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LAST DAYS of JUDAS ISCARIOT

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Emily Nyokka, left, and Jackie Szymborski prepare backstage for a presentation of the Players’ Club’s latest production. Photo by Mihail Matikov

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STUDENT-RUN NEWSPAPER PROUDLY SERVING THE SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY SINCE 1927.

IN MEMORIUM

ALUMNUS DIES RESPONDING TO ROADSIDE CALL BY JUAN DE ANDA | juand@mail.sfsu.edu

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE HONOLULU POLICE DEPARTMENT

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Honolulu police officer and University graduate remembered as a dedicated member of fraternity and family.

ARRET DAVIS, 28, FATHER, devoted police officer and SF State 2005 alumnus, died Jan. 21 when his patrol car was rear-ended and burst into flames, according to the Honolulu Police Department. Davis stopped his car on Interstate Hawaii 1 to help a couple in a stalled vehicle. The 41-yearold driver of the truck was arrested for negligent homicide upon his release from the hospital, according to Honolulu Police Chief Louis M. Kealoha. Davis, known for his commitment to his studies and work and his fun-loving personality, was an entry-level officer. He joined the Honolulu Police Department July 1, 2008. His commanding officer, Maj. Moana Heu, described Davis as dedicated to his occupation. “He did more than just come to work and do his job; he did his best at whatever task was given to

him,” Heu said. “Garret’s death was especially difficult for me because he died on my watch. I count him among my finest officers.” According to his older sister, Amanda Stevens, Davis always aspired to go into law enforcement. “He had always wanted to be a police officer. It was always something he had on his short list of possibilities in life,” Stevens said. “He wanted to do something where he could help people every day and he didn’t want to be stuck behind a desk. It was his personality to be out doing things.” Davis was often described as outgoing, friendly and charismatic. He was a unique character, according to Stevens. “My brother was always quite the ham and very energetic and full of life. He was always helping out people and constantly caring,” Stevens said. “My SEE OFFICER ON PAGE 3

SEE BIBLICAL PAGE

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VOLUME LXXXXII ISSUE 2

Turning to college alternatives With rising tuition and a weak job market, students are often eyeing trade schools as faster routes into the workforce. BY BRIAN BALISI | bbalisi@mail.sfsu.edu

The rising cost of tuition and the constricted job market have many students considering enrolling in alternative institutions, like vocational schools. Lisa Westlund, a counselor at Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco, said there is no simple answer to give students who don’t know what to do after high school. Westlund said many recent students lack the desire and motivation to attend a four-year institution, but they are interested in other educational pursuits such as culinary school, beauty school or vocational school. “Students shouldn’t restrict themselves into thinking they have to go to a university,” Westlund said. “There are many possibilities out there, and sometimes it’s best for them to attend technical schools based on their financial situation or what their parents want for them.” SF State freshman Ana Duenas said she comes from a large family where everyone attended universities. “I had the support of my family to go to school,” Duenas said. “I was sort of pressured to choose SF State, but I love it because it’s really rich in culture and they have a good SEE SKILLS ON PAGE 2


02.01.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

2 CAMPUS

SF SPEAKS OUT WHAT ARE SOME CREATIVE WAYS TO SOLVE THE BUDGET CRISIS AT SF STATE?

Students could organize ways to fundraise money. I don’t know exactly what we could do but find ways so that students are part of it.

JOSE CHAVEZ,

UNDECLARED MAJOR

Swapping universities for skills CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

ethnic studies program.” ALHS college and career counselor Maria Martinez calls this a lazy generation that can dream big, but wants everything handed to them. They look for the quickest way to achieve a goal without having to put in the hard work, which is why vocational schools seem so appealing when they offer a two-year degree and prospect of quickly finding a job afterwards. “Most people today just want to pursue their career, so they enter into these private institutions,” Martinez said. “But they don’t understand that with a bachelor’s degree they can use it anywhere, compared to a degree from these other institutions, which are limited to that field.” Martinez said students who are quick, hands-on learners could be perfect for vocational schools. She said these schools have programs specially built for those kinds of students because the classes are so fast-paced.

Former SF State student Lashanna Cummings said she tried all sorts of institutions after she graduated from high school in 1996. She started her college career at Sacramento State University, then bounced around to other college campuses across California until she found herself at SF State in 2002. Cummings said after she completed her first semester, she was told that she would have to take certain classes over again after her transcripts were never received from other campuses. “(SF State) told me I basically had to do everything all over again,” Cummings said. “From that point I didn’t feel like starting over with SF State or any other university.” Cummings said her desire to be the first in her family to earn a college degree led her to attend DeVry University, where she will be graduating in October with a degree in business. “The feeling I’m going to get when I graduate will be comparable to child birth,” Cummings said. “It’s going to be one of my proudest moments, and I’m so excited.”

Miss Chinatown hopefuls seek cultural connection Despite a decrease in participation among University students in a popular Lunar New Year pageant, students still see it as an opportunity to contribute to their community.

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BY ANGELA RAIFORD | araiford@mail.sfsu.edu

They built a new fountain down by The Village and it’s beautiful, but I think we could be cutting down on things like that that are rather extravagant.

MORGAN SHINGLE, SOCIOLOGY MAJOR

I think they should figure out what students want instead of just making random classes available. There’s also a lot of money wasted. I don’t know where but I guess in like clubs that people don’t really go to; not a lot of people use them.

DIANA CHANG,

HE WINNER WILL not only win $10,000, but will ride on a float Feb. 11 during San Francisco’s Chinese New Year parade, the biggest celebration outside of Asia. They will also become a goodwill ambassador for the Chinese community throughout the Year of the Dragon. Continuing an established tradition in Chinatown history, a select group of Chinese American women will be competing in the Miss Chinatown USA pageant Feb. 4. Promoting Chinese culture and heritage, the annual event developed into a national contest in San Francisco in 1958. The pageant has not, however, become a tradition for many Chinese American students from SF State. Last year there were two contestants from the University, including Anita Wong, a business major, who secured the Fourth Princess title after a lastminute decision to enter. “I wanted to get a better taste of what it was like to be a part of such a historical event for San Francisco,” said Wong, 22. “I’ve always wondered since I was a little girl what it would be like to be a part of a pageant.” Each year, the Chinese Chamber

