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Threets Thrives in Three-Peat By: ishaGaines

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Queen:

King:

It began  with  an  internal  shatter   that  froze  this  female  football  player   in  place.  It  ended  with  Total  ACL   Reconstruction  Surgery  and  a  three-­‐ ‹…Š•…ƒ”Ǥ––‡’–‹‰–‘‰”ƒ„ƒϐŽƒ‰ during  the  2009  A.W.  Brown  Parent   vs.  Staff  Homecoming  Football  Game,   Chante  Threets  shattered  her  ACL   ‘–Š‡ϐ‹‡Ž†Ǥ –™ƒ••‹‹Žƒ” Junior  cxheerleaders  cheer   to  a  “balloon  pop,”  she  said.   at  Homcoming  Pep  Rally   “That  stopped  me  dead  in   my  tracks.” After  12-­‐weeks  of  physi-­‐ cal  therapy  and  a  leg  brace   from  ankle  to  hip,  Threets   learned  to  use  her  knee   again.  Threets  returned  to   –Š‡ϐ‹‡Ž†ƒ•“—ƒ”–‡”„ƒ… for  the  2010  A.W.  Brown   staff  team.  The  comeback   doesn’t  end  here.  Not  only   Winfred  Dalcour  steps  in  staff  step   did  she  throw  the  ball  as   show  during  Homecoming  Pep   “—ƒ”–‡”„ƒ…ǡŠ”‡‡–•ƒŽ•‘ Rally. gained  at  least  20  yards  on   a  reception  that  was  thrown  to  her.   The  game  commenced  Friday,  Oct.  16   at  Duncanville  High  School  Stadium.   In  attendance  was  the  E.W.  Holmes   marching  band. “I  didn’t  think  I  would  be  strong   enough  [to  play],”  Threets,  the  Pre-­‐K   4  teacher  said.  “[But]  I  don’t  like   people  telling  me  I  cant.” Among  the  other  notable  plays,   Staff  football  team  huddles  up  to   “—‹…ϐŽƒ‰’—ŽŽ•ǡƒ†–‘—…Š†‘™ dances,  the  AWBFLA  staff  defeated   go  over  their  winning  strategy. the  parents,  33-­‐21.  With  her  adrena-­‐ line  going,  

33-21, Homecoming Victory

- Benny Dunn

spiritFRIDAY

robertWHITE

“The kids  got  to  see  their   parents  and  teachers  in   another  way…re-­living   their  glory  years.”

The 2010 Royal Court:

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Photo by: Robert White Photo design: Benjamin Solmon

“Learning today, Leading tomorrow... we make the connection.”

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A.W. Brown staff member makes a comeback in parent vs. staff homecoming football game.

October 2010

GoldenEagle the

RalphHayes RayvenThurmon PrinceOdyssey Keeley,  6th  

PrinceKeAndre Choice,  1st

PrinceDeMarion Smith,  3rd

PrincessChynna Crawford,  4th

PrincessReagan Leslie, 6th

What’s INSIDE: Spotlight:

Principal, Paula  Brown   “Lessons  from  Geese”

News:

pg.2

A.W. Brown  to  build  school   auditorium.

Opinion:

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Students speak  about  school   lunches,  uniforms,  and  educa-­ tional  school  fairs.

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Writing Staff: Â

angelaCISNEROS, TA elementary acisneros@awbrown.org bjDUNN, 3rd grade student igaines@awbrown.org

dariusFRASURE,6th grade teacher dfrasure@awbrown.org

dorothyGENTRY,4th grade teacher dgentry@awbrown.org myrondaSOWELL, pre-k 3 teacher msowell@awbrown.org

Contributors:

Paula Brown, Jeilan Haynens, Azarias Haynes, Felecity, 4E

Photographer:robertWHITE

rwhite@awbrown.org special thanks to all photos contributed

Design:

ishaGAINES

igaines@aawbrown.org special thanks to all design ideas contributed

Advertising:

ishaGAINES

igaines@aawbrown.org

“ Spotlight:  Lessons from Geese�

Cynethia Belton, Alex Kuren, Benny Dunn

Campus Briefs:

I think most of us have heard the derogatory statement: “ he or she doesn’t’ t have the sense that God gave a goose�. At that point, we usually laugh and shake our heads in wry agreement. While on the surface that seems amusing, I’ve learned that there are many wise lessons we can learn from geese...

Editor:ishaGAINES...igaines@awbrown.org Copy Editors: Â

By:  Paula  Brown A.W. Brown principal

Lesson 1.  The  Importance  of  Be-­â€? ing  Proactive  and  Achieving   Goals:  As  each  goose Ď?Žƒ’•‹–•™‹Â?‰•ǥ‹–…”‡ƒ–‡•—’Ž‹ˆ– for  the  birds  that  follow.  By   Ď?Ž›‹Â?‰‹Â?ƒÇŽÇŻˆ‘”Â?ƒ–‹‘Â?ÇĄ –Š‡™Š‘Ž‡Ď?Ž‘…Â?ƒ††•͚ͳ’‡”-­â€? …‡Â?–‡š–”ƒ–‘–Š‡Ď?Ž›‹Â?‰”ƒÂ?‰‡Ǥ The  lesson  is  when  we  have   a  sense  of  community  and   focus,  we  create  trust  and  can   help  each  other  to  achieve  our   goals.

Lesson 2.  The  Importance  of  Team   Work  and  Synergy:  When  a   goose  falls  out  of  formation,   it  suddenly  feels  the  drag  and   ”‡•‹•–ƒÂ?…‡‘ˆĎ?Ž›‹Â?‰ƒŽ‘Â?‡Ǥ – “—‹…Â?Ž›Â?‘˜‡•„ƒ…Â?–‘–ƒÂ?‡ advantage  of  the  lifting  power   of  the  birds  in  front.  The  les-­â€? son  here  is  if  we  had  as  much   sense  as  geese,  we  would  stay   in  formation  with  those  headed   where  we  want  to  go.  We  are   willing  to  accept  their  help  and   to  give  our  help  to  others.

Lesson 3.  The  Importance  of  Sharing:   Š‡Â?ƒ‰‘‘•‡–‹”‡•ˆ”‘Â?Ď?Ž›‹Â?‰—’ front,  it  drops  back  into  forma-­â€? –‹‘Â?ƒÂ?†ƒÂ?‘–Š‡”‰‘‘•‡Ď?Ž‹‡•–‘–Š‡ point  position.  From  this,  we  learn   that  it  pays  to  take  turns  doing  the   hard  tasks.  We  should  respect  and   ’”‘–‡…–‡ƒ…Š‘–Š‡”ǯ•—Â?‹“—‡•Â?‹ŽŽ•ǥ capabilities,  talents  and  resources.

