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AN ATLAS OF COMMONING Time: 2017 Contribution: Case study researcher and Exhibition Curator Collaborators: Chun Zheng, Lu Zhu, Paul Moscoso, Tamara Cartwright, Ernest Bellamy Tutor: Prof. Gruber Stefan

The studio collaborates with ARCH+, Germany’s leading journal for architecture and urbanism, and the IFA, a cultural agency curating programs and exhibitions for Goethe Institutes, the German cultural centers across the world. ARCH+ and IFA together produced the acclaimed exhibition Post-Oil Cities that has toured on four continents since 2010 and been translated into more than five languages. As research partners for the follow-up exhibition, we will contribute to an exhibition and accompanying magazine on Urban Commons that will open in June 2018 in Berlin, before traveling to Pittsburgh followed by other international destinations. As a studio we also traveled to Berlin from October 14 - 22 for a three-day workshop with ARCH+.


THREE TENSIONS The atlas is defined by three axises of tensions, Access/ Collective Ownership, P2P Production/ Reproduction Labor, and Right to the World, which are colored in different colors. They underline the context nature of practice of commonings. The following case studies are colored correspondingly to the tension which they belong to. Access / Collective Ownership On one hand, the so-called sharing economy is currently redefining our relation to ownership away from possession to access to things according to our need and demand. On the other hand, more and more collective alternative forms of ownership are emerging, such as cooperative housing, Community Land Trust, etc. P2P Production / Reproduction Labor P2P Production is a form of an economy is viewed as an alternative to traditional capitalism, whereby business owners own the means of production and also the finished product, hiring labor to carry out the production process. Reproduction Labor is often associated with care giving and domestic roles including cleaning, cooking, child care, and the paid domestic labor force. Solidarity / Right to the World How much regulation do we need? How much can we rely on solidarity? Especially when we appose issues of global commons, economy, migration, etc.

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COMMONING GEJIAYING COMMUNITY AMIDST WUHAN METROPOLITAN Yidan Gong Advisor Jonathan Kline and Stefan Gruber Abstract Today governmental attitudes in Wuhan towards historic small-scale neighborhoods are shifting from complete demolition and redevelopment to preservation and evolution. However, a mismatch exists between the spatial expectations of government planners and long-term residents around the future occupancy, aesthetics and community appropriation of the public realm. This project engaged residents, community committee officials and planning department staff in a workshop in March of 2018 designed to reveal this mismatch and explore alternative approaches. Building on case studies on urban commoning, the project explores scenarios for reorganizing key public spaces and reoccupying buildings with new cooperative uses, such as art studios and a history museum. A more bottom up could allow the historic small-scale neighborhoods of Wuhan to evolve in a way that better serves existing residents and cultivates a new approach to planning that creates dialogues between stakeholders, offers tools to empower residents, and inspires rethinking on the current planning methods.

inconsistency between linear thinking and non-linear patterns of the planet and society. And this conflict results in the unsustainable developing patterns of demolition and development which stem from a conventional mindset of construction is the symbol of growth. Within this developing paradigm, there is an imbalance between the dominant power of developers, government and powerless residents, and renters who are even almost without the voice. And currently, they have no cooperation but just transactions between each other. The whole mechanism is really focused and limited in this core of groups. But do they really conflict with each other? I believe no. Commons is not just about sharing but exchange and negotiate with different groups. And all these groups they must have their own interests. As urban designers, we need to change the role of designers from controllers to moderators in order to build up the platform to curate the conversations between different groups. To change the worldview from the Darwinian view that survival of the fittest is played out in a violent struggle dominance. In this thinking landscape, the world is viewed as highly competitive, however, there is another option which is cooperative. And, this is indeed how the most resilient natural world works.

Ariel View of Gejiaying Neighborhood, Wuhan, Hubei

Context After a decade of fast development of real estate and two decades of real estate policy changes in China, cities in China have been expanding at an irrational speed. After 1982, the land ownership was explicitly designated to the nation or villages collectively, which was regarded as shared by everyone as a common resource. This change to a large extent amplify the commodified value of land, empowered the government, and weakened the power of residents. As currently, in China, there is no real estate tax, selling land has been a method for the government to secure the budget or even make revenue. In terms of the developers who take charge of the development of the land, there are always intense competitions between them when fighting for the bid. Thus, the developments tended to hold a huge piece of land and development as a complex and completed project on a large scale to make more profit, which has generated the generic cities with high-rise buildings. Right now the major issue is the conflicts and

