groth, custodian, Plant; Lacey-De Olson, receptionist, Health Center; Shannon Emrey, clinical placement coordinator, Nursing; Kathy Gaia, communications officer, Switchboard; Jesse Glaves, Enterprise web developer II, ITS

New Positions/Promotions

So when it was time for the senior engineering student and his teammates to design a senior project, Thurston and U.S. Navy vet T.J. Bosler came up with an idea to armor these combat shelters to make them safer for our country’s service men and women.

Jennifer Peplinski, project research analyst, University Advancement; Coral Pruitt, senior director of strategic projects, University Advancement; Krista Fuller, enrollment specialist, Virtual Campus; Debra Louden, assistant director, Student Accounts; Cathy Carter, project management specialist, Virtual Campus; Emily Wirth, assistant director, Financial Aid; Dori Sonntag, associate vice president, University Advancement; Kim Brus, assistant director of donor relations, University Advancement; Frank Case, S.J., vice president of the University; Bryn Boorman, program coordinator, Law student events and activities

It was sheer coincidence that Berg Co. in Spokane was one of the manufacturers of the combat shelter. Bosler made contact, and Berg was “very gracious and willing to take on this project with us,” Thurston said. The five-student team has been working diligently to prepare design drawings after compiling research and taking direction from a myriad of sources. “Our drawings are 90 percent complete. We’ve really had two issues to solve: create a better ballistic panel, and determine how best to attach it to the shelter.” The students have worked under the supervision of adjunct faculty members Anthony Schoen (’12) and Aaron Zwanzig. The students will present their project during the public’s Senior Design Expo, April 27, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in and around Herak Center. More than 40 teams will display their efforts at this public exhibition.

Goodbyes Sherri Peterson, assistant director, Financial Aid; Cheree Adams, program assistant II, Financial Aid; Mark Bodamer, associate professor, Psychology; Sally Hommel, medical receptionist, Health Center

Senior engineering students determined to design a safer shelter (under them), Carney Devereux, T.J. Bolser, Hank Thurston, Elizabeth Hassebrock and Ty Partington.

Anniversaries

5

Laurie Ferguson, custodian, Plant; John Johnston, lead security officer, Campus Security

Cradle Call

Neighborhood Café links faculty, community April 23 An idea that hatched during Gonzaga’s 125th anniversary celebration three years ago is continuing under different nomenclature this month. The Gonzaga Faculty Neighborhood Café, formerly Transformation Café, features four presentations, open to the Spokane community, engaging area residents in conversation with GU faculty. Assistant Physics Professor Adam Fritsch presents Secrets of the Atomic Nucleus, and Communications Professor Tony Osborne discusses Focus and High Performance, both sessions at 9:30 a.m. on April 23.

Then, at 11 a.m., Political Science Lecturer Sean Swan features the Future of Europe, while Associate Professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice Al Miranne presents The Cost of Corrections. All four lectures are designed for 20 minutes, leaving plenty of time for discussion among the groups. Previously held in coffee shops around town, this year’s presentations are being held in Hemmingson Center in an effort to introduce our community to Gonzaga’s new gathering place. Go to www.gonzaga.edu/spirit for more detail on each presentation.

Students present original research April 23 The Spokane Intercollegiate Research Conference, April 23 at Whitworth University, will feature a number of original research projects by students from Gonzaga and other area colleges. For example, Assistant Professor Suzanne Ostersmith is leading a session featuring three interdisciplinary student researchers and 11 additional students: Diana Fisher (engineering design and choreographic process), presenting a research paper on engineering as well as a piece of choreography she presented at a regional dance conference at University of Wyoming in March called Fem; Kaitlyn Anson (writing and choreography),

FOCUS ON . . . ERADICATING HATE

presenting her research in creating a dance called Driving the Pastoral from a creative writing travel log presented at Wyoming, as well; and Miranda Heckman (biology, education and dance), sharing research, choreographed lesson plan and performance that uses dance to teach Spokane River science. Another of many GU presenters is Lydia Rush (Biochemistry), under the direction of Associate Bio-Chem Professor Matt Cremeens, who will present her research in creating an analysis that would be able to predict which reactions may possess non-statistical behavior, which would allow the scientific community to bypass expensive dynamics calculations.

