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[X]press The Golden Gate Wednesday, May 18, 2011

VOLUME LXXXX — ISSUE 16

INSIDE:

Bay to Breakers PAGES 16&17


Campus

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Move out donations sought SPEAKS

SF STATE

OUT

Goodwill drive helps students and community

A weekly unscientific survey of SF State students.

By Brittney Barsotti bbarsott@mail.sfsu.edu

“What do you think is the worth of a bachelor’s degree today?”

In previous years, the massive move out from the dorms at the end of the year resulted in mounds of items spilling into the halls. “Everything was piled in the hallways, you couldn’t close the doors,” said Caitlin Steele, the sustainability programs manager at SF State. It was not until Jim Bolinger, the University property manager at SF State, looked around and saw that many of the discarded items could be recycled or repossessed. This year marks the fourth annual Give ‘n’ Go donation drive for a Sustainable Move Out at SF State. Partnering with Goodwill, San Francisco Food Bank and the Larkin Street Youth Center, SF State plans to divert more than 50,000 pounds of recyclable goods, preventing them from going to the landfill. Last year the organizations collected 49,000 pounds of recycled books, clothes and electronics, according to Michael Bongiorni, the donations manager for Goodwill. They also collected 1,000 pounds of non-perishable food, along with toiletries and cleaning supplies. “We at Goodwill are proud that students at SFSU see moving out as a sustainable event, not only to keep things out of landfills but to help provide jobs for the community,” Bongiorni said. Each year the clothes and books are collected and sent to Goodwill stores to be sold and recycled. “I chose to donate to the Goodwill because of the convenience,” said junior Alison Michael, a 22-year-old history major at SF State. “I had a lot of clothes and the bins were very accessible.” Michael said that the donation drive also helped her with SASHA TIVETSKY — [X]PRESS the moving process because she MOVIN’ ON OUT: Robby Castellino helps Elaine Lee move out of her SF State dorm and into a did not need to pack out as many new home May 16. Goodwill is coordinating an eco-friendly donation drive around the dorms. items. “Plus I feel better knowing that the clothes are going to a good Steele said. “The goal is to con- tails regarding the event at their cause,” Michael said. tinue the program and to educate mandatory end-of-the-year dorm THE BLOTTER According to Steele and Bon- students on how much better it is meetings. Campus crime log giorni, the project began when to donate their items instead of There will be a 48-foot donafrom the past week Bolinger noticed that several put into them into landfill.” tion truck located outside the of the items that students were In efforts to inform students Towers at Centennial Square on leaving behind were reusable. of the program and its benefits, SF State campus today from noon Officers responded to a call Soon afterward the partnership a Youtube video and webstory to 6 p.m., and also Thursday and of a man threatening to shoot with Goodwill began and the have been created in partnership Friday from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. another man near the Creative project has continued to grow with Goodwill. There will also be bins located Arts Building at a campus event and expand. Also, the University has sent around campus where students May 14. Police stood by to keep “It’s a great way for the Univer- out emails to all of the dorm resi- can donate clothing, books and the peace. No arrests were made. sity to support the local commu- dents. electronics. nity and organizations that supThe resident assistants in the Attendants will be available to port the city of San Francisco,” dorms have also announced de- assist students with the process. A vehicle was broken into in GOLDEN GATE the parking garage between 6 p.m., May 11, and 9:30 a.m., May 12. The total loss was estimated at $680. PRESS stretches from one side of the bay to the other. With the first runner Officers responded to a fire completing the race in 30 alarm that was activated on minutes, the rest of the day was May 12. Upon inspection, they dedicated to the culture of Bay learned that a malfunctioning to Breakers where by 10 a.m. it transformer in the basement transformed into a full-blown electric room of Centennial Vilcity-wide dance party. lage was giving off smoke that — Gil Riego Jr. set off the alarm.

Reporting by Brittney Barsotti, Photos by Gregory Moreno “To be at the higher end of the socio-economic class you need a higher degree.” Edelyn Araga, undeclared, sophomore, 18

don’t want you.”

“ If continuing in school, it can be great. But, you can become overqualified for some jobs and then they

Dori Dunning, alumuna, 23 “It gives you the opportunity to go to school for something else. Any degree can be a positive thing to have.” Colton Long, sculpting and painting, senior, 22 “You got to step up or a BA in something amazing.” Tristan Medina Asian American studies, junior, 20

“I doesn’t matter what the BA is in, it’s the skill set that the individual takes with it and applies to what they do.”

Devian Reyes, studio painting and drawing, sophomore, 19

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Experiencing the 100th Bay to Breakers

T

he 100th annual Bay to Breakers has come to be known as one of the most interesting races in the country. At 7 a.m. athletes and citizens fill the streets of San Francisco to run, jog, walk and drink their way across the seven-mile course that

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Wednesday, May 18, 2011

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CULTURE La Raza commencement

Celebration embraces heritage By Natasha Artavia nartavia@mail.sfsu.edu Excited chatter echoed through the hall as students, decked out in royal purple and gold caps and gowns, waited somewhat impatiently for their ceremony to start. The faint aroma of incense wafted from inside McKenna theater and the voices of excited family members and friends could be heard in the distance. The 31st annual Noche de La Familia, Night of Family, a graduation ceremony hosted by La Raza Student Organization for all Latino students, took place on May 21 to add a cultural and personal touch to the graduation celebration. As friends and family, including parents wearing carnations pinned to their clothes, filled the rows and seats of the theater, a picture slide show of the graduates played silently on the large screen that hung down on the stage. As each new graduate appeared on screen, cheers erupted from somewhere in the crowd. As the lights dimmed, a collective cheer, backed by honks of vuvuzelas and airhorns and the rattle of maracas, filled the theater. “I feel, being Latina, we really value our families in celebrations like this,” said Claudia Pocasangre, 23, a creative writing graduate. Pocasangre, who is of Guatemalan descent, is the first in her family to graduate from college. Although she walked the stage at the larger commencement last year, the feeling of being personally recognized for her achievements was not there. The event was open to all of the 850 Latino SF State students in the class of 2011. Many of the students who chose to participate in the celebration did so not only to take pride in their culture, but to take pride in the spirit of family. Noche de La Familia allowed families to see their sons and daughters cross the stage, accept their diplomas, and hear their names and degrees called out. The ceremony also allows family members who are not fluent in English to be a part of the celebration by providing the program in both English and Spanish. “It’s more personal,” said Jorge Rojas, 22, a criminal justice graduate of Mexican descent. This year, the keynote speaker was labor activist Dolores Huerta. Huerta is known for her activism within the

ERIK VERDUZCO — [X]PRESS

PRIDE: SF State graduate Noemi Hernandez hugs her uncle, Juan Torres, after Noche de la Familia, the La Raza Student Organization graduation ceremony for Latino students at McKenna Theater May 21. Latino community, including helping to organize and cofound the United Farm Workers Association with Cesar Chavez, a leader in the grassroots movement to unite all farm workers within the state of California. Huerta, who is a major leader in the Latino community, spoke to the graduates about the gloomy situation forecast for the economy and education. However, she encouraged students and all Latinos to continue their activism, and not just give back to their communities, but return to their communities. Along with the keynote speech by Huerta, the ceremo-

ny also included words by District 9 Supervisor David Campos and a commencement address by student speaker Nayeli Ceja. Ceja, a member of La Raza Student Organization graduating with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology, stressed the importance of the bonds that were established among the class of 2011 during their journey to graduation and to not lose sight of their goals. The celebration was also filled with cultural songs by Ye Ye Suarez and ballet folklorico performances by Ballet Folklorico Alma de Mexico.