Urban Milieu There are many areas which are derelict by the overwhelming development for various reasons. They became the exceptions in the urbanized cities. But it is the derelict situation that enables those areas still to preserve the original localism to some extent which is exactly valuable during current rapid but generic development. Although they do have the potential to become special and valuable archipelagos within cities, there are also obstacles from investors, the government, and historical characters of the land. However, I think these unclear situations could also become the crack to find our alternatives to preserve the inherited value. Thus, I would like to explore how to resist the generic urbanism with alternatives to preserve the traditions and affordability, and on the other hand, adapt to the urban development to raise living conditions. To study this question more specifically, I would like to choose Gejiaying Neighborhood in Wuhan,

Tanhualin Art District Gejiaying Community

TOD Business District

17 acre, 3,111 households, 8,088 residents, Including 1,625 temporary residents, 20%, 25% of the residents are 60+ year-old seniors .

Location of Gejiaying Neighborhood

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Precarious Demographics

which is in the conflict between urbanization and localism as the site. Gejiaying locates at the central part of Wuhan, which is a derelict site within the urbanization. On the right North of the neighborhood, there is the one of the most famous touristic place of Wuhan, Tanhualin, which is an art district. The art atmosphere originates from its near location to Wuhan Art College that some students who graduated from the school came here to establish their studio. After several years of evolving, the main street has already turned to a collection of vintage stuffs and artistic stores together with snack shops. As a result, it is essential to take the exited capitalistic elements and potential commodification threat into consideration when envision the future for the neighborhood. I would like to illustrate the characters of the neighborhood in the following four symptoms. 1.

Unclear Ownership and Land Lease

Senior locals and low-income renters are the major population Gejiaying. As young descendants go out to work, the seniors stay at home with no one to take care. Since the rents are relatively low, thus, many low-income workers tend to rent an apartment there. Elders and low-income workers are of less voice and lower educational background which increase the difficulty of efficient involvement of residents in the designing process. 2.

Rooted Lifestyle

Precarious demographics

Unclear ownership and land lease

The ownership of land in the neighborhood is designated to the nation, however, the land leases are of various conditions. Some of them are owned by individuals who live there or rent out, some are owned by Housing Authority which lends the house to low-income workers. Moreover, as there is no open information about ownership, it is difficult for designers to tackle this issue other than asking Community Official verbally to check the feasibility of demolition of a certain house. This mixture of various conditions and opaque information increase the difficulty for the government and developers to acquire the land, and for designers to moderate all initiatives. 3.

Rooted lifestyle

As most people who live in Gejiaying have stayed there for decades, they have already formed a closed circle of lifestyle which also influences the newcomers. There is a great level of sharing space and acquaintance, which are due to the lack of individual balcony or the limitation of indoor space. It is interesting to see the residents hanging quilts and clothes on the electricity wires or public hanging wires. There is some public open space which is called “small balcony” vividly suggesting the

characters of function in the neighborhood. 4.

Ambitious urbanization development

Adjacent to Gejaying, there is well-developed art district called Tanhualin, which originates from several workshops established by art students who graduated from the nearby Wuhan Art College. The government is planning to develop Gejiaying under the scheme of art district which can take advantage of Tanhualin in terms of retails, commercial, artists, and investments. However, I think, this will be an absolutely artificial ingredient added to the neighborhood with arbitrary power.

Methods Yoshino Cedar House is a community center and guest house in Yoshino which is a rural village in Japan. it is co-designed by Airbnb and architect Go Hasegawa aiming at revitalizing the aging community of the rural town. The house was built by Airbnb and donated to the Yoshino Town Office. And then the House is run by 28 local hosts and the proceeds earned from the guests are paid to the hosts and reinvested locally. Yoshino’s struggling economy is historically rooted in sustainable forestry and carpentry. The Yoshino Cedar House is built with local cedar wood and designed to celebrate 6 generations of woodwork craftsmanship with a contemporary design. Yoshino Cedar House is managed as a pooled resource. Every night a volunteer host stays at Yoshino Cedar House with the travelers and prepares an authentic Japanese breakfast in the mornings. At “Meals with Friends” local elders cook and host communal dinners for travelers in the house, and also the villagers come together. According to the interview with Teru, who is the coordinator of the hosts, although the hosts will only get 65 dollars per day, they are reaching out to the outside via the tourists and gaining awareness of the local place and belonging to the village. And as it is just launched this March, the revenues will reinvest to the village after a whole year running in March 2018. I envision myself as a side educator or facilitator. Rather than producing designs after the developers buying the land lease and work for them as clients, I would try to help to reconstruct the relationships between developers and residents. I would represent the rights of the neighborhoods and the residents to reach out to cooperate with developers and the government. Just like in the Yoshino Cedar House, Yoshino Cho has Airbnb built the house as a

