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WELCOME TO THE SIXTH FORM If you are already at Godolphin then you will appreciate the high quality of teaching here and value the outstanding pastoral care, the dedication of staff, and the friendships and wonderful sense of community that we enjoy. The Sixth Form experience is even better! You may already know that, but you may not realise quite how different life is in the Sixth Form and how much more it has to offer you - so read on! If you are not currently at Godolphin and are considering coming here for your sixth form education, you are making a wise choice. As well as benefitting from first class teaching across a wide range of subjects, and studying in a very friendly, supportive environment, you will also be able to choose from a huge range of activities to broaden your horizons, extend your interests and to develop your leadership skills. Our Sixth Form offers opportunities and experiences that are hard to beat and will help you make the most of the next two important years of your life. Our location is also a big bonus: we are a few minutes walk into the historic city of Salisbury, with its shops, cinema and excellent communications. Godolphin itself is in beautiful grounds and is within easy reach of the cities of Southampton, Winchester, Bath and London, as well as beautiful countryside and historic sites such as Stonehenge. It offers the best of all worlds and the Sixth Form will give you the best possible springboard to an exciting future.

At a Glance

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HEAD OF SIXTH FORM Life in the Sixth Form is special! You will have countless opportunities to develop your interests, to strengthen friendships, make new ones, and to grow as a person. You will have much greater freedom and independence: to choose when you want to study, to wear your own clothes, and to go into town during the afternoon or to socialise in the Sixth Form Costa Café. You can take ownership of your studies. Of course, you will need to manage your time, and we will help you do that. Keeping on top of your work will enable you to enjoy sixth form life to the full. All the girls talk about how different life is in the Sixth Form, including the relationship with teachers. You will learn in partnership with them on a much more equal footing so that they can share with you their knowledge and enthusiasm for their subject. The smaller teaching groups allow for considerable individual guidance. They will enable you to get the most out of your chosen subjects and to do well.

The Sixth Form is fantastic. It is very different from the lower school and great fun! The two sixth form houses are set slightly apart from the main school - the perfect distance to enjoy independence without feeling detached from school life. Our Costa café gives us the perfect opportunity to spend time relaxing with friends - both from in and out of school - and, with the city centre only 5 minutes walk away, there is plenty of opportunity to take a break from school work and busy schedules. Many girls decide to board to get more independence before leaving home and to take full advantage of everything on offer, or to just chill in-house with friends. Whether your interests include cooking (Leith’s course), lax (National Champions!), debating (Southern Regional finals this year!), charity events, Zumba, kick-boxing, art & photography, or amazing trips, the enhancement programme will not let you down because Godolphin Sixth Form has it all!

The Sixth Form will give you opportunities to take on important roles with genuine responsibility. You will be able to make a significant contribution to the School and become a role model for the younger girls. In the next two short but important years, you will begin to plan for your future and make exciting decisions about the next stage of your life. Throughout the whole process, our experienced staff will support you with higher education and careers advice. Life in the Sixth Form is an unforgettable experience, characterised by energy, enthusiasm, rising to challenges, hard work, fun and laughter. All our Upper Sixth leavers will tell you how much they have loved it. As they embark on the next exciting phase of their lives, there is a confidence in them and a sense of independence and self-worth. We want you to leave Godolphin with the best possible A-level results, and with that same sense of achievement, purpose, self-belief in your abilities and strengths. We look forward to welcoming you into the Sixth Form.

A-levels are a big jump from GCSEs, but smaller class sizes and a more relaxed relationship with your teachers cater for your individual needs. Studying your chosen subjects and having more free time means there is more opportunity to read around the topics and become thoroughly engaged in them. These exciting two years will fly by and soon enough you will be looking beyond the Sixth Form. The enhancement programme offers fascinating lectures, ‘audiences with…’ and careers evenings with old girls. You will get advice and help, making the transition from school to higher education or the world of work far less intimidating. The expertise of staff such as Dr Dougall, Mrs Ferguson, your tutor and teachers will guide you through this process. The support is brilliant. The last two years have been full of happy and memorable experiences. Our highlights have included our Christmas ‘ents’, ‘muck-up day’, and Commem - the Upper Sixth trip to Westminster Abbey to commemorate Elizabeth Godolphin: a beautiful service that brought the whole year together, with many people contributing, through reading and playing. This enthusiasm and eagerness to get involved typifies the happy spirit of Godolphin’s Sixth Form, which is the thing we are going to miss the most. Bryony Ford & Iona Dryden, Head Girl and Deputy Head Girl, 2012-2013.

Dr Alistair Dougall, Head of Sixth Form

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WHY A-LEVELS AT GODOLPHIN? What we expect from you ... You are now at the stage when you will be thinking about your future. Each year the great majority of Godolphin girls make the informed decision to continue here for their sixth form education, and others choose to join us from elsewhere. When you move into the Sixth Form you will work in a genuine partnership with your teachers, but your progress will be down to you to a much greater extent than before. This is a very positive thing and will be important for your success. You will need to become an independent learner, taking responsibility for managing your time and reading around your chosen subjects to deepen your understanding and move beyond the constraints of your textbooks and classroom.

Commitment There is a significant jump from GCSEs to A-levels. To enable you to achieve your best, you will need to work hard both in lessons and in your own free time. As a guide, each hour spent in the classroom should be matched by at least one hour of independent study. We achieve excellent A-level results at Godolphin and, despite fierce competition for places, Godolphin students are very successful in securing places at the leading universities. They achieve this through genuine commitment to their studies and through working independently. If you are to enjoy the same success, you will need to take the same responsibility for your own learning.

More responsibility As those of you already here know, the Sixth Form plays a crucial role in the life of the school, and you will have opportunities for significant further responsibility: in sports, in charity and voluntary work, in your House, as a prefect and in the various Sixth Form societies and activities. You should seize the chance to take on more responsibility, leadership roles and to work as part of a team. This will enrich your experience and will impress universities and future employers.

Leadership Along with a strong sense of community, the opportunity for leadership is one of the most important ways in which a school sixth form differs from a sixth form college. Being a sixth former here will give you the chance to develop your leadership skills and to make a genuine and valuable contribution to the life of Godolphin. Because girls hold all the leadership roles in a girls’ school, they provide strong role models and encourage ambition, and research shows that this influences future career development. Girls educated at girls’ only schools tend to be leaders in life too.

Students from independent schools are better prepared for top universities. The Daily Telegraph, 24 January 2013 Single-sex schools are more likely to produce high-flying career girls ... they find it easier to make riskier choices than women who are placed in a co-ed class. The Observer, 8 January 2012 A greater proportion of women who attended single-sex schools go on to higher paid careers. Research published in Oxford Review of Education, August 2011 3


... and in return A supportive, friendly environment As a member of our Sixth Form, you will have both privileges and responsibilities. You will be taught in smaller groups similar to those that you can expect to find at university. Apart from formal occasions, you can choose what you want to wear (although we do have guidelines and expect you to ‘dress for work’ during the school day). You will have your own study area and will be able to study and relax there during your free periods, or choose to do so in one of the House sits, computer rooms, or kitchens; or in the new Sixth Form Costa Café. There is a real sense of community and camaraderie in the Sixth Form Centre where we value living and working together. I really enjoy being able to study the subjects that I am especially interested in. Also, having smaller classes means that you work at a good pace and the teachers can explain everything in good detail. I like the fact that the teachers treat you more like adults so that there is more independent learning. Becca Whitworth

Pastoral care You will receive outstanding pastoral care in the Godolphin Sixth Form. In these two crucial years of your education, it is important to know that you are in capable hands. We have a team of highly experienced, dedicated staff who will support and guide you so that you can make the best of everything on offer.

