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FLORIDA BAPTIST WITNESS Volume 130, Issue 15

Inspiration and information for such a time as this

Every day people make decisions, promises based on whether a product is helpful, productive and worthwhile. There are three values that I consider important in choosing to read the Witness. They are: Staying Connected – We are always better together, and the Witness helps us see we’re in this together and there is something bigger than ourselves. Staying Convinced – As morals continue to decay in our society, reading theologically sound coverage, celebrating the Gospel, and discovering missions help us stay convinced God’s eternal truth is still winning the day. Staying Concerned – Reading the Witness not only gives us a blessing, but also prompts us to pray for our leaders, our churches, and revival in our land. Make a decision to subscribe to the Florida Baptist Witness today.

August 8, 2013

If you are reading this, you are either part of a special promotion or a regular subscriber of the official newspaper of the Florida Baptist State Convention. The Witness is pubished 26 times a year and is partially supported with funds from the Cooperative Program with the remaining revenue coming from advertising and subscription sales. It has been said that reading an old newspaper is like holding history in your hands. Florida Baptists have been in good hands since 1884 when leaders determined a newspaper was vital for teaching theology and polity to an undertrained clergy and laity across the frontier. Since that time, the Florida Baptist Witness has been recognized as a tool that communicates the missionary commitment and involvement Florida Baptists have struggled to defend and implement. Most importantly, with visual impact, through words and pictures, in print and online—via newsprint, smart phones, digital pages and video—the Witness has at its core the commitment to share the Gospel message of Jesus Christ. Featuring stories of missions and ministry, the Witness inspires, educates and empowers. Profiling pastors and church members in times of disaster and triumph, the Witness delivers an ongoing message that Jesus is alive and embodies hope. Telling timely stories of events with truth and accuracy, we give readers confidence to share facts and opinions steeped in grace. This summer begins a year-long celebration of the commitment Florida Baptists have to telling the Good News! Enjoy a bit of history on the inside pages of this wrap, and then consider how you will either stay committed to the journey by continuing your support of the Witness through a subscription--or pack your bags and hop on this leg of the trip by becoming a subscriber.

We hope you join us!

Ken Whitten, Pastor Idlewild Baptist Church, Lutz Chairman, Board of Directors, Florida Baptist Witness

The Florida Baptist Witness is a light of truth in a dark world. The Witness brings Florida Baptists together in a time that demands unity. The Witness exposes the darkness, encourages the brokenhearted, and celebrates our victories. The Florida Baptist Witness is a historical record of Florida Baptist fulfilling the Great Commission.

Shelly Chandler, Pastor First Baptist Church, Bonifay

Member, Board of Directors, Florida Baptist Witness

In a day of rapid change, one of the best ways for concerned Florida Baptists to stay informed is by reading the Florida Baptist Witness. From missions and evangelism to events that affect us all, this newspaper provides excellent coverage of current happenings, as well as news and commentary to educate and encourage us in our faith. I highly recommend subscribing to the FBW.

Debbie Brunson First Baptist Church Jacksonville Former member, Board of Directors, Florida Baptist Witness


An editor from SouthAfrica Gideon Jacques “G.J.” Rousseau, one of three regional editors of Baptist Newspapers Luther Rice was the publisher of The Columbian Star, which was the first weekly Baptist family newspaper in the United States. Rice began the journal in 1822 but the publication was closely tied to now defunct Columbian College. Luther Rice is known as the man that “changed the scattered Baptist churches into a Baptist denomination.”

1884 Ad

JAMES MCDONALD

A.P. Ashurst, one of the first editors of the Witness, in 1884 took out an ad promoting the Witness to prospective advertisers in the Roswell American News Directory. In the ad, he called the new paper, “the prettiest paper in the Land of Flowers, as pretty as any in the United States.”

Florida Baptist Newspapers In 1848 James McDonald published The Baptist Telegraph and Florida Emigrant. The paper predated the Florida Baptist State Convention and served the only four Florida Baptist associations, Suwanee, 1835, Florida 1843, Alachua 1847 and West Florida 1847 with less than 100 churches.