A mother’s hard work pays off

After being encouraged to attend college at a young age, graduate credits family support By Jennifer Terman jterman@mail.sfsu.edu East Los Angeles, with its graffiti-lined streets cluttered with cars in its high afternoon sun, known to be dangerous at nightfall, created a rough environment growing up for liberal studies major Edith Ramirez. But from a young age, Edith’s single mother and aunt pushed her and her cousins to get out of the harsh streets and in to college. “Since we were little we were told ‘go to college,’” Edith, 24, said. “It wasn’t an option for me, it was something I had to do.” This is not the expectation for most lower-income families whose main priority is to get a job and have a family, accord-

ERIK VERDUZCO — [X]PRESS

SUCCESS: Ramirez, 24, hopes to show others from that college is possible.

er events and dances,” Bracy said. “The fundraisers raised a lot of money for the school so the school would give us discounts. Our tuition per month was like 25 percent (of the regular tuition rate).” ing to Edith. After high school, Edith went to Santa “For other families it’s just ‘find a job, Monica Community College for four years raise a family, have a kid at 17.’ Mainly it’s to work on her general education, then just ‘get money,’” she said. transferred to SF State for two years to finNot only was encouragement essential ish her major in liberal studies. to Edith and her cousins’ success, but also Part of the struggle for Edith was baltheir protectiveness. ancing a demanding work and school “They were like ‘it’s 7, you shouldn’t be schedule. out late’ and so we’d go inside,” Edith said. “There were times at Santa Monica “They watched who our friends were. Community College I had two jobs. I had We couldn’t go to work,” Edith and sleep over at said. anybody’s house. “You have to be They would say a full time student ‘you guys have to to get financial keep looking up. aid so I was a full You’re not living time student and in this environworked full time.” ment forever.’” Out of the four Edith’s family Edith Aiden Gleisberg, volunteer cousins was so protective closely grew up because her childhood environment in with, two went onto college, including East Los Angeles was rough. Bracy, who graduated from Cal State Los “We both grew up in a low-income com- Angeles. munity,” said Edith’s cousin Bracy Marti“We always had choices,” Bracy said. nez, 24. “It wasn’t an easy growing up situ- “That’s what we were taught. You had ation.” two different paths — you got educated Their neighborhood also had gang and and you could afford certain things or you drug problems, but their moms were not didn’t get a degree and you live your life willing to let their children become a part on a day-to-day basis.” of that group. Instead, they made the deciEdith’s cousin Susan Arguello, 30, did sion to put the girls in a high school away not see the path for college as easily as her from their home so they would not be fol- younger sisters did. She said it was diffilowed or get into trouble with surround- cult to go to college with little financial ing people. support. “We took the bus an hour to Hollywood “My parents separated and it was hard High,” Bracy said. “It was a better location. for me to get college funds from them at No one knew where we lived that way. all,” Susan said. “I did get into a medical They didn’t want us to encounter the same assistant program. It would have been nice people we live around as the same people to have all of us graduate from a univerat school so if we had problems at school sity. That’s why we’re so proud of (Edith) they wouldn’t make problems at home.” and her mom is so proud of her.” Edith’s mom and aunt arranged for the Not only does her family have high esgirls to go to private school by fundraising. teem for Edith, so does her close friend The school also offered a discounted tu- and roommate, SF State student Julio Corition to them. tez, 21. “My mom used to do all these fundrais“I’ve known her since spring ’09 and

Since we were little we were “ told ‘go to college.’ It wasn’t an option for me, it was something I had to do.”

she was my roommate in Parkmerced,” Julio said. “She’s been like a bigger sister. It was nice to have her as a role model.” Julio and Edith came from similar backgrounds which brought them closer. “She’s coming from a similar situation as me — first person in our family in college and single moms.” Julio also said that Edith is a dedicated person. “She’s really passionate about what she does in the Mission helping troubled families,” Julio said. Not only is she someone Julio can look up to, but be close friends with, even though she has a demanding schedule. “She’s my buddy for everything — concerts, homework, she’s able to do all this fun stuff with me even though she has work at 4 a.m. and her computer broke before finals and she’ll go to the computer lab at 6 a.m.,” Julio said. After graduation, Edith plans to spend time with her mom and take a break from schooling. “I want to rekindle the relationship with my mom,” Edith said. As far as what she plans on doing professionally after college, she said she is unsure, but she knows she wants to impact someone’s life. “I want to give back to the community and maybe be a mentor,” Edith said. Edith’s mom was not the most enthusiastic about Edith’s desire to become a teacher, but understood after explanation. “She wanted me to be a lawyer. She said ‘a teacher isn’t going to make a lot of money’ and I said ‘it’s not about money.’ I said ‘you remember a teacher who helped you. I want to make a difference like that’ and she smiled.” Edith’s motivation became clear when she overheard a conversation on the bus. “I was waiting for the 22 last week and I overheard this woman saying ‘I’m so excited my child graduated sixth grade. I just want them to graduate high school,’” Edith said. “I wanted to say ‘there’s more than just graduating high school.’”


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Wednesday, May 18, 2011

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PROJECTS Science and Engineering

Students showcase work, results By Caitlin Olson caitpat@mail.sfsu.edu

GIL RIEGO JR. — [X]PRESS

FINE TUNING: Graduate engineering student and construction manager Chokri Sakhri, tightens the inner arch for his group’s project the “Double-Arch Bridge,” at the Student Project Showcase hosted by SF state’s college of science and engineering. Together, they spent approximately eight months planning and constructing the bridge. “We all put in our own expertise,” said 24-year-old senior Randy Dilag. “Some people were good at design and some in construction.” Melissa Roncall, senior, said that although the labor was really intense at times, she is proud of the final product. “I wouldn’t change a thing,” Roncall said. Another group, the SFSU Steel Bridge Team, decided to build a steel bridge instead. They adhered to the American Institute of Steel Construction Student Steel Bridge Competition rules and spent nine months working on the project. “It was fun, but the last month was stressful,” said 24-year-old senior Corey Wageman. “The biggest problem was that we had to hire out for welding.” Other engineering majors chose to work on projects that reflected their personal hobbies and interests. Heather Esposito, a 27-year-old mechanical engineering junior, decided to build a front-rowing rowboat because she doesn’t like to face backward when she is rowing in a traditional rowboat. Instead, she built a contraption using pulleys and ropes that directs the energy she would normally exert in the opposite direction.

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“It won’t work perfectly because it’s still flawed, but it can be improved greatly,” Esposito said. Esposito, a kayaker, has spent two semesters designing and building the project. “I can’t wait to test it!” Esposito said. While Esposito is still waiting to test out her final project, Alexandra Koba and Laura Johnson’s hemi-section project has already been put to use at SF State. “We took an anatomy class and we fell in love,” said Koba, 23. “We wanted to give back to the class. We wanted to give them a learning tool.” Together, the physiology majors researched the head and neck and performed a hemi-section on a cadaver. The dissection has been used in anatomy classes to teach students about the human body. “I like teaching other people what we’re doing and getting feedback,” said Johnson, 27. Some groups had troubles with their projects but have learned from their experience, as was the case with civil engineering major Luis Rodriguez, who spent nine months with his group designing and building a model of a multi-story commercial office building. One of their models broke at the base because they used light-weight balsa wood as opposed to sturdier material. “We made notes to next years’ team so they can improve theirs,” Rodriguez said.

GIL RIEGO JR. — [X]PRESS

TESTING: Project Manager Nicholas Schultz of “Steel Bridge” demonstrates the strength of the cantilever of their bridge in the gym, May 13.