Lesson 4. The  Importance  of  Empa-­â€? thy  and  Understanding:  When  a   goose  gets  sick,  two  geese  drop   out  of  formation  and  follow  it   down  to  the  ground  to  help  and   protect  it.  To  have  the  sense  of   geese,  we  will  stand  by  each   ‘–Š‡”‹Â?†‹ˆĎ?‹…—Ž––‹Â?‡•ǥĥ™‡ŽŽĥ when  we  are  strong. Lesson 5.  The  Importance  of  En-­â€? …‘—”ƒ‰‡Â?‡Â?–ǣ ‡‡•‡Ď?Ž›‹Â?‰‹Â? formation  honk  to  encourage   those  up  front  to  keep  up  with   their  speed.  When  we  “honkâ€?   [read  speak],  we  need  to  ensure   that  our  honking  is  encouraging.   In  groups  and  teams,  produc-­â€? tion  is  much  greater  where  there   is  encouragement.  Individual   empowerment  is  the  result  of   “—ƒŽ‹–›Š‘Â?Â?‹Â?‰Ǩ Maybe  those  geese  aren’t  so   †—Â?„ƒˆ–‡”ƒŽŽǼǨ

Banks  Recovery: ‘Â?‡‡†–‘”‡Ž‹Â?“—‹•ŠŠ‹•’‘•–ǥ”Ǥ George  W.  Banks  Jr.  returns  to  work   with  a  pep  in  his  step  after  a  leave-­â€? of-­â€?absence  from  Sept.  10  -­â€?  Oct.  4.  The   Breast  Cancer  Drive: reason:  Prostate  cancer.   A.W.  Brown’s  Breast  Cancer  Drive   Approaching  his  3rd  year  at  A.W.   began  September  2010  to  kick  off   Brown   F.L.A.,  Banks  was  diagnosed  in   National  Breast  Cancer  Awareness   July   2 010.    Because  of  early  detection,   Month. Banks  had  the  cancer  removed.     Recognized  in  October,  the  national   With  a  95-­â€?percent  recovery  rate,   program  celebrates  25  years  of  prog-­â€? Banks,  Behavior  Management   ress. Interventionist,  recommends  men  45   Brown’s  committee  headed  by  Jessie   and  older  get  checked  every  year. Newton,  SPED  Admin,  and  Adjuanita —”•–ǥ”‡nj…ƒÂ?’—•ˆĎ?‹…‡ƒÂ?ÂƒÂ‰Â‡Â”ÇĄ‹• â€œâ€Śespecially  African  Americans,â€?  he   designed  to  raise  money  for  the  Komen said.  “It  is  the  second  leading  cause  of   Foundation’s  research  and  treatment  of   death  for  them.â€? breast  cancer.  Last  year,  the  committee         -­Cisneros   raised  $1200.  Newton  said  the  commit-­â€? School  Growth: tee  has  set  a  new  goal  of  $1400,  that   The  A.W.  Brown  Elementary  cam-­â€? they  intend  to  reach.  Something  special   pus   has  added  three  new  6th  grade   to  the  program:  a  pink  decorative   sections.   The  classes:  Math  and   blanket  with  signature  pink  ribbons.   Science  -­â€?  Akia  Smith,  6B;  Language   The  same  styled  blanket  and  separate   Arts  and  Social  Studies,  Darius   ‘Â?‡ˆ‘”DzÂ?ÂƒÂŽÂ‡Â•Çł™‹ŽŽ„‡”ƒˆĎ?Ž‡†–Š‹• month.  “Pink  souvenir  handbag  sales,  a   Frasure,  6D;  and  Language  Arts  and   pink  dress-­â€?down  day,  and  luncheon  on   Social  Studies  -­â€?  Chejuana  Martin,  6F. October  26,  will  also  support  the  drive,â€?   “Adding  the  sections  shows  sign   Newton  said. of  expansion,â€?  6th  grade  Reading   “The  drive,  founded  in  2005,  was  the   teacher  Twanna  Mead  said.  “The   spawn  of  a  breast  cancer  program  at Â?‡™–‡ƒ…Š‡”•ƒ”‡Ď?‹––‹Â?‰‹Â?“—‹–‡ Newton’s  church,â€?  Hurst  said.  “I  jumped   well  and  things  are  going on  board,  because  I  saw  a  need  to  in-­â€? ˆƒÂ?Â–ÂƒÂ•Â–Â‹Â…Ç¨Çł form  the  public  and  community  about         -­Cisneros breast  cancer,â€?  Hurst  added. Food  Deposits: Donations  are  accepted  at  both  the   For  two  years,  A.W.  Brown  F.L.A   elementary  and  Pre-­â€?K  campuses.  The   has  been  recognized  for  donat-­â€? last  day  of  the  drive  for  our  district  is   ing  the  most  food  to  the  North   October  29.       -­Cisneros Texas  Food  Bank.  After  raising  over   4,000  pounds  of  food  last  year,  it’s   planned  to  raise  4,500  pounds  this   season.   -­Cisneros      

Paula  Brown,  Principal by:  robertWHITE

Campus Additions: The  Elementary  Campus  will  soon   ‰‡–ƒÂ?‡nj‹„”ƒ”›ǨŠ‡ÂŽÂ‹Â„Â”ÂƒÂ”Â›ÇĄˆ—ŽŽ‘ˆ iPads,  Apple’s  latest  mini-­â€?computer   device,  will  “accommodate  a  full   classroom,â€?  Benjamin  Solomon  Dis-­â€? trict  Technology  Director  said.  “We   do  not  have  space  for  a  [traditional]   library,â€?  he  said.  “[So]  the  iPad’s  will   „‡Ď?‹ŽŽ‡†™‹–Š‡nj„‘‘Â?•Ž‹Â?‡ÂŠÂƒÂ”Ž‘––‡ǯ• Web  and  Encyclopedias.â€?    -­Cisneros Have  you  looked  down  lately?  Out   with  the  old  “Green  Mileâ€?  of  carpet,   in  with  the  washable  red  and  yel-­â€? Ž‘™Ď?Ž‘‘”‹Â?‰–Šƒ–™ƒ•’—–‹Â?‘˜‡”–Š‡ summer.  Children,  follow  the  yellow   ǎƒÂ?†”‡†ǯ„”‹…Â?Â”Â‘ÂƒÂ†ÇĄ™‡ǯŽŽ„‡”‹‰Š– „‡Š‹Â?†Â›ÂƒÇŻÇ¨    -­Cisneros

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GoldenEagle.... theCREW

October 5th, Carla Butler, Pre-K 4A Teacher was PWVWZMLJa7NÅKM5I`),Ia5ILM*M\\MZ8ZWgram’. Butler sports her new brown leather chair OQ^MV\WPMZJa7NÅKM5I`

robertWHITE


Oh’ Possum, in the Debri

By: ishaGAINES

By: ishaGAINES

Golden Sigmas step in Hollywood competition. As the  group  of  six  boys  entered   Disney’s  “Hollywood  Studios”  for  the   “Disney  Step  Classic,”  they  wondered   if  they  were  in  the  right  place.  Seem-­‐ ingly  the  youngest  in  the  competi-­‐ tion,  they  noticed  very  few  steppers   looked  like  them  –  elementary-­‐aged   and  a  tad  shorter. “Stand  there  and  look  good,”  Step   Director  William  Holmes  teaches  his   team.  “You  have  to  focus.” Holmes’  group  was  on  a  mission   –‘’”‘˜‡Š‘™Ǯƒ–—”‡ǯ–Š‡‹”–ƒŽ‡– actually  was.  So  they  let  their  feet  do   the  talking.   ‘’‡–‹‰‹–Š‡Ǯͳͻƒ†—†‡”ǯ group  would  hopefully  add  to  their   reputation  of  being  one  of  the  elite   elementary  step  teams  in  the  Dallas   area.  So,  The  Golden  Eagle  step  team   gladly  accepted  Or-­‐ lando,  Florida  as  their   new  stomping  ground.     The  third  annual  com-­‐ petition  judged  by  the   National  Step  Team  Alliance  was  an   all-­‐day  event  on  Saturday,  Sept.  4,   2010.   The  team  began  their  10-­‐minute   show  dressed  in  red  tuxedos  and   black  capes.  After  announcing  the   Ǯ ‘Ž†‡‹‰ƒ•ƒ”‡Š‡”‡ǯ‘˜‡”–Š‡ gothic  and  opera-­‐styled  tune,  “The   “Phantom  of  the  Opera”  the  boys   began  to  step. Their  capes  swung  and  feet  tapped   in  four  steps  that  were  complicated   but  synergized,  Holmes  said.  As  part   of  the  routine,  the  team  used  canes   –‘Ǯ•™‹‰‘—–ǯ–Š‡…‘’‡–‹–‹‘Ǥˆ–‡” a  blindfolded  step  routine  and  trib-­‐ ute  to  Greek  fraternities  and  sorori-­‐ ties,  the  Golden  Sigmas  took  12th   place.  Out  of  the  29  competitors,  The   Golden  Sigmas  were  the  only  team   from  Dallas. I  told  them  up  front  “to  have  made  it   this  far,  they  had  to  be  good,”  Holmes  