Ambitious Urbanization Development 04


catalyst to trigger the economy and strengthen the solidarity between villagers by having them hosted the tourists. Esteem and affordability are very important elements for cultural and economic sustainability. The Granby Four Streets is an area in Liverpool, UK. It has been ignored by the development for decades. And now the residents, community members, investors, and organizations altogether revitalize the community and local economy through upcycling and creative action. They have various projects to involve residents and all the other people, such as Granby Four Street Market. They have stands every month to sell artworks done by the residents. Granby Winter Garden is built on the foundation of an abandoned house. And at Granby Workshop, they upcycle the materials from the ruins of abandon buildings and make them into new artworks and then sell them.

Actors

Government

They start by establishing the first kindergarten cooperative in Korea after a protest to the government about the decision of removing of the forest and new development. Later on, there are more and more cooperatives happening, such as theater, food cooperatives. So maybe it could be the case that land lease is shared between the Government, community, and developers to create a sustainable economy.

Capital Flow

Land Lease

Agency

Money Renters

Besides the upcycle system of material, it is the circular economy model that revive and support the local market. Granby Four Streets Community Land Trust purchase and hold the vacant land and property to involve investors like Private Social Invest Company Steinbeck Studio to put certain capital in. Then cooperate with Architecture Collective Assemble to revitalize the community by initiating several projects. After Assemble winning the 2015 Turner Prize, they reinvest the community by establishing the Granby Workshop. It is the Granby Four Streets CLT that enables the affordability to maintain in the area. So in China’s context, maybe a community lease trust could be introduced. That the community holds the land lease as a way to empower the residents to negotiate with developers and keep certain affordability for renters. Meanwhile, cooperatives between the government, community, and developers may be a way to involve different groups onto the platform. Sungmisan is a self-managed village in Seoul, South Korea. Here, the village is different from the village in Urban Village, it is not a geographic notion, but a local network of cooperatives.

Occupancy of the physical space in the community

Property Owners

Demolition, relocation and new development

Developers

Design firms/ studios may have to do generic designs under the commission of developers

Current Mechanism in Terms of Finance and Land Lease

Community Committee

Government

Agent of Initiator Public Space

The Government Policy Support and Capital Support

NGO

Agent of Activity

Community Added Value to the Neighborhood

Renters

Property Owners

Private Space

Help to build up platform for conversations

Planning Department • • •

Artists, or Small Business e.g. Architecture Studio

Educator Facilitator Moderator

Artists, Investors, or Developers

Reconstructed Relationships between Stakeholders

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Community Workshop During Spring Break,I went back to Wuhan, China and organized a workshop in Gejiaying Community with the residents, urban planners and officials from the community committee on 12th Mar 2018. We had fantastic discussions on the open spaces which the community plan focused on. The conversation started with discussion on how the spaces are being used currently. Most of the participants tended to pay more attention to the messy annoying parking bicycles or hanging laundries rather than green planting plots or communal space. Moreover, it was out of my anticipation that they tended to speak out their ideas than documented on post-its, which is quite different from what I experienced in US. After I introduced the cooperative ideas which we studied for the last semester and synthesized some ideas which could be adapted to Gejiaying Community, we explored alternative ideas drawing on the images of the current spaces. The residents were passionate to voice out their ideas as a way to contribute to the community that they lived in and loved. Though the cooperative ideas were difficult and abstract for them to understand, while they were talking their own ideas, cooperation between the government and artists from the nearby art schools were implicitly introduced and described. Another important treasure the residents valued much was the history of the community, as it was an important place to store military equipments and that politic celebrities met. The most discouraging point among the discussion, however, is the fact that residents and the community committee relied too much on the investment of the government as a catalyst, which actually was unknown till now.

Investigation of Current Use of the Space

Participants of the Workshop

Discussion on Cooperative Alternatives

The most interesting and contradictory conversations happened after the workshop among a resident, an urban planner, and the chief of the community committee. Each of them held literally different opinions, which not necessarily conflicted with each other, but none of them was willing to take into serious consideration of the others. 8min Video Documentation of the Workshop https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=eQQCPZq2eLg&t=2s