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Science buffs and engineering enthusiasts gathered in the main gym at SF State May 13 to present their projects at the 13th annual College of Science and Engineering Student Project Showcase. The showcase allowed both graduates and undergraduates to present biological science and physical science related projects and receive feedback from their peers, professors and judges. Approximately 300 students presented 128 projects, some of which had taken years of preparation. “It really highlights the best,” said event coordinator Lannie Nguyen-Tang. “The students put a lot of effort in these.” Projects ranged from remote-controlled gadgets to models of buildings and bridges. “It’s great to see all the gadgets on the tables, and I like that students are proud of it,” Nguyen-Tang said. The participants gained not only handson experience from working in their field, but several also won cash prizes up to $500. “We’re looking for high-quality students and high-quality presentations,” said Ron Powell, a judge at the event. Powell, who is a fellow at technology company Novellus Systems said he was impressed with the projects. “The diversity and the quality is all really good,” Powell said. Though many of the students were enthused about presenting their work to their peers and being judged at the showcase, many had already placed in other competitions around the nation. One group of students built a doublearched bridge that won first place for both innovative design and most aesthetic design in the National Timber Bridge Design competition, along with a $200 prize from the showcase. “I’m proud of it,” said 23-year-old senior Clarence Li. “Even if it fell over, I’d still be proud of it.” Li said that his team decided to build a bridge with two arches instead of one for aesthetic reasons, but they quickly learned that it was the most difficult part of their project. “It was tough,” said Chokri Sahkri, 32, senior. “But once you see the fruit after you plant the seed, it’s great.” The Arch Nemesis Wood Bridge group also entered the National Timber Bridge Design Competition and placed second in best overall design. Their bridge is capable of holding 4,500 pounds. “Out of all the other engineering projects here – I mean I’m being a little biased – but I think we shine the most,” Dilag said.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2011

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20TH 6:30PM hi•a•tus (L., pp. of hiare, to gape, whence gap, gasp): 1. a break where a part is missing; 2. any gap or opening The Golden Gate [X]press will take a break from publishing for the summer and will resume with the first Fall semester issue on Wednesday August 24 During the summer the Advertising Office will remain open by appointment only Call ahead to Eva Charles Advertising Sales Manager at 415 338 3133 or email echarles@sfsu edu

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TOP 10

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SAN FRANCISCO

SUMMER GUIDE

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Grow-Your-Own Festival | Embarcadero Saturday, May 21, 2011 - 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. | Cost: FREE Center for Urban Education About Sustainable Agriculture/Teaching Kitchen | One Ferry Building, San Francisco CUESA provides information on gardening in the Bay Area, sales on plant starts, and cooking demonstrations by Sunset Magazine Recipe Editor Amy Machnak and Ani Phyo, author and cook. http://www.cuesa.org/events/2011/grow-your-own-festival

2

7th Annual Asian Heritage Street Celebration | Civic Center Saturday, May 21, 2011 - 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. | Cost: FREE Civic Center Plaza/Little Saigon District | 200 Larkin St., San Francisco The largest gathering of Asian Pacific Americans in the nation includes a jazz and wine area as well as disc jockeys, martial arts experts, and a variety of handmade artwork vendors. http://asianfairsf.com/2011/02/7th-annual-asian-heritage-street-celebrationset-for-may-21-2011/

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San Francisco Carnaval Festival 2011 | Mission Saturday, May 28-29, 2011 - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | Cost: FREE Harrison Street between 16th and 22nd streets | Harrison and 16th St., San Francisco “Live Your Fantasy” is one of California’s largest multi-cultural celebrations. San Francisco Carnaval 2011 will showcase Latin American and Caribbean cultures with a multitude of food, music and dancing. http://www.carnaval2010.org/north-america/san-francisco-carnival-2011-on28th-n-29th-may/

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LIVE 105′s “Battle of the Bands” Show | Hayes Valley Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 8 p.m. | Cost: $5 Rickshaw Stop | 115 Fell St., San Francisco A fun and lively battle of the bands held by LIVE 105 with the audience favorite progressing to a LIVE 105 BFD concert at the Shoreline Amphitheater later this summer. http://www.rickshawstop.com/event/36425/

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Flogging Molly Play Punk-Irish | Haight Monday, June 2, 2011 - 6 p.m. | Cost: FREE Amoeba SF | 1855 Haight St., San Francisco The raucous powerhouse Flogging Molly brings its iconic and entertaining traditional Irish and punk energy to Amoeba Records for a free in-store performance and signing to advertise their new album. http://www.amoeba.com/live-shows/performances/san-francisco/2011june-02/flogging-molly/artist.html

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SF Civic Symphony Concert | Union Square Sunday, June 5, 2011 - 1 p.m. | Cost: FREE Empire Ballroom, Sir Francis Drake Hotel | 450 Powell St., San Francisco The oldest community orchestra ,the San Francisco Civic Symphony will be hosting a free concert in Union Square. the SFCS provides the community with accessible and free classical music. http://www.sfcivicsymphony.com/

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35th Annual San Francisco Free Folk Festival | Sunset Saturday/Sunday, June 25-26, 2011 - All Day | Cost: FREE Presidio Middle School | 450 30th Ave., San Francisco This folk festival includes over 60 musical acts, multitudes of free dance parties, workshops on how to build your own washtub bass, sing like a barbershop quartet, and make music with found objects. http://www.sffolkfest.org/2011/index.shtml

10

OminoDay: All Day DJ & World Music Festival | Portola Saturday, June 4, 2011 - 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. | Cost: FREE Jerry Garcia Amphitheatre (McClaren Park) | 50 John F Shelley Drive, San Francisco Ominoday is a day-long free music festival in memory and commemoration of Andrew “DJ Domino” Ele, youth and community activist who lost his life to a random act of violence. http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=128541353840884

100 DAYS FOR 100 DOLLARS YMCA OF SAN FRANCISCO Try Pilates, swim laps, or lift weights. It s only a dollar a day!

Available for students under 25 with a valid student ID. New members only. Expires 6/30/11

8

61st Annual Juneteenth Festival | Downtown Saturday/Sunday, June 18-19, 2011 - 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. | Cost: FREE Civic Center | Civic Center, San Francisco San Francisco’s 61st Juneteenth festival is one of the oldest celebrations of the abolition of slavery in the city. Entertainment will include jazz, hip-hop, R&B, gospel and spoken word performances. http://www.sfjuneteenth.org/

FEEL GOOD THIS SUMMER

FIND YOUR LOCAL YMCA Visit www.ymcasf.org or call us at 415-777-YMCA.

7

34th Annual Haight Ashbury Street Fair | Haight Sunday, June 12, 2011 - 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. | Cost: FREE In the Haight Ashbury over 100 vendors will grace the streets with food, green businesses, crafts, artists, clothing, nonprofits, three stages of music with two dedicated for a battle of the bands. http://www.haightashburystreetfair.org/about-hasf

~Compiled by Spencer DeVine


10 Wednesday, May 18, 2011

goldengatexpress.org - GOLDEN GATE [X]PRESS

Wednesday, May 18, 2011 11

GOLDEN GATE [X]PRESS - goldengatexpress.org

COMMENCEMENT Cost rises

SPEAKER Ambassador

University increases grad prices

Diplomat to give speech at ceremony

Graduation by the Numbers

By Michelle Olson maolson@mail.sfsu.edu To get to Cox Stadium this Saturday, SF State students must pay their fair share of fees — blood, sweat and tears just won’t cut it. One hundred dollars to file a graduation application is required, plus a $60 rental fee for the cap and gown. “It’s kind of out of hand, and actually I think it’s ridiculous,” said SF State student Erin Cabral, who is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in kinesiology. This is the first time in more than 10 years that the University has raised the graduation application fee from the original $40 price. According to the Office of Commencement, $20 of the $100 will go to the diploma and its cover and the rest will help to fund the ceremony. “All services in general — cost for labor, printing, chair rental, etc. — have gone up since 10 years ago. It was necessary for the university to increase the fee,” said Norma Urcuyo-Siani, director of the Office of Special Events and Commencement. “We regret that it had to be done.” But graduating students are still less than pleased. “It costs more to get out of school than it takes to get in,” said Marsha Wescott, 21, a broadcast and electronic communication arts major. Wescott is also paying an additional $150 for announcements, which brings her total graduation cost to about $300. The $60 cap and gown rental fee is also leaving a bitter taste in students mouths. But at least they get to keep the cap and tassel. “It just sucks because you’re never going to wear the cap again,” said communications major Sufyan Khan, 23. He also is paying $30 for wallet pictures. “But I just figure it’s $60 for a tassel and a cap and to be able to participate.” But it is actually a lot more than that, according to Rob Stone, the CEO and general manager of Franciscan Shops and the SF State Bookstore. “The short answer is that the price reflects all the combined costs of the cap and gown rental: labor, systems, space usage, marketing, freight costs, dry cleaning, distribution, etc.,” Stone said. “(The price is) Not simply the wholesale cost of the garment.” The rental gown also costs more because it is made from reusable cloth instead of the Marsha Wescott, cheaper disposbroadcast and electronic able material. Of the 8,000 arts major students eligible to graduate, 4,000 will take part in the graduation ceremony May 21. A total of 21,000 people, including the graduating students, are expected to attend. Sara Gagnon is one of the 4,000 not attending the ceremony. She works two jobs and feels her money would be better spent on a party she is throwing herself. “I feel like I’ve already spent so much time and money on my education at SF State,” Gagnon said. “I don’t really want to take time off of work and rent a gown. For me, I would rather invest my time and money into a celebration that my friends, my family and I can really enjoy, and that will allow all of us, not just a few of us, to spend time together.” For students who are attending, extra tickets for friends or family have become a hot commodity. Five tickets are given to each student when they get their cap and gown, and three more tickets can be requested on a first come, first serve basis. “You will never pay for tickets from the University,” said Wendy Johnson, textbook department manager. “Having to pay for your graduation tickets is one of the biggest myths.” But Cabral paid $150 for an extra 10 tickets for his family. Just one visit to Craigslist and a number of ads pop up for tickets with prices ranging from $10 to $25 a ticket. “You don’t even want to quote me on what I think about students who sell their tickets for graduation,” Johnson said. A graduation fee, cap and gown rental, maybe some pictures, announcements and maybe a few scalped tickets later, and the end result is a degree. “Its expensive, but necessary, I guess,” said Jane Beery-Beesly, a graduating liberal arts major. “So I have to find the money to cover it all.”