Students volunteer for Heroes Community Service Project

Golden Sigmas  pose  at  Florida  step   competition. said.  “They  are  the  best  of  the  best.” Infused  with  three  alumni  mem-­‐ bers,  the  team  received  an  engraved   Ǯ‹…‡›‘—•‡ǯ–”‘’Š›ƒ†”ƒ–‹‰‘ˆ Ǯš…‡ŽŽ‡–ǯˆ‘”‘˜‡”ƒŽŽ•Š‘™’‡”ˆ‘”-­‐ mance.   Nicolas,  6F,  said  he  wasn’t  afraid  on   stage  during  the  competition.  Satis-­‐ ϐ‹‡†™‹–ŠŽ‡ƒ˜‹‰–Š‡…‘’‡–‹–‹‘ with  “something,”  he  said  the  steps   were  easy  to  learn. “You  know  how  you’re   working  and  having  fun   at  your  job  -­‐  It’s  kinda  like   that,”  he  said.  “I  know  we   did  our  best.  I  wasn’t  nervous.”  “We  were  close  to  the  only  elemen-­‐ tary  group  competing,”  said  Holmes,   who  also  teaches  Kindergarten.   “We  did  see  another  group  that  had   elementary  students  competing,  but   they  still  looked  older.” Holmes  founded  The  Golden  Sigmas   in  2005  to  provide  a  goal-­‐oriented   alternative  to  those  not  athletically   inclined.  He  said  although  some  bal-­‐ ance  both  sports  and  stepping,  his   team  has  no  problem  being  enter-­‐ taining  during  step  performances. He  said  they  step  past  elementary   level  and  are  often  asked  by  show   sponsors  to  compete  at  middle   school  levels.  Under  its  new  name,                     The  Golden  Sigma  Mini  Fraternity,   the  team  now  has  over  35  members. “We  have  a  level  of  respect  in  the   stepping  community,”  he  said.  “[Our   competitors  say]  uh,  oh  here  they   come.  We  have  that  swag  about  our-­‐ selves.”  

“We have a level of respect in the stepping community,”

In an  instant  everyone  began  to   scatter.  With  screams  to  follow,  the   volunteers  saw  something  furry,  tan,   and  wide-­‐eyed.  Attempting  to  re-­‐lo-­‐ cate  him  using  a  tractor,  the  children   watched  from  a  distance.  This  animal   had  interrupted  the  assembly  line   rotation  the  volunteers  had  created,   while  clearing  a  40-­‐foot  brush  pile  at   the  Hamilton  Park  Urban  Tree  farm   in  North  Dallas.  This  possum,  was  the   surprise  of  the  H.E.R.O.E.S.  commu-­‐ nity  service  project  where  some  5th   and  6th  grade  students  volunteered.   The  students  receive  one  daily  grade   for  participation. The  Hamilton  Tree  Farm  is  a  non-­‐ ’”‘ϐ‹–‘”‰ƒ‹œƒ–‹‘–Šƒ–‰”‘™•–”‡‡• which  are  used  to  beautify  the  city  of   Dallas.  The  farm  allows  volunteers  to   assist  with  their  efforts  just  as  Brown   students,  parents  and  staff  did  from   8  a.m.  –  12  p.m.  on  Saturday,  Sept.  11,   2010.

Marc Morrow,  ESL  &  Character   Education  Instructor  and  H.E.R.O.E.S.   Community  Service  Program  Co-­‐ ordinator.  Morrow  launched  the   H.E.R.O.E.S  program  in  2008.  Morrow   looks  for  projects  that  are  not  dan-­‐ gerous,  that  are  age-­‐appropriate  and   easily  accomplishable  on  a  Saturday   ‘”‹‰Ǥ ‡ϐ‹†••‹š’”‘Œ‡…–•ˆ‘”–Š‡ students  to  complete  in  a  school  year. “They  can  create  their  own  kinds  of   community  projects,”  he  said.  “I  truly   believe  we’ll  be  on  the  map  one  day   „‡…ƒ—•‡–Š‡›•–ƒ”–‡†ƒ‘Ǧ’”‘ϐ‹–Ǥdz Devonte,  5D,  who  was  a  volunteer   said  he  was  educated  on  how  to  build   Ǯ•–—ˆˆǯ™Š‹Ž‡ƒ––Š‡ˆƒ”Ǥ ‡•ƒ‹†Š‡ hopes  to  build  houses  for  his  family   and  this  was  his  start.  Devonte  said,   “God  will  bless  you”  when  you  do   community  service. Floyd  Williams,  ISS  teacher,  said   he  agrees  the  students  received  “a   little  botanical  know-­‐how”  at  the  tree   ˆƒ”Ǥ‘Ž—–‡‡”‹‰‹•ƒ‰”‡ƒ–™ƒ›–‘ show  God  that  you  care  about  the   earth,  Williams  said.  

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Timeless Tales Five-year Grandparents’ Day tradition JZQVO[»]VM`XMK\ML¼O]M[\

By: ishaGaines

Phantom ‘Swag’

Pg. 4

92-­year-­old, Casey  Jones  reads  “Grandma’s  Biscuits”

The Chosen Few

The process to elect the new 6th grade council members commenced on October 4. By: angelaCISNEROS The  6th  grade  student  council  has   been  chosen.  The  criteria  included   having  at  least  an  85-­‐percent  grade   point  average  and  good  behavioral   standing.  The  candidates  were  given   an  opportunity  to  give  a  speech  to   showcase  their  leadership  skills.  “Be-­‐ ing  a  good  role  model  is  a  must,”  said   Twanna  Mead,  6th  grade  Reading  

Teacher and  student  council  advisor.     Once  approved  for  selection,  students   could  start  their  campaigns.  Students   were  not  able  to  use  any  form  of  food   for  campaigns.  Some  resorted  to   Šƒ†‹‰‘—–’‡…‹Ž•ǡǮ–‡ƒ…ƒ’ƒ‹‰-­‐ ing,’  and  making  elaborate  posters   -­‐  which  were  posted  in  the  6th  grade   hall  for  viewing.  Ballots  were  cast  at   the  October  6  election.   Š‡‡™…‘—…‹ŽŠƒ†–Š‡‹”ϐ‹”•– ‘ˆϐ‹…‹ƒŽ‡‡–‹‰‘…–‘„‡”ͳͳǤŠ‡ council  plans  to  host  a  food  drive,   campus  clean  up,  Pasta  for  Pennies-­‐   to  support  leukemia  and  lymphoma   research,  toiletry  delivery  to  a  local   nursing  home  and  a  visit  to  City  Hall   in  Dallas,  TX.