Pastors as Editors

LUTHER RICE at Triennial Convention

F.B. MOODIE 1884-1885

Two pastors of First Baptist Church in Jacksonville have served as editors of the Witness. Rev. L.B. Plummer was editor and manager from October 1887 to March 1888. W.A. Hobson (pastor of FBC from 1900-1923) served as editor from 1904-1906. Other Florida Baptist pastors also served as the paper’s editor.

J.C. PORTER 1890-1904

W.A. HOBSON 1904-1906

C.M. BRITTAIN 1909-1912

1920

1890’s

Contents of the Witness in the first few decades reflected the various backgrounds of its editors and contributors—from preachers to businessmen—to scholars, missionaries and housewives. There were weekly sermons and articles on general agriculture and fruit growing. The editors generally promised to review current news “in light of prophesy.” An article on the front page of the Jan. 1, 1890 issue warns, in all capital letters, “WHY BOYS LEAVE THE FARM.” Noting the “aversion” country boys have for the farm, it lays the blame partially on a “pessimistic” view of fathers or neighbors engaged in farming—and on education. “In a word, they are educated to leave the farm.” The article encourages readers to enlighten boys and girls on the benefits of country life other than the “plowing and hoeing” so as to “teach them that farming is just as dignified and honorable as any other vocation.”

the Witness in 1930, was born Jan, 17, 1880 in Steynsburg, South Africa. His father was a teacher, but he was raised in abject poverty in South Africa. He worked at various jobs as a child and teenager and received very little formal education. In October 1899 in the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), he was commandeered to fight against the British, he was made a prisoner of war and was kept for over two years on the island of St. Helena. Rousseau learned English there. He served aboard Atlantic sailing ships and there met Christine McConnel, whose father was a Baptist minister with the SouthG.J. ROUSSEAU ern Baptist Home Mission Board. After they married, Rousseau was converted in a revival in Alliance, Nebraska. The family moved to Waco, Texas, where he attended college and became a student pastor. Rousseau served as a chaplain in World War I, and then became pastor at First Baptist Church, Norman, Okla., and then First Baptist Church in Marshall, Texas. It was reported his “most satisfying ministry” was serving as pastor of First Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida from 1925-1930.

1900’s

At the turn of the century, a controversy at Stetson University caused such acrimony that the school began its own rival state newspaper, The Southern Baptist in 1903. By 1904, both papers were printed in Jacksonville and on May 18, an “amusing incident” occurred when the Florida Times Union, which printed both papers, mistakenly switched editorials in the two rival papers. After the error, and with the unlikely prospect that Florida Baptists would support two state papers, they merged to become The Florida Baptist Witness.

In the 1920’s the Witness for the first time had achieved greater editorial stability and with offices permanently established in Jacksonville, the state newspaper gained higher visibility and circulation began growing. The weekly paper included Baptist news, church news, and information supporting the State Convention’s growing program of church development resources. The Witness regularly published news from the Southern Baptist Convention and its agencies—and articles of interest to Florida Baptists that had appeared in other state Baptist newspapers. The Witness also began to carry extensive coverage of the actions taken and messages delivered at the SBC annual meeting and the Florida Baptist Convention annual meeting.

A circuitous route In 1888 W. D. Turnley, an Ocala lawyer, bought the Witness and moved it to Ocala. It was printed in this building for some of the time it was in Ocala from 1888-1904 when it moved to Jacksonville. In just a few short years since its inception in 1884, the Witness moved from Lake City to Deland, and from Deland to Ocala, and from Ocala back to Jacksonville.

The Cranston Press was a single-revolution big-cylinder “drum” newspaper press, built in the late 1800s. It had the wooden delivery fingers in the back, flipping out the paper on the same side as the feeding of the paper and was the kind most likely used to produce the earliest issues of the Witness. The printing of the paper is now outsourced after the paper is produced jointly by an offsite designer and the managing editor.

FIRST BAPTIST JACKSONVILLE

W.D. NOWLIN 1912-1914

1930s-1940s

The Witness during this period reflects a continual emphasis on Cooperative giving as a way to support a growing Southern Baptist mission enterprise. In the April 17, 1930 issue a listing of 1929 mission work in “foreign lands” shows growth over a 10-year period in number of churches; self-supporting churches; baptisms, an missionaries in Brazil, with 169 supporting churches; and 2,795 baptisms for a total of 30,864 in membership. That same issue has a letter to the editor,“Telegram Just Received,” which reads, as is: Yesterday Foreign Mission Board voted unanimously to cooperate United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration in collection clothing for war strickened people of Europe clothing to be assembled by local churches.