of Commerce invites organizations and colleges to send in their Miss Chinatown USA nominees. The search extends all the way to Hawaii, the hometown of 13 former winners, according to Audra Lynn Chen, content writer for Hawaii’s Chinese Chamber of Commerce. “The Miss Chinatown pageant has always been a big thing here,” said Nicole Leong, winner of this year’s Miss Chinatown Hawaii. “Here in Hawaii, the Miss Chinatown Hawaii produces two queens: Miss Chinatown Hawaii and Miss Hawaii Chinese.” Only 12 winners from the San Francisco area have been awarded the title crown in the past 53 years, with the last SF State student being Melissa Ng Mei Hang in 1992. This year there is one SF State graduate participating in the contest, Jenny Chin. A native of San Francisco, Chin graduated with a degree in child and adolescent development, and will be participating in the pageant for the second time. The decrease of participation from young Chinese American women from SF State reflects a much larger decline in Asian American students in their communities, according to Liberty Chui, an English and Chinese double major at SF State. “I am not in a place to say because I am not involved in pageants personally, but I do notice that Asian Americans

are not as involved in their community,” said Chui, 22. “Maybe it is the stereotypical Asian American outlook about being in a hybrid of two different worlds of traditions. There is the American one and the other Asian, and not having the ability to conjoin the two due to separate ideals or beliefs. Events within the community may be a wakeup call for us Asian Americans to start taking part in it.” Those who do take part in learning about their culture with events like MCU are able to feel more connected to their Asian American heritage. As fourth runner-up, Wong was invited as a guest, along with the 2011 court, to attend the Harrah’s coronation ball. She was also invited to the Hoi Ping Association and Wong Association dinners. With only one contestant hailing from SF State this year, Wong notes that the opportunity is one to be relished. “My grandparents are active members in the Chinatown community, (so) they were very excited that I was so interested in being a part of Chinatown’s culture” said Wong. “I’ve really learned to embrace the Chinese culture. It feels good to know that I was a part of my very own Chinatown history.” To purchase tickets for the pageant, contact the San Francisco Chinese Chamber of Commerce at (415) 9823000.

CIVIL ENGINEERING MAJOR

CRIME BLOTTER

01.21 through 01.29

Cheers to the Freakin’ Weekend

I feel like oftentimes there’s this idea of we just need to do more with less. I think we need to start focusing on ways to actually get more resources for the University.

AMY CASSELMAN, ALUMNI, LECTURER OF ETHNIC STUDIES

REPORTING BY ELISSA TORRES PHOTOS BY GODOFREDO VASQUEZ

What better way to celebrate the end of winter break than having a few drinks in the Student Services building? That’s what one thirsty, underage college student did before a police officer cited her Jan. 21. Apparently, the excitement of a new semester was too much to bear and she just had to pop open a bottle with faculty nearby in the Bursar’s Office. Bottoms up!

Red Eye Gone Wrong

UPD responded to complaints by a Towers resident who nearly went blind after being the unlucky recipient of numerous lasers aimed at his eyes from a mysterious location. The victim chose not to press charges after the assailants were identified. He may not have known, but the antagonists were in the midst of a Star Wars battle. Clearly, the force was not with them.

Compiled by Xpress Staff

Pencil Thief Not the Sharpest

An SF State student was cited for shoplifting in the Bookstore Jan. 27. Seemingly intimidated by more extravagant items like highlighters and plastic-coated paper clips, the student slipped several dozen pencils into his pockets before attempting to make a run for it home to presumably add to his pencil fort (is there any other reason to steal two dozen pencils?). The alarm screamed as he walked through the door with almost $10 worth of unpaid pencils.


CAMPUS 3

| 02.01.12

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OFFICER REMEMBERED FOR WORK ETHIC, POSITIVITY

MILESTONE: Garret Davis at his SF State graduation May 2005. Garret graduated with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. Photo courtesy of Amanda Stevens

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

brother was loyal, loving, funny, sentimental and one of my best friends.” The last time Stevens spoke with her brother was the week prior to his death. In that conversation, they discussed reunion plans for May so that the family would be together. His parting words were habitual, but now bring pain to Stevens. “He always said ‘I love you’ when we finished talking, but it wasn’t like he knew he was going to die,” Stevens said. “He always called me ‘sissy’ and he said, ‘Bye sissy. I love you,’ and he went off to work. I never thought that was the last time I would hear him say that to me, ever.” Davis was born in Toledo, Ohio, May 23, 1983, but moved with his family to Folsom, Calif., in 1991. He was a 2001 Folsom High School graduate. Davis graduated from SF State in 2005 with a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice. “He had actually started at San Francisco State to study in the film program, and he was doing a criminal justice minor,” Stevens said. “He was in a criminal justice class where somebody spoke one day and he was so moved by this testimony that from that day on he was determined to be a police officer.” While attending SF State, Davis was a Pi Kappa Phi fraternity member. “Our brotherhood is very strong and he was a solid asset to this fraternity,” friend and fraternity brother Blake Cohlan said. According to Cohlan, Davis was considered the class clown of the group and was always fun to be around. “One of my favorite memories of him was staying at his house the night before Bay to Breakers,” said Cohlan. “After a party we went to bed around 3 a.m. and woke up at 6 a.m.,” Cohlan said. “(He was) decked out in pirate attire, we took the bus downtown. (We) met up with the other guys, and just had such a fun time.” But aside from enjoying college life to its fullest, Davis knew when to buckle down and balance work and play. According to Jeffrey B. Snipes, chair of

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the criminal justice department, Davis was a valuable asset in the classroom and showed potential for success. “I had the pleasure of having Garret in two of my classes in Fall 2004. Not only was he an excellent student, but his enthusiasm and always upbeat attitude made for a great classroom experience for everyone,” Snipes said. “He was a very conscientious person, and I knew that he would make an excellent police officer. It is so unfortunate that his life has ended at such an early age.” Another fraternity brother, Matthew Schneider, also remembers Davis this way. “He was a very kind and respectful young man who smiled a lot, so I was not surprised to learn a few years ago that he had become a police officer,” Schneider said. The Pi Kappa Phi fraternity alumni organized a fund to help out with travel and funeral costs for his family, according to Cohlan. Within two hours they were able to raise $1,000, and they have raised more than $4,000 as of Jan. 26. The money collected will also be placed in a fund to aid his three-and-a-half year old daughter, Mackenzie. According to Stevens, the daughter hasn’t been told that her father died. “Her mother feels that she is too young to comprehend what is going on and too young to understand the magnitude of what’s happened,” Stevens said. “When she eventually does ask who her father was, she is going to know that she was the apple of her father’s eye, that he loved her very, very much. We are making a scrapbook with people who knew him to write letters to her so that as she grows up, she can know what an amazing man her father was.” There will be a memorial service in Honolulu Feb. 7 and another one Feb. 11 in Sacramento. To help out with the funeral donations visit http://www.giveforward.com/garretdavis?t=2. Davis is survived by his sister, Amanda Stevens; his mother, Rhonda Davis; and his daughter, Mackenzie. Additional reporting by Jessica Schimm.