Emily Wirth, assistant director, Financial Aid, and spouse Jeff had a baby girl, Alice. Tim Fitzgerald, assistant professor, Mechanical Engineering, and spouse Stacey had a baby girl, Charlotte. Jennifer Nyland, head athletic trainer, and spouse Esau had a baby girl, Nora.

COMMENCEMENT 2016 Saturday, May 7 (Ceremonies at McCarthey) 8:30-10 a.m. Law Ceremony Reception at Law School until 11:30 a.m. Noon-2 p.m. Graduate Ceremony Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 3 p.m. 3:30-5 p.m. Commencement Mass Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 6 p.m. Sunday, May 8: 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Undergraduate Ceremony at Spokane Arena Reception on McCarthey South Lawn until 2 p.m. Best-selling New York Times author Father James Martin, S.J., who wrote “The Jesuit Guide to (Almost) Everything,”

Fr. James Martin, S.J.

Kristine Hoover looks to support faculty in their teaching and scholarly work.

-Evan Olson photo

Hoover’s passion for justice perfect fit for Institute

guarantees success,” Albert says. “She is a highownership person and will always make a class, project, program or initiative better.”

What draws a highly successful business professor at Bowling Green State University out west to Gonzaga University and the Organizational Leadership program?

Hoover has included service-learning in many of her classes and it is also a part of her research stream. Social justice and the ‘human first’ approach is what drew Hoover to this position as director.

“I saw the job announcement come across my computer, I came for an interview and was compelled by the mission of Jesuit education, packed up with my husband and our kids and moved to Spokane,” explains Kristine Hoover, associate professor of Organizational Leadership since 2009. And her commitment to Jesuit education is carrying over into her newly-accepted assignment as director of the Gonzaga Institute of Hate Studies. “Kristine is a collaborator,” says Joe Albert, acting dean of the School of Professional Studies. “I believe that increased connectedness and collaboration are exactly what the Institute needs at this time. What Kristine will bring is not only increased collaboration, but an extension of the mission of the Institute to include peace building. “Her commitment to any project pretty much will speak and be conferred an honorary degree at Sunday’s undergraduate ceremony. Local author and mental health counselor Michael Gurian (’80) will deliver the Graduate Michael Gurian Commencement address and receive an honorary Doctor of Letters. Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson will deliver the Law Commencement address, and Professor of Law Emeritus Gary Randall will receive the Law Bob Ferguson Medal. Gonzaga officials expect to confer 1,146 undergraduate degrees, 767 graduate degrees and 112 law degrees. For a complete list of commencement events, click on www.gonzaga. edu/commencement.

“I want our work to add value to the conversation,” Hoover says. “There is currently valuable research in social justice, equity and inclusion, looking at barriers to social justice. One of those barriers very well may be hate. Maybe if we can combat hate we can create greater social justice.” The Institute is already collaborating on a number of projects around campus: supporting a Leadership Studies symposium last week featuring Larry Spears, Jim Kouzes and Howard Behar, publishing Volume 13 of the Journal of Hate Studies, preparing an international call for submissions to Volume 14 of the Journal, planning for the Fourth International Conference on Hate Studies, and partnering with University Advancement and CCASL to fully endow the Eva Lassman Student Research Award. “Many people here are doing important work. The president’s recent appointment of the Council on Equity, Inclusion and Intercultural Awareness is a good example. The Institute can provide support for teaching and research by extending the reach of these distinctive contributions through presentations and publications,” Hoover says. “Ultimately, we want to empower students and faculty on issues related to understanding the capacity to dehumanize others and interventions to combat those capacities in our communities today.” Hoover lauded founding members George Critchlow, Raymond Reyes and many others for creating a distinctive catalyst toward greater knowledge of the human condition, the advancement of human dignity and human rights, and fulfillment of the hope for a just, inclusive public life. For more information, contact hatestudies@gonzaga.edu.