Casey Jones  wakes  up  every  morn-­‐ ing  ready  to  go  to  one  particular   place.  Geared  up  to  play  Bingo,  exer-­‐ cise,  and  hang  with  people  his  age,   Jones  is  comfortable  with  his  daily   routine  of  going  to  the  Desoto  Civic   Center.    At  the  age  of  92,  he  still  likes   to  get  out. On  the  morning  of  Sept.  9,  his  plans   would  change.  Jones  walked  into  the   Pre-­‐Kindergarten  campus  expecting   to  be  honored  on  National  Grandpar-­‐ ents’  Day  2010,  but  unbeknownst  to   him,  he  was  asked  to  read  to  the  class   of  25  students.  His  daughter-­‐in-­‐law,   Debora  Jones,  put  him  up  to  it.  Jones   gladly  accepted,  even  cracking  a  joke   or  two  as  he  read  “Grandma’s  Bis-­‐ cuits.” The  annual  program  at  the  Pre-­‐K   campus  honors  grandparents  for   their  contributions  over  the  years.   Pre-­‐K  teachers  design  individual  pro-­‐ grams  that  include  painting,  poems  

....Continued on Pg.12

....Continued from Pg.4

Pg. 5

At the  farm,  Williams  and  crew   emptied  old  tree  canisters,  recycled   salvageable  trees,  created  a  com-­‐ post  pile,  and  discarded  debris.   “There  were  smiles  on  faces  and  joy   in  [the]  people’s  hearts,”  he  said.                 Speaking  of  smiles,  Williams  said   seeing  the  students’  reaction  to  the   possum  was  good  fun. “We  all  had  a  big  laugh  after  the   whole  spectacle  ended.”

Volunteers watch  as  tractor  attempts   to  re-­locate  possum.

6th Grade Student Council: Jissel Melendez-­  President Maiya  Murphy-­  Vice  President Tremayne  Bell-­  Treasure Reagan  Leslie-­  Secretary Parliamentarian-­  Ariyan  Williams

Other Council Members: Isura Adedokun Keyasia  Hamilton JaLyric  Jacobs Jada  Johnson Alexia  Larzeia Caitlin  Lawrence Davier  Ross Sean  Smith Summer  Waters

;\]LMV\LM[QOVMLÆIO[_MZMXW[\MLQV\PM 5th and 6th grade hall as part of Constitution week 2010.


Assembling to Assemble, the Stage that Brown Built By: Â angelaCISNEROS A.W. Brown F.L.A is in-midst of constructing new auditorium on elementary campus.

A.W.  Brown  F.L.A  is  in-­â€?midst   of  constructing  a  new  audi-­â€? torium  on  the  elementary   campus.  This  new  auditorium   will  change  the  way  AWBFLA   conducts  ceremonies  and  the   way  the  audience  views  them.   As  apart  of  phase  four  of  a   multi-­â€?phase  renovation  project   for  AWBFLA,  guest  will  be  wel-­â€? comed  with  intricate  murals   and  a  “calming  zoneâ€?  (i.e.,  the   lobby).  The  one-­â€?story  audito-­â€? ”‹—Â?‹•‡š’‡…–‡†–‘„‡Ď?‹Â?‹•Š‡† Spring  2011  -­â€?  just  in  time  for   campus  graduations.   Benjamin  Solomon,  District  Tech-­â€? nology  Director  said  he’s  looking   forward  to  the  state  of  the  art  sound   system,  that  will  be  “better  than   BOSEâ€?,  high-­â€?performing  audio  prod-­â€? ucts.  With  electronic  theatre  lighting,   tech  support  can  provide  support   from  an  audience  seat. Dz‡”ˆ‘”Â?ƒÂ?…‡•ƒÂ?†‡“—‹’Â?‡Â?–™‹ŽŽ be  easier  to  manage,â€?  Solomon  said.   “I  could  be  an  usher  and  sit  in  the  au-­â€? dience  -­â€?  and  control  the  sound,  lights   and  the  mixing  pad  with  an  iPad.â€?  

ing  Manager  said  we  rented   close  to  200  chairs  last  year   for  award  ceremonies  –  and   of  course  –  set  them  out.   Šƒ‹”•Ž‹Â?‡†ƒŽ‘Â?‰–Š‡Ď?Ž‘‘” and  bleachers  were  the   seating  choices.  In  previous   years,  maintenance  has  laid   gigantic  tarps  to  cover  the   ‰›Â?Ď?Ž‘‘”ƒÂ?†•‡–—’ƒʹǤ͡ foot-­â€?tall  stage  in  2009. Mitchell  said  this  wasn’t   Šƒ”†…‘Â?’ƒ”‡†–‘–Š‡Ď?‹”•– Step  Explosion  the  school   Early  phase  of  construction   hosted,  where  we  had  to   by:robertWHITE …Ž‡ƒÂ?—’…ƒÂ?‡•’Žƒ––‡”‡†‘Â?–Š‡Ď?Ž‘‘” ‘Ž‘Â?‘Â?…ƒÂ?‰‡–“—‹–‡…‘Â?ˆ›‹Â?ƒÂ?› by  guest  clowns.   There  was  a  team  of  steppers   one  of  the  1,400  plus  seats  in  the   dressed  up  as  clowns  that  had  real   audience  too.  Using  a  rear  projec-­â€? cake  as  a  part  of  their  performance.   tor  behind  the  stage,  Solomon  and   attendees  will  be  able  to  view  custom   DzŠ‡Ď?Ž‘‘”•‹Â?–Š‡‰›Â?Šƒ†Œ—•– backdrops  for  ceremonies  and  other   been  redone  with  four  layers  of   wax,â€?  Mitchell  said. events  the  school  will  host. Great  thing,  the  new  auditorium   Dating  a  few  years  back,  the  gym   Ď?Ž‘‘”’”‘˜‹†‡†–Š‡’”‡Â?‹—Â?•‡ƒ–•‘ˆ will  support  a  4-­â€?foot  stage,  where   viewers  can  easily  see  a  cake  throw-­â€? the  house.  Dating  a  few  years  for-­â€? ward,  cushioned  stadium-­â€?style  seats   ing  routine,  should  clowns  reappear. will  be  the  reward  of  true  humility. Patrick  Mitchell,  Assistant  Build-­â€?

“What do you think about the new auditorium?�

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Trevor,  4C Kortnei,  4C “It  will  be  good  that  we  have   “I  think  it  is  good  to  have  one,�   he  said  excitedly.  “Classes   one,�  she  said.  “If  we  do  a   could  go  in  there  for  fun  Fri-­ play  or  assembly,  we  will   have  a  better  place  to  do  it.� days.� Jasmyne,  3D “I  love  it,  because  it  is  go-­ ing  to  be  fun  and  exciting  to   perform  in  there!�

Journee,  3F “I  think  it’s  going  to  be  re-­ ally  fun,�  she  said.  “A  special   place,  because  more  family-­ will  be  able  to  come.�

Aliyah,  3C “There  will  be  great  things  that  happen  there!�

Devon,  4A “I  think  it’s  going  to  be  nice   and  it’s  going  to  be  fun,�  he   said  anxiously.  “We  will  get  to   have  plays,  assemblies,  and   graduations  there  instead  the   gym!� Kyla,  4D “I  think  that  it  is  going  to  be   a  big  deal  for  the  school,�  she   said.  “It  shows  us  moving  to-­ ward  bigger  things.�

L’Tosha,  4A I  think  it  is  going  to  be   really  great,�  she  said   with  excitement.  “When   we  have  assemblies   now,  we  can  go  over   there  instead  of  in  the   gym!� London,  3E “I  like  it,  because  more   people  will  be  staring  at   us.�

Pg. 6 The multiple construction developments that have taken place at A.W. Brown are actually a part of a multi-phase project. The phases are‌ Phase  1-­â€?  Where  the  administrators’   ‘ˆĎ?‹…‡•ƒ”‡ÂŽÂ‘Â…ÂƒÂ–Â‡Â†ÇĄ†‘™Â?–‘–Š‡Ď?‹”•– set  of  double  doors,  is  where  Pre-­â€?K   classes  used  to  be  held.  Pre-­â€?K  now   has  their  own  building  on  the  corner   of  Camp  Wisdom  and  Westmoreland   streets. Phase  2-­  The  connecting  hallway   –Šƒ–…‘Â?’Ž‡–‡•–Š‡Ç˛Â•Â“Â—ÂƒÂ”Â‡Çłˆ‘”Â?ƒ–‘ˆ the  elementary  campus,  the  gym  and   campus  parking  lot.  Phase  3-­â€?  The  5th  and  6th  grade   wing  of  the  elementary  campus  and   –Š‡ƒŽ‡”‹—Â?ƒ††‡†Ǥ Phase  4-­â€?  The  construction  of  the   new  auditorium. Phase  5-­â€?  A.W.  Brown  plans  to  add  a   parking  lot  to  the  south  of  building. Phase  6  –  With  the  recent  pur-­â€? chase  of  110  acres  of  land  in   Duncanville,we  wonder  what  this   phase  will  be...