02.01.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

4 CITY

Video jockeys move on to new beats

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BY BRIAN BALISI | bbalisi@mail.sfsu.edu

USICIANS TODAY RELY heavily on the Internet to become the next big thing, but think back to a time when YouTube stars didn’t exist and blogging seemed like a foreign language. In 2002, a television show called Distortion 2 Static was created to highlight some of hip-hop’s biggest stars as well as up and coming acts. The show provided viewers a chance to observe their favorite artists in a sit down interview in a setting similar to Yo! MTV Raps or BET’s Rap City. But after 10 years on the air, producers of the show and SF State graduates Halline Overby who goes by DJ Haylow, and Ariel and Aries Nuñez (aka Rel and Prince Aries), decided to end their long run last November. Although the show is over, Aries said he appreciates SPINNING: Aries Nuñez (aka Prince Aries) DJs at 111 Minna Jan. 27. Although Distortion 2 Static, with DJ Haylow and Rel, is over, hip-hop is everything D2S brought for the group. All members have still a big part of Nuñez’s life. Photo by Andrew Lopez different projects going on, with each project sharing some type of aspect from the show that brought them fame. throwing events or selling merchandise, always went back into funding the show. Aries is deejaying more events and developing mixtapes, Ariel has an online show “We definitely did the show out of the love of doing it,” Aries said. “It didn’t matcalled Conceited Bastards that focuses on lifestyle, and Overby, along with Ariel, is working on the Ron Ayers Project, which documents the famed jazz musician Ron Ayers ter that we were coming out of pocket with our own cash because we knew we had to invest in it.” and his influence on today’s culture. Overby said Distortion 2 Static was a true grassroots passion project. He remem“We compromised a lot for that show,” Aries said. “But it was the love and that pasbered how he felt the first time the show aired back in 2002. sion for it that never let us give up. We accomplished everything we wanted with it and “I looked out over my balcony thinking that all these houses have a chance to watch now we just have to find the next big thing.” our show and I realized how big our reach was,” Overby said. “We knew we were Aries said he knew they had a constantly growing fan base with the Distortion 2 Static name, but he never realized how big it was until they aired their final show at club sacrificing for the greater good for hip-hop and the Bay Area. For that we had people’s respect and we knew we were doing a good thing.” Mighty in San Francisco. SF State history major Eduardo Daza Taylor, 23, said he enjoyed the show because “It was a very proud moment to see how packed the place was,” Aries said. “ I they were passionate about hip-hop and they paved their own way and told their own wasn’t sad because it felt like we were graduating and it was on to the next big thing.” narrative. Aries said the idea for D2S came from Ariel. Ariel at first wanted to do a variety “They were true entrepreneurs and hustlers in the game. It’s really sad that the show, but the focus then changed to showcase the attention starved hip-hop scene. Aries show ended because it was one of the last organic shows out there staying true to their then joined Ariel and Overby to develop D2S after they earned a late-night time slot on message,” Taylor said. “Their contributions make the show legendary status in the Bay public access television. Area.” “The first show was weird. It was just a bunch of clips cut together. There was no Overby said that with the accessibility of the Internet, television doesn’t have the structure, but it was all just for fun,” Aries said. “No artists really cared to mess with power it used to. us until we got picked up by a Warner Brothers affiliate then we had to get a little more “Television is becoming archaic,” Overby said. “YouTube and blogging changed the structure with the show.” game on us. Those things, along with our late night time slot, started to affect Distortion Aries said the three of them funded everything for D2S, with Ariel even taking out 2 Static.” a student loan to purchase a camera. Any extra income they made from D2S, either by

Keeping a spotlight on relief effort Local group focuses on helping to fund long-term rebuilding efforts after Japanese tsunami through sales of their specially-designed T-shirt. BY KELLY GOFF | kfoff@mail.sfsu.edu

In a tranquil apartment in Hayes Valley, a small side table topped with perfectly-folded T-shirts packed carefully away in a plastic container serves as a daily reminder that more than 7,000 miles away in Japan, daily life for many tsunami survivors is anything but tranquil. While the international spotlight may have faded from Japanese relief efforts, Wyatt Sweet, 27, Emily Schwartz, 26, and friend Kamiu Lee, 26, are continuing fundraising efforts through their small initiative, Tees for Japan. “It can be many years before a country is kind of up and running (after a disaster) so part of our job has been to keep informing people of what the situation is there and that people are still in need of help,” said Sweet, an SF State alumnus. Mostly a word-of-mouth effort, their fundraising is built around a simple gray T-shirt, emblazoned with a bright red emblem created by Schwartz, who by day works as a graphic designer. Schwartz said that she was aiming for an idea “that isn’t so literally depicting that it’s connected with a cause, but is cool, that is something that people want to wear, but that is representative of the cause.” The result is an image of chrysanthemums taking the shape of the round, red circle that dominates the Japanese flag. “You know, it’s clear. Maybe some people get it and some people don’t, but it has a connection, I think, that is

reminiscent of Japan. But, it’s not necessarily so literal… A lot of people seem to respond positively to the design,” said Schwartz. Roughly $11 from every shirt sold is donated, as the group has managed to keep costs low by doing all the work of marketing their charity efforts and packaging the product by themselves. Operating out of PHILANTHROPIC: Emily Schwartz (left) and Wyatt Sweet hold up the shirts they design Schwartz’s apartment, with Sweet living and sell for Japanese relief. All net profits from each sale go directly to charities to support just downstairs, has given them the flextsunami victims. Photo by Gil Riego Jr. ibility to keep up with orders before and after their day jobs. management and operations for SHINE, said that the Lee, who works as a financial analyst money raised by Tees for Japan goes toward a new phase in New York, has been a friend of Schwartz since they of the recovery effort. attended Boston University together. She primarily deals “We will be providing funding for five months for with the finance end of the effort, although she has also Youth for 3.11, a nonprofit Japanese organization, that has kept a small stock of shirts in New York for friends and been sending undergraduate and graduate youth volunco-workers interested in helping. teers to the disaster sites since the earthquake for providThe group has partnered with SHINE Humanity, a ing services such as debris cleaning, offering academic Southern California-based non-profit, as means to donate help to children, social events for the survivors, etc. We the money they raise. will be applying the funds from Tees for Japan for this “Obviously we thought about the American Red phase as we feel there is a great need still for volunteers Cross, which is the biggest,” said Lee. “But we found you don’t know where (money) is going – it’s always to a and this organization is providing a valuable service to the community of survivors,” said Hassan in an email. good cause, but we wanted to know more. SHINE is very Lee said that since they began the initiative last year, small and flexible. Because we’re small, it was easy to Tees for Japan has made one donation of $800 to SHINE, work with them.” and that they are “hoping to make another donation before Seema Hassan, director of administration, program the end of this quarter.”