Discussion Canvas with Drawings Based on the Ideas of Participants

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Cooperative Explorations on Three Nodes Learning from the discussion on the workshop and the cooperative idea, it is of promising probability that the community could act as the agent of activity by the renters and residents who live in Gejiaying Community. The Community Committee, the most fundamental governmental branch, could serve as the media of coordination to financial or resource discussion of the community. The government, as well, could provide policy and capital support to accelerate initiative activities in the community. NGO, artists, small business, and developers, who are outsiders though, could contribute to the community by co-finance and co-design together with the residents. During this whole interconnected process, the Planning Department is supposed to act as an educator, facilitator, and moderator to curate and build up the platform for conversations and negotiations. The exploration of the above three specific nodes would hopefully become the catalyst sites to initiate cooperative ideas and disseminate the new cooperation paradigm in the community. The diverse stakeholder groups in Gejiaying Community, the residents, Community Committee, the government, and artists could work together and contribute to the community by co-constructing, co-managing, co-financing in the spaces which are rehabbed are appropriated into museum, kindergarten, community center, art studios, or community garden. With the networks gradually sprouting and connecting within the community, they are potentially able to reach out to a larger scale of development to a broad audience and connect to the surrounding communities and even more.

Intervention Proposals

Historical building 1st floor-kindergarten 2nd floor-residential of 16 units

Historical Site where a significant political event happened

Convenience Store

A Historical Site with a Kindergarten, Abandon Buildings and a Convenience Store

Collectively Managed Art Studios and History Museum

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Potentially rented to an artist

Add-ons Community Center

A Messy Open Space and Add-ons

Community Center and a House Rented by an Artist

Cooperative Community Farm/ Garden

Co-designed and Co-managed Open Space

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Exhibition at Miller Gallery The thesis was documented and exhibited in Miller Gallery from April 19th to 25th 2018. I organized the whole space as a mini mockup workshop by exhibiting the canvas which we used in the workshop on a hand-made table and a corner of renovation open space by rehabbing hanging laundry into a projection screen. Moreover, the diagrammatic models are embedded with the ideas of building up certain frameworks of cooperation alternatives, meanwhile leaving a certain level of possibilities and flexibilities. The informality and playfulness of the exhibition are aimed to suggest the limited interventions and control of urban designers, who are supposed to curate platforms to allow indigenous creativity sprout from the community by the negotiation and communication between different stakeholder groups.

Reference 1. Aureli, Pier Vittorio. The Possibility of an Absolute Architecture. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2011;2014. 2. Manzini, Ezio. Design, when Everybody Designs: An Introduction to Design for Social Innovation. Cambridge, Massachusetts: The MIT Press, 2015. 3. Al, Stefan. Villages in the City: A Guide to South China’s Informal Settlements. 1st ed. Honolulu: Hong Kong University Press, University of Hawaii Press, 2014. 4. Meadows, Donella. Leverage Points: Places to Intervene in a System. Hartland, Vermont: The Sustainability Institute, 1999. 5. Irwin, Terry. Wicked Problems and the Relationship Triad. In Stephan Harding (ed.), Grow Small, Think Beautiful: Ideas for a Sustainable World from Schumacher College. Edinburgh: Floris Books. pp 232–257, 2011.

Exhibition at Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University

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RESILIENT POROSITY Time: 09/2016 - 12/2016 Contribution: Proposal of concept, part of modeling, rendering, hand sketches Collaborators: Tamara Ariel Cartwright | Ankita Patel Tutor: Prof. Stefani Danes | Prof. Stefan Gruber, Carnegie Mellon University

This project imagines a city that allows us to gain experiences in many different places, and with many different people. Spatially speaking, this implies blurring edges, rethinking boundaries and allowing for more porous transitions between in- and outside. Such spatial qualities are not new to East Liberty, but in fact result from careful observations of the existing urban milieu. The project ‘Resilient Porosity’ aims at enhancing the existing structure of East Liberty by providing a network of public spaces where people of different classes, races and interests can mix in small scale neighborhood clusters. The project proposes a fine grain urban fabric capable of absorbing a wide variety of programs, building types, and building scale. Thus it evenly diffuses and redistributes large scale retail prevalent in East Liberty across the neighborhood community. The proposed field condition emerges from the meticulous aggregation of building and green space typologies according to a specific set of rules. Given the underlying relational character of the project, the configuration presented here should be understood as one of many possible versions, able to adapt to different forces throughout the planning and implementation process.

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RESILIENT POROSITY

CREATING A MICRO CITY THROUGH POROUS CLUSTERING


SUPERBLOCK During urban renewal in the 1970s, superblocks were introduced to East liberty in order to segregate pedestrian from automobile flows. Meanwhile the lack of building density within the superblocks also led to vast open, undefined and often neglected public spaces. Currently the concept of superblocks is being reconsidered in a much denser urban context: in Barcelona multiple urban blocks are combined into a superblock closing off the interior roads to through traffic. Inside the superblock traffic is slowed down to 10 mph in order to create pleasant streetscapes that prioritize pedestrian experiences. Taking inspiration from Barcelona our proposal reimagines the existing superblocks as and opportunity to create a more walkable neigborhood.