robertWHITE

Info Box:

The auditorium will include: t 1,400  plus  cushioned  seats  that  have   been  handpicked  and  tested  by  campus   administrators t Two  dressing  rooms  for  prepping  and   planning   t Flat  screen  television  sets  throughout   the  facility t Sound  system  including  18-­�inch  sub-­� woofers t Rear  projector  controlled  by  an  Alan   and  Heath  digital  mixing  pad t The  facility  will  have  a  4-­�foot  stage t All  of  this  provided  with  the  help  of  Ed   Cummings  and  Associates

Pg. 7

Opinion Section

“What are the benefits of the A.W. Brown Health, Math, and Literacy (Reading) Fairs?�

How Do You Feel About School Uniforms?

Dennis,  5B “The  math  fair  helps  you  learn  about   different  ways  to  use  numbers,�  he   said.  “The  health  fair  helps  you  to   learn  how  to  eat  and  drink  nutritious   things.  The  reading  fair  encourages   students  to  read  more.�

From the voice of students...

By:  Felecity,  4E I  think  school  uniforms  are  appro-­â€? priate  for  school.  If  we  wear  clothes   that  look  raggedy,  then  people  will   think  our  school  is  horrible.  Parents   might  take  their  kids  out  and  take   them  to  another  school.  Some  kids   won’t  have  their  friends  there  to  play   with.  If  we  wear  school  uniforms   we’ll  be  alright. Also,  uniforms  are  nice  to  wear,   because  they  have  the  United  States   Ď?Žƒ‰…‘Ž‘”ƒÂ?†–Š‡Ď?Žƒ‰…‘Ž‘”‘Â? them.  Yellow  is  the  color  of  the  sun,   so  it  is  like  we  are  the  shining  stars.   That’s  why  I  think  it  is  nice  to  wear   school  uniforms,  instead  of  regular   clothes. School  uniforms  are  easy  to  pick  out   instead  of  casual  clothes  everyday.   We  might  be  wearing  the  same  thing   over  and  over  again,  but  that’s  ok.  At   least,  we  won’t  be  messing  up  our   room  looking  for  casual  clothes.  We’d   have  to  clean  our  room  after  school   everyday. Another  reason  I  like  school  uni-­â€? forms  is  because  they  show  owner-­â€? ship  and  leadership,  that  makes   students  and  the  staff  look  like  a   great  school.  School  uniforms  show   –Šƒ–™‡ƒ”‡—Â?‹Ď?‹‡†ƒÂ?†ƒ”‡ƒ•…Š‘‘Ž that  follows  the  seven  habits. School  uniforms  are  also  more  in-­â€? expensive  than  casual  clothes.  When   our  parents  buy  us  clothes,  they  don’t   have  to  be  all  fancy  -­â€?  you’re  really   not  coming  to  school  to  show  off.  I   know  my  mom  doesn’t  want  to  pay   Ď?‹ˆ–›†‘ŽŽƒ”•ˆ‘”ƒÂ?‘—–Ď?‹–ˆ‘”Œ—•–Â?‡Ǥ That  is  why  I  will  always  like  school   uniforms.

By:  Jeilan  Haynes,  6th  grade  from  a   Dallas  Charter  School,  likes  school   uniforms: Well  I  know  teachers  like  uniforms,   because  we  don’t  sag.  We  look  good   in  a  person  should  someone  higher   than  the  principal  come  to  the  school   to  see  what  we  look  like  and  what  the   teachers  are  teaching  us.   What  the  student’s  like  about  the   uniforms?  Well  I  think  it’s  because   they  look  at  department  store  sales   and  say  that  they  look  good.   What  do  the  principals  like  about   the  uniforms?  Well  to  make  the   teachers,  the  students,  and  the  school   look  good  -­�  of  course. By:  Azarias  Haynes,  4th  grade  from   DISD,  dislikes  school  uniforms: I  dislike  school  uniforms  because   they  make  everybody  look  bad.   Sometimes  they  make  me  and  my   friends  uncomfortable  at  school.  I   feel  like  wearing  my  own  clothes,   because  I  look  better.  Plus,  we  only   get  two  days  to  wear  what  ever  we   want  at  school.  And  I  think  it  is  unfair   for  the  kids. Submit  opinion  articles/ideas  to   igaines@awbrown.org

Bj Knows... About the Lovely Ladyz Step Team. He talks to Winfred Dalcour, advisor and 3rd grade teacher. In  November  is  the  next  perfor-­ mance. They  get  taught  to  step. There  are  15  girls  on  the  team. They  go  where  they  supposed  to   [when  performing] They  practice  Tuesday  and  Thurs-­ day  5:00  p.m.  to  6:00  p.m.  &  Mon-­ day  and  Friday  4:00  p.m.  –  6:00   p.m.

BJ Knows... About the Dairy Farm at the <M`I[;\I\M.IQZ0Q[KTI[[_MV\\W the farm on October 12, 2010. Milk  starts  out  hot. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  machine  that  makes  the   milk  cold. The  girl  cows  are  called  cows  and   the  male  cows  are  called  bulls. Cows  only  make  white  milk. The  farm  was  blue  and  white.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you think about school lunches?â&#x20AC;? Tajon,  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  3E DzÂ&#x2022;ǤÂ&#x2018;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?ÇŻÂ&#x2022;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Ǩdz Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x192;ÇĄ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good,  the  lunch  is  good  and  I  eat  it.â&#x20AC;? Nadia,  KB â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  good  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  healthy,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   if  we  eat  all  our  food  we  get  ice  cream,  if   we  pay  for  it.â&#x20AC;?

Katie,  1B â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  tastes  kind  of  yummy,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   make  good  food  and  breakfast  in  the   morning,  with  good  milk  and  good  or-­â&#x20AC;? ange  juice.â&#x20AC;? Tamia,  2C â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  like  all  the  milk,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything   looks  good.â&#x20AC;?

Aaron,  5B Dz Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2019; people  learn  more  about  math  and   to  follow  steps  in  a  fun  way,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  for  your  brain  and  to  help  pass   the  TAKS.  It  encourages  to  doall  the   work  without  any  help,  in  addition  to   Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â?Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x153;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Ǩdz Camâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ron,  5E â&#x20AC;&#x153;Math  Fair  is  to  teach  kids  to  add,   multiply,  subtract,  and  divide,â&#x20AC;?  he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Helps  develop  our  minds  and   make  better  choice  so  you  can  have   a  healthier  body.  The  reading  fair  en-­â&#x20AC;? courages  us  to  read  more  books  and   helps  our  development.â&#x20AC;? Colbi,  6C â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  make  math  more  fun  for  some   students  and  to  help  them  better   understand  it,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  health   part  helps  them  learn  more  informa-­â&#x20AC;? tion  about  health  to  help  them  take   care  of  their  bodies.â&#x20AC;? Rikeisha,  6D Dz Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2019;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022; Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;ǤdzÂ&#x2022;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;ǤDz  think  it  is  a  great  opportunity  to  get   out  and  play  and  release  your  feel-­â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Ǩdz Tremayne,  6D Dz Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201E;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030; families  out  to  have  fun  and  get  a  bet-­â&#x20AC;? ter  learning  experience  for  math,â&#x20AC;?  he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  can  focus  more  on  their   health.â&#x20AC;? Tiara,  6F DzÂ&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;-­â&#x20AC;? nity  to  achieve  more  understanding   and  set  new  goals.â&#x20AC;?