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CITY 5

| 02.01.12

MUNI CHARTS A NEW COURSE San Francisco transit is slated to undergo changes for the upcoming America’s Cup to make the wharf more accessible to pedestrians. BY KATHERINE YAU | kyau202@mail.sfsu.edu

SEX COLUMN THE sNS & OUTS ABYWEEKLY CASSIE BECKER

An orgasm a day keeps the doctor away

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COURTESY OF THE SAN FRANCISCO MUNICIPAL TRANSPORTATION AGENCY

While a trek to and around San Francisco often includes a pricey gas bill or an elaborate goose chase of Muni stops and BART rides, local city slickers will soon enjoy a wider range of public transportation options that will herald economic and environmental benefits. The San Francisco Municipal Public Transportation Agency plans to extend public transportation to funnel the influx of foot traffic during the America’s Cup races summer 2013, with test runs of the new lines this summer according to SFMTA Urban Planning Initiatives Manager Peter Albert. “The goal is to avoid congestion on the waterfront, giving people the right informa-

tion and giving them incentives to come in anything but a car,” Albert said. “Safety becomes the issue with hundreds of thousands of people coming to the races.” Changes include implementing bike rental stations where people with a membership may rent, ride and drop off bikes at certain destinations. A new bike lane by the waterfront will also be installed along with supplementary car garages and additional bus stops. Old trains and tracks will be brought back into action for a new E line that will run from SEE SFMTA ON PAGE 9

HAT LATE-NIGHT rendezvous with a stranger didn’t go quite as planned. It’s too late to bait another, and you’re too fired up to sleep. Sounds like someone has to take care of their own business. People like to think that it’s their personal dirty little secret, but 91.8 percent of men and 76.8 percent of women aged 20 to 24 admitted to the 2010 National Survey of Sexual Health and Behavior that they have masturbated at least once in their lifetime. Why wouldn’t you? The perks of masturbation are endless, starting with zero risk of STDs and pregnancy. The masturbator can get as creative as he or she wants from fantasy to masturbatory implements, including a lubed up toilet paper roll or pool floats for the guys and a back massager or a turkey baster for the girls. In a real pinch, pretty much any appropriately-shaped household item will work, in addition to anything that vibrates or grips. According to “The Good Vibrations Guide to Sex,” there are numerous health benefits to make masturbation a healthy part of your routine of taking care of yourself. For the ladies, there’s freedom from menstrual cramps and a decreased likelihood of yeast infections. For men, there’s a reduced risk of prostate infections

Since breaking up with her inner prude, Cassie Becker has done it all. Her interest in sexual exploration has lead her to write several blogs and break even more beds. She’s extensively researched and written about it - all with a sexy smile.

and cancer. Both sexes can look forward to stronger pelvic muscles, which leads to better sex and masturbation in the future. Not to mention the stress relief, burned calories, released endorphins and the cardiovascular workout - all icing on the cake. Masturbation can also increase the ability to have orgasms. People can learn how they like to be stimulated sexually so that sex is that much better when it includes a partner, improving overall body image and self-esteem, according to Planned Parenthood. “When you masturbate, you’re getting to know your own body and you’re getting to know what you like and you’re exploring different things,” said 21-year-old Lauren Miner, psychology major and sexual health educator at SF State. The best news of all: it’s impossible to overdose or overindulge. The more the better, so have at it! Let yourself feel good. Yes, it’s indulgent. Yes, it’s selfish. But it’s not for anyone else; it’s for you! Give it to yourself, however you want it. Show yourself how much you care.

Contact Eva Charles 415.338.3133 echarles@sfsu.edu

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6 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

02.01.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

BAYVIEW-HUNTERS POINT DISTRICT This district’s high poverty and crime rates often overshadow its largely underrated food scene. Nevertheless, the Bayview-Hunters Point District contains a food oasis of distinct, homey soul food that’s hard to find anywhere else if you just know where to look.

SWEET TOOTH ON TRIAL: Stephen Frothingham, middle, rehearses his role as Judas in the Players’ Club production of “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot” Jan. 28. Frothingham, who is on stage for the entirety of the play, describes his role as exhausting but fulfilling. Photo by Mihail Matikov

BIBLICAL TURNCOAT GOES TO PLAYERS’ COURT

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BY DEVERY SHEFFER | dsheffer@mail.sfsu.edu

T’S A STORY OF BIBLIcal proportions, the trial of the ultimate betrayal. Judas Iscariot, the apostle of Jesus Christ, is notorious as the disciple who turned in his soon-tobe crucified leader to the authorities for thirty pieces of silver. The question of Judas’s motives takes center stage in the current production at the Studio Theatre. Paintings of dark, knotted trees engulfed the theater, an intimate venue and the setting for the play “The Last Days of Judas Iscariot,” a dark comedy chosen by SF State’s Players’ Club for their spring production. The Players’ Club is a student organization comprised of theater majors, that produces one full-length play each year. It is directed, acted and designed entirely by SF State students. The play, which originally debuted at the Public Theater in New York in 2005, takes a closer look at the New Testament character of Judas and the story of his controversial actions that eventually led to his suicide by hanging. The play is set in modern times. It’s a courtroom scene set in purgatory where one lawyer has chosen to defend Judas, who has been locked up in a catatonic state since he took his own life centuries ago. “There’s so much about Judas Iscariot. People have talked about him for thousands of years. He betrayed Jesus; he’s always depicted by the traditional Christian church as this horrible person,” said senior Stephen Frothingham, who was chosen to play the role of Judas. “I did a little bit of research; I read ‘The Gospel of Judas.’ It’s agnos-

University theater group brings Christianity’s most notorious traitor to a modern trial.

tic text so it’s a little bit different. They show (Judas) as a hero. He was the one who Jesus trusted and said, ‘You need to do this so I can ascend to my throne in heaven.’” Both of these perspectives of Judas are depicted by the various witnesses called to the stand in the play, including Mother Teresa, Sigmund Freud and Jesus. The role of Judas has been one of the most challenging ever for Frothingham. He is on stage during the entirety