I chose the Sixth Form because I talked to the girls already in the Sixth Form and they told me how much better and different it was from the lower school, and I love it. I didn’t want to leave my friends, and I also knew that the subjects I wanted to study were available with teachers who I knew already. Ellen Bhamra

You will belong to the same, small tutor group for both your lower and upper sixth years so that your tutor can get to know you well and can guide you in your academic work and oversee your progress. We all have challenges at times, and managing your A-level studies may not always run smoothly. Your tutor will be there to help. Of course, you can also talk to the Head of Sixth Form and to the Sixth Form Housemistresses at any time. I value how open and friendly the staff are and how easy it is to talk to them about anything. Honor Willis

Higher Education & Careers Advice Most of our sixth formers choose to go on to university or art college, and they have an excellent record of achieving places at the leading universities and colleges. Even in these highly competitive times, the overwhelming majority are successful in securing their first choice of university course. Of course, the higher education route is not for everyone and you may want to pursue a different path. There are plenty of options to start a great career without going to university. Whether you want to go to university or want to do something else, we will give you guidance and support to help you make whatever is the right decision for you. As well as advice from experienced staff, you will have a week-long work shadowing placement, and attend a variety of workshops designed to help you with career investigations and to give you the best preparation possible for both university and non-university options.

All our workshops were so useful. Speaking to people at my university interviews, I didn’t find anyone who got help like we did. I had a much better understanding of the whole application system. Daisy Nicholls 4


Extra-curricular Sports Whether or not you play in one of the school sports teams, you will have the opportunity to take part in a wide range of sports in the Sixth Form and to keep fit. Options available are netball, hockey, lacrosse, cross-country, swimming, athletics, tennis, rounders, cricket, fencing, basketball, badminton, volleyball, rebounders, pilates, fitness and riding. We have an amazing track record of achieving really impressive results with our sports teams. Notable recent achievements include: six National Athletics representatives; Intermediate National Jumping with style Champions; NSEA Show Jumping Champion 2012; outright U19 National Lacrosse Champions 2010, 2011 and 2013 and seeing eight Godolphin girls play for England or Wales at the U19 Lacrosse World Cup 2011, with one (England Captain) being the only European player to make the World All Star Team. More recently, one of our Welsh players has been selected to play in the Senior Lacrosse World Cup 2013.

Drama There is a range of opportunities available for you to get involved with Drama outside of the academic curriculum. As well as taking part in School productions, either performing or as a member of the backstage and technical crew, you can also join Portal Theatre Company, a resident theatre company based at Godolphin that creates devised and scripted performances throughout the year, with a view to taking productions into the wider community. You can find out more about Portal by looking at the website: www.portaltheatre.com. In addition, girls are encouraged to create their own shows, and these are often performed at our frequent Blackledge Fringe events - to rave reviews! Speech and Drama Lessons are also available. So, even if you are not studying Drama at A-level, there are still lots of opportunities to take part in the Sixth Form.

Sports, in particular cross country, athletics and netball, have given me both a break from work to relax and a great deal of satisfaction and confidence. Alex Mundell

I’ve been in ‘Nights at the Circus’ and ‘Hairspray’ and it has been such great fun and really rewarding. Izzy Pugh-Cook

Becoming National Lax Champions was the icing on the cake! We all worked hard from the start, and that just showed what hard work can do! Eloise Musgrove 5


Music Godolphin has an outstanding reputation for music. Music plays a major role in the life of the School, and there are numerous opportunities to use and develop your musical talents in the Sixth Form. Sixth formers make a vital contribution to two of our wonderful, talented choirs: the Godolphin Choir and the Godolphin Vocal Ensemble. The Vocal Ensemble has an outstanding list of achievements: Winners of the Barnardo’s Choir of the Year Competition 2011, semi-finalists in the BBC Songs of Praise Choir of the Year Competition 2010 and 2011, runners-up in the Barnardo’s Choir of the Year Competition 2012, Wiltshire Life Performing Artists of the Year 2012 (third prize) and finalists in the BBC Songs of Praise Choir of the Year Competition 2012. If you enjoy singing and want to be a member of either choir, then you may be just an audition away from a fantastic experience. If you play a musical instrument and play to the required standard, then you can join the Godolphin Orchestra, or the Concert Band, or play in the Senior Strings or one of the ensembles playing chamber music. Our sixth form musicians have performed in some wonderful venues including Salisbury Cathedral, St Paul’s Cathedral and St John’s Smith Square. If you just want to continue playing music or want to learn a new instrument, then music lessons are available on all orchestral instruments plus piano, guitar and voice. If you are a musician, then Godolphin will give you so many opportunities to make the very most of your talents together with countless opportunities to perform.

The BIS The Barnardo's Business Incentive Scheme (BIS) gives you the opportunity in the Lower Sixth to cut your teeth in the business world. Alongside like-minded peers, you form a company with fellow students and can choose to work in whichever department you would like, such as finance or marketing. You will attend board meetings on a weekly basis. You have to research and then decide what the company produces. In recent years, a range of products has been sold including personalised pyjama bottoms, t-shirts and pillowcases. School fetes, teddy bears' picnic, and a Valentine's disco have also been organised and run successfully by previous companies.

Being in the vocal ensemble and choir has introduced me to many people around the school. It’s given me the opportunity to sing in amazing venues and on TV! Flora Rowe

I’ve really enjoyed being involved in the BIS. I have learned how to produce a product from scratch (in this case, the ‘Godolphin Trackies’!). Rachel Beard

Library The library has a wide selection of resources including books, E-books, newspapers, periodicals, CDs, DVDs, computers and a special area with resources solely for A-level students. Independent learning is encouraged and the library works closely with academic departments to foster this approach. There is plenty of space to work, and the library is open in the evenings and at weekends to enable the Sixth Form to have ready access. As well as the constant quest for information, libraries have a spiritual role to perform. It is important to be able to lose oneself in a story; to be able to reflect and dream. Our library has a comprehensive collection of contemporary fiction, both junior and adult, and numerous non-fiction books that can stretch the imagination and feed the soul. 6


Enhancement In keeping with our commitment to prepare our students for life beyond the Sixth Form, we offer a stimulating, comprehensive Enhancement Programme as well as the opportunity to take part in a wide range of extra-curricular activities involving sports and the performing arts. We encourage our students to acquire new skills and knowledge as well as to develop existing talents and interests. The Enhancement Programme will give you unique and exciting opportunities to expand your horizons.  The choice is extensive and ranges from cinema and theatre trips, film nights, career talks and ‘audiences with’ speakers from all sorts of diverse backgrounds, our own version of ‘Any Questions?’ through to ballroom dancing, Zumba, relaxation classes, first aid, visiting Stonehenge at dawn and survival cookery ... to name just a few! For more information on the activities you can choose from, have a look at the Sixth Form section of the School website: www.godolphin.org.

Seminar Society In the Lower Sixth, you have an opportunity to carry out research into a topic of special interest to you, which you then present to a small group of your fellow students and selected staff through the Seminar Society. This is an excellent way to prepare for university where you will have to discuss your own ideas in seminars and be expected to defend them. You may also find that you want to develop the topic in more depth during the Upper Sixth and gain a qualification for your project (see the information on the Extended Project Qualification in the Curriculum section of this booklet). Seminar Society is optional, but it is an excellent opportunity to prepare and give a talk on a topic that interests you, as well as learning from your fellow students as they give their own talks to the rest of the group. It will give you a real sense of achievement and enhance your skills in public speaking.

I loved Creative Cuisine - it was useful and a great break from school ... and you came back every week with a new skill and a delicious treat! Anna Bardwell

Seminar Society gives you a chance to become more confident about speaking in public and an opportunity to research a topic you are really passionate about. The research and presentation also gives you something that you can talk about in interviews. Bethany Wildash

I have enjoyed the Debating Society, the Green Group, Philosophy talks, the Politics Society and Amnesty International and have learned more about myself as a person as a result. I have developed skills that I am sure I will use in the future. Emma Cary The enhancement programme gives you the chance to explore things that you are interested in and things you might not have known you were interested in! From theatre to being a doctor to science cafe ... there is something for everyone. Megan Mullin 7


Duke of Edinburgh Godolphin prides itself on having a strong Duke of Edinburgh contingent at all three levels: Bronze, Silver and Gold. The award provides a balanced programme of activities that develops the whole person in an environment of social interaction and team working. Many our students do Gold D of E in the Sixth Form, completing it in the Upper Sixth with a final presentation at St James’s Palace. The five elements of skill, volunteering, participating and improving in a physical activity, attending a residential trip, and going on an expedition-training weekend will enable you to do an exciting and challenging range of things. You can do something for the community and many girls use the volunteering element to get experience in an area they are interested in studying at university. We have had expeditions to Dartmoor, the Brecon Beacons, Snowdonia and the Peak District. They are challenging, but then that is the point. All the elements are hugely rewarding. Completing the D of E will give you a real sense of achievement!