It costs more to get “ out of school than to it takes to get in.”

33%

of SF State seniors plan to go to graduate school

Because of the economic recession,

42.5 PERCENT of students are taking fewer classes per semester

Plans after graduation Because of the economic recession,

42 PERCENT of students are working more hours

50%

of SF State seniors who plan to seek employment

7.6% of SF

State seniors who plan to travel

Tuition Increase throughout the years • 2007-2008- $3,456

• 2008-2009- $3,762

• 2009-2010- $4,740

• 2010- 2011- $5,014

• Upcoming 2011- $5,688

*Pending budget approval

By Gil Riego Jr. griegoj@mail.sfsu.edu Jeffrey Bleich, the United States Ambassador to Australia, will be making a 7,416 mile journey from Sydney, Australia to the SF State campus to receive an honorary award and speak at the graduation commencement May 21. Bleich, a former California State University Trustee and friend of President Barack Obama for more than 20 years, will be receivPHOTO VIA STATE DEPARTMENT ing an honorary doctorate of laws for his contribution to SF State and higher education in California according to a statement released by Michael Bruntz, a University spokesman. “Generally, the main commencement speaker is the person — or one of the persons — receiving an honorary degree at the ceremony,” said University spokeswoman Ellen Griffin. “The University’s honorary degree committee solicits suggestions and nominations from throughout the campus, makes recommendations to the president, who in turn makes nominations to the CSU Board of Trustees.” Griffin said that this year, SF State President Robert A. Corrigan made the recommendation to the honorary degree committee and they agreed to the nomination. “Bleich has been a long-standing advocate for human rights and social justice,” Corrigan said in a statement. “This commitment to others, and belief that all deserve equal opportunities in this life, was a guiding principle during his remarkable leadership of the CSU Board of Trustees. Today’s students— and those of tomorrow— owe a debt of gratitude to Bleich’s leadership.” While this may seem like a major coup for the campus, students have differeing ideas regarding graduation speakers in general. “It’s a tradition, so I’m not opposed to it,” said business and marketing graduate Mike Newman, 25. “The graduation ceremony has a lot of problems in general, but I’d rather have the university’s graduation ceremony announce each person individually.” While Newman is not opposed to the speaker, other students are not so enthused about longwinded speeches at graduation. “It’s a little useful, but overdone,” said Anthony Michaiel, 23, a first-year broadcast and electronics communication arts major. “It might be useful for someone who is graduating and looking for inspiration.” With the success that Bliech has achieved, some students feel that a newer face should be speaking to the students. “They can be inspiring,” said Kristen Torres, a consumer and family behaviors major. “But I wouldn’t mind if the speaker was someone younger who has succeeded. It would give us hope that we can come out of here with something to look forward to.” Peter Koo, executive director of the Associated Student Inc., agrees with Torres. “The speaker should inspire students before they go to the real world,” Koo said. “In general it should be someone people look up to and admire with a good perspective in the workforce and community.” Bleich will be one of the two speakers at this year’s graduation. The other speaker, George M. Marcus, “is an entrepreneur, business leader and philanthropist,” according to Bruntz’ statement. He has been a long-time supporter of the arts and higher education in California and at SF State. Bleich was unavailable for comment at time of publication due to scheduling conflicts.


Budget

12 Wednesday, May 18, 2011

goldengatexpress.org - GOLDEN GATE [X]PRESS

ANALYSIS Higher education

Tax extensions to prevent cuts to CSU By Chris Haire chaire@mail.sfsu.edu For students who are tired of balancing the high cost of tuition with a Top Ramen diet and massive debt, be prepared — things could get much, much worse. About half a million dollars worse. Gov. Jerry Brown further highlighted the bleak future of higher education when he released the May revision of his budget proposal May 16, outlining a plan that potentially cuts $1 billion from the California State University system if a series of tax extensions fails to gain legislature and voter approval. The revised proposal does not make any further cuts to CSUs, quelling the fears of many who anticipated additional reductions, and calls for a general fund allocation of about $2.3 billion. Brown’s January budget proposal already cuts an initial $500 million, but if the governor’s controversial tax extensions do not pass, the cuts will have to be doubled. “We are prepared to live with the $500 million cut from January and we hope that is the extent of it,” said Leroy Morishita, vice president of finance and administration. “(We) hope that the tax extensions get approved. Without them, it’d be pretty devastating.” Unfortunately for advocates of the extensions, before they can get placed on the ballot this fall Brown must convince two Republicans from both the assembly and the senate to side with Democrats. In an attempt to appease conservatives in the legislature, Brown has tabled the income tax extension until next year — hoping that Republicans will allow the sales and vehicle registration

taxes to get on the ballot. “I want to get the tax extensions and I am willing to make certain accommodations,” Brown said, alluding to alternative plans to go around Republican opposition. “I am not going to give Republicans a roadmap to ruin. I want to see balanced, honest budgeting.” However, in order for the tax extensions, which are set to expire July 1, to get on the ballot and stanch the reductions to the CSUs, Brown must get the legislature to enact them prior to voter ratification. According to Steve Boilard, the director of higher education for the Legislative

remain intact for five years. Republicans, however, have noted that if the taxes are approved, there is no certainty that higher education will be protected beyond next year. “Republicans are not going to support the idea of tax increases,” said Craig DeLuz, deputy chief of staff for Assemblyman Kevin Jeffries (R-Riverside) who is on the budget committee. “Especially if there is no guarantee for higher education.”

Education at a crossroad Without the tax extensions, however, the CSUs would be cut another $500 million. The University’s share would be approximately $32 million, according to President Robert A. Corrigan. SF State would likely face a 32 percent increase in fees as well, probably beginning in the spring, Morishita said. Including the 10 percent cut students will face in the fall, fees will increase a total 42 percent from spring 2011 to spring 2012 — equating Steve Biolard, director of to $3,678 per semester and $7,356 higher education for the per year. Beyond that, the University Legislative Analyst’s Office could possibly reduce or cancel spring enrollment, a move that would hinder those in commuAnalyst’s Office, the extensions nity colleges from advancing towould go into effect for a set time ward their degrees. A cancella— most likely a six-month period tion of spring enrollment, which — and voters would then vote for happened in spring 2010, is a dea full extension. viation from the 1960 Master If voters do not approve the Plan; its objective was to facilitaxes, though, the revenue from tate the transition from two-year the temporary extension would to four-year institutions and give still remain. community college students an This is seemingly a reneging accessible route to earn bacheof Brown’s campaign promise to lor’s degrees. not pass any taxes without voter “The budget continues to approval. look grim for public higher edThe taxes, if approved, would ucation,” Corrigan said. “Addimaintain the current level of the tional cuts would have a devasVehicle License Fee at 1.15 per- tating impact on our ability to cent and the Sales and Use Tax at 6 percent. All of the taxes would CSU continued on Page 13

If you look at what students pay, it’s still low for the nation. But it’s been increasing rapidly. Our real concern is how volatile tuition is.”