ADONIRAM JUDSON HOLT 1914-1918

G.J. ROUSSEAU (one of three regional editors) 1930

W.D. NOWLIN (one of three regional editors) 1930

1950s-1960s

Several decades into its existence and with the arrival of Baptist Press, the official news service of the Southern Baptist Convention in the 1940’s, the coverage of the Witness was greatly expanded. As Florida Baptists launched building campaigns and grew, the paper featured images that reflected this new era. A Feb. 26, 1959 front page BP story, “Nine Million Mark Surpassed in Church membership,” reflected this.

EDWARD D. SOLOMON 1931-1949

1990s

The 1990’s brought stories of a raging controversy in the SBC, missionary news from lands far away, and reports of what Florida Baptists thought about current events. In early fall 1992, just after Hurricane Andrew blew ashore, the Witness began to tell the story of Florida Baptist Disaster Relief, a story it has been telling for more than 20 years.

W.G. STRACENER 1949-1969

EDGAR R. COOPER 1971-1983

2000-2013

The turn of the century brought about a decade of change for the Witness with the advent of an online edition and three redesigns of its print edition. Google News regularly includes Witness news, feature and opinion items in its sources.

JACK BRYMER 1984-1994

JAMES A. SMITH SR. 2001-2013

The Witness is the first Baptist state paper to offer its entire content online for free.

2010

The Witness publishes its news, in various formats for the iPad, iPhone and DROID.

Social Media At Twitter @goFBW readers will find regular alerts to stories, breaking news announcements, and periodic friendly dialogue.

1970s-1980s

Florida Baptist Witness has a fan page on Facebook where readers may show their support by commenting on stories, posting photos, sharing announcements and more! Join our community today.

Reports & Features Using vibrant colors and eyeNews magazine Throughout the years, the Witness has responded to special events, like the 2010 Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting in Orlando, with fresh new approaches to presenting the newslike this special 44-page magazine.

August 8, 2013 • Florida Baptist Witness

MICHAEL CHUTE 1995-2001

2002

Throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s the Witness reported on the growth of ministries in churches throughout Florida, the programs of the Florida Baptist Convention and missions around the world. The Witness also reported on growing tension in the Southern Baptist Convention. In the Dec. 8, 1983 issue, a BP story “Baptist Leaders Respond to a Call for ‘Guidelines,” much ado was made about a suggestion by SBC President James T. Draper Jr., of FBC in Euless, Texas. Draper suggested a committee be appointed for the purpose of drawing up some “irreducible minimums” of things Baptists believe. They included the full divinity of Christ, substitutionary atonement by Christ for the sins of mankind, justification of God’s grace through faith, and belief in the bodily resurrection of Christ.”

In the Jan. 3, 1900 issue, a front page article, “Teachers at Tallahassee: Gathering of the Pundits at the State Capital,” describes Dr. N.C. Schaeffer as “a brainy man, an original thinker and brimful of information about school matters He is a fine looking, affable gentleman and his lectures were a rich feast.”

B

Printing Press

catching layouts to package wellresearched and culturally relevant stories around timely themes, the Witness is committed to delivering to Florida Baptists stories that teach, inspire and encourage.

Editors not pictured In addition to those pictured, editors serving the Witness whose photos are not available include: 1884, A.P. Ashurst (co-editor); 1885, S.M. Provence and J.H. Griffith (co-editors); 1886, Napoleon Alexander (N.A.) Bailey; 1887, Rev. L.B. Plummer; 1888, C.H Nash; 1906, J.H. Tharp; 1909, Frank Edwards; 1911, Erasmus Z. Franklin Golden; 1918, J.W. Mitchell; 1928, P.L. Johnston; and 1930, Lee M. White.