Gary Randall

PAGE 3


Idea for Center for Catholic Education gaining steam In November, Gonzaga Education Dean Vincent Alfonso walked the streets of Rome where leaders of the Catholic Church have passed for centuries, and he couldn’t help but be inspired. Then he attended the World Congress on Catholic Education, which included a session with Pope Francis, and he came away more convinced than ever that Gonzaga can fill a niche in providing multiple education experiences for teachers and administrators who work or aspire to work in Catholic schools. The Gonzaga Center for Catholic Education is still in concept stage. But at its root is building an educational foundation to support teachers who want to teach in Catholic schools, kindergarten through high school.

How does this shape our future?

Alfonso says as part of the School of Education’s strategic plan, the creation of a Center for Catholic Education places Gonzaga at the forefront of Catholic education initiatives in the region. “In addition, the CCE will provide opportunities for students, staff and faculty to serve Catholic elementary and secondary school students, families, teachers, administrators and religious. The World Congress and CCE are consonant with the School’s and University’s mission of preparing men and women to serve the greater good,” Alfonso says.

“The CCE is not a brick and mortar building, but a concept whose focus is on Catholic education. The mission of the CCE is to renew and strengthen our “We need to address a number of issues for Catholic K-12 Catholic schools so they may flourish through schools, including low salaries and a shortage of a community that nurtures the heart, mind and teachers that are entering the pipeline,” Alfonso says. soul. This community inspires faith formation and “We need to help fund teachers working in Catholic intellectual inquiry within our Catholic tradition,” schools, provide teacher development opportunities Alfonso says. and work directly with children – many who need counseling and academic intervention.”

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS M-F, 7:30 am-2:30 pm Bagels, bagel sandwiches & coffee bar

ASTOR

ADDISON

THE ZAGGIN’ WAGGIN M-F, 11 am-1:30 pm Spring-early Fall Burgers, featured specials

What are we doing?

The schools of Education and Business Administration are already assisting the Spokane Catholic Diocese and its schools in myriad ways. For example, the School of Education has hosted the Celebration of Catholic Schools breakfast for more than 12 years and has been hosting professional development days for teachers and administrators the past two years. In addition, Education and the Diocese have established an annual day of reflection that takes place at the Bozarth Mansion. Together with the Business school, Education has been providing services to two Catholic elementary schools, including teacher in-services and professional development, principal consultation, and financial management guidance and consultation. “We expect these services to expand over time with financial support from donors,” Alfonso says.

MARKETPLACE M-F, 9 am-10 pm S-S, 10 am-7 pm One-stop convenience shopping that also includes fresh daily soups

SHARP AVE.

COG M-F, 7 am-8:30 pm Sat, 9 am-7:30 pm Sun, 9 am-8:30 pm BOONE Lots of choices

CAT

ROSAUER

COLLEGE HALL

BARC

WELCH

TILFORD

THE BULLDOG Open daily at 11 am Close M at 8 pm S/T/Th at 9 pm F/Sat at midnight Full menu, beer, wine, spirits

STARBUCKS M-F, 7 am-10 pm S-S, 9 am-10 pm Full menu coffee bar

THOMAS HAMMER COFFEE M-Th, 7 am-6 pm F, 7 am-2 pm Coffee bistro

Food options have changed across campus over the last year, prompting Spirit to outline for readers where they can eat or enjoy a beverage. Hours may vary on holidays and school breaks.

DESMET

CROSBY

HEMMINGSON

EINSTEIN BROS BAGELS

M-F, 7 am-5:30 pm Bagels, bagel sandwiches & coffee bar MARTIN

CAFÉ LAWTE FUEL CELL M-F, 7:30 am-7 pm M-Th, 7:30 am-4 pm Coffee bar, pastries S-S, 10 am-3 pm & to go items Fresh smoothies, protein shakes and bars

COUGHLIN

HAMILTON

JUNDT

CROSBY CAFE M-F, 7:30 am-4:30 pm Coffee bar, pastries and to-go items

spirit GONZAGA FACULTY AND STAFF NEWSLETTER

• Senior ingenuity, 2 • Eradicating hate, 3 • Where to eat on campus, 4 APRIL 2016 | VOL 17 | #7

TURN AROUND

Chuck Salina, associate professor in Education, and collaborators worked with Sunnyside High School to turn around graduation rates from under 50 percent to nearly 90 percent in just a few years.

From powerless to powerful Chuck Salina still gets a little choked up when he thinks about the power of positive relationships and their potential to raise our society to new heights.