From Apples to Alligators By: Â ishaGAINES

By: Â MyrondaSOWELL

Pre-K 4 Class opts for a differnt tradition. Sitting  in  a  row  of  three,  the   eager  students  awaited  a  thou-­â&#x20AC;? sand-­â&#x20AC;?pound  animal  to  jump  out  of   the  plastic  bag.  Some  cried,  some   politely  said  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no,â&#x20AC;?  and  others  sat   curiously  with  wide  eyes. To  their  surprise,  it  came  in  ed-­â&#x20AC;? ible  bits.  Now,  some  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  stop   Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;͜njÂ&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;ÇŚÂ&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2022;Ǥ At  11:00  a.m.  on  Thursday,  Sept.   23,  2010,  the  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  4I  satellite   classroom  located  in  the  Concord   Learning  Center,  tasted  alligator   as  a  part  of  a  science  and  literacy   lesson.  After  the  lesson,  the  stu-­â&#x20AC;? dents  graphed  how  the  alligator   tasted. Some  said  it  tasted  like  chicken,   Â&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x160;ÇĄÂ&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020; apple  dippers  and  French  fries. The  alligator  tasting  was  the  idea   of  the  Concord  Learning  Center  

Director,  Shenikwa  Cager.  Helping   the  students  to  associate  the  letter   A  with  alligator,  Cager  insisted   the  students  try  the  new  recipe   at  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pappadeaux  Seafood  Kitchen.â&#x20AC;?   Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2019;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Ǩ After  a  few  snapshots  of  greased   lips  and  chomping  teeth,  there   came  the  student-­â&#x20AC;?lead  motiva-­â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;ÇŽÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;ÇŻÂ?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2013; wanting  a  taste. Â&#x2020;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;ÇĄÂ&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x160;ÇĄ a  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  4I  student,  secretly  ap-­â&#x20AC;? proached  her  teacher  to  say  that   she  thought  a  real  alligator  would   pop  out  of  the  plastic  bag.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  thought  it  was  going  to  eat   me,â&#x20AC;?  she  said  after  settling  down. So  while  her  friends  were  not   Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;ÇĄÂ&#x2022;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021; of  the  alligator.  Then  she  did  the   unthinkableâ&#x20AC;Ś  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can  I  have  another  

piece?â&#x20AC;?  she  whispered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  sure  can,â&#x20AC;&#x153;  her  teacher  said   proudly. Parent  Jody  Darden  Sr.  said  he   takes  his  family  for  Cajun  food  fre-­â&#x20AC;? Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A;Ǥ Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;͜njÂ&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;ÇŚÂ&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?ÇĄÂ&#x2122;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018; tasted  the  alligator,  has  also  tasted   octopus  and  lobster.  Darden  said   different  foods  involve  different   cultures.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  good  to  take  them,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;so  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  know  what  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   like,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  judge  before  you  try  it,â&#x20AC;?   he  tells  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;sha  Gaines,  the  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K   4I  Concord  Teacher.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be   open-­â&#x20AC;?minded  about  different   foods  and  cultures.â&#x20AC;? Being  open-­â&#x20AC;?minded  is  a  trait   Gaines  tries  to  instill  into  all  of  her   Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;ÇĄÂ&#x201E;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;ÇĽ she  said  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  leave  that  to  the   children.

Q ues ti on & A nsw er with  Rev.  Armond  Brown lets talk about baseball... Q:  When  did  the  program  start? A:  Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Ď&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2039;-­

Q:  When  does  the  league  begin? A:  The  spring  league  begins  in  late   March  and  ends  in  early  June.

pating  in  the  southern  division  of  the   DALLAS  LITTLE  LEAGUE  BASEBALL   program.  We  entered  2  teams  -­  (1)   10  &  under  and  (2)  12  &  under.  Both   Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2022;Ď&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Ǥ͜͜͝

Q:What  are  the  team  goals? A:The  team  goal  is  to  win  the  division,   capture  the  league  crown,  qualify  for   the  nationals  and  travel  to  Japan  to   compete  against  the  Japanese.

Q:How  many  members  on  the   team?  

Q:Is  the  team  co-­ed?  A:The  baseball  program  is  for  boys   only,  but  we  plan  to  initiate  a  girls'   softball  program  in  the  fall  of  2011.

A:  We  had  a  combined  total  of  27   players.  The  players  carried  over   from  last  year's  teams  are  currently   Â&#x2030;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2030;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;ÇĄ͡͝Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â? strength  and  conditioning  course   Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Ď&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2014;ÇĄÂ&#x192;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020; Ghaazee.  Mr.  Ghaazee  trains  many  of   our  local  professional  athletes.

Q:Who  are  the  coaches? A:The  team  is  coached  by  myself,  Phil   Owens,  Dr.  Banks,  Mr.  Moss,  Terry  Mc-­ Coy,  Judy  Carroll,  Dennis  Belton,  Eva   Maxey  Mr.  Bussey  and  Benny  Dunn.

Pg. 8 Sowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sizzling Science Autumn Leaf Science Activity (Pre-K -Kinder)

Materials: Ziploc  bags   Science  Journal  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  (any  type  of  note-­â&#x20AC;? book) Crayons Magnifying  glass Chart  (to  record  kinds  of  leaves) Large  manila  paper Book  -­â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leaf  Manâ&#x20AC;?  by  Lois  Elhert

Directions: 1.  Give  each  child  a  Ziploc  bag. 2.  Take  the  children  outside  to   gather  leaves  in  their  bags. 3.  Bring  leaves  inside  for  further   investigation. 4.  Give  each  child  a  magnifying   glass  and  allow  him  or  her  to  dis-­â&#x20AC;? cuss  the  different  attributes  of  his   or  her  leaves.   5.  Lists  the  attributes  on  chart   paper  as  the  children  study  their   leaves. 6.  Have  each  child  draw  a  picture   of  his  or  her  leaves  in  his  or  her   science  journals.

Q:Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  most  impor-­ tant  thing  you  teach  players?                                 A:The  most  important  lesson  to  be   learned  from  baseball  is  the  impor-­ tance  of  recognizing  and  fully  maxi-­ mizing  every  opportunity  to  experi-­ ence  success.   Q:What  is  your  coaching  strategy? A:  My  philosophy/strategy  is  (1)  our   greatest  ally  is  preparation;  and  (2)   the  ultimate  judge  of  performance  is   effort  rather  than  outcome. Q:When  are  tryouts? A:Tryouts  for  remaining  roster  spots   Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ď&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2039;Â? January  following  the  Christmas   break.  A  sign-­up  sheet  will  be  posted   in  the  front  lobby  for  boys  8-­12.

Leaf man by Sowell

Extension: Re-­â&#x20AC;?read  the  book,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Leaf  Manâ&#x20AC;?,  by   Lois  Elhert.  Have  children  use   leaves  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  collected  to  make   their  own  leaf  man.