Proposed California budget beyond CSU • $6.6 billion- the increase in projected baseline revenue from last year • 4.05 percent- the increase in state funds from the January proposal • $343 million- the proposed budget for CSUs infrastructure • 8.8 percent- the amount of budget that goes toward higher education • 2.9 percent- the projected fiveyear growth for gross domestic product • 90,600- the number of jobs added in the state during the first three months of 2011

Legislative initiative will increase revenues for Cal State system Controversial bill proposes 13 percent levy on oil companies

affect students and education.” Although the proposed bill would seem to bring a sustainable form of revenue to higher education, the CSU system doesn’t approve of the bill as written and has adopted a “support if amended” position. By Juan De Anda According to Erik Fallis, spokesman for the CSU Chanjuand@mail.sfsu.edu cellor’s Office, the CSU has taken this stance because they found the language and wording of the bill to be Oil is often associated with exploding geysers of black overly ambiguous. gold in the hands of a wealthy few, but with Assembly Bill “Our main challenge is that we do want more funding 1326, a shower of revenue may begin to fall into the fund- but we don’t see protections for our current funding and ing of the higher education system. statutorily we want writing that will clarify and make this Approval of AB 1326 would provide a 12.5 percent oil funding distribute effectively,” Fallis said. “We are sugand natural extraction severance tax to fund the Cali- gesting amendments to make it better.” fornia State University, the University of California and Fallis said the CSU has identified three weaknesses community college systems, but the bill is currently fac- in the language of the bill: the creating of a new bureauing divided support. cracy to administer the funds, no specific “That oil is California’s and the monamounts to the distribution, and limited ey that is being made should go into the protections that ensures the money suphands of Californians and that is what plements and do not retract current state Furutani intends with this bill,” said general funds. a representative from the office of asAs it stands, AB 1326 would create a new semblyman Warren Furutani. “Oil combureaucratic board to distribute and dispanies need to pay their fair share and burse these funds generated. these funds will go directly toward stu“It’s difficult to understand why we dents.” need another legislative body when we The tax is based on the amount per already have bodies like the Controller to barrel extracted from California and is disburse these revenues,” Fallis said. “Besimilar to a sales tax but the taxing will sides Californians see government as havnot affect the cost of gas at the pump, ing too much bureaucracy already. Why according to wording in the bill. have more?” According to Furutani’s office, the bill In a letter to assemblyman Henry Perea, Lucie Camara, finance proposes that the funds generated from major head of the assembly revenue and taxation the tax would be directed toward acacommittee, Karen Zamarripa, CSU assisdemic programs and student support services. tant vice chancellor, wrote that AB 1326 is too restrictive Lucie Camara, a finance major, believes Furutani’s bill and limiting. initiative is a innovative and necessary idea. “Campuses are complex institutions that are respon“I haven’t heard about it but I think it’s about time we sible for not only offering courses and direct student supstart seeing some money invested in students,” Camara port but also community service programs, faculty-stusaid. “I think the government puts too much money on dent applied research and libraries,” Zamarripa wrote. other things like prisons and all the budget cuts seem to Zamarripa added that there are several other students

I think the “ government puts too much money on other things like prisons and all the budget cuts seem to affect students and education.”

needs that are not reflected in the bill’s language. “Students also need access to health services, counseling and tutoring and laboratories. AB 1326 should reflect the complete needs of our students and what it takes for them to succeed.” Furutani’s office responded that the intent of the initiative was to address student’s needs. “The bill is addressing students academic needs so that they can stay on track and finish their post-secondary education and the funds shouldn’t go to officials, administration, or such,” said a spokesman from Furitani’s office who declined to be named. “But nonetheless, we are taking suggestions from everyone to make this bill stronger and sustainable.” According the CSU Budgetary Office, the current general fund for students is $2.77 billion and, according to Fallis, the amount is predicted to be reduced to $2.29 billion over the next five years. “With the current language of the bill, this fund would be like the lottery,” Fallis said. “It didn’t prove to be a sustainable form of funding.” Ian Moreno, undecided major, said he heard about the bill from friends attending other universities and echoes sentiments of disbelief. “I mean, it sounds great and all but like the saying goes, ‘Show me the money. Show me the money.’” Lucien Artman, a communications major, said that although the bill is noble, the proposed bill seems like an attempt to tap into the oil market and profits. “It seems like everyone is just rushing in to cash into the oil industry and to be honest I think this will be just another failed effort to fund our education,” Artman said. “I don’t hear any specifics just saying something will fund education that is going to work.” AB 1326 is modeled after Alaskan and Texan oil taxation laws. Alaska’s is at 20 percent and Texas is currently at 4 percent. As it stands now, oil and gas companies in California do not get taxed on revenue earned and the bill is currently sitting in the assembly Committee of Revenue and Taxation awaiting amendments.


Wednesday, May 18, 2011 13

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CSU: Negotiations key to gaining Republican votes for state budget passage continued from Page 12

position. Next week, the state legislaserve students. … We can- ture will convene to discuss the not rebuild California with- budget and the LAO will present out an educated workforce.” recommendations about the best The CSU system is already in way to finalize the budget. an unprecedented situation. In The California Constitution yet another contradiction of the mandates that the legislature Master Plan, eight of the 23 CSUs approves the budget by June 15, will collect more revenue from but with the polarizing tension tuition than from the general in the assembly and senate, that fund, including SF State. deadline is usually unattainable. The other seven institutions Last year, an agreement was not are Cal State East Bay, Cal State reached until October, although Fullerton, Cal State Long Beach, most believe that was due to Cal State Northridge, Cal State lame duck Gov. SchwarzenegSacramento, San Diego State and ger’s frustration with Republican San Jose State. antagonism. SF State will H o w e v e r, raise more than this is the first $133 million year in which through tuition a simple majorrevenue, nearity rather than ly $11 million a two-thirds more than the majority is reUniversity is quired for apallotted to reproval. ceive from the In Novemstate. ber 2010, votThe Univerers approved sity’s general Proposition 25, fund revenue is which altered at 1992 levels. a decades-old For perspecNick Coluzzi, vice president rule requiring tive, every dolof finance for Associated a super majorlar spent today Students Inc. ity to pass the would be the budget. equivalent of 65 cents in 1992 — While this eases the burden a 35 percent decrease in general of Democrats, who control both fund revenue over nearly two de- houses, Brown’s adamancy about cades. passing the tax extensions will And when classes resume provide a set back for the legisin August, tuition will have in- lature. creased 15 percent from fall 2010. A super majority is still reAnother fee hike would presum- quired to approve taxes; Demoably cause the discrepancy be- crats need four Republicans, two tween tuition and general fund assembly members and two senrevenues to grow. ators, to agree to the extensions Despite the continual raising —something Brown believes he of fees, the CSU still possess- can attain. es the lowest tuition when set “The Republicans I’m talking against an official list of 15 com- to know they have to approve exparable institutions throughout tensions,” he said. the country, according to a surHowever, there is a question of vey released by the LAO April 14. how involved Republicans have Also, by comparison, the Uni- been in a meaningful dialogue. versity of California system costs “As long as we are not included $11,279 per year. in that discussion, you’re not goHowever, if the sales and vehi- ing to get Republicans to agree to cle license taxes are not passed, increases,” DeLuz said. SF State’s costs will rise above In fact, California Republithose of the next five universi- cans released their own budget ties — placing the University in proposal May 12 that did not inthe middle. clude the tax extensions. It wo“If you look at what students ould, however, make deeper cuts pay, it’s still low for the nation. to state workers. But it’s been increasing rapidly,” The CSU and SF State, meanBoilard said. “Our real concern is while, are planning their budgets how volatile tuition is.” based on the first $500 million With such inconsistency in cut. fees, according to Boilard, it is Since Brown’s proposal asdifficult for middle class students sumes the approval of the exand parents to plan for educa- tensions, if they are approved, tion. nothing changes. If they are not While those in the lower in- approved, the budgets of the come bracket qualify for Cal CSU and SF State will have to be Grants, which go up in coordi- revised. nation with fee increases, and “The CSU does not want a 32 while wealthier Californians can percent cut,” said Erik Fallis, the pay for education out of pocket, spokesman for the chancellor’s those in the middle get squeezed, office. “This whole thing gets a Boilard said. One reason is that lot more complicated in the planstudent loans do not increase ning stage.” with fees. The University Budget Office “Once again, it’s a sad state of — which, along with Morishita, affairs when one of the best high- will unilaterally release the buder learning institutions in the get in July — will also not plan country gets cut,” said junior his- for another $32 million cut until it tory major Nick Coluzzi, the vice knows the fate of the extensions. president of finance for AssociIn fact, Morishita said that his ated Students, Inc. “The issue is office is not prepared to discuss our legislature and its inability to alternative proposals if the extra make good choices for our own $500 million cut is placed on the students.” CSUs. If the taxes do not pass, howBudget moving forward ever, then the University will Over the next two months, the work to adjust its budget based state legislature, the CSU chan- on what the CSU Board of trustcellor’s office and the University ees recommends. budget office will work to finalize “Planning for ‘what ifs’ is a diftheir budgets. But the uncertain- ficult thing,” said Budget Office ty of the state budget leaves the Director Franz Lozano. “There CSU and SF State in a precarious are too many ‘what ifs’.”