C


An editor from SouthAfrica Gideon Jacques “G.J.” Rousseau, one of three regional editors of Baptist Newspapers Luther Rice was the publisher of The Columbian Star, which was the first weekly Baptist family newspaper in the United States. Rice began the journal in 1822 but the publication was closely tied to now defunct Columbian College. Luther Rice is known as the man that “changed the scattered Baptist churches into a Baptist denomination.”

1884 Ad

JAMES MCDONALD

A.P. Ashurst, one of the first editors of the Witness, in 1884 took out an ad promoting the Witness to prospective advertisers in the Roswell American News Directory. In the ad, he called the new paper, “the prettiest paper in the Land of Flowers, as pretty as any in the United States.”

Florida Baptist Newspapers In 1848 James McDonald published The Baptist Telegraph and Florida Emigrant. The paper predated the Florida Baptist State Convention and served the only four Florida Baptist associations, Suwanee, 1835, Florida 1843, Alachua 1847 and West Florida 1847 with less than 100 churches.

Pastors as Editors

LUTHER RICE at Triennial Convention

F.B. MOODIE 1884-1885

Two pastors of First Baptist Church in Jacksonville have served as editors of the Witness. Rev. L.B. Plummer was editor and manager from October 1887 to March 1888. W.A. Hobson (pastor of FBC from 1900-1923) served as editor from 1904-1906. Other Florida Baptist pastors also served as the paper’s editor.

J.C. PORTER 1890-1904

W.A. HOBSON 1904-1906

C.M. BRITTAIN 1909-1912

1920

1890’s

Contents of the Witness in the first few decades reflected the various backgrounds of its editors and contributors—from preachers to businessmen—to scholars, missionaries and housewives. There were weekly sermons and articles on general agriculture and fruit growing. The editors generally promised to review current news “in light of prophesy.” An article on the front page of the Jan. 1, 1890 issue warns, in all capital letters, “WHY BOYS LEAVE THE FARM.” Noting the “aversion” country boys have for the farm, it lays the blame partially on a “pessimistic” view of fathers or neighbors engaged in farming—and on education. “In a word, they are educated to leave the farm.” The article encourages readers to enlighten boys and girls on the benefits of country life other than the “plowing and hoeing” so as to “teach them that farming is just as dignified and honorable as any other vocation.”

the Witness in 1930, was born Jan, 17, 1880 in Steynsburg, South Africa. His father was a teacher, but he was raised in abject poverty in South Africa. He worked at various jobs as a child and teenager and received very little formal education. In October 1899 in the Second Anglo-Boer War (1899-1902), he was commandeered to fight against the British, he was made a prisoner of war and was kept for over two years on the island of St. Helena. Rousseau learned English there. He served aboard Atlantic sailing ships and there met Christine McConnel, whose father was a Baptist minister with the SouthG.J. ROUSSEAU ern Baptist Home Mission Board. After they married, Rousseau was converted in a revival in Alliance, Nebraska. The family moved to Waco, Texas, where he attended college and became a student pastor. Rousseau served as a chaplain in World War I, and then became pastor at First Baptist Church, Norman, Okla., and then First Baptist Church in Marshall, Texas. It was reported his “most satisfying ministry” was serving as pastor of First Baptist Church in Pensacola, Florida from 1925-1930.

1900’s

At the turn of the century, a controversy at Stetson University caused such acrimony that the school began its own rival state newspaper, The Southern Baptist in 1903. By 1904, both papers were printed in Jacksonville and on May 18, an “amusing incident” occurred when the Florida Times Union, which printed both papers, mistakenly switched editorials in the two rival papers. After the error, and with the unlikely prospect that Florida Baptists would support two state papers, they merged to become The Florida Baptist Witness.

In the 1920’s the Witness for the first time had achieved greater editorial stability and with offices permanently established in Jacksonville, the state newspaper gained higher visibility and circulation began growing. The weekly paper included Baptist news, church news, and information supporting the State Convention’s growing program of church development resources. The Witness regularly published news from the Southern Baptist Convention and its agencies—and articles of interest to Florida Baptists that had appeared in other state Baptist newspapers. The Witness also began to carry extensive coverage of the actions taken and messages delivered at the SBC annual meeting and the Florida Baptist Convention annual meeting.