D of E has been great and challenging. I’ve learned when to be a leader and when to step back, and about the struggles you can face and how to overcome them, and I think this will help me a great deal later on in life. It also taught me the importance of patience. Lizzie Stewart

Boarding

I enjoyed being in Seminar Society. The independent research is a really good opportunity to look into something that interests you, and giving the talk to the rest of the group was a very good experience. I also enjoyed listening to other people’s talks. Tallulah Nicholls

The Sixth Form Centre comprises two Houses - School and Jerred - set in beautiful gardens with single and double study bedrooms, TV rooms, fully equipped kitchens, a games area and relaxation rooms. Boarding in the Sixth Form is the perfect place to prepare for life after school. Within the safety of a close-knit, caring community, you get the opportunity to begin the path to independence. The Centre runs on trust with very few official rules. This will encourage you to think carefully about how you act as an individual and how you treat others. With support and monitoring by the resident boarding team, you can decide how to organise your study, social and sleep time! It is an ideal stepping stone to life at university.

I love boarding! I have made friendships that will last for years. I have loved every minute of it! Mary Ingram

Combined Cadet Force Membership of the CCF will give you the chance to develop self-confidence, self-discipline, and responsibility as well as endurance, resourcefulness and perseverance. The varied and exciting programme includes basic military skills of weapon training, shooting, fieldcraft (living under a poncho and eating Army rations!) and drill, as well as activities such as walking, climbing, canoeing and raft building.  It offers you the opportunity to develop leadership skills as you progress through the CCF and become responsible for the delivery of basic training to newer recruits and leading groups on adventurous activities. Annual highlights include participation in the Ten Tors Challenge on Dartmoor and the ski trip to Austria.  Girls attend two camps each year.  We spend a few days a year visiting military establishments and enjoy excellent support from the local Gunner units at Larkhill and Tidworth.  The CCF can offer you challenges and a sense of adventure, and will help you to grow in confidence through the emphasis placed on personal development and camaraderie. 8


I really enjoyed the Sixth Form ‘Any Questions?’, as it made us think about the wider world and provoked interesting and lively debates. Megan Gompels The Seminar, Debating, History and Politics societies have all fuelled my interest in current affairs. I’ve really enjoyed them. Faith Bryer-Ash

I had no idea what to expect when I moved into the Sixth Form. I am really enjoying it and I’m glad I stayed. There is no way I would have been able to settle down quickly, make friends and continue to do well with my studies if I’d gone somewhere else. Annabel Bateman

The Scholars’ Programme Every Friday there is a Scholars’ activity after school. These are open to every student, whether a scholar or not. Not only will you find the talks and activities interesting, they will also help to expand your knowledge and impress university admissions tutors. Universities love to see students who enjoy intellectual enquiry, are not limited by their A-level subjects and who are interested in everything that, as humans, we are part of.

I joined Godolphin in the Sixth Form and by the first half-term teachers and the other students (and even I) had forgotten I was ‘new’, as it was so easy to fit in. I have made life-long friends. Maddie Hudson

The past year’s topics have ranged across millennia and even the boundaries of our universe! We have held 30 million year old fossils in our hands; heard Professor Al Khalili talk on understanding the void beyond the known universe; explored the DNA of a royal skeleton, considered the plausibility of the Turin Shroud and even re-enacted star formation in the Geography room! Scholars have shared their own research on topics as varied as Lady Thatcher’s legacy, child soldiers, Hitler and the Trojan War. Closer to our own time, Cyberterrorism and the Just War have been the focus of Chris Fuller’s research at Southampton University and in a series of talks he challenged us to decide where we stood on issues that face the world today. While Sir Sherard Cowper- Coles, ex- British Ambassador to Afghanistan, gave us a fascinating insight into the fragility of the UN’s Afghanistan solution and the importance of understanding the past in order to resolve the problems of the present.

I would advise other students to take part in every opportunity given to you. Even if you find it tough at times, it builds you as a person and is very enjoyable. Alex Healey The Sixth Form has been much better than I ever expected. The independence is great and there is an amazing sense of community. Coming to Godolphin was the best decision I could have ever made. Lizzie Stewart

So, as Scholars, we observe, reflect, make connections and present our ideas for discussion; we challenge our preconceptions and, in so doing, we impress and often surprise ourselves. Join us! 9


I really loved Commem. It was so beautiful and such a privilege to have Westminster Abbey entirely to ourselves! I really enjoyed the whole day up in London. Catrin Southgate

It was great to go to Grittleton with my year group and to be able to relax as well as get really useful tips on study and revision.. It was very interactive and good fun. Tallulah Nicholls

Grittleton House A few weeks into the Sixth Form (October of the Lower Sixth) we go away to Grittleton House, near Chippenham, for two days. It is a fantastic opportunity to really get to know your fellow students and to bond as a year group. As well as having lots of fun, you will have useful workshops on study skills, self-defence and mental resilience, which will not only help you with your A-level studies and in preparing for university, but will also help you to find out more about yourself, your individuality and your unique strengths. I enjoyed Grittleton. It was good to get out of school after a busy few weeks and to be in a relaxed environment. I especially liked the self-defence session, and the study skills workshop was very useful. Having young presenters made it more relevant because they were in our shoes not long ago. Lucy White

“Commem” Every Autumn, the Upper Sixth spend a day in London visiting a gallery, museum or exhibition of their choice before having free time together in London and then meeting for a very special service in Westminster Abbey. As all the tourists leave, we go in for a private service in the Henry VII Chapel to commemorate the School’s founder, Elizabeth Godolphin. The service is conducted by our chaplain, Rev’d Jane, and the Upper Sixth girls provide the music and do the readings. It is very special! Commem was a great day that made me feel part of something greater - like we were all part of one giant blue pinny! Emma Cary 10


THE SIXTH FORM CURRICULUM Introduction

How do university offers work?

The two years in the Sixth Form are an important and exciting time of development. Academic subjects offer genuine intellectual stimulus and challenge, while also providing qualifications for further study and future careers. As you have already read, opportunities abound in the Sixth Form: in sport, music, drama, art, debating, cookery, photography and many other spheres, including a flourishing Duke of Edinburgh Award programme, and an exceptional range of trips and expeditions, both in the UK and overseas. While enjoying these various pursuits, Godolphin sixth formers are also actively encouraged to develop as confident young adults, aware of the relationship between freedom and responsibility, and amply justifying the trust placed in them, both within School and in the wider community.

Offers for university places are usually based on three full A-levels (i.e. subjects taken to A2 level). Most university offers require a combination of A-level grades (e.g. AAB or ABB), but some offers are made based on a total number of UCAS tariff points. The UCAS points system is set out below: QUALIFICATION

GRADE

POINTS

A2 Level

A*

140

A2 Level

A

120

A2 Level

B

100

A2 Level

C

80

A2 Level

D

60

A2 Level

E

40

AS Level

A

60

AS Level

B

50

AS Level

C

40

AS Level

D

30

AS Level

E

20

How do you choose your courses? You should choose subjects in which you are interested, which suit your ability and skills, and which support your aspirations for higher education and career choice. Experience shows that students achieve higher grades at A2 level by combining complementary subjects (e.g. Biology, Chemistry and Mathematics; English, History and Economics or a modern language). The fourth subject at AS level offers additional scope: for example AS Art & Design, with A2s in Mathematics, Physics and Design Technology would ensure a secure programme for courses in Design Engineering. You need to consider all these factors as you make your decisions.

How do A-levels work? Most A-levels consist of four modules. The first two modules make up the Advanced Subsidiary, or AS, award. The second two modules, the A2 modules, complete the A-level. To gain a full A-level, students must cover work at both AS and A2 level in their chosen subject. Modular exams are available in June each year in all subjects, and some subjects also have assessment opportunities in January.

We offer comprehensive guidance to all students during this process, both to those already at Godolphin and to those hoping to enter our Sixth Form from other schools. There are many opportunities for discussion with teachers, tutors and with our Careers Adviser, Mrs Bethan Ferguson.