Pg. 10

Rite On, Honor Choir

handed. They  brought  along  more   than  150  pairs  of  socks  for  any  child   0WVWZ+PWQZXMZNWZU[I\ in  need  at  the  hospital.  The  choir   ;KW\\Q[P:Q\M0W[XQ\IT members  didn’t  complain  about  the   sock-­‐drive  either,  Granville  said.  The   As  the  A.W.  Brown  Honor  Choir   second  grade  class,  section  E,  raised   walked  into  the  Texas  Scottish  Rite   the  most  socks  and  will  receive  a   Hospital  for  Children  in  Dallas,  TX,   game  day  for  their  efforts. they  could  only  hear  one  sound.   The  choir  was  selected  in  August   That  sound  was  from  the  voices  of   2010  after  three  days  of  auditions.   hospital  workers  saying  how  disci-­‐ Granville  said  her  goal  is  for  her   plined  and  well  behaved  the  choir   students  to  under-­‐ was.  On  September   BJ Knows: stand  music  in  a   ʹ͹ǡ–Š‡ͶͶ•–—†‡–•          ...about the campus Honor Choir new  way.  “They  are   lined  up  in  rows  of   t  The  choir  is  currently     not  just  singing,”   –Š”‡‡ˆ‘”–Š‡‹”ϐ‹”•– she  said.  “They  are   ‘Climb  Every  Mountain’.   performance  of  the   reading  music.  If   t There  are  more  girls   2010-­‐11  school  year.   they  were  to  go  into   than  boys  in  the  choir.   Dressed  in  red  shirts   t Ms.  Grandville  loves  to   choir  or  band  [after   and  khaki  pants,  the   share  music  with  the  com-­ elementary  school],   choir  performed   they’ll  already  have   munity.   for  patients  of  the   a  foundation.  The   hospital.   foundation  is  the   The  program  cre-­‐ most  important  thing.” ated  by  Antoniece  Granville,  new   Š‹•‹•›ƒǯ•ǡ͵ǡϐ‹”•–›‡ƒ”‹ choir  teacher  to  Brown,  consisted   honor  choir.  “I  enjoyed  singing  to  all   of  the  school  song,  two  poem  selec-­‐ the  kids  in  need.” tions,  “Footprints  in  the  Sand”  and   Joia,  3E,  said  she  enjoyed  going  to   “Garden  Angel”  wedged  between  two   Scottish  Rite  because  they  had  chil-­‐ traditional  African  American  songs,   dren.  She  said  a  few  of  the  children   “Everytime  I  Feel  the  Spirit”  and  “All   were  in  wheelchairs,  but  she  wasn’t   Night  All  Day.” afraid.“They  were  yellow  and  pink,”   The  honor  choir  currently  has   she  said  about  the  chairs.  “[I  want]  to   forty-­‐six  3rd–6th  grade  choir  mem-­‐ see  the  children  again.  I  was  praying   bers. for  them.” The  honor  choir  didn’t  come  empty  

L`af_ko]n]j][]fldq[]d]ZjYl]\'[`Yf_]\2

By: ishaGAINES

Checkmate, Team Quickly Learns ‘Win’ Strategy By:dariusFRASURE )?*ZW_V.4)+PM[[<MIU_QV[ÅZ[\ tournament against Irving ISD. IRVING  -­‐  A  Chess  Tournament  is   ‘‡‘ˆ–Š‡‘Ž›’Žƒ…‡•›‘—…ƒϐ‹† over  130  students  in  absolute  si-­‐ lence,  concentrating  for  30  minutes   or  more.     On  Saturday,  October  9,  the  A.W.   Brown  F.L.A  Eagles  Chess  Team   faced  schools  from  the  Irving  ISD   in  honor  of  Scott  Watson,  a  teacher   who  recently  passed  away.    During   the  tournament,  the  Eagles  cleared   ƒŽŽϐ‹˜‡”‘—†•ǡ™Š‹…Š„‡‰ƒƒ–ͻǣ͵Ͳ a.m.  and  concluded  at  5:20  p.m.

Hour after  hour,  facing  new  op-­‐ ponents  in  their  age  groups,  from  Ir-­‐ ving,  Plano,  and  other  parts  of  North   Dallas,  the  Eagles  represented  not   only  Brown,  but  the  whole  southern   region  of  Dallas.   An  appearance  by  Dr.  Alexey  Root,   author  of  www.monroi.com    and  for-­‐ mer  US  Chess  Champion,  was  the  ic-­‐ ‹‰‘–Š‡Ǯ…Š‡••„‘ƒ”†ǯǤ‘‘–•ƒ‹†•Š‡ would  submit  a  picture  of  the  team   to  the  renowned  magazine,  Chess  Life   For  Kids  because  she  was  impressed.   “You  all  are  so  well  organized,”  she   said.   Noticeable,  the  Eagles’  decorum,   the  team  was  invited  to  three  other   tournaments  in  the  North  Dallas  area.  

Our New School Logo!

We’ve changed our school name. A.W. Brown Fellowship Charter School was the old school name. A.W. Brown Fellowship Leadership Academy is the new name. Lucky us, we get to publish A.W. Brown .4)IVL)?*.4)?MTW^M\PMM`\MV[QWV[IVL\PM6-?NWZKM\W be reckoned with...the new school logo!

Louis Thomas  and  Caitlin  Lawrence  use  algebraic  notation  for  each   move  during  their  matches.

FOCUS SQUARED: By:dorothyGENTRY

Chess team competes with determination. Focus is  the  theme  of  the  A.W.   Brown’s  Chess  Team  this  year.  It   was  that  very  focus  and  concentra-­‐ tion  that  helped  guide  the  team  to   its  recent  1st  place  tournament  win. “We  teach  the  players  that  focus  is   the  key  to  success,”  said  Darius  Fra-­‐ sure,  coach  of  the  Chess  Team  along   with  Kestin  Wheeler,  and  new  6th   grade  teacher  at  AWBFLA.    “We  teach  them  to  focus  on  the   task  at  hand  and  they  will  succeed.” And  succeed  is  exactly  what  they   did  at  the  recent  Scott  Watson  Me-­‐ morial  Chess  Tournament.  Brown   ’Žƒ…‡†ϐ‹”•–‘˜‡”ƒŽŽ‹–Š‡–‘—”ƒ-­‐ ment,  which  was  held  October  9th   at  Jack  E.  Singley  Academy  in  Irving,   Texas. In  individual  play,  Louis,  6B,   ’Žƒ…‡†ϐ‹”•–‘˜‡”ƒŽŽƒ†‘‘˜ƒǡ 3B,  placed  third. During  its  second  year  back  on   campus  –  after  a  four-­‐year  hiatus  –   the  team  and  its  coaches  –  Wheeler   and  Frasure  –  mean  business  in  the   chess  world  and  in  the  academic   world. Students  who  fail  one  class  in  any   six-­‐week  period  must  sit  out  three   weeks  -­‐  including  any  scheduled   tournaments  and  practices.  If  a   student  fails  two  classes  in  any  six-­‐ week  period,  they  sit  out  for  a  full   six  weeks  and  “need  to  be  at  home   hitting  the  books,”  said  Frasure.

“Behavior –  or  the  lack  thereof  –  is   also  not  tolerated.  If  you  can’t  behave   here,  how  can  you  behave  in  public?”   asks  Wheeler. In  the  chess  world,  coaches  Wheel-­‐ er  and  Frasure  are  aiming  to  put  A.W.   Brown’s  team  on  the  national  map.   Frasure,  who  coached  Carter  High   School’s  award-­‐winning  chess  team  –   has  brought  his  strength-­‐of-­‐the-­‐mind   coaching  style  to  Brown,  as  well  as   junior  coaches.  The  junior  coaches,   current  players  from  Carter’s  Chess   Team,  help  with  chess  practices  and   help  players  with  their  moves. “We  teach  the  players  that  they  are   •–—†‡–•ϐ‹”•–ǡdz ”ƒ•—”‡•ƒ‹†ǤDzŠ‡••‹• a  mental  sport.  Here  we  are  teaching   them  life  skills,  not  just  a  game.” All  in  all,  coaches  Wheeler  and   Frasure  want  the  players  to  enjoy   themselves. “Chess  is  a  privilege,”  Frasure   added.  “Most  kids  don’t  know  how  to   play  chess  and  most  adults  don’t  ei-­‐ ther.  This  is  a  gift;  so  the  players  need   to  cherish  it  and  make  the  most  of  it.” “Statistics  show  that  math  and  criti-­‐ cal  thinking  skills  are  higher  in  kids   who  play  chess,”  he  continued.  “We   make  sure  that  if  they  win,  they  win;   and  if  they  lose,  they  learn  from  that   loss  and  keep  on  moving  –  with  their   heads  held  high.” The  teams  next  chess  tournament   is  scheduled  for  early  November.  For   more  information  on  the  A.W.  Brown   Chess  Team,  email  chess@awbrown. org.