THE LAST DAYS OF JUDAS ISCARIOT THURSDAY, Feb. 2 through SATURDAY, Feb. 4 7 p.m. STUDIO THEATRE located in the CREATIVE ARTS BUILDING

of the two hour play going back and forth from acting out flashbacks used as evidence in the court or posed perfectly still in catatonic agony. For Frothingham the role has been both fulfilling and emotionally exhausting. “I get into my sad place for it. I’ll be crying, there’s snot coming out, tears and drool and then afterwards I have to find my happy place so I go and listen to some music. I just have to recenter myself because it’s unhealthy other-

wise,” he said. Casey Worthington, senior, has been acting since high school, but this time around he is taking his passion for theater behind the scenes as director. The play was originally directed by Philip Seymour Hoffman, Worthington’s favorite actor, but this isn’t why he chose to propose the play to the Players’ Club. He chose it because he was attracted to the deep subject matter that is brought up in the script. “For me, what it really questions is fate and how much choice we have in our own lives, free will,” Worthington said. “Judas seems to have been chosen to do what he did and yet is it his choice to be in hell? What is free will? What is choice and what is fate? And which one controls the world we live in?” The students began practicing the play in the beginning of January, giving them just a few weeks to prepare for the premiere showing last week. As stage manager, senior Ben Calabrese is in charge of coordinating every aspect of the play and making sure it all runs smoothly. Despite the challenge of putting together a production during winter break, he is proud of what he and the rest of the students have accomplished. “There’s an art term called ‘mise en scene’ which refers to a whole picture where you have sets, lights, sounds, and acting that all come together to sort of an artistic punch that sort of hits you over the head, and we have fantastic people in everyone of those,” Calabrese said. The remaining shows will be this Thursday through Saturday at 7 p.m. in the Studio Theatre located in the Creative Arts building.

New ice cream shop serves up classic and custom malts, milkshakes and sodas, each with a handmade nod to the past. BY MATT MAXION | mmaxion@mail.sfsu.edu

With an authentic soda fountain nicknamed Dandelion and 1930s jazz and swing music playing in the background, the recently-opened Ice Cream Bar provides a distinctly vintage offering of house-made sodas and ice cream in Cole Valley. Owner Juliet Pries, who got her first ice cream maker when she was 6 years old, said the menu contains recipes from the prohi-

bition era. Pries designed everything else around streamlined deco from the interior to their old-fashioned appliances, she said. “Some of these recipes date back to the 1800s,” Pries said. “By bringing them back, people find it very interesting to experience something they’ve never had.” Pries read numerous reprints of old manuSEE ICE CREAM ON PAGE 9

QUEEN’S LOUISIANA PO-BOY CAFE HINT: Though they specialize in Louisiana-style Po-Boys, it’s their powdered sugar-laden beignets that fulfill this category. Pop one of these suckers in your mouth, and you’ll devour a dozen within seconds. 3030 San Bruno Ave.

CHEAP EATS

TACOS EL PRIMO

HINT: Find this food truck parked in the neighborhood’s industrial area to get access to their mouthwatering carne asada tacos or their tacos al pastor, each for a $1.50. It’s difficult to scout out, but once you find this gem of a taco truck, you’ll be coming back for more. Yosemite Avenue & Jennings Street

ROMANTIC

LIMÓN ROTISSERIE

HINT: The Latin lounge music and the warm hues of earthy tones permeating the restaurant definitely set a comfy mood. The newest of three locations in San Francisco, Limón Rotisserie introduces the complexities of Peruvian cuisine to this neighborhood. 5800 Third St.

WILDCARD

AUNTIE APRIL’S CHICKEN, WAFFLES & SOUL FOOD

HINT: It’s a match made in foodie heaven: fried chicken battered to a crisp with its white, juicy meat, paired with fluffy-onthe-inside waffles with a drizzle of maple syrup. This family-run restaurant melds these two elements together effortlessly. 4618 Third St.

AN XPRESS GUIDE TO DINING IN THE CITY. COMPILED BY EAST BAY DWELLER AND VORACIOUS FOODIE MATT MAXION, WHO ENJOYS WRITING ABOUT THE BAY AREA FOOD SCENE. HE IS ALSO THE SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR FOR THE GOLDEN GATE XPRESS.


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8 OPINION EDITORIAL

WE NEED MORE THAN SPARE CHANGE KELLY GOFF

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu

SARA DONCHEY

ONLINE MANAGING EDITOR sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

SCOTT GRAF

PRINT MANAGING EDITOR sgraf99@mail.sfsu.edu

GODOFREDO VASQUEZ

MEDIA EDITOR gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu

NATALIE YEMENIDJIAN ART DIRECTOR nataliey@mail.sfsu.edu

MICHELLE OLSON

ONLINE COPY CHIEF maolson@mail.sfsu.edu

CASSIE BECKER

PRINT COPY CHIEF cassbeck@mail.sfsu.edu

TAMERRA GRIFFIN

CAMPUS EDITOR tgriffin@mail.sfsu.edu

LISA CARMACK

CITY EDITOR lcarmack@mail.sfsu.edu

HUNTER MULICH

A&E EDITOR hunter@mail.sfsu.edu

KC CROWELL

OPINION EDITOR kcrowell@mail.sfsu.edu

KEALAN CRONIN

SPORTS EDITOR kealancronin@mail.sfsu.edu

KRISSA STANTON

BREAKING NEWS EDITOR kstanton@mail.sfsu.edu

HENRY NGUYEN

PRINT PHOTO EDITOR nenhenry@mail.sfsu.edu

GIL RIEGO JR.