POROSITY In the past, East Liberty was subject to divestment and shrinking, leaving many vacant lots in between existing building. Our proposal reinterprets the resulting porosity of the urban fabric as a potential asset for creating a fine grain network of public spaces punctured by buildings of varying scales, and a mix of market rate and affordable housing.

DIVERSITY The existing diversity of building scales and uses is essential to East Liberty’s vitality, as it attracts different socio-economic classes and a variety of commercial opportunities. Our proposal aims at maintaining such diversity, while further integrating and evenly distributing buildings and programs of different nature and type. Accordingly the master-plan is based on a wide variety of building and green space typologies.

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BUILDING TYPOLOGY

Micro Unit: Affordable, Adaptable, Community Structured, Compact. Multi-functional options for lower income residents, college students, artists, and maker spaces. Typical unit size: 593 sqft Total building floor area: 1,010 sqft Scheme infill: 6%

Single Family Unit: Increases homeownership. Provides stability for the neighborhood. Allows renters to grow within the neighborhood through rent-to-own home options. Typical unit size: 715 sqft Total building floor area: 1,430 sqft Scheme infill: 9%

Adaptable Single Family Unit: Increases diversity by attracting wealthier residents. Adaptable functionality- Large Family to extended family, Micro Unit Social Space, Neighborhood Cafe/ Market. Anchors corners of clusters and micro unit social spaces. Typical unit size: 1,315 sqft Total building floor area: 2,315 sqft Scheme infill: 1%

Double-Entry Apartment: Centers activity in cluster. Shared common spaces on first floor can act as community gathering space.

Small Scale Commercial: Commercial space for startups and smaller offices and retail.

Typical unit size: 2,300 sqft Total building floor area: 4,600 sqft Scheme infill: 3%

Row Houses: Affordable. Compact. Brings a cohesive design to the neighborhood that relates to Pittsburgh’s architectural identity.

Bar Apartment: Mixed used, Diverse options in apartment Corner Apartment: Anchor to super blocks and larger sizes to appeal to all renters. Provides good edge for clusters micro clusters, Bottom floor can be used as commercial and larger social spaces. or spacial spaces. Naturally forms an open plaza under pilotis.

Typical unit size: 2,400 sqft

Typical unit size: 4,600 sqft

Total building floor area: 7,200 sqft

Total building floor area: 23,000 sqft

Scheme infill: 6%

Scheme infill: 33 %

Typical unit size: 5,207 sqft Total building floor area: 20,828 sqft Scheme infill: 29%

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Large Mixed Use Commercial: Diverse layout options structured around a shared parking lot. Rethinks the ‘Big Box’ typology and mall strips. Typical unit size: 14,913 Total building floor area: 50,076 sqft Scheme infill: 13%

GREEN SPACE TYPOLOGY

Urban Garden: Smaller outdoor areas foster community and sense of ownership. Some units should front the space to increase safety, awareness, and upkeep, while other units may back up to it to give a sense of intimacy and privacy. This typology works best with smaller building scales.

Ball Courts & Plazas: A porous city can not support heavy masses without varying scales of open spaces. Larger open spaces must be programmed to support the culture and lifestyles of the neighborhood while also being programmed to attract regional visitors for economic vitality.

Informal Gathering: Cities and neighborhoods need flexibility to thrive. The medium scale green spaces allow community members to define the program within the space: tailgating, BBQ picnic, outdoor study room. This typology works best with smaller buildings fronting it.

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PARKING RELATIONSHIP

3.Public plaza at the corner of small blocks.

4. Shared parking along streets.

Parking is found on traditional single family homes and the double entry apartment where as larger apartments, mixeduse commercials and new micro unit typologies share lots.

TYPOLOGY DEFINING RULES

1.Zig zag minor roads within the clusters.

2 .Green spaces vary in sizes to form the porosity and support diverse building scale.

5.Single family homes located along streets for demand of parking.

6.Buildings vary in scale and use within the cluster.

7.Micro units cluster together to form a shared open space and co-operative community.

8. Big box is broken down into small cluster of buildings.

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RETHINKING THE BIG BOX : WHOLE FOODS

RE-IMAGINING THE NEW PENNLEY PLACE HOUSING

SECTION THROUGH NEW MEDIUM SCALED GREEN SPACE AT NEW PENNLEY PLACE

PROJECT METRICS Number of Parking : Building square footage: Food Demand Met :

240 41400 16

The project’s overall approach also mandates rethinking the “Big Box” typology and huge vacant parking lots. Thus we envision a new typology of big box retail, illustrated here for Whole Foods, that is not just a grocery store but also acts as urban plaza as it gradually dissolves into the surrounding neighborhood. The various sections of Whole Foods are laid out as individual pavilions connected by passageways and open to the city, thus breaking down the perceived scale of the retail area. The roof now is used for parking and a vegetable garden, hence providing more usable open space and re­ moving the large on street parking that disrupts the fine grain urban fabric.