A circuitous route In 1888 W. D. Turnley, an Ocala lawyer, bought the Witness and moved it to Ocala. It was printed in this building for some of the time it was in Ocala from 1888-1904 when it moved to Jacksonville. In just a few short years since its inception in 1884, the Witness moved from Lake City to Deland, and from Deland to Ocala, and from Ocala back to Jacksonville.

The Cranston Press was a single-revolution big-cylinder “drum” newspaper press, built in the late 1800s. It had the wooden delivery fingers in the back, flipping out the paper on the same side as the feeding of the paper and was the kind most likely used to produce the earliest issues of the Witness. The printing of the paper is now outsourced after the paper is produced jointly by an offsite designer and the managing editor.

FIRST BAPTIST JACKSONVILLE

W.D. NOWLIN 1912-1914

1930s-1940s

The Witness during this period reflects a continual emphasis on Cooperative giving as a way to support a growing Southern Baptist mission enterprise. In the April 17, 1930 issue a listing of 1929 mission work in “foreign lands” shows growth over a 10-year period in number of churches; self-supporting churches; baptisms, an missionaries in Brazil, with 169 supporting churches; and 2,795 baptisms for a total of 30,864 in membership. That same issue has a letter to the editor,“Telegram Just Received,” which reads, as is: Yesterday Foreign Mission Board voted unanimously to cooperate United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation Administration in collection clothing for war strickened people of Europe clothing to be assembled by local churches.

ADONIRAM JUDSON HOLT 1914-1918

G.J. ROUSSEAU (one of three regional editors) 1930

W.D. NOWLIN (one of three regional editors) 1930

1950s-1960s

Several decades into its existence and with the arrival of Baptist Press, the official news service of the Southern Baptist Convention in the 1940’s, the coverage of the Witness was greatly expanded. As Florida Baptists launched building campaigns and grew, the paper featured images that reflected this new era. A Feb. 26, 1959 front page BP story, “Nine Million Mark Surpassed in Church membership,” reflected this.

EDWARD D. SOLOMON 1931-1949

1990s

The 1990’s brought stories of a raging controversy in the SBC, missionary news from lands far away, and reports of what Florida Baptists thought about current events. In early fall 1992, just after Hurricane Andrew blew ashore, the Witness began to tell the story of Florida Baptist Disaster Relief, a story it has been telling for more than 20 years.

W.G. STRACENER 1949-1969

EDGAR R. COOPER 1971-1983

2000-2013

The turn of the century brought about a decade of change for the Witness with the advent of an online edition and three redesigns of its print edition. Google News regularly includes Witness news, feature and opinion items in its sources.

JACK BRYMER 1984-1994

JAMES A. SMITH SR. 2001-2013

The Witness is the first Baptist state paper to offer its entire content online for free.

2010

The Witness publishes its news, in various formats for the iPad, iPhone and DROID.

Social Media At Twitter @goFBW readers will find regular alerts to stories, breaking news announcements, and periodic friendly dialogue.

1970s-1980s

Florida Baptist Witness has a fan page on Facebook where readers may show their support by commenting on stories, posting photos, sharing announcements and more! Join our community today.

Reports & Features Using vibrant colors and eyeNews magazine Throughout the years, the Witness has responded to special events, like the 2010 Southern Baptist Convention annual meeting in Orlando, with fresh new approaches to presenting the newslike this special 44-page magazine.

August 8, 2013 • Florida Baptist Witness

MICHAEL CHUTE 1995-2001

2002

Throughout the 1970’s and 1980’s the Witness reported on the growth of ministries in churches throughout Florida, the programs of the Florida Baptist Convention and missions around the world. The Witness also reported on growing tension in the Southern Baptist Convention. In the Dec. 8, 1983 issue, a BP story “Baptist Leaders Respond to a Call for ‘Guidelines,” much ado was made about a suggestion by SBC President James T. Draper Jr., of FBC in Euless, Texas. Draper suggested a committee be appointed for the purpose of drawing up some “irreducible minimums” of things Baptists believe. They included the full divinity of Christ, substitutionary atonement by Christ for the sins of mankind, justification of God’s grace through faith, and belief in the bodily resurrection of Christ.”