ONLINE PHOTO EDITOR griegojr@mail.sfsu.edu

JUAN DE ANDA

ASSISTANT CAMPUS EDITOR juand@mail.sfsu.edu

ELISSA TORRES

ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR elissat@mail.sfsu.edu

MATT MAXION

SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR mmaxion@mail.sfsu.edu

Students watching President Obama’s State of the Union address perked up at the mention of the student debt crisis. If only he’d actually brought something new to the table. For someone who was elected on a platform of radical change, his take on the student debt crisis was unacceptably stale, but it is still reassuring that now there is finally some attention being paid to the this problem at the federal level. We have witnessed people at both the state and higher education levels attempt to stop the hemorrhaging, but these attempts are not sustainable -- especially when they involve slashing vital student services. The president emphasized that “states also need to do their part, by making higher education a higher priority in their budgets.” Nice sentiment, but as any student in California knows, this has not been viable. We cannot rely on the state of California alone to fix this crisis. It was only in December that the CSU, UC and community college systems each lost another $100 million of funding in budget cuts. Even though institutions have made drastic cutbacks on costs, those cutbacks have fallen squarely on the shoulders of students who cannot afford to lose resources. This must change. It is time for institutions to stop culling from the bottom up and start chopping from the top

KEN KOBRE

PHOTO ADVISER kobre@kenkobre.com

JUSTIN OROZCO

CIRCULATION jaorozo@mail.sfsu.edu

ARUN UNNIKRASHNAN I.T. CONSULTANT arun@mail.sfsu.edu

EVA CHARLES

ADVERTISING & BUSINESS echarles@mail.sfsu.edu

MONICA QUESADA

PRODUCTION ggxads@mail.sfsu.edu

WRITE US A LETTER The Golden Gate Xpress accepts letters no longer than 200 words. Letters are subject to editing. Send letters to KC Crowell at: opinion@ goldengatexpress.org

ABOUT XPRESS The Golden Gate Xpress is a student-produced publication of the journalism department at San Francisco State University. For more information or comments, please contact Kelly Goff at: editor@ goldengatexpress.org

down by eliminating inefficient administration systems and top-level salaries. The process of reforming student loans and eliminating student debt has to be much more radical than states budgeting more money for higher education.

OPINION

RACHELE KANIGEL

FACULTY ADVISER kanigel@mail.sfsu.edu

BY SARA DONCHEY

sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

Obama’s proposal to stop the interest rates on student loans from doubling in July is a start. This stems from 2007 legislation that greatly reduced rates on federally subsidized Stafford loans. Currently, that cut rate is set to expire in July. Interest rates on those loans would jump from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. Policy makers need to take some cues from those who are exploring drastic new strategies. Take the “Fix UC” proposal, drafted by a group of students out of UC Riverside. Their plan would require students to commit to paying 5 percent of their annual income for 20 years after graduating. This could possibly triple UC revenue in time. Is it viable? Would people actually agree to pay a small amount over time rather than go into debt right out of the gate? It is telling that one of the more innovative solutions on the table amounts to little more than indentured servitude. We need real, radical commitment. We need guarantees that interest rates on student loans won’t double this year. We need assurance that our services, classes, and faculty won’t be cut. We need leaders willing to work with states, colleges and students to form a real plan.

Taking on power to end abuse

A

BY MICHELLE OLSON | maolson@mail.sfsu.edu

LMOST everyone has heard the story of the Big Bad Wolf and Little Red Riding Hood. Of course, the Wolf has to be a boy and Red Riding Hood has to be a girl. This is the way we have been trained to think: The man is the perpetrator and the woman is the victim. These roles are played out over and over again in American society, especially in domestic violence cases. But these violent acts aren’t about gender, they’re about the power and control one feels when physically, sexually, emotionally or verbally abusing someone else. According to a 2010 survey by the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, one in four women were victims of severe physical violence by an intimate partner while one in seven men experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner. A recent case alleges that San Fran-

cisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi may have abused his wife, Venezuelan TV actress Eliana Lopez. Mirkarimi was recently charged with three misdemeanor charges after a New Year’s Eve incident. One of the charges included battery of Lopez. Another recent high-profile case illustrates that this issue isn’t about gender, but an abuse of power. Assistant District Attorney Sanaz Nikaein was arrested with her husband, Faysal Nuri, for suspicion of domestic violence, last Saturday after getting into a scuffle at their home. They were both released on bail. Let’s not forget that Nikaein works for District Attorney George Gascon, who is prosecuting Mirkarimi. Both of these San Francisco figures are paid to uphold the law. They are both innocent until proven guilty, but if they did hurt their spouses, they deserve a lot more than to be put on leave. They need to be punished like everyone else. According to the National Center of Women and Policing, studies show that at least 40 percent of police officer families experience domestic violence, as opposed to 10 percent of families in

the general population. Abusers are said to have a “Jekyll and Hyde” complex, which they can work to their advantage to make it seem like they would never do that. But domestic abuse is an unfortunate reality. Police officers draw even more advantage from being comrades with the men and women who report to the scene of their crimes. The victims of people in power face an even higher uphill battle. It’s vital to break the cycle of abuse, and by treating these cases the same it would be a message to abusers and victims that the system does work, no matter who you are. The cases of Mirkarimi and Nikaein are a chance to show domestic violence victims that they can fight and win. This could help give victims the strength they need to start a new future. We should not cast Mirkarimi and Nikaein as abusers, but the justice system has a chance to show that domestic violence is taken as a serious offense no matter who the defendant is. There is help. Go to Lacasa.org for help in San Francisco, or call (877) 5031850.


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GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

Ice cream goes retro

415-586-9400

VALUE MENU each Parkmerced/ SF State/ Ingleside $ 55Plus Tax

5

10” 1-TOPPING PIZZA

SALAD

TWO 2 LITER DRINKS

2 CHOCOLATE LAVA CAKES & 20 oz DRINK

Family of Louis Williams in search of any co workers that worked at the following facilities:

Treasure Island Naval Station Hunters Point Annex San Francisco, CA (1956-1976). Raychem Corporation Menlo Park, CA (1976-1980). Motorola Corporation (1980-1995) STIRRED: Chris Simpson works as a bartender at the brand-new Ice Cream Bar near Cole Valley, which serves custom desserts and sodas with an old-school feel. Photo by Mihail Matikov

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6

als about soda fountains in order to create an accurate, late 1930s look and feel to the restaurant. With some help from mixologist Russell Davis, who is a bartender at Rickhouse in the Financial District, the Ice Cream Bar boasts a hefty drink menu complete with more than 75 tinctures and fountain syrups ranging from usual flavors like vanilla and cherry, to more adventurous flavors like sassafras and candy cap mushroom. “We combine state-of-the-art techniques with old-fashioned style to provide you with a one-of-a-kind experience,” said Davis. By using newer methods like nitrogen cavitation, which is a hastened way of infusing flavors of dried herbs and spices into a tincture, a customer can request any off-the-cuff custom drinks they want, according to employee Anne Sauer. “Normally, it would take several weeks to get the flavor out of the spices,” said Sauer. “But with this, we can get it done in five minutes.”