SECTION OF PEN AVENUE AND NEGLEY PLAZA

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Location

Spatial Definition

GREEN SPACES IN MICRO CLUSTERS Within this system we begin to see how our rules structure the flow of spaces throughout the micro cluster. Different typologies are grouped together and the positioning of fronts versus backs begin to form green spaces of different scales.

Entrances & Paths

Ecology

Plaza at the corner of the block provides a destination and anchors activities in the porous city design.

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WEAVING THE URBAN VERTICAL CARPET Time: 08/2015 Contribution: Team leader, proposal of concept, part of digital 3D modeling, physical modeling, all images except the specified Collaborators: Hiroaki Murakami, Oita University, Japan | Minseo Cho, Kyungsung University, Korea Tutor: Prof. Shannon Bassett, University at Buffalo, USA Won Excellence Award of Busan International Architecture Design Workshop

The project locates in poor hillside villages in Busan, Korea, facing a dilemma of rejuvenation as other villages within the city. The villages possess meaningful historical endowments, however left with wrecks caused by wars; they are in desiring need of development, but isolated from the main city for a long time and lack of activation. Our strategy is to reconnect the sites within and with the outside by various methods: adding catalyst and vigor to beat the heart of villages in society level, just like weaving a vertical carpet to make connections. What we would like to foresee is that the villages thrive and survive in metropolitan with precious historical memories and traditional Korean characteristics as a livable community for refugees to spend their happy old age and a possibility of activation of the city in the future.


BEFORE

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SITE CONTEXT ABOUT SITE

• Fragmentation to the Outside

As the site has existed for a long time in history under circumstance of complex topography, historical events which have influenced it all the time that brought about its unique characteristics but also issues. As the collage at bottom shows, -- war refugees, -- hillside agriculture, -- informality with topography -- brilliant view of the port and the city, and -- and lonely residence are the main factors compose the site, they are thorny to handle, but of much possibility to be created.

CHINA

SITE LOCATION Convenient Transportaion Variety Topography The project sites in poor hillside villages in Busan, which is the second developed city, biggest port in Korea. The site faces towards Busan station, only 650m away, and has a good view of the port and sea. Plus, it back on a mountain which embodies External transan ecological garden and agriculture fields. portation line Internal transportation line

Easy Acces To Important Spots

Traditional livelihood and sceneries are losing with time passing by. Old conventions are no longer in much attention to compete with fast urbanism and are destroyed.

• Urban Declination

• Inadaptation to Paradigm Shift

Squatter settlements in low quality, most for war refugees, it was among the top 40% of declining villages in Korea.

A paradigm shift from a space-centered physical environment to a people-centered residential environment, however the area is undergoing the old-fashioned anti-sustainability developing pattern.

LONG TIME AGO

Unbalenced Demography >people External transportation line

External Site transportation line

Internal transportation line

Internal transportation line

Traditional Land Use

Major public gardens

Commercial

Government

Greenery

Busan

Choryang-dong was separated from Busan Station by the city’s main road that cuts across the old downtown area of the city.

CITIES NEAR JIYUAN HEINAN HISTORICAL MAPS AND PANORAMIC VIEW OF STATUS QUO

Residential

Korea

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN URBAN AND RURAL AREA • Disappearing of Historical Endowments

ISSUES

Site

YESTERDAY

Demography Japanese Settlements

18th CENTUREY

AGRICULTRAL AND THE SITE

1950S

Japanese Colony It was home of laborers who live on port URBANISM CONTEXT Factory architecture duringand thetemporary Japanese colonial period. Residential of low quality

Korean War

Economic Development

Residential of normal quality Residential of good quality Korean War Water

the Site

Site towards Busan Station

NOW Metropolitan

Unlicensed working class during the Economic Development Period housing here, made the place more complex, diverse and mess.

OF

drived people out to Southern part of Korea. It Agricultural plots became one of the settlements of war refugees.

1980S

The site locates at

TODAY

It was an obstinate place within Busan metropolitan, highly contrast to modern pattern, but still of its characteristics.