In the Jan. 3, 1900 issue, a front page article, “Teachers at Tallahassee: Gathering of the Pundits at the State Capital,” describes Dr. N.C. Schaeffer as “a brainy man, an original thinker and brimful of information about school matters He is a fine looking, affable gentleman and his lectures were a rich feast.”

B

Printing Press

catching layouts to package wellresearched and culturally relevant stories around timely themes, the Witness is committed to delivering to Florida Baptists stories that teach, inspire and encourage.

Editors not pictured In addition to those pictured, editors serving the Witness whose photos are not available include: 1884, A.P. Ashurst (co-editor); 1885, S.M. Provence and J.H. Griffith (co-editors); 1886, Napoleon Alexander (N.A.) Bailey; 1887, Rev. L.B. Plummer; 1888, C.H Nash; 1906, J.H. Tharp; 1909, Frank Edwards; 1911, Erasmus Z. Franklin Golden; 1918, J.W. Mitchell; 1928, P.L. Johnston; and 1930, Lee M. White.

C


D

August 8, 2013 • Florida Baptist Witness

Historical journals ‘honor those who honor Christ’ GRACEVILLE (FBW)—It is one o’clock in the morning on April 8, 1965. The streets are quiet, people are asleep, and communism has engulfed Cuba for six years. The Caudills hear a knock on the door. Marjorie Caudill knows. By ANNA BARLOW

Witness Intern “Herbert, they’ve come to get you,” she tells her husband. Herbert Caudill was a missionary and pastor who moved his family to Cuba in 1935. He spent 40 years witnessing to the Cuban people, and like his son-in-law, David Fite, was arrested and served time in a Cuban prison. Through three generations, this family left a mark of dedicated service as an example of committed Christian living that is still remembered today by thousands of Cubans and their families who lived through those darkest days of persecution. The story of the Caudill-Fite family is just one of thousands of stories that can be found in the pages of annual journals produced by the Florida Baptist Historical Society since 2002. An idea that came about in 1999, the journals were created to provide a scholarly report that accurately reports events important to Florida Baptist history. The journals are alive with anecdotes and facts about Florida Baptist missionaries, families, pastors, and churches—and the various agencies, ministries and programs of supported by the Cooperative Program and carried out through the Florida Baptist

HOW TO GET YOUR NEWS IN THE NEWSPAPER: We know there is something special about getting a newspaper with an article about your church or with the name of someone you know in it. Perhaps you are that someone. Florida Baptist Witness welcomes churches and folks affiliated with the Florida Baptist State Convention to keep us informed of news and information that might be of interest to our readers. Please note we are a bi-weekly newspaper with a two-week publishing schedule and a very small staff. We need plenty of lead time to accommodate any requests for news coverage, so please let us know well in advance especially if you have events that you would like us to include in our coverage. Please submit to us information about your events and happenings at your church or in the life of your church members. News releases should include basic information about the event and contact information so we may reach you to follow up. There are seven basic components that comprise Witness: editorials (by our executive editor); letters to the editor; viewpoints (opinion pieces by various individuals); news stories; feature

State Convention. The 15 journals already in print cover topics ranging from Florida Baptists in Cuba to early Baptist theology— with an issue about the history of deacons set to come out next year. According to Jerry Windsor, secretary-treasurer of FBHS since 2002, the society created the journals that document stories and preserve history that otherwise might be lost— with the intention they would “honor those who honor Christ.”

“We do not want to be a vending machine of information,” Windsor told Florida Baptist Witness. “We want to build a platform online that we can send people to, so they can discover for themselves.” stories; news briefs; Florida Focus; Bible Study commentaries; classified advertising; and advertising. Churches may submit onetime announcements of special events to Florida Focus as a free service. These short announcements are due at least three weeks in advance and may be submitted online. We regularly follow-up by email and telephone. Don’t hesitate to check if you haven’t heard from us about an idea. WEBSITE: Go to our Web site and click on the Contact Us link on the right hand side and select “General Correspondence.” E-MAIL: There is an e-mail address you are welcomed to use called witness@gofbw.com. The best e-mail address, however, is jhannigan@gofbw.com