Other menu highlights include malts and milkshakes, which are shaken with milk, egg yolks and ice—not ice cream, unlike the traditional recipe. The Too Good To Be True contains Pries’s house-made rye butterscotch syrup, two egg yolks, milk, malted cream and blackstrap molasses all shaken in a tin cup. They’re thinner than the traditional milkshake, but just as rich. The ice cream selection is wide and diverse: the roasted pineapple has chunky, yet smooth consistency; the Sicilian pistachio is creamy and nutty; the butterscotch is undeniably simple, with no-fuss sweet flavors. The Ice Cream Bar oozes with innovation, yet pays homage to art deco and the prohibition era. For those who haven’t heard of panacea, phosphates or lactarts, now is the time to indulge in these tasty, madefrom-the-base sodas. “I just want customers to experience having (drinks) mixed here, or having somebody make something in front of you with natural flavors,” said Pries.

ADDITIONAL MUNI LINES FOR AMERICA’S CUP CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

Caltrain to Fisherman’s Wharf, according to SFMTA spokesman Paul Rose. “We’re planning to start running later this year before the races in 2012 on the existing tracks we have in place and using our historic street cars,” Rose said. According to Albert, the costs of such an expansion will total $20 to $30 million, an end that will be met by fundraising and contributions from America’s Cup supporters. “This is barely enough to do all the things we need to do with the plan,” said Albert, who penned a document called the People’s Plan, which included all changes needed during the summer yacht races. Despite the cost, the event and additional ease of access is expected to impact local job creation and boost the city’s economy, creating lasting improvements to the transportation sector.

“We also believe that this will be an economic engine creating 8,000 jobs and bring as much as $1 billion to the Bay Area economy,” Albert said. “It should be a very good thing for San Francisco.” Even with the additional train lines looming in the horizon, some still believe public transportation to be more difficult than driving. SF State junior and broadcast and electronic communication arts major Hailey Johnson drives to her job at Pier 39 and doesn’t believe that will change with transportation improvements. “Honestly I would still probably drive,” said Johnson, who regularly pays $10 to $15 in parking fees for parking her car while she works. Regardless of how San Francisco natives feel about the impending America’s Cup and the changes to come with it, whether these changes will drastically alter the flow of traffic has yet to be seen.

If you have worked at any of these facilities please contact Mark Dowdy at 1-800-479-9533.

CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY NEWMAN CLUB St. Thomas More Church Father Labib Kobti, Pastor 1300 Junipero Serra Blvd. San Francisco, CA 94132

(415) 452-9634

www.stmchurch.com/newman email: newman@stmchurch.com Weekly Meeting, For Current Activities: Cesar Chavez Student Center: St. Thomas More: (415) 452-9634 Mondays: 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Close to campus! Please call Verbum Dei: (415) 573-9062


02.01.12 | GOLDENGATEXPRESS.ORG

10 S P O R T S PLAYER

KEENYA MCDANIEL

WEEK

TRACK AND FIELD

of the

Sophomore sprinter Keenya McDaniel has been chosen as the Xpress Player of the Week. McDaniel started out the women’s track and field season by tying the school record for the 60 meter run with a time of 7.7 seconds. In the same tournament, McDaniel helped bring the Gators to a fifth place finish as anchor leg runner in the women’s 4x400 relay.

PHOTO BY TYLER DENISTON/SF STATE SPORTS

GATORS’ SPORTS SCHEDULE

Wrestlers carry on family legacy

FRIDAY, FEB. 3 WRESTLING SF State vs. Cal State Bakersfield at 1 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.) SF State vs. Cal Baptist at 3 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.) WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SF State vs. Cal State Stanislaus at 5:30 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) MEN’S BASKETBALL SF State vs. Cal State Stanislaus at 7:30 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) SATURDAY, FEB. 4 SOFTBALL SF State vs. Western Washington at 12:15 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) BASEBALL SF State vs. Alumni Game at 1:30 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.) SOFTBALL SF State vs. Cal State San Marcos at 5 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) WOMEN’S BASKETBALL SF State vs. Chico State at 5:30 p.m. (Chico, Calif.) SOFTBALL SF State vs. Dominican University at 7 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) MEN’S BASKETBALL SF State vs. Chico State at 7:30 p.m. (Chico, Calif.) SUNDAY, FEB. 5 SOFTBALL SF State vs. Humboldt State at 12:15 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) SOFTBALL SF State vs. Cal State Stanislaus at 2:45 p.m. (Turlock, Calif.) WED, FEB. 8 BASEBALL SF State vs. Central Washington University at 2 p.m. (San Francisco, Calif.) WRESTLING SF State vs. Menlo College at 7 p.m. (Atherton, Calif.)

TAKE IT TO THE MAT: Zach Jimenez battles in a 7-5 victory against Cal Poly wrestler Sean Dougherty Jan 13. Jimenez’s 5-9 season continues to improve with a recent victory at a Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference tournament Jan. 28 at Adams State. Photo by Sam Battles

An early emphasis on sports has led Zach and Isaiah to devote their college careers to the wrestling team. BY SEAN DUFFY | scduffy@mail.sfsu.edu