Most students at Godolphin take four AS levels in the Lower Sixth, continuing with three of these to the more demanding A2 level in the Upper Sixth, on which university offers depend. A few students may wish to take five subjects at AS and continue with four, but this is not something we would normally encourage. Even the top universities do not require more than three A-levels and it is much better to achieve three good A-level grades than to get lower grades in four subjects. All decisions are taken in consultation with you, your parents, teachers and tutors, as it is important that you make the choices that are best for you.

The timetable tries to take account of every option and there is considerable flexibility over the choice of subjects you can combine. Nonetheless, the option blocks may not always facilitate the combination you want, so you need to discuss your desired options with the Academic Deputy, Mrs Helen Portas, and with Mrs Ferguson. In most cases, students are able to do all their chosen subjects and we will always endeavour to accommodate your choices wherever possible. 11


Frequently asked questions: Do some university courses require particular subjects? Most do not, but some do. If, for example, you want to study Medicine, then you will definitely need to study Chemistry - see the list below. For most courses, though, particular subjects are not required.

University Courses/Career Choice

Useful or required A-levels

Architecture

A good art portfolio is essential. In addition, Mathematics and/or Physics A-level will be desirable. If you want to do a more engineering based course these subjects may even be necessary. Business Studies or Management Mathematics is helpful, but not essential. Computer Science Mathematics is required. Economics and PPE (Politics, Philosophy & Economics) Mathematics is strongly advised. Engineering Mathematics and Physics required. Further Mathematics is useful (and sometimes required). Foreign Languages Two languages (modern or classical) are desirable. Law Any A-levels at the highest grade with at least one essay based subject such as English or History. Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science Chemistry is crucial. (A couple of courses state that they will consider candidates who do not have Chemistry A-level, but that is because some schools cannot offer it. In reality, you need Chemistry). Biology is also highly desirable, at least to AS level. Natural Sciences Mathematics together with at least two of the three sciences is strongly advised. Psychology You do not need Psychology A-level, but Biology to at least AS level is often required.

Do my subject combinations matter? Some degree courses require particular A-levels (see above). To get onto the most competitive courses, the universities may also prefer it if you have studied at least two of the more traditional/academic subjects to A2 level. To get more information about this, you may like to read a document called ‘Informed Choices’ which has been published by the Russell Group of universities (which includes many of the UK’s leading universities). You can look at this document on the Russell Group’s website: http://www.russellgroup.ac.uk/ In any event, we recommend that you discuss your proposed choices with your tutor and with Mrs Portas. Mrs Ferguson and Dr Dougall will also be happy to discuss this with you.

Should I start a new subject at A-level or stick to subjects I know? The Sixth Form is an ideal opportunity to try something new, and it does not matter that you have not studied a subject at GCSE. Indeed, subjects like Business Studies, Economics, Government & Politics, History of Art and Psychology will be new for everyone. Read about subjects you have not done at GCSE in the following pages. If they look of interest and you want to find out more, feel free to speak to the Head of Department for more information. He or she will be happy to answer your questions.

Should I take the subjects I like best? It is important to pick subjects that you think you will enjoy. We all work best when we are interested in and enjoy what we are doing. So, bear that in mind when making your choices. It is an important factor to consider.

What other factors are important? There are various other factors that you should think about, such as how the subject is assessed. You may like the idea of doing coursework where the assessment is not based entirely on timed examinations. Does part of the course involve giving a presentation of some kind? Is there a field trip? Will there be a lot of practical work? How much essay writing is involved? Is a trip offered which will complement the syllabus? The following pages will answer many of these questions, but do ask the subject staff if you want to know more.

Can I change any of my choices once I have started in the Sixth Form? In order to give yourself the best start in the Sixth Form we strongly advise you to think very carefully before making your choices. Inevitably, though, some students occasionally decide that they want to make a change, and that is not a problem. However, it is important that you make that change sooner rather than later in order to ensure that you do not lose ground, so we ask students to make any changes before the first fixed exeat in the Lower Sixth and to only do so after taking advice from your tutor and the relevant subject staff. 12


6 easy steps to choosing your A-level subjects 1. Look through this booklet to find out what Godolphin can offer you in the next important stage of your education. Read the following subject pages carefully and write down the subjects that interest you.

2. Talk to the relevant Heads of Departments and subject teachers to find out more about those subjects. Talk to others too: your tutors; the Careers Adviser, Mrs Ferguson; the Academic Deputy, Mrs Portas; the Head of Sixth Form, Dr Dougall; your Housemistress and, of course, your parents.

3. Come to the subject previews in September to find out more about the A-level subjects you are interested in. Ask questions and keep an open mind.

4. Choose which subjects you are going to find out more about during the two ‘discovery days’ we offer in October. If you know you are definitely going to do a particular subject, then take the opportunity to get a taste of something else. Try some new subjects.

5. Make your preliminary AS choices at the end of the Autumn Term and then give your final option choices to Mrs Portas in February, after the mock exams are over.

6. Then focus on working hard for your GCSEs and IGCSEs. Do the best you can to get the best grades you can, and then enjoy the summer and wait for your results.

Welcome to the Godolphin Sixth Form. Your A-levels start here! 13


ART & DESIGN

Head of Department: Mr Nick Eggleton Examination Board: AQA

Why study Art?

Will I enjoy it?

Being aware of the creative world around you will already have inspired you to produce a range of work at GCSE. Now is the opportunity for you develop your existing knowledge further in a creative, personal and innovative way. You will extend your understanding of the role of other artists, past and present, allowing you to put your own work into context. We want you to be a part of that creative world and to influence it with your own ideas and imagination. Come and work with our creative team in a vibrant and exciting department.

If you get a real buzz from creating, experimenting and developing your own individual artwork then the answer is – YES! The greater freedom that the course allows will give you the opportunity to discover more about yourself and your individual creativity. Although we are on hand to give help and advice and to monitor your progress, you will be free to explore the direction that you want to follow.

Assessment AS: 2 Units: Unit 1 Coursework, Unit 2 Externally Set Assignment. A2: 2 Units: Unit 3 Coursework, Unit 4 Externally Set Assignment.

Course content AS: Unit 1 Coursework. A residential trip to either Cornwall or Liverpool - visiting art galleries and museums as well as the surrounding area - will provide inspiration for your own practical work. Unit 2 Externally Set Assignment. This is a starting point to explore and create more of your own practical work. A2: Unit 3 Coursework. This is a more self-directed, personal investigation beginning at the end of the Lower Sixth and continuing until late January of the Upper Sixth. It allows you to study any aspect of art and design in detail and includes a written 3000 word personal study and a portfolio of practical work. Unit 4 Externally Set Assignment. This is a starting point to explore and create more of your own practical work.

Tell me more‌ You will get the opportunity to build on your existing knowledge by using the extensive facilities in our Art & Design studios. What makes us unique is the range of disciplines we offer, the fact that our studios are open until late at night and the specialist teaching offered by our very talented and creative staff. You will have access to the wider community of artists through our network of contacts. We pride ourselves on creating new and innovative work with our students. The department has no house style; we are constantly creating new work reacting to current ideas and approaches. Individuality is encouraged to allow you to fulfil your potential. Progression: Students from here go on to study on a variety of courses both nationally and internationally. The traditional route is to do an Art Foundation course first before progressing onto a degree. However, many students use an A-level in this subject to obtain entry onto courses such as Architecture, Product Design, Engineering Design, Film and Animation, Art History, Fashion and many others. 14


BIOLOGY

Head of Department: Dr Bernadette Medany Examination Board: Edexcel

Why study Biolog y?

Will I enjoy it?

Indeed, many will tell you that Biology is not essential if you want to study Medicine. However, why wouldn’t you want to study the science of life if you want to become a doctor? It’s a good choice if you’re interested in studying Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Science, Physiotherapy, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Environmental Studies, Forensic Science, Sports Medicine … the list goes on and on!

Please don’t think that Biology is the “easy” science. It is far from easy - yet very rewarding to those prepared to put in the work and time required to delve deeper into the mystery of life. Yes, there is some plant biology in there as well - but plants are amazing, they split water molecules, releasing the oxygen we need to live and making food for us at the same time. Without plants there wouldn’t be life as we know it on this planet, so pay respect to the chlorophyll molecule!