The journals are easily accessible at the website online at http://www. floridabaptisthistory.org/ and at the Florida Baptist Historical Society which has an office on the campus of the Baptist College of Florida. The process of creating the journals is extensive. Initially, a list of potential topics is drawn up and voted upon by a committee. This typically happens two years before each journal is published, although might take four or five years to before they are ready for publication. Topics are carefully selected and the committee tends to choose on events from at least 25 years ago or so removed in order to mitigate “emotion,” insure the best research and appropriate interpretation of the facts, and allow for full discovery. “That way the history—not the politics—of the events is what comes through,” Windsor said. Next, a team of writers begins research. They talk to family members, read through old newspapers and other historical documents, go over church minutes, and work together to organize the final product. Windsor said the FBCH depends on Florida Baptist Witness— published continuously since 1884 and archived at the Baptist College of Florida—as a primary source for all of its work. Finally, each journal goes through several stages of review and proofing before publication. Windsor said the journals are “a valuable tool” and provide a central source that can be referenced and used by churches, seminary student, pastors, writers and others. “We want to honor those who honor Christ,” Windsor said. Florida Baptist Witness intern Anna Barlow is a member of Hillcrest Baptist Church in Pensacola and a student at University of North Florida. Joni Hannigan is the managing editor. Her number is 904-5963167. INFORMATION TO INCLUDE ABOUT UPCOMING EVENTS ■ Who, what, where, when, why, including the address of the event, how to sign up for the event, any costs. ■ Photos of the event, in a large format, sent as jpegs. ■ If you are using e-mail to send information and send a document, save it as a Word document or as a text file. ■ Give some background about the event, but remember to keep it short until someone is following up and asks questions. ■ If you think something is worth a story: Put in the background, people we can contact, etc. DON’T WRITE THE STORY YOURSELF.

goFBW INTRODUCE YOUR BUSINESS TO MORE THAN 30,000 READERS when you advertise with us. Pastors,church staff, church members, denominational leaders and others can see your ad in every issue of the Witness. Expand your reach even further by advertising on our web site. To place an ad or if you have any questions, contact John C. Hannigan at 800-226-8584, ext. 3166.

Witness subscription rates & information Florida Baptist Witness is the official newspaper of Southern Baptists in the Sunshine State. For nearly 130 years, the Witness has been publishing Good News about God’s work in Florida, the U.S. and across the world! The Witness is affiliated with the over one-millionmember Florida Baptist State Convention and reaches leadership in more than 3,000 congregations across the state. Additionally, many churches provide it for all their church members. The Witness is printed bi-weekly and published on Thursdays as an 11 X 17 inch tabloid, with a five-column page on a cold web press with an imprint area 10.25 inches wide and 16.25 inches high. Material for publication is due by noon, 10-calendar days prior to the Thursday publication date, but because of limited space for advertising, advance reservations are strongly recommended.

INDIVIDUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS Our INDIVIDUAL subscription rate is $24.95 for one year. All individual subscriptions are pre-paid on an annual basis and are renewable the following year. Subscriptions can be paid for one or more years.

GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS Gift subscriptions function like an individual subscription, however, we send a card to the recipient of the subscription notifying them of your gift. We invoice the giver for the cost. Each gift subscription is renewable on an annual basis by the initial provider.

GROUP SUBSCRIPTIONS Our GROUP subscription rate is $11.50 for one year and is designed for a church to gather 10 or more subscribers together to receive the Witness at their home address and be billed through the church office. We offer the option of pre-paid annual, quarterly or monthly billing. All billing is done through the local church. By utilizing the monthly billing, churches are able to manage their account in a smaller monthly amount. Subscriptions continue until the church sends a written request for names to be deleted from the group. Churches are offered the flexibility of adding subscribers at any time and are then invoiced for the actual number of issues mailed each week.

CHURCH BUDGET PLAN Our BUDGET rate is $10.00 for a year and is designed for a church to send the Witness to every active church family. This rate is beneficial in reaching the entire congregation with the Witness at a very practical rate. The billing is handled through the church office and is generally done on a monthly basis. Churches are offered the flexibility of adding subscribers at any time and are invoiced for the actual number of issues mailed for each issue. Like the group subscription, this plan continues until the church provides written notification to discontinue the service. *Churches may also ask about rates for publishing their church newsletter in a wrap, or by utilizing a page of the Witness, once a month, on average, for this purpose.

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