Having a home wrestling gym, a father who coaches the local high school wrestling team and a world-class fighter for a mother, Isaiah, 21, and Zach Jimenez, 20, seemed destined to be collegiate wrestlers. Growing up in the Jimenez household, wrestling was ubiquitous. Their father, Simon, coaches wrestling at Palma High School in Salinas, Calif., and coached the brothers throughout their wrestling career. “We started competing around 9 or 10,” Isaiah said. “My COMEBACK THROWDOWN: Isaiah Jimenez struggles in his most recent victory at SF dad’s been my coach since I started wrestling. For middle school, high school, everything.” State Jan. 21 after recovering from a 1-0 deficit in the third period, winning the match on The brothers bring their family tradition of wrestling to a 5-2 count. Photo by Sam Battles this year’s highly-touted Gator wrestling team, with Isaiah Isaiah’s younger brother Zach is also a junior; though Isaiah is a competing in the 165-pound and Zach in the 184-pound weight year older, he red-shirted his freshman year so they have the same classes, respectively. eligibility. Zach has struggled recently, but hopes to improve his Though in different weight classes, Isaiah and Zach trained and season record of 5-9. watched film together growing up, fueling the family love of wres“It could be better,” Zach admitted. “Once the matches haptling from an early age. pen, you try not to let them dawn on you too much. You gotta look “When we were little we’d go in the workout rooms and mess forward to February and March for regionals and nationals.” around,” Isaiah said. “We would always work out and wrestle Despite an up-and-down season, the brothers and their teamtogether.” mates are preparing for their upcoming conference tournament, the Sports are rampant in the Jimenez family. Their grandfather Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference tournament, which deterwrestled competitively, as did several of their uncles. Their mother mines who does and does not go to the NCAA Division II National Anna competed in tae kwon do for a decade, during which she Wrestling Championships March 9 and 10. became a second-degree black belt and finished second in the “We gotta stay in the matches, all seven minutes,” Isaiah exTaekwon-Do World Championships. plained. “We can’t give up late when we’re tired.” “We kind of got pushed from an early age,” Isaiah said. “Our The Gators traveled to Phoenix for a dual meet over the weekwhole family has been involved in sports, (my dad and uncles) were end, losing to RMAC rivals Adams State 27-10, and Grand Canyon really successful in high school.” University 25-10. The brothers think that dual meets are good tests To supplement the wrestling season, the brothers studied tae both individually, and as a team. kwon do throughout their adolescence, competing in various tour“They’re important for regionals and seating,” Isaiah said. naments. Though not directly related to wrestling, Isaiah recalls the “They’re always tough.” competitions preparing him for tense moments during important The team is looking to halt a current five-game losing streak, matches. falling to 20th in the most recent NWCA Division II poll in the “It helped going to big events and venues and not getting too process. Isaiah recently fell out of the individual rankings in the nervous and shutting down,” Isaiah explained. “It helped in the 165-pound weight class, after beginning the season ranked sixth. competitive (side), being good and aggressive.” Though the team has struggled recently, the Jimenez brothers This extensive fighting background has culminated in Isaiah’s remain confident and focused on achieving their preseason goals. success, as he is considered the team’s best wrestler, compiling a “Goal number one is definitely (to) win the region. In my closet, 15-6 record so far this season. every day I go in there it says 184-pound RMAC champion on the “He’s probably our top kid,” said wrestling head coach Lars Jensen. “Recently he’s gotten beat in some close matches. He needs wall. And right underneath that it says national champ,” Zach said. to get in on his offense.” “That’s always been my goal.”


S P O R T S 11

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BASKETBALL

1,000 points and counting BY ALVARO ALFARO | aalfaro@mail.sfsu.edu

Surpassing a major achievement in points scored, third-year guard Nefi Perdomo sees his childhood dream of becoming a pro player within reach.

L

AST WEEK SF STATE JUNIOR shooting guard Nefi Perdomo surpassed the 1,000 point mark for his career total, becoming only the 12th player in the school’s history to reach this milestone. With 1,033 points under his belt, Perdomo moves into ninth place on the all-

time scoring list. Higher-level college players generally achieve this feat sometime during their third year of playing. Nate Robinson of the Golden State Warriors and Raymond Felton of the Portland Trail Blazers both passed the 1,000 point mark their junior years of college. Both NBA players abandoned their collegiate careers after their third year to play professionally, which is a dream Perdomo said he can hold out for. “I most definitely want to play four years at this school. It’s a dream to go play overseas; that’s a dream and a goal that I have set,” said Perdomo, a criminal justice major. “But that’s after the fact that I finish school.” Perdomo currently ranks top five in free throw attempts and three-point attempts in the school’s history. He’s made 316 field goals, 191 assists and 117 threepointers which are all top 10 in school history. Eighteen games into the season, Perdomo is averaging 16 points and four assists per game. If he continues to build on an already impressive career, he will put an even larger dent in the history books. As the team’s lead scorer, Perdomo poses as an offensive threat to any opponent. In the team’s most recent game against the UC San Diego Tritons, Perdomo had four assists and 19 points. “When you go to game plan against (SF State) you better start with Nefi Perdomo,” said UC San Diego head coach Chris Carlson. “I think the biggest thing for him is not so much focusing on what’s next. Focus on the now, focus on continuing to be a good player in the CCAA.” Perdomo’s skills have not yet peaked; he continues to grow every day. Head coach Paul Trevor said he sees Perdomo’s growth both on and off the court. “Over the time he’s spent here he’s really grown up and matured and become an excellent student as well as an excellent young man,” said Trevor. “I notice a transformation almost every day. He’s maturing; he wants to better himself on the court and that’s what makes him so successful.” Former shooting guard and teammate for two seasons Marquel Hoskins hasn’t seen a change in Perdomo’s natural disposition despite his growth. “Personality hasn’t really changed, he’s really the same,” said Hoskins. “But as far as leadership role, I can see him trying to get to that point.” Perdomo has been a shooting guard for the last three years at the University, but standing at 6 feet 1 inch, Perdomo will have to change his position to

PICKING UP THE PACE: Nefi Perdomo, #13, tries to pass a defender during a game against UC San Diego Jan. 28. Perdomo, the lead game scorer, contributed 19 points to the 56-45 win, which ended the Gators six-game losing streak. Photo by Hang Cheng

point guard in order for his dream of playing overseas to come true. Perdomo will have to embrace the leadership position as point guard, something he feels confident about. “Ever since I was old enough to grab a ball and shoot it, I had the dream of being a professional basketball player,” Perdomo said of his early aspirations. “I know that if I was to go overseas that I would have to change my position and become a point guard and I’m willing to do that. I think I’m very capable of doing it. I have the ball handling skill but I will need to work on it more.” It is not uncommon for players to change positions and find success. Former UCLA standout Russell West-

WRESTLING

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Jan. 28 SF State

LOSS vs. Adams State 10-27

SCORES FROM THE LAST WEEK OF GATOR SPORTS

Jan. 28 SF State LOSS vs. Grand Canyon University 10-25

LOSS

WIN

Jan. 26 SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 60-67 Jan. 28 SF State vs. UC San Diego 56-45

brook played shooting guard in high school as well as in college and made the move to point guard when he was drafted by the Oklahoma City Thunder. Trevor believes Perdomo has the tools to be a scoring guard, but is also capable of playing point guard. However, before Perdomo can make the change to the lead guard position there are a few things he needs to learn, including trusting and playing off of teammates. “What he runs into right now a little bit is he takes the world on his shoulders; he kind of wants to make the play that saves the team instead of trusting that we can all do it together,” Trevor said. “I think that’s one thing that he’s still learning about, and he’s getting better.”

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL WIN

LOSS

Jan. 26 SF State vs. Cal State San Bernardino 66-54 Jan. 28 SF State vs. UC San Diego 55-68

SOFTBALL WIN

Jan. 28 SF State vs. Alumni 7-6

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON GATOR SPORTS VISIT WWW.SFSTATEGATORS. COM


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Golden Gate Xpress Spring 2012 Issue 2  

The second issue of the spring 2012 semester of the Golden Gate Xpress.

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