Once upon a time, Biology at school was restricted to the study of plants (botany) or animals (zoology). But times have changed! Research has taken place at such an incredible rate since the structure of DNA was first discovered (a mere 60 years ago!) that the subject you study at A-level is nothing like the course taught just a few decades ago. Genetic engineering used to be the stuff of science-fiction and horror movies - it’s now reality. At A-level you learn about the facts - for example, how new cures for cancer could be developed - as well as the ethical concerns. This is the science that has a social conscience and this course makes you think about the moral dilemmas facing biologists at the cutting edge of research.

Course content You study four topics at AS and four at A2. These topics are approached as case studies, taking every day issues and exploring the biology involved. The topics you study at AS cover a diverse range of subjects including cardiovascular disease, cystic fibrosis, stem cell therapy and the conservation of rare species. The topics you have the chance to study at A2 include aspects of forensic biology, immunology, sports physiology and the working of the human brain.

Assessment There are two written papers at AS and two at A2. Each paper tests the knowledge and understanding of two topics. At A2 the second paper also assesses understanding of a prereleased scientific article which you study in class. At AS you are also tested on practical and research skills. You have to produce a written report of about 1500-2000 words on a biological topic of your own choice. For the A2 coursework you carry out your own investigation at Nettlecombe Court Field Centre, in Exmoor National Park, whilst on the Biology Field Trip.

Tell me more… You’ll get to carry out lots of interesting experiments as well as hold debates on ethical issues. There is a dedicated website with plenty of resources you can access at any time. You’ll get to go on day trips - for example to conferences on conservation at Marwell Zoo or on genetic research in London. There could also be an opportunity for you to take part in the National Biology Olympiad. 15


BUSINESS STUDIES

Head of Department: Mr David Miller Examination Board: AQA

Why study Business Studies?

Will I enjoy it?

Why do some firms set up next door to their competitors while others set up as far away as possible? How do some firms make a profit and a loss at the same time? How can you motivate workers who are doing the same repetitive task every day? These are just some of the questions that you will be able to answer after having studied Business Studies. You will have the knowledge to set up your own company after the first term and the ability to problem solve just like Richard Branson!

Business Studies is going to equip you with the understanding to run your own firm or manage your own business department. It will give you the confidence to enter into a firm and make a positive difference, and firms are always attracted to young workers who understand how companies work.

If you are looking to cut your teeth in business then you can participate in the Barnardo’s BIS where students set up and run their own company in the Lower Sixth. Never been in a factory before? Then join us on the Czech Republic trip and you too could wear the fetching attire seen below!

Course content AS: The first unit is based on entrepreneurship and covers the basics involved in setting up your own business. The focus then changes in the second unit to the internal workings of a firm, working through the topics of marketing, finance, operations management (production) and human resource management. A2: The focus is now on large firms, often multinationals, and we build closely on the foundations of the AS level, investigating the internal workings of the firm in more depth. The final unit is based mainly on a pre-released topic, focussing on the influence of external factors on firms.

Tell me more‌

Assessment

Many of our business students go on to study the subject further at university, either in its own right or in a specialist area such as Accountancy. Your career options and the variety of companies that you will be able to work for are endless and it really is a case of picking a product or service that particularly enthrals you, as every firm needs employees with business acumen. So get that passport ready - a trip to Prague awaits you!

AS: The two exam papers are based on unseen case studies and consist of data response questions. A2: In addition to a further set of data response questions, Unit 3 requires the student to use the unseen case study to compile a business report. The final unit is an essay paper, and one of the essays will be based on the pre-released topic. 16


CHEMISTRY

Head of Department: Dr Clinton Thrower Examination Board: AQA

Why study Chemistry?

Will I enjoy it?

Chemistry is fundamental to our world. It shapes everything around us. From medicines to fuels, from clothes to biodegradable polymers, it is responsible for what we have now, and is at the forefront of current research. From nanowire development for solar cells to enzyme research to stop premature deterioration of fruit, it is important in solving so many of the problems facing our planet. Studying Chemistry gives you a reasoned view of global issues and how they might be solved, as well as a highly regarded qualification. Chemistry A-level proves your ability to recall information, as many subjects do, but it also shows that you can apply the concepts you have learnt to new situations and analyse data in order to reach valid conclusions. You will gain valuable life skills such as the ability to solve problems, synthesise information, link ideas and think logically. You will learn how to use qualitative and quantitative methods, how to observe and record findings accurately and how to critically analyse the methodology used in investigative activities.

If you have an interest in the subject and enjoyed Chemistry at GCSE level, then yes. The material we cover solves some of mysteries we had to leave open ended at GCSE and allows you to finally understand some of the details we did not have time for in your earlier studies. The A-level students love the “oh, it all makes sense now” moments, and this makes it an academic subject that students genuinely enjoy. However, Chemistry is academically challenging and is recognised as one of the hardest A-levels to take. This is why it is so highly regarded by universities and employers. Students also enjoy the academic rigour of the subject, which is promoted by running optional degree level extension classes in session time as well as the ‘Cambridge Chemistry Challenge’ during the AS year and the Royal Society of Chemistry’s ‘Chemistry Olympiad’ in the A2 year.

Tell me more… AS level Chemistry builds on the knowledge and understanding developed at GCSE, with A2 concepts extending those covered at AS. You will learn the answers to many interesting questions, such as why the things around you appear the way they do, why some solutions are coloured, why some reactions occur while others do not and why keeping your room tidy is impossible, as you cannot compete with entropy! The course aims to stimulate enjoyment of Chemistry, a subject which not only occupies a central position amongst the sciences but which also fits well with numerous other A-levels outside of Biology, Physics and Mathematics. It is an essential A-level for the progression into medicine, dentistry, veterinary science and pharmacy, but also opens up a vast range of professions from environmental sciences and art conservation to forensic science and patent law.

Course content AS: You will build upon the Chemistry you have already learnt, extending the concepts and finding out why we had to ‘fib’ a little at GCSE! Unit 1 covers the atom in detail, chemical bonding, element and compound structures along with trends and patterns in the periodic table and an introduction to organic chemistry. Unit 2 extends the organics from Unit 1, along with topics including reaction rates, energetics, equilibria and mass spectrometry. Unit 3 assesses the practical work done throughout the AS year with an internally examined practical and theory paper.

Of course, as well as countless industrial-based jobs, it could also lead to the best job in the world as there is a world-wide shortage of Chemists in education! Rather than narrowing your choices, Chemistry will create countless possibilities for you. It has to be one of the most fascinating and pivotal subjects you could ever decide to study.

Assessment AS: Unit 1: Foundation Chemistry. 1 hour 15 minute paper. Unit 2: Chemistry in Action. 1 hour 45 minute paper. Unit 3: AS ISA (Skills Assessment). Practical & 1 hour paper.

A2: In Unit 4 you extend the concepts from your AS units on kinetics, equilibria and analytical techniques, with new work on acids and bases and a major section on organic chemistry. Unit 5 contains thermodynamics, redox equilibria, periodicity in period 3, transition metals and complex ions. Unit 6 assesses the practical work done throughout the A2 year with an internally examined practical and theory paper.

A2: Unit 4: Kinetics, equilibria & organic Chemistry. 1 hour 45 minute paper. Unit 5: Energetics, Redox & inorganic Chemistry. 1 hour 45 minute paper. Unit 6: A2 ISA (Skills Assessment). Practical & 1 hour paper. 17


DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

Head of Department: Mr Matthew Berry Examination Board: AQA

Why study Design Technolog y?

Will I enjoy it?

It’s a 3D world! Think about the objects that you enjoy owning and using - all your possessions have been designed and made by somebody. Your mobile phone was designed on a computer screen and modelled using rapid prototyping techniques. The car you will soon be driving (most of our students pass their driving tests while in the Sixth Form!) started life as a sketch before being developed into a clay model and then a 3D computer model. As a designer you will be at the crossroads of a number of skills.

If you are interested in how things look and work and in creating things of your own, then, yes, of course! Design is about bringing ideas to life. Imagine how satisfying it must be for the person who designed the iPhone to see it being used or to have been the inventor of a product that made a real difference to the quality of someone’s life.