Hispanic Heritage Month Sept 15–Oct  15:  

Marked Hispanic Heritage Month. This month commemorates the anniversary WNQVLMXMVLMVKMNWZÅ^M4I\QV)UMZQKIV countries.

Did-U-Know THIS about... A.W.Brown Fellowship Leadership Academy [www.awbrown.org] <WLWVI\M\W\PM/WTLMV-IOTMVM_[XIXMZKWVI\K\ I’sha Gaines at igaines@awbrown.org

Did-U-Know...?

Did-U-Know...?

A.W. Brown  has  over   1,400  students  and  150   staff  members.

A.W. Brown  opened  its  doors   ˆ‘”–Š‡ϐ‹”•––‹‡‹ͳͻͻͻǤ‡ celebrated  10-­‐years  in  2009.

Did-U-Know...?

Did-U-Know...?

Spud Webb,  former   NBA  basketball  player,   is  on  our  Board  of  Di-­‐ rectors  and  a  sponsor  of   the  annual  golf  tourna-­‐

To support  the  A.W.  Brown   Education  Foundation,  visit   awbeducationfoundation. org  for  more  information.


week  of  homecoming  events  that   allowed  students  and  staff  to  wear   pajamas,  silly  ensembles,  team  jer-­â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2022;ÇĄÂ&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x201E;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013; shirts.  The  spirits  seemed  high  at   the  Homecoming  Pep  Rally  that   took  place  that  Friday  afternoon.     As  a  surprise  to  students,  10  A.W.   Brown  staff  members  stepped  in  a   throwback  step  routine  to  amp  up   the  homecoming  excitement.  The   10-­â&#x20AC;?minute  show  included  steps  and   dances  that  the  team  created  dur-­â&#x20AC;? ing  weeks  prior. Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x160;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Ǥ I  would  not  have  given  up  the  op-­â&#x20AC;? portunity  to  do  something  fun  that   the  students  would  enjoy  doing   themselves,  Threets  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  that  they  look  at  you   not  only  as  an  adult  or  as  an  educa-­â&#x20AC;? tor,  but  as  a  normal  person  that  can   have  fun  too,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  get  hurt   and  I  bleed  just  like  them.â&#x20AC;?

Did-U-Know...?

and  music.  This  year,  grandparents   were  treated  to  gold  and  black  dĂŠcor   as  part  of  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  Grandparents   are  Goldenâ&#x20AC;?  theme  and  a  continental   breakfast.  Some  grandparents  even   Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2022;Ǩ Kim  Dalcour,  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  4  teacher,  said   reading  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Biscuitsâ&#x20AC;?  for   her  Grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Day  program  has   Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x192;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;ÇŚÂ&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?ǤÂ&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D; said  the  book  reminds  her  of  her   Grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  cooking  that  always  kept   her  â&#x20AC;&#x153;full.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Almost  all  of  my  grandmaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  cook-­â&#x20AC;? ing  was  from  scratch.â&#x20AC;? Dalcour  said  she  plans  to  have   Jones  return  to  read  to  the  children   this  semester  for  the  Daddy  Daycare   Program.  We  will  bring  him  back  to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;teach  these  young  daddyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  to   do,â&#x20AC;?  she  said  excitedly. Rachel  Bolden,  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  3  teacher   and  Chairperson  for  Grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Day,  believes  grandparents  are  role   models  who  have  to  keep  up  with  

their  grandchildren. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raising  a  child  is  not  just  up  to  the   parents  -­â&#x20AC;?  but  as  the  old  wives  tale   Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;ÇĄÇŽ Â&#x2013;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192; child.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Keeping  up  with  his  granddaughter   is  exactly  was  Jones  does.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  daily  talks  about  reading  to  the   kids,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  just  likes  to  get   out.  He  has  a  good  heart.â&#x20AC;? Casey  Jones  will  return  to  read  to   the  Pre-­â&#x20AC;?K  4  class  right  before  his   93rd  birthday.

Birthdays:

Classifieds:

Threets  said  she  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  feel  any   pain  in  her  knee  although  she   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  sudden  stops  and   turns. DzÂ&#x203A;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;ÇĄÇłÂ&#x2022;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;ǤDz Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;-­â&#x20AC;? ally  felt  good.â&#x20AC;? There  was  no  shattering  this  time   around  for  Threets.  She,  along  with   other  team  members,  sported  pink   wristbands,  spat,  laces,  and  socks  in   honor  of  Breast  Cancer  Awareness   Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;ÇĄÂ&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ď?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Ǥ Benny  Dunn,  staff  member  and   coach  of  the  staff  team  said  he  was   nervous  about  Threets  playing,  but   felt  she  did  a  great  job  as  a  player.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All-­â&#x20AC;?in-­â&#x20AC;?all  the  game  was  a  great  suc-­â&#x20AC;? cess,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  got  the  win,  there   were  no  serious  injuries  and  the  stu-­â&#x20AC;? dent/parent  feedback  was  very  posi-­â&#x20AC;? tive  and  exciting.  The  kids  got  to  see   their  parents  and  teachers  in  another   wayâ&#x20AC;Śre-­â&#x20AC;?living  their  glory  years.â&#x20AC;? The  game  triumph  came  after  a  

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Continued from Pg. 5

....Continued from Pg.1

To  my  wonderful  daughter   Paizja,    I  Love  You  and  hope   you  had  a  Happy  8th  Birth-­â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;ǨÂ&#x2018;Â?Â?Â&#x203A;ÇŻÂ&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2022;

Employment: WORK  FROM  HOME MARKETING  ASSISTANT

A  select  group  of  administrators   and  cafeteria  staff  members  take  a   trip  to  a  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cafeteria  foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  show  every   year.  At  the  show,  approximately   200  vendors  allow  attendees  to   taste  different  foods  that  could   be  implemented  into  their  lunch   programs.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  program  was   located  at  the  Waxahachie  Civic   Center.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  looking  for  an  energetic  and   outgoing  assistant  to  join our  team.  Each  assistant  works  on  a   commission  only  basis. Duties  include  contacting  prospective   clients  by  phone  to determine  their  needs  for  web,  design,   printing  services and  mailing  brochures.  Each  successful   referral  you  generate Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Ď?Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Ǥ

A  few  items  spotted  at  the  show:   Orange-­n-­Spicy  Chicken Turkey  Pot  Roast Rib  Sandwiches Mock  Pecan  Pie

DETAILS/APPLY Â ONLINE:

How  it  works:   After  spotting  a  food  item  A.W.   Brown  would  like  to  add  to  the   menu,  staff  members  can  suggest   the  idea  to  The  Paper  Plate  Inc.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Paper  Plate  Inc.â&#x20AC;?  is  responsible  for   food  preparation  and  safe  delivery   of  meals  supplied  to  A.W.  Brown   students.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Choiceâ&#x20AC;? Benjamin  Solomon,  District  

<WXTIKMIKTI[[QĂ&#x2026;ML)LKWV\IK\ igaines@awbrown.org

Technology  Director  said  the  mock   pecan  pie  was  his  favorite. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not  only  did  it  taste  wonderful,  but   it  was  made  of  pinto  beans,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  healthy.  Kids  would  love  it.  I  will   be  going  every  year  now  all  because  of   the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;beanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  pie.â&#x20AC;?

GoldenEagle_final