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STRATEGY GENERATION By analyzing circulation, public space and land use of status quo, accessibility to important spots and potential transformation spots as the follow diagrams show, strategy of (re)stitching and (re)connecting is proposed. Among analysis of status quo, the most important in our perspective, is potential transformation spots, such as place with good sightline, long steps and green space. By taking advantages of these areas, the sites could be transformed with holding its spatial characters that granted by time.

Circulation

Car Road Pedestrian Road Off Road Bus Stop

Public Space

Public

Private Gimhae Airport 9km

Ecological Forest Park 0.5km

Busan Tower 2km

Sight Point

Steps

Green Space

Busan Station 0.7km

Haeundae Beach 12km

Land Use

Residential Kindergarten Commercial Agriculture Residential with 1st Floor Commercial

Accessibility

CONCEPT: WEAVING THE URBAN VERTICAL CARPET Phase 1: Cracks between the city, mountain and the site.

Phase 2: Weaving the vertical carpet to make connection within the site and with the outside.

Phase 3: Adding catalyst to revive the whole site and make it as a start to activate the rest villages.

WEAVING STRATEGY - Sightline Connection - Vertical Circulation - Market Concentration Observatory Pedestrian Connection Market

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MATER PLAN

CIRCULATION

SECTOR

OBSERVATORY 1

Museum of the City Look-out Observatory at Dea Chung Ecological Park

OBSERVATORY 2

The Mang Yang Road Look-out Observatory

OBSERVATORY 3

Community Pocket Park Look-out Observatory

3

Ma

GREEN SPACE

ng g R o ad Yan

1

2

ACTIVITY

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WEAVING ELEMENTS

WEAVING STRATEGY

3. Transmiting green down from the mountain

Observatory

Community Path

Pocket Shelter

2. Connecting with pedestrian bridges and elevators

Sightseeing Path

Elevator

1. Following the hillside trend

SITE Ob

s erv a t o r

y

Ob

s erv a t o r

y

o S c h ol

sa Bu

n S t at

io

Op

e ra H o us

e

n

n

C

hina Tow

SECTION ALONG THE MOUNTAIN 23


After stitching within the site and guaranteeing convenience for local residence, how to provide more possibilities to activate and maintain the vigorous is the key goal. We try to come up with new combination after investigation of the activities of local residence and tourists, aimed at adding new catalysts, but not disturbing the local life.

6.00

10.00 13.00 16.00 19.00 22.00

Resting More

Less

Chatting Fitting Saling Shopping Chessing

NOW

INTENTION

CREATIVE COMBINATION

Agriculturing

TOURISTS

ACTIVITIES OF LOCAL RESIDENCE

Walking

NOW

COMMENSAL HARMONY ALONG THE STEPS

COMMENSALISM BEWEEN LOCAL RESIDENTS AND TOURISTS

INTENTION

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REVIVING TIANGANG ONGOING ECOLOGY Time: 04/2014-05/2014 Contribution: Team leader, proposal of concept, part of digital 3D modeling, all images except the specified, and presentations Collaborators: Geng Jia | Chen Shan Tutor: Prof. Wolf RĂźdiger Zahn | Prof. Chen Tian, Tianjin University Won Gold Award of the 4th International Landscape Planning and Design Competition

Tiangang Iron Mill is composed of three abandon factories in the city of Tianjin. Although the factories are derelict from the development in Tianjin, the embedded value of culture, history, environment is significant which are supposed to be recognized. During our investigation on site, the residents who live in the nearby communities are eager to having sports center and exercise places. As a result, we tailor the project according to potential users’ needs. In this project, we explore alternative ways to re-purpose the factories flexibly according to demand and need. For example, one factory is sliced into three parts, each of which are designated to different function. The space is renovated to an indoor gym with a racing field and a restaurant attached to it. Besides up-cycling and re-purposing the space, sustainable ecology is another important element, in which solar power, carbon cycle, and water cycle are three major resources that we explore to reconstruct a healthy and sustainable relationship between human and living atmosphere.

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By dataing and analysing the answers of elders, middle ages, youths, workers, emplyers, residents, etc. Top 3 willingness turn out to be: 1. Space and facilities for sporting and fitness 2. Schools 3. Better environment

Residential Area Villages

STEP 1:

STEP 2:

STEP 3:

Constructing public spaces and preserving original grid.

Transforming post-industry factories into fitness center and building new buildings.

Constructing bicycle path and outdoor sporting fields to form a fitness system.

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MASTER PLAN ELEMENTS OF THE COMMUNITY

POST-INDUSTRY FACTORIES Multi-function Exhibition Center

Rolls of Trees Plaza

Preserving existed factories and renovating them into public facilities and adding commercial functions.