Assessment AS: Unit 1: 2 hour paper worth 50% of AS, 25% of A2. Unit 2: Coursework (50% of AS, 25% of A2)

Of course, you need creativity in order to imagine the function of an object, an awareness of aesthetics to produce its shape, and you will also need to know about standards, materials and manufacturing processes. The A-level course has been designed to encourage you to take a broad view of design and to make products and to appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing.

A2: Unit 3: 2 hour paper worth 25% of A2. Unit 4: Coursework (25% of A2)

Course content At AS level you will develop an understanding of a broad range of materials, with emphasis on the life cycle of products, manufacture and final disposal. You will also look at the broader issues for designers, including the environmental sustainability of products and consumer safety. AS Unit 1: Materials, Components and Application. This involves a knowledge and understanding of product design, learning about materials and components, processes, manufacture and quality and design in practice. AS Unit 2: Learning Through Designing and Making. This is the AS coursework element: a project chosen by you, and designed and made by you. It covers all of the skills related to Designing and Making (i.e. researching, generating and developing ideas, solving problems, detail designing, communicating ideas and information, planning, evaluating, using ICT and working with materials). Recent work has included furniture, storage, games and aids for the elderly.

Tell me more… The course will help you develop a range of skills: refining problems; learning how to assemble data and synthesise the information; to think logically and creatively; to find solutions to existing design problems; to come up with new ideas; to produce a specification demonstrating an understanding of what people want. You will produce a plan of action and learn how to present your work.

At A2, the specification offers you the opportunity to further develop the knowledge and practical skills you will have learned from the AS course. You will continue to develop a body of coursework alongside an understanding of the processes and procedures of commercial production and manufacture.

3D Design can open up lots of exciting career paths: product design, industrial design, interior design, graphic design or furniture/packaging/sports equipment design. There is also computer generated animation. Or perhaps this course could take you into engineering, design engineering, architecture, manufacturing, marketing or advertising. The processes of creative thinking and innovation are vital for a successful business and are being used in Business Schools. You will have so many options.

A2 Unit 3: Design and Manufacture. This can be either a completely new project or the development of the project from unit 1 but with an emphasis on working for a client, commercial techniques and scales of production. A2 Unit 4: Design and Making Practice. This is the A2 coursework element: a study of modern technologies and materials, such as smart materials, product manufacture, design in practice and advertising and marketing. 18


DRAMA

Head of Department: Mr David Hallen Examination Board: Edexcel

Why study Drama?

Will I enjoy it?

You might study Drama because there is no alternative; you are a driven dramatist, and committed to the subject as a personal and professional choice. You may well intend to study Drama in higher education or at Drama School, and A-level Drama is a passionate, necessary choice. However, you may be the kind of person for whom Drama is a more of an interest - you enjoyed it at GCSE or have been involved in School productions over the years, and now think it would sit well as part of a balanced spread of A-levels. You might not be sure how it fits in with your future plans, but know that you would like to compliment your other A-levels with an inspiring, creative and largely practical subject.

How could you not? The course is designed to stretch and develop your artistic abilities and is both academically fulfilling and creatively compelling. You will work in a friendly, informal environment with like-minded performers and directors, exploring some complex and rewarding texts and techniques. Without doubt, you will gain a tremendous sense of achievement at the end of the course, with performance memories to treasure.

Assessment AS: Practical work and coursework, internally assessed 40% practical performance, externally examined 60%. A2: Devising project, internally assessed 40% written examination, externally examined 60%.

Course content AS: You will study two units in the Lower Sixth, where the focus is on your development as a performer. The first is a practical exploration of three different plays; two published texts and one live performance. Your work is a balance of practical rehearsal and individual coursework. The second unit leads to an examination of live performance. You will perform to a live audience in a published play directed by a member of staff, as well as preparing and performing a monologue. A2: In the Upper Sixth, you focus on direction and, again, there are two units to complete. The first is a devising project where you and your group create an original piece of theatre from a stimulus provided by us. Your working process and performance are both examined. Finally, you will sit a written examination in which you outline your conceptual interpretation of a classic text from the point of view of director.

Tell me more‌ You will have access to our purpose-built Blackledge Theatre, fully equipped with a wide range of lighting and sound equipment. You will benefit from our departmental links with higher education and industry when making decisions about the future. You will have the opportunity to be taught by staff with a wide range of professional performing arts experience. You will have the opportunity to work with local theatre-makers to produce new and interesting types of performance. You have automatic entry to the Portal Theatre Company, the resident Godolphin acting group. You will experience not just the thrill of live theatre, but the discipline of working to non-moveable deadlines, working in groups, working independently and learning how to manage the pressure of performance. We have a record of outstanding results at AS and A2! 19


ECONOMICS

Head of Department: Mr David Miller Examination Board: Edexcel

Why study Economics?

Will I enjoy it?

Ever wondered what ‘the credit crunch’ is actually about? Or how a rich country such as the UK can possibly owe over £1 trillion? Or why it is expensive to shop in some countries but much cheaper in other countries? These are the sorts of issues that will be covered during your study of Economics. It will provide you with a fascinating insight into the workings of the global financial system, as well as equipping you with the necessary knowledge to hold an intellectual economic debate and wow your guests at future dinner parties!

Do you enjoy topical debate, making money and travelling? You will find that, once you learn the basic theory, many of the lessons will relate directly to the current issues in the news. Economics is addictive and you will find your knowledge expanding on topics such as gold that you would not have previously thought possible! There will be the opportunity to invest £100,000 in stocks and shares through the stockbroking competition, and to travel to the Czech Republic and to London, where you will visit the Bank of England and have a tour of Lloyds of London, seeing the world famous insurance market in action (see below!).

Course content AS: The course splits into microeconomics and macroeconomics. The basis of microeconomics is the model of demand and supply, which can then be used to explain the workings of the vast majority of markets. There are some markets however which do not work correctly for a variety of reasons and we will investigate why this is the case. Macroeconomics looks at the workings of the whole economy and the ways in which the government can affect it, as well as examining the linkages between instruments such as interest rates and taxation. A2: This is an extension of the AS course, investigating the ways in which companies both operate and compete with each other, and the legal parameters within which they must operate, as well as focussing on the workings of the global economy and the development of BRIC and subSaharan African economies.

Tell me more… Economics is a popular subject at university, both in its own right and as part of a degree such as PPE (Philosophy, Politics and Economics). While strong mathematical ability is not required at A-level, many university courses will require A-level Mathematics. Your career options are wide and varied and, statistically, you will be amongst the top graduate earners!

Assessment There are four units in total, comprising structured response and data response questions. The final unit will also require a written essay. There is no coursework. 20


ENGLISH LANGUAGE Head of Department: Mr Matthew Ryan East Examination Board: AQA

Will I enjoy it?

Why study English Language? Or Y stu D Ing? A-level English Language is quite different from English lower down the school. It is relevant, topical and varied, examining language in all its forms, spoken, written and electronic. It matches well with Humanities subjects and with Modern Foreign Languages or Social Sciences - particularly Psychology - both at A-level and at university.

Of course! This subject has a very high retention rate from AS to A2. It is enjoyable as it involves so much discussion and participation, some role-play and the use of language not normally associated with academic study: it could be called English without reading hard books, though the study of linguistic theorists and other background reading material is encouraged.

Like all A-levels, English Language is challenging and requires hard work. You will need to brush up your grammar in order to analyse language in a range of forms, including spontaneous speech, with its “like” and “whatever,” texts, MSN messaging, slang, and many forms of English, including American, Australian and “Old” English, from the time of Chaucer to the present day, including the study of accent and dialect. You should have a genuine interest in Language in use all around you, from signs, adverts, packaging and stand-up comedians to toddler talk, children’s writing, poetry and hip-hop.

Assessment AS: One exam paper involving unseen texts for analysis. Coursework: two pieces of original writing, both with critical commentary. A2: One exam paper testing understanding of varieties of English from different times and places and child language acquisition. One coursework essay on any area of language study you choose. Examples have included the language of football and rugby commentaries; love letters from Keats to modern day texts; recipes from medieval times to Nigella DVDs; the language of diaries or hymns or pop lyrics.