Once again, it’s a sad state of affairs when one of the best higher learning institutions in the country gets cut. The issue is our legislature and its inability to make good choices for our students.”

Congratulations to the

Class of 2011 Welcome to the SF State Alumni Family Best wishes from SF State Alumni Relations Special offer for graduating seniors only Lifetime membership for only

$49

(a savings of 45%) To learn more about the Alumni Association’s membership benefits and how to join visit

www.sfsu.edu/~alumni/


14 Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Sports

goldengatexpress.org - GOLDEN GATE [X]PRESS

Senior Gators depart the Swamp Graduating athletes reflect on their collegiate careers and of what awaits them after SF State PHOENIX O’ROURKE Men’s Basketball

DOMINIQUE HUNTER Women’s Basketball

Guard holds all-time Captain defying odds, University records working toward pros By Juan Martinez person@mail.sfsu.edu Much like a Cirque Du Soleil performer, Phoenix O’Rourke understands how to balance a high-wire act. Aside from lifting weights, conditioning and practicing in the off-season, players also have to deal with the same responsibilities as other students. San Mateo native O’Rourke remembers how he balanced playing guard for the SF State men’s basketball team with school work for four years. “Student-athletes do not have a chip on their shoulders,” he said. “They just go through things that other students don’t. I had 18 hours or so of work a week. At times it can be tiring and draining definitely, but it has its rewards. You get to meet a lot of cool people.” Under first-year head coach Paul Trevor, O’Rourke played his final collegiate game March 1 against the Cal Poly Pomona Broncos. In 39 minutes, he scored nine points, collected four rebounds and recorded five steals in the Gators’ first ever playoff home game. While SF State lost 69-66 in overtime, it did have a 16-11 overall record and earned the fourth seed in the California Collegiate Athletic Association Basketball Championship. “The future of the program looks really positive,” O’Rourke said. “Coach Trevor is one of the greatest coaches I’ve ever had. He has one of the best coaching techniques and is going to bring in more talent. With the success this school has had over the last four years, it will bring more people and continued success. It could only get better from here.” O’Rourke, a business management major, has left an impressive mark at SF State.

He was named to the Department of Athletics Honor Roll for all seven semesters of his athletic career and was also a recipient of the 2009-2010 Dr. Hal Charnofsky Award for being the most Outstanding Male Student-Athlete. While on the court, O’Rourke set records. He holds all-time school records in most games played (115), steals (143), and three-point field goals attempted (497). “School has been very important to me,” O’Rourke said. “My mom always stressed to do well in school. My brother Ronald was the first to graduate from college. Hopefully I have made them happy with my academic achievements.” With graduation around the corner, O’Rourke is looking forward to his future. Although he doesn’t have any summer plans, he would love to become a police officer one day and did not rule out returning to SF State as an assistant head coach. “Being a cop has been on my mind,” he said. “I’d like to go traveling sometime soon. I would like to go to Asia, Europe and South America to sight-see for sure, but also to partake in some basketball tryouts.” The 6-foot, 185-pound O’Rourke averaged 6.6 points, 2.2 rebounds, 1.6 assists, and 1.2 steals per game as a guard. In addition, he shot 37 percent from the field, 33 percent from the three-point line, and 67.2 percent from the free throw line. “I had a great time here,” O’Rourke said. “I’ve helped recruit freshmen since my sophomore year. Whenever a recruit was here, I’d take them to my house and show them around. I’m going to miss it.” O’Rourke is thankful for all the love Gators fans showed the men’s basketball team. “To everyone who supported the men’s basketball program, thanks a lot,” O’Rourke said. “You all definitely helped us significantly.”

MAX FERNANDEZ Cross Country

By Godofredo Vasquez gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu As Dominique Hunter ends her four-year basketball career at SF State, she is moving on to bigger and better

things. Hunter, 21, played center and became a contributor for the Gators during her first year. She played in all games her freshman season, but most impressively she cracked the lineup and started in 23 of 28 games. That year she led the SF State women’s basketball team with 54 blocks and was awarded with the Academic All-CCAA for her outstanding performance in the classroom. “No one expected me to have such a good freshman season,” Hunter said. Her four-year collegiate career was made possible by her consistent performance year after year. Hunter helped her team reach the first round of the California Collegiate Athletic Association Basketball Championship in the 2009-2010 season. This past season she posted career bests in average points per game, 12.8, and average rebounds per game, 11.8; both of which were team highs. She also led the team with 37 minutes of playing time per game and 64 total blocks. Those numbers resulted in Hunter being named 2010-2011 Female Athlete of the Year and being selected for the 2011 AllCCAA Women’s Basketball first team. Hunter said she is proud of those two accomplishments but said the best part of her experience at SF State was the bonds developed between teammates. “I’m going to miss the teammates that became my sisters,” Hunter said. The 6-foot-1-inch San Francisco native said she was not interested in sports prior

to the eighth grade, but decided to try basketball after her family pointed out her tall frame would be an advantage. “Over time, I grew a passion for it,” Hunter said. She said the sport has helped her become mentally tough and discover how competitive she is. “I didn’t think I had that competitiveness in me until I started playing basketball,” Hunter said. After graduating from Gateway High School, Hunter was recruited by SF State head coach Joaquin Wallace, who visited her home and spoke with her mother. That visit played a key role when it came time for Hunter to decide on which school to attend. Hunter said Wallace’s honesty when recruiting her was also important. The head coach made it clear she would have to earn a starter role on the team. After graduating, Hunter plans to pursue a professional basketball career and is trying out for teams in the United States as well as overseas. Hunter said going overseas would be ideal because she has always wanted to travel. Hunter explained that finding a place to play after college is different than coming out of high school because pro teams do not reach out to students like schools do when they are recruiting players. “It takes a lot of work and money,” Hunter said. Hunter is graduating with a degree in business management this spring and is applying to master programs in case she is not selected by a professional team. She said she considers herself lucky for having two great options after SF State, and is eager to pursue a master’s degree in sports management. Hunter, the Gators’ team captain, finishes her career at SF State with 900 rebounds, 200 blocks and 1,000 points scored.