When Salina left Sunnyside High after two years, he noticed a new swagger and a sense of hope. “The students, teachers and administrators had a ‘Together We Will!’ attitude. The support they received made them feel powerful to make a difference,” Salina says.

“Students say, ‘The teachers care about us now.’ Of course, the teachers always cared about the students, but In a partnership between Gonzaga, the federal it’s more apparent now due to intentional supports given government and the state of Washington, Salina was at all levels of the team approach,” says Suzann Girtz, loaned to the Sunnyside School District as a researcher GU associate professor. Her research allowed Gonzaga and then as principal of Sunnyside High School from to share lessons learned with the state Superintendent 2010-12. When he began, the graduation rate was 49 of Public Instruction’s office to scale this work on the percent in this low-income community. Now, little state and national levels. Salina, Girtz and then-Assistant more than three years later, the Sunnyside graduation rate has reached nearly 90 percent, which leads the Yakima Valley, and continues to grow.

Professor Joanie Eppinga wrote one book on the turn around, “Powerless to Powerful,” and a second book is in the works. Meanwhile, the same Sunnyside leadership team is in place. Salina’s assistant principal Ryan Maxwell is now the principal, who, by the way, was just named Washington state’s Principal of the Year. “The staff wouldn’t let the district hire from outside and mess up what we had begun,” Salina says. Salina also passed on kudos to AVP Patricia Killen, former Education Dean Jon Sunderland and Dean Vincent Alfonso for their support of the program.

GU grads making most of their degree

JEPSON

CINCINNATI

MARGIE’S M-F, 8 am-2:30 pm Coffee bar, pastries & to-go items

RUBY ST.

PEARL

DAILY BREAD EXPRESS DUFF’S BISTRO M-Th, 11 am-1:30 pm M-F, 7 am-10 pm Sandwiches, soup S-S, 11 am-10 pm Hot sandwiches, soup SHARP AVE. cart, F’real milkshakes & to-go items PANDA EXPRESS M-F, 10:30 am-9 pm KENNEDY S-S, 11 am-8 pm Chinese cuisine

SUB CONNECTION M-Th, 11 am-11 pm F, 11 am-2:30 pm Sub sandwiches, soups & chips

STANDARD

Where to eat on campus

“We will be an international leader in transforming lives through faith formation and intellectual inquiry,” he says.

BARNEY’S M-F, 7:30 am-2 pm Coffee bar, pastries & to-go items

LAW

VIEW ONLINE AT: www.gonzaga.edu/spirit

Salina says what he brought to the district was a belief system founded upon his Jesuit, Catholic, humanistic foundation. Three things helped turn this program around: 1. the power of positive relationships and the trust they build, 2. the use of data to support positive change rather than as punishment, and 3. the creation of systems that support teachers in their work. “Too often the blame for lack of success falls upon the teachers,” Salina says. “That’s backwards. We need to look at responsibilities differently, and focus on improving systems that better support teachers in their work. Thus, their work becomes more intentional.”

More than 92 percent of Gonzaga graduates who received their bachelor’s degrees with the class of 2015 reported they are either employed (full- or part-time), continuing their education, serving as volunteers or serving in the military.

degrees between July 1, 2014 and June 30, 2015. The report was developed by Gonzaga’s Career and Professional Development Center using guidelines developed by the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Gonzaga’s 2015 first Destination Survey Report found nearly two-thirds (65.6 percent) of those graduates were employed, while nearly a quarter (23.7 percent) either were continuing their education (17 percent), performing volunteer service (5.5 percent) or serving in the military (1.2 percent). A total of 7.6 percent of the graduates were still seeking employment or acceptance into a graduate or professional school.

Ray Angle, Gonzaga’s assistant vice president for career and professional development, said the University’s “success rate” of 92.4 percent for the class of 2015 underscores the value of a Gonzaga degree in an increasingly competitive national job market.

The report includes data from 1,103 of the 1,153 undergraduates (95.7 percent) who received their bachelor’s

The NACE has not yet issued its success rate report for 2015, but the national average success rate for the class of 2014 was 80.3 percent. For more, visit www.gonzaga.edu/ spirit.

APRIL 2016

April Spirit 2016  
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