Tell me more… Visits to lectures at other schools, to English and Media Centre conferences in London with the world-famous linguist, David Crystal, and to the British Library Exhibitions all feature on a regular basis. You will also be taken into town to scrutinise gender-orientated language on product packaging! Regular visits to our prep school enable you to see child language development for yourself.

Dr Johnson’s Insults…

Course content AS: The study of spoken, written and electronic English, including media, adverts, dialect etc. You will look at “texts” of enormous range including slogans, text messages, politicians’ speeches as well as the linguistic theorists who have written and formed pyscho- and socio-linguistic theories. We also look at language in different social contexts, including language and gender, power and technology. A2: The study of child language acquisition forms a major part of the course, including visits to our prep school to see speech and writing development in action. The other section includes history of the language from Anglo-Saxon to present day English, as well as a wide range of different varieties of global English. Resident Gap students fill us in on Australian slang!

Fopdoodle – fool, insignificant wretch Slubberdegullion –paltry, dirty wretch Gorbelly – a big paunch & swelling belly Dandiprat – a little fellow, an urchin Scroyle – a mean fellow, a rascal 21


ENGLISH LITERATURE Head of Department : Mr Matthew Ryan East Examination Board: AQA

Why study English Literature?

Will I enjoy it?

A-level English Literature is a traditional and popular academic subject, highly regarded by universities, leading to a variety of careers. It complements History and Religious Studies particularly well, though you can also take it with a range of other subjects in Humanities, Science and Modern Foreign Languages.

Naturally! If you choose English Literature because you enjoy reading, discussing and analysing books, and writing your own informed responses to them, this flexible course with its room for personal choice is bound to stimulate and engage.

Like all academic subjects, English Literature is demanding. You need to work hard, to read - both widely and with close attention to detail - to think analytically and to discuss your ideas in the classroom and beyond. And, of course, to write essays. English Literature is very rewarding: it enriches your mind as you meet a variety of great literature and it sharpens your ability to express yourself clearly in speech and writing. Most of all, it gives the enormous pleasure offered by reading and discussion - why else would the country be full of reading groups?

To read, or not to read...

By the end of the course, the range of books you will have encountered will stay with you, good friends in your lifelong enjoyment of literature.

Tell me more… Creative Writing Club, debates, involvement in scholars’ lectures and theatre visits are the “more” that you will experience if you take up this subject. We are keen to encourage reading groups and competition entries , and open to other ideas to supplement your enjoyment of literature.

Course content AS: You will study six literary texts. For the exam, you will study two 19th or 20th century novels from a selection including Pride and Prejudice and The Kite Runner, as well as two poets from a list including Frost, Keats or Browning. For the coursework, you will read two plays from the comedy genre, one modern and one by Shakespeare.

Assessment AS: One exam paper on Aspects of Narrative, covering four texts, poetry and novels. Two pieces of coursework on drama, involving one modern play and one Shakespearean comedy.

A2: You will study at least six texts. Four of these will be for the exam on Gothic Literature, taken from a selection including Macbeth, Northanger Abbey, The Bloody Chamber, and poetry by Chaucer. Two or three others will be taken from any period and genre for the independent reading coursework pieces in which you will choose your own texts.

A2: One exam paper on Gothic literature, involving three or four texts from different genres, including Shakespeare. Two pieces of coursework on any literature of your own choice, one of them linked to an aspect of literary theory. 22


EXTENDED PROJECT QUALIFICATION (EPQ)

Centre Co-Ordinator: Mrs Helen Portas. Supervisor (History of Art): Mrs Sara Radice Examination board: AQA

Why take the EPQ?

Will I enjoy it?

If you have a thirst for intellectual inquiry and enjoy exploring topics beyond the curriculum, the EPQ could be for you. Since 2009, a number of History of Art A-level students have undertaken the EPQ and this will now be an option in any subject where there is a supervisor available. The project, which can be on an academic topic of your choice (agreed with your supervisor), takes the form of a 5000 word dissertation supported by a presentation to a non-specialist audience (of peers, parents and staff ) with a question and answer session. The dissertation must not be merely descriptive, but pursue an original line of argument analytically.

Those who have done the EPQ found that it gave them an ideal opportunity to make links between their subjects. Linguists were able to translate from original sources and work on projects that enhanced their understanding of the culture of the language they went on to read at university, while others took the opportunity to explore connections between Music, Literature, History or Maths and Art. Topics have ranged from the influence of courtesans on nineteenth century Parisian culture, German and British artistic responses to the First World War to harmony in sixteenth century Arcadian landscapes; and from the links between Odilon Redon’s work and the theories of Darwin to the evolution of the ancient goddesses of love and fertility. We always select one of our Art Historians to take their presentation to the regional heats of the National ARTiculation Prize at Roche Court. Both Isy Orange and Tilly Bourchier spoke of the mixture of fear and excitement that they felt in sharing their ideas with an audience at Roche Court, but, as Isy said, “the experience was exhilarating”. Isy described working on the project as “the culmination of all my A-level studies.”

You will start to think about your topic when you return to school after your AS exams in the summer term of the Lower Sixth, and the project will be handed in at the end of the spring term of the Upper Sixth. Supported by weekly meetings with your supervisor, you will learn skills that are really valuable for university such as managing a large scale project, carrying out research using specialist libraries and archives, preparing a bibliography, reading critically, writing at length with footnotes, presenting your findings and, perhaps most importantly, reflecting on your progress and the results.

Course content AQA suggest that the project should take you about 120 hours. Of this, you will spend roughly thirty hours in sessions with your supervisor learning the relevant skills of how to manage your project and how to carry out research and extended writing. You will need to keep a production log of all stages of the project, reviewing and evaluating your progress. Significant marks are allocated for the process of the project and the strategies you have used to meet your stated objectives. The EPQ is an excellent introduction to university-style independent work, as it allows you to develop organisational skills - balancing it with your other A-level subjects - to achieve your stated aims. You will also develop your research, writing and presentation skills. You will have the opportunity to learn how to use an academic library and should aim to look at a variety of sources for your research or learn to use new technologies. Key marks are awarded for problem solving, decision making and creative thinking. You will need to think critically and analytically and to demonstrate understanding of the complexities and connections made in your project. Often the best projects are those that make links between the candidate’s A-level subjects.

Assessment The EPQ has a maximum value of 70 UCAS points (i.e. half an A-level) but, unlike the AS, students who achieve over 45/50 marks can gain an A* grade.

Tell me more…

Finally, you will be marked on your communication skills and ability to convey and present your outcomes and conclusions, as well as your own assessment of your learning during the project.

The EPQ provides universities with vital evidence of your skills and interests, as well as giving you a topic to discuss in your personal statement and at interview. 23


FOOD TECHNOLOGY

Head of Department: Mrs Penny Parry-Jones Examination Board: AQA

Why do Food Technolog y?

Will I enjoy it?

Food Technology is an exciting, interesting and fun course! It supports and links well with Science subjects, Business Studies and P.E. If you are specialising in Sciences, this course promotes your creative side. Food science content is often helpful, and concepts are straightforward to grasp because of their familiar context. Food Technology is a useful AS to broaden a Humanities, Literature, Arts or Language based A-level course. It will demonstrate capabilities in a great range of transferable skills that otherwise may have limited access. And, let’s not forget, the knowledge and practical skills acquired are essential life skills!

Yes - if you enjoy practical activity, developing your independence, have some desire to be creative and solve real issues. You are involved in producing a new food product designed to meet a set of criteria that you have identified and to fill a gap in the market that you have noticed. A genuine interest in food and food-related issues and trends ... and, of course, a love of cooking helps too.

Assessment AS: 1 x 2 hour paper (50% of AS, 25% of A-level) A2: 1x 2 hour paper (50% of AS, 25% of A-level) Coursework requirements: AS: 1 major project (50% of AS, 25% of A-level) A2: 1 major project (50% of AS, 25% of A-level)

Course content Materials and Components: all about food ingredients and

food commodities - both their nutritional properties and their impact on health, as well as how they interact in food systems. Design and Market Influences: this takes account of why

and how new products appear on the market and the factors that influence their survival and development. Processes and manufacture: a broad knowledge of

manufacturing systems used to produce food products that are suitable and safe for retail and catering markets.