CARLY BLISS Women’s Soccer

Plagued by knee injury, future Soccer player plans to continue grad student may race again science studies after graduation By Godofredo Vasquez gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu For Max Fernandez, cross-country offered a way to get out of fifth period in high school without having to skip

class. The idea to join the cross-country team was first brought up by a close friend but he quickly realized he enjoyed running and could be good at the sport. “I realized I had some potential, so I stuck with it,” Fernandez said. The Huntington Beach native ran all four years at Edison High School and decided to attend SF State after liking what he saw while at a recruiting trip. While at SF State, Fernandez ran his first three years until he was forced to redshirt his senior season because of a knee injury. Fernandez said one of his proudest moments as a Gator came off the field as the president of the SF State Student-Athlete Advisory Committee. The committee was able to get Associated Students Inc. to provide a bus for fans to travel to Turlock, Calif. and support the women’s soccer team during their 2010

Conference Championship at California State University Stanislaus. “They funded the bus and I was in charge of finding fans and making sure they got on the bus to and from Stanislaus,” Fernandez said. “We filled 48 out of 55 seats.” Fernandez said his 26:03 finish at the University of Washington’s Sundodger Invitational 8K race during his freshman year is the performance he will always remember. In 2009, Fernandez helped the Gators win a team title at the 4.05-mile Cal State Monterey Bay Meet, by placing second. According to Fernandez, the best part of attending SF State was the experiences and interactions he had with teammates and with everyone else at the school. Fernandez is graduating with a degree in business marketing, and is also applying to the business graduate program at SF State. If he gets accepted into the program he will run for the Gators cross-country team since he still has one more year of eligibility. Coaching or being an athletic director is something he would enjoy doing later in life, Fernandez said. “Right now I just want to focus on my career.”

By Al Scott ascott@mail.sfsu.edu For four years Carly Bliss has excelled on the soccer field and in the classroom. As she prepares to graduate from SF State, her experiences in the city of San Francisco have undoubtedly helped her grow as an individual and shape her dreams for the future. The San Diego native helped lead the Gators to its first ever California Collegiate Athletic Association championships this past season. In the championship game against Cal State Los Angeles, Bliss connected on a penalty kick that allowed her team to edge the 3-2 win. “Playing soccer has been so intense,” Bliss said. “It’s captivated my life.” She was also named to the 2010 Daktronics NCAA Division II All Region second team as well as the All-CCAA second team. For this, Bliss credits the rest of her team. “When I leave, I hope to keep all my friends and not lose the connections I’ve made,” Bliss said. “My teammates have been my rock.” In her final season, Bliss was third on the team in goals and points as well as

fourth in assists. As a leader on the team, it was not a role that Bliss had originally sought. It found her. According to Bliss, one of the best elements of soccer are the competition and the aggression. “I love the thrill of competition,” Bliss said. “It gives me an adrenaline rush to slide tackle someone and get away with it.” Bliss is the definition of a true student -athlete. She has maintained honor roll status all four years and she has developed a true love for science. She has studied biochemistry over the years and she will receive her Bachelor of Science this semester. In 2009 Bliss received the Dr. Hal Charnofsky Award for her excellent performance in the classroom. In addition to her school work, Bliss works at the Academy of Sciences at Golden Gate Park and does research in the SF State bioorganic chemistry department. She also interns at Shanti, a nonprofit HIV and breast cancer research program. In her spare time, she also coaches soccer youths. Bliss’ goals extend far beyond soccer. She is currently waiting for admittance into the UC San Francisco biochemistry program.


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GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

READY FOR THE RAIN: Bryanna and Celesse Merkel from Redding, Calif. twirl jellyfish umbrellas as they head down JFK Boulevard.

B

ay to reakers GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

SPIKE: An eccentric group of people play volleyball by the Conservatory of Flowers during Bay to Breakers.

SLEEPY: A man dressed as a banana takes a nap near the Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park May 15. Many participants were passed out along the Bay to Breakers route.

GIL RIEGO JR. — [X]PRESS

ON THE MOVE: Thousands of participants walk up Fell Street during the race, which organizers promised would be a more subdued event than those in the past.


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16 Wednesday, May 18, 2011

GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

READY FOR THE RAIN: Bryanna and Celesse Merkel from Redding, Calif. twirl jellyfish umbrellas as they head down JFK Boulevard.

B

ay to reakers GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

GREGORY MORENO — [X]PRESS

SPIKE: An eccentric group of people play volleyball by the Conservatory of Flowers during Bay to Breakers.

SLEEPY: A man dressed as a banana takes a nap near the Conservatory of Flowers in Golden Gate Park May 15. Many participants were passed out along the Bay to Breakers route.

GIL RIEGO JR. — [X]PRESS

ON THE MOVE: Thousands of participants walk up Fell Street during the race, which organizers promised would be a more subdued event than those in the past.


Wednesday, May 18, 2011 17

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Race draws varied crowd

GREGORY MORENO— [X]PRESS

NO-NO: A police officer orders Daniel Gruver to pour out his alcohol during the 100th annual Bay to Breakers race May 15. By Godofredo Vasquez gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu Thousands of people ran, walked and partied on the city streets of San Francisco as they celebrated the 100th annual Bay to Breakers race May 15. The 12K race hosted two types of crowds: the serious runners and those there for the famed costume aspect of the event. Headlining the more conventional portion of the footrace was Moroccan Ridouane Harroufi, who finished first in the men’s group, and Kenyan Lineth Chepkurui, who finished first among the women. Joel McDonnell, 23, was among the serious runners at Bay to Breakers. He decided to participate because he enjoys running and said the event was exciting. “It was pretty amazing the amount of people that were there,” he said. McDonnell trained for more than a month prior to the race, carving out spare time from work and going to Academy of Art University. His training consisted of five-mile runs that over time were replaced with seven-mile ones. “It wasn’t as hard as I thought it would be,” McDonnell said. “The hill of Hayes really separated the competition though.” He finished the race in 59 minutes and 38 seconds and plans on participating again next year. “I have to beat my record,” McDonnell said. But for many, like 28-year-old Jennie Waskey, Bay to Breakers is part of San Francisco’s tradition of fun — not competitive sports. Waskey said she has consistently attended the race since the second grade. “It started up as a family thing,” Waskey said. “Then it was about hanging out with friends.” The more relaxed participants were focused solely on having a good time at the historic event. Many locals who played home to the event warmly embraced the crowd by providing music while others offered drinks. A woman near Hayes Street yelled “Get your Jell-O shots!” as people passed by. Although law enforcement and the Zazzle Bay to Breakers website said that alcohol would not be allowed, many attendees found ways to drink. As a result, many people were visibly intoxicated halfway through the race. Elsie Williams, a San Francisco resident and 20-year Bay to Breakers participant, said that the race event has become more and more about partying. “It’s gotten wilder over the years,” Williams said. “There’s more naked people. But it’s always fun.”

Every year Williams and her friend Claire Rovegno design and build tall hats to wear at Bay to Breakers. They said this year was special because it was the 100year anniversary of the event. For first-timer Bob Stinson, 24, attending the race gave him and his three friends from Arizona the chance to meet up and have some fun. “They heard this might be the last one, so they decided to come out,” Stinson said. “I never knew it was that big of a deal.” The streets were filled with numerous characters, including: bees, Waldos, salmon “swimming” the opposite way, Care Bears, gnomes and even more coordinated efforts like a group that showed up dressed as the cast of the animated movie “Up.” Rosenne Stanford, 28, and 99 of her Harvard Business School classmates flew in from Cambridge, Mass., to be part of the San Francisco race. All 100 students dressed up as gnomes, wearing red underpants inscribed with their group name, “the underpants gnomes.” “Harvard can be kind of boring, so we needed some fun,” Stanford said. San Diego resident Chachee Ramos has been coming out to Bay to Breakers for seven years in a row now and said the race captures the city’s atmosphere. “Bay to Breakers brings people together and symbolizes San Francisco in one day,” Ramos said. Police officers were present along every intersection of the route and asked participants were asked to dispose of their alcoholic beverages. Long Fung Chung has worked at Bay to Breakers with the American Red Cross for the last eight years and said he has seen some change this year. “People are better behaved this year,” Chung said. “People used to lay down on the streets.” The American Red Cross placed eight first aid and emergency stations throughout the race course. Chung said the biggest ailments people needed help with were blisters, cuts from falls, headaches and dizziness. SF State student Jessica Schimm attended Bay to Breakers for the first time this year and said her favorite part of the event was the unique outfits. “The best part was seeing all of the different costumes,” Schimm said. “The ‘Black Swan’ costumes were one of my favorites.” She said other SF State students should experience Bay to Breakers. “I would definitely recommend it to SFSU students,” Schimm said. “It’s like a rite of passage living in San Francisco.”