Restaurants and Bars Fitness Center

RESIDENTIAL AREA Improving villages into better qualities and constructing ecological residential buildings.

Jogging Belt

COMMERCIAL AND BUSINESS BUILDINGS Waving Bridges

Eco-office

Transorming small brick buildings into retail shop and buidling eco business buildings to attract more people and activate the site.

Business Building

PEDESTRIAN ROUTES AND BYCICLE PATH

Bicyble paths

Water Route

Residential Building

HAIHE RIVER AND INNER WATER POND

QUANTITIES Gross Area Coverage Plot Ratio Greening Rate

Riverbank Garden

Bycicle path providing people with space for fitness and connecting the whole site together with pedestrian routes.

71.4ha 39.6% 2.3 24.3%

Traditional Village

Ecological Residential Building

Improving the existed pond into a recreation spot and coloful the living experience of the community.

GREENERY AND JOGGING BELT Providing people with comfortable jogging place in foggy Tianjin and a livable community environment.

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ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

SEASONAL ACTIVITY ORGANIZATION Open Space

JOGGING BELT SECTIONS

Public Lawn Picnic Field Cafe Playground Garden Boating Fountain Fishing Pond Flower Garden

Waterbank Perth

Outdoor Exhibiton Scluputure Garden

SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE RECYCLE Extra power released to activate ventilation Aborbing solar power

MATETIALS OF JOGGING BELT

Energy Recycle

HARD COVER Low Impact Cover

Brick

Wind generating elctricity

Stone

Concrete

Part of power generating electricity

Part of power sending buildings fresh wind through facilities

Purified rain water used as domestic water

Rain water collected at the top of the viewing tower

Water Recycle

SOFT COVER

Plastic

Rain water absorbed by plants and discharged to river

Wood

PLANTS

Trees

Shrubs

Grass

Water Plant

Flower

CO2 absorbed by plants

Ecological cycling in the garden

Air recycling within the architecture

Carbon Recycle

OTHER NATURAL ELEMENTS

Jogging Path

Water

Mud

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FACTORY RENOVATION

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

LAYERS OF THE BUILDING 1. Original factory

100m

313m

One main post-industry factory is transformed to fitness center with swimming pool, basketball fields, tennis fields, soccer field, extreme sports, etc. By preserving the nostalgic industrial atmosphere inside the architecture and adding modern sporting facilities, it can provide people with a unique sport experience in a wild and rough building. 2. Adding pedestrian path LI N G

OC

K C LI M BI N

SO

CCER

RU

N NIN G

G

R

C YC

BASIC INFORMATION CONSTRUCTING DATE: 1950s LENGTH: 313m

3. Breaking into three parts by public resting space

WIDTH: 100m HEIGHT: 15m

3. Breaking into three parts by public resting space

4. Adding sports facilities

INTENTION PERSPECTIVE

SW

IMMING

DIVING

TENNIS

BA

SKETBAL

L

ELEVATION

4. Constructing hanging running race

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“DODO” HAMMOCK CLUSTER AND NAP MAP Proposed by: Stefan Gruber, Faculty, School of Architecture, College of Fine Arts (CFA); and Yidan Gong and Chun Zheng, Graduate Students, School of Architecture, CFA Inspired by the French children’s word for napping, “Dodo” creates a dedicated space for napping on CMU’s campus during the fall, summer and spring seasons, while promoting awareness for the benefits of sleeping on our campus. Stay tuned for details on the campus location for this innovative space! A corresponding Nap Map will also highlight the best spaces on campus to grab a snooze!

INSPIRATION FROM MILITARY PARACHUTE

AXON

IDYLLWILD, CALIFORNIA

VIEW FROM THE PASSING TREET

VIEW FROM THE TENNIS COURTS

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OTHER WORKS 2013.08-10 ANCIENT ARCHITECTURE MAPPING OF DASHENGRONG TEMPLE, MINQIN, GANSU

Facade of Dashengrong Temple

Section of Dashengrong Temple

2012.05 ATTENDED COMPETITION OF CONSTRUCTION IN TONGJI UNIVERSITY ON BEHALF OF TIANJIN UNIVERSITY, WON BRONZE AWARD

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2013.04-05 DESIGN OF SALES CENTER

CALLIGRAPHY

CHINESE PAINTING

WATERCOLOR PAINTING

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YIDAN GONG Email: yidan.gong25@gmail.com Telephone: 412-880-8598 Address: 5030 Center Ave, Apt353 Pittsburgh, PA,15213

Yidan Gong Portfolio  

Urban Design and Planning Work Collections from 2011 to 2018

Yidan Gong Portfolio  

Urban Design and Planning Work Collections from 2011 to 2018

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