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Opinion

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[X] press The Golden Gate

CLOSURE Declining to Walk

A PUBLICATION OF SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kelly Goff - kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu OPINION EDITOR Michelle Olson maolson@mail.sfsu.edu ART DIRECTOR Geena Stellato geena@mail.sfsu.edu ASSISTANT ART DIRECTOR Natalie Yemenidjian Nyemenidjian@gmail. com SOCIAL MEDIA EDITOR Daniel Gamberg gamberg@mail.sfsu.edu A&E EDITOR Scott Graf sgraf99@mail.sfsu.edu CAMPUS EDITOR Juan DeAnda juand@mail.sfsu.edu CITY EDITOR Jennifer Terman jterman@mail.sfsu.edu BREAKING NEWS Megan Taros ch3no2@mail.sfsu.edu COPY CHIEF John Blomster blomster@mail.sfsu.edu

MANAGING EDITOR Caitlin Olson - caitpat@mail.sfsu.edu

MANAGING EDITOR Sara Donchey - sdonchey@mail.sfsu.edu

EDITORIAL Commencement

BA not a golden ticket

Y

ou’re standing on the graduation stage, moments away from receiving your degree. All you can think about is your college education and how much it took to get to this point. Without a doubt, it took some money. You have paid an arm and leg for tuition, and most likely you took out loans. But even though you obtained a bachelor’s degree, you really cannot bank on making more money than your predecessors did 10 years ago. While it is still important to get a bachelor’s degree, it does not guarantee the same benefits as it did before. The median salary for men with a bachelor’s degree increased by less than $2,000 between 2000 and 2008, and for women, the average salary increased a despicable $600, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. Let us not forget that it costs more to live now than it did 10 years ago, but unfortunately we will not be making any more money, despite that hardearned degree. Even the cost to get that degree has gone up. Between 2000 and 2008 the average price of attendance for full-time students at a public four-

year college increased by almost $4,000. While paying more to make almost the same does not make much sense, students have learned that a bachelor’s degree has become not a luxury, but now almost a necessity. Many graduates are entering a Bay Area workforce in which more than 40 percent have at least a bachelor’s degree. So, just to fit in, these graduates need a piece of paper with their names on it that says they pulled too many all-nighters, consumed unhealthy amounts of caffeine and can commit to finishing something. But how do new graduates stand out when almost half the population around them has the same piece of paper, if not a better one? Twenty-five percent of jobs created by 2018 will require a bachelor’s degree, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As a result, many students will have to continue to strive for education to obtain not only their bachelor’s degree but also their master’s. But as you are walking across that stage, contemplate whether you think the job you obtain will compensate for all the money you spent on tuition.

AARON TEXEIRA Investigative Cartoonist

PHOTO EDITOR Erik Verduzco erikv@mail.sfsu.edu SPORTS EDITOR Godofredo Vasquez gvasquez@mail.sfsu.edu MULTIMEDIA EDITOR Gil Riego Jr. griegojr@mail.sfsu.edu FACULTY ADVISER Rachele Kanigel kanigel@sfsu.edu PHOTO ADVISER Ken Kobre kobre@aol.com MAGAZINE ADVISER Don Menn donmenn@mail.sfsu.edu ADVERTISING Eva Charles echarles@mail.sfsu.edu PRODUCTION & BUSINESS Barbara Landis ggxads@mail.sfsu.edu Erika Rae Langdon elangdon@mail.sfsu. edu Justin Morrison jjmorrison88@yahoo. com CIRCULATION Cory Rayden crayden@mail.sfsu.edu I.T. CONSULTANT Arun Unnikrashnan arun@mail.sfsu.edu

CONTRIBUTION Higher education

There’s no need to rush to graduation

By Hillary Bray/Special to [X]press xpressnewsstaff@gmail.com

W

hen it comes to SF State, it seems like most of my peers are either in a rush to get out, or they are here for the long haul. While college may be expensive and everyone wants to get “the cheapest deal,” is it really the cheapest deal in the long run? College is a time to learn, and that is not limited to just inside the classroom. This next academic year I am studying abroad in the United Kingdom. I wanted to study abroad in an effort to learn more about the world around me. Sometimes I feel so secluded from the rest of the world that I forget that a world exists beyond California. However, because of problems with transferring

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classes, it turns out that it will take me another semester than expected to finish my degree. At first, I was terrified that I would have to spend more time and money in college. My parents were very supportive and told me that they would prefer me to stay in college longer, they said that the economy and the job market are only going to get better the longer I stay in college. Additionally, they told me that there was no point in rushing through only to find that no jobs are available. My point is that college is supposed to be an amazing learning experience. I have learned that you do not need to rush through it. My advice to you is to learn everything you can and take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way. There is no need, especially with the current job market, to run full force through this amazing process.

The Golden Gate [X]press is a student-produced publication of the journalism department at San Francisco State University. For more information or comments, please contact Kelly Goff at kgoff@mail.sfsu.edu.

Student refuses to participate in grad ceremony By Aaron Salazar aaronsal@mail.sfsu.edu

A

s I glide through all the rituals that lead up to graduation, I am overcome with a sense of closure. I enjoyed the food in all my classes’ end-of-the-year parties. I turned in my last final, and I even paid the fee for submitting my grad application late. But there is one ritual I will be abstaining from: I refuse to participate in this year’s graduation commencement ceremony because I get no sense of closure from being congratulated by a man for whom I have lost all respect. I’m talking about our campus leader, President Robert A. Corrigan. When I enrolled in 2006, tuition was $2,500 a year, and now it costs that much for just one semester. And the Board of Trustees have warned that tuition could climb to $7,400 next fall. Along with the rising tuition, I have seen the depletion of the educational quality at SF State. Since 2008, 400 teachers have lost their jobs, 340 class sections were terminated and 3,000 eligible students were denied access due to enrollment cuts. In fall of 2009, students lost a month of school and faculty and staff took a 10 percent pay cut due to the ferocious furloughs. It seems like the University has been cut to the bone. But there is one area of fat that has not been cut; in fact, it keeps growing. When I enrolled in 2006, Corrigan absorbed a $271,590 annual salary. Five years later, his huge heap of cash has grown to $298,749, according to Board of Trustees website. That is almost a $30,000 increase, which is worth more than my entire college career. Let’s not forget that on top of this, the president receives a $60,000 housing allowance and a $12,000 car stipend each year. When confronted with these discrepancies, the administration justifies them by saying SF State needs to compete for the best administrators by offering opulent pay packages. Well, the best administrators should recognize that leading a state-supported institution comes with limitations, and when the University suffers, the president should suffer. The president lacks that understanding. He has demonstrated that students, faculty and staff are expendable, but his absurd expanding salary is essential. When I think of these outlandish contradictions, I am repulsed at the thought of sitting through Corrigan’s speech where he yammers on about hard work and dedication. If he were talking about how to take advantage of helpless students, I might take him more seriously because he is an authority on the subject. But when it comes to virtue and service I simply cannot trust him. An important lesson I have learned from doing class projects and organizing students is that the foundation for any successful relationship is trust. For a university to function efficiently, its members must feel dignified by their leaders. The people who do the work should expect to shoulder the same burden as the people who want to lead them. Simply put, the best leaders lead by example. But this lesson is absent from the minds of the SF State administration. While students, faculty and staff suffer from fee increases and layoffs, the president and top administrators enjoy luxurious pay raises. I am definitely going to celebrate these past five years of hard work. But I won’t have my dignity insulted by the hollow congratulations of a hypocrite.

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