Tell me more… This course is a great opportunity to develop and stimulate creativity and innovation through new product design and understanding existing food product designs. The coursework mirrors exactly what happens in the food industry, so it is ‘real life’. You gain a whole range of skills, the sort that can be helpful at university with your ability to study independently. Spending time on practical activities such as cooking and testing ideas, analysing existing products, experimenting and running taste panels makes a refreshing change from normal classroom-based subjects. Opportunities for further study and employment are vast, and the success rate of graduates gaining employment is high. Careers vary from food scientist to media and journalism, from hospital dietician to teacher, from events management to sourcing and buying for large retailers. The list is endless. People always have to eat! 24


GEOGRAPHY

Head of Department: Mrs Sarah Collishaw Examination Board: AQA

Why study Geography?

Will I enjoy it?

“There has never been a better or more important time to study Geography. With growing interest in issues such as climate change, migration, environmental degradation and social cohesion, Geography is one of the most relevant courses you could choose to study. Whatever your passion for the world - fascination with landscapes or concerns about inequality - Geography will provide you with knowledge and transferable skills that will reward you personally and advance you professionally.” (Dr Rita Gardner, RGS-IBG)

Yes! Geography is dynamic and so relevant to the world in which we live today. There is a natural progression from GCSE and you will have the opportunity to develop fieldwork skills and study geographical issues and impacts.

Assessment AS: Unit 1: 2 hour paper. Structured short and extended

questions (70% AS : 35% A2). Unit 2: 1 hour paper. Structured skills and generic fieldwork questions (30% AS : 15% A2) A2: Unit 3: 2 ½ hour paper. Structured short and extended

questions plus an essay (30%). Unit 4: 1 ½ hour paper. Structured short and extended questions based on a fieldwork investigation. (20%)

Tell me more…

Course content

The skills you learn through studying Geography are transferable and make you highly employable. Class presentations develop your research, communication and presentation skills and fieldwork demands teamwork, problem solving and analytical skills. You will be good at combining information from a variety of sources with excellent written skills. Geographers are flexible, creative and are highly motivated. We analyse spatial and temporal data using graphical and statistical techniques, including ICT and GIS (Geographical Information Skills).

AS: Unit 1: Physical and Human Geography: two Physical Geography topics (Rivers and Cold Environments) and two Human Geography topics (Population and Health Issues) are studied. Unit 2: Geographical Skills: a skills paper to develop your investigative, cartographic, graphical, ICT and statistical skills. We use the local environment for fieldwork. A2: Unit 3: Contemporary Geographical Issues: an issues-based approach to contemporary geographical themes, focussing specifically on the three topics of Ecosystems, Plate Tectonics and Associated Hazards, and Contemporary Conflicts and Challenges.

We get good results and our Geographers have gone on to study the subject further at Cambridge, Durham, Exeter, Leeds, and many other top universities.

Unit 4: Geography Fieldwork Investigation: this provides the opportunity to investigate a geographical subject that you have enjoyed studying. You will undertake a personal fieldwork investigation of a geographical hypothesis, issue, or problem, and you will be assessed on your investigation skills, understanding and knowledge in response to set questions on the examination paper.

“There is no such thing as a geography job; there are jobs that geographers do.” Geography graduates have one of the highest rates of graduate employment, and geographers enter a wide variety of career paths, which include chartered surveying, environmental consultancy, the financial sector, the Armed Forces, marketing and manufacturing. 25


GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS Head of Department: Miss Julia Miller Examination Board: Edexcel

Why study Politics?

Will I enjoy it?

You could soon be voting in a general election - an election that could change your future and those of your family and friends. How should you decide how to vote? What are the choices on offer? How does the system work? What are your rights - and how can you guarantee them, and if necessary, protest to protect them? Like it or not, political decisions shape your life.

Definitely! Politics is in the news everyday and affects every aspect of our lives. There is always something exciting happening for us to analyse and investigate. There is lots to discuss and debate about people and events, and the examination questions are designed to enable you to argue your understanding of current issues. Politics encourages you to think for yourself and is excellent preparation for university.

Politics affects everything you do! From the age that you can vote, marry and drink to how loud you can play your music and what you study in school. For these reasons and many others, you should be aware of how the system of government operates. A-level Politics will widen your understanding of how and why politicians make decision and how we can influence them. You will also examine the big ideas that drive politics. If you are interested in ideas, you will love Politics!

Course content AS: The course will enable you to develop a good understanding of the key features of the British political system. It looks at the nature of the UK constitution and at key institutions such as Parliament, Government and the Judiciary. It considers the various electoral systems used in the UK and the relationships between the different parts of the UK. The role of political parties and pressure groups is examined, as well as the ideologies of the main political parties. You will also be introduced to the EU and the UK’s relationship with it. A2: This focuses on ideologies - political thought that explores what it is that human beings want from politics and so gets to the heart of what politics really is. We examine the main ideologies and how they challenge each other in explaining human nature and how it can be encouraged or controlled in different types of society.

Tell me more… Government & Politics helps students to develop analytical and evaluative skills that are also used in subjects such as English, History, Geography, Economics and RS, and fits well with these subjects. It can also be an attractive choice for those who are more creatively, linguistically or scientifically minded, and so can work well as the ‘different’ option at AS.

Assessment AS: 2 x 1 hour 20 minute papers. A2: 2 x 1 hour 30 minute papers.

There are no specific GCSE requirements, but you need to have the ability to construct and develop a written argument.

There is no coursework. 26


CLASSICAL GREEK Head of Department: Mr Andrew Mackay Examination Board: OCR

Why study Greek?

Will I enjoy it?

Churchill once said that everyone should study Latin as it’s good for us, but we should study Greek “as a treat”. In fact, Greek is more than a treat: it is rather addictive, and in these risk-averse days it should carry a health warning: “may become a lifetime’s fascination”. This could be simply because the subject is so interesting and all-encompassing; the Greeks’ achievement lies at the basis of so much of what we value: science, philosophy, drama, art, the Olympics and the idea of fair competition and, of course, democracy.

As mentioned on the Latin page, predicting the future is the sort of thing classicists do with extreme caution. However, because the Greek genius covered such varied areas of human endeavour it is very hard to think of anyone who would not enjoy some aspects of the course. The fundamental thing that characterises the ancient Greeks is a burning intellectual curiosity, and if you have that, then you will find the course extremely stimulating!

Tell me more… The same can be said about Greek as Latin, but even more so: a good pass at either AS or A2 level will provide convincing evidence of analytical ability and intellectual strength. To quote the classicist and writer Max Davidson: “The language is harder to master, as there is a new alphabet to learn; but once you have overcome that hurdle, you find yourself face to face with a civilisation that makes the poor Romans look like also-rans. Everything the Romans did, from poetry to athletics, from vase painting to constitutional government, the Greeks did earlier and did better. The whole course of European civilisation, the values we cherish and the principles by which we govern were set in Athens in the 4th and 5th centuries BC. Nothing in my own education matched the excitement of reading the great Greek authors in the original and watching those fertile minds at work.”

Assessment AS: 2 x 1½ hour papers: Language; and Greek Prose and Verse A2: 2 x 2 hour papers: Greek Prose and Greek Verse - the

papers combine unseen and prepared passages. There is no coursework.

Course content You can view the specifications at www.ocr.org.uk. The key components of study are Language and Literature. The current AS set texts are taken from Homer Iliad XXIV and Xenophon Anabasis. Homer’s Iliad is the foundation stone of Western Literature, and Book XXIV contains one of the most moving passages in any classical text - King Priam’s meeting and reconciliation with Achilles, the killer of his beloved son Hector. The Anabasis is the engrossing account of the return of Xenophon’s army to Greece after an expedition deep into the heart of Asia, and far from their beloved sea. At AS the language paper involves unseen translation and optional English-Greek sentences. If you enjoy being precise and accurate then translating into Greek can be very satisfying, and is not as hard as it sounds, but it is no longer obligatory. 27


HISTORY

Head of Department: Miss Julia Miller Examination Board: AQA

Why study History?

Will I enjoy it?

As Head of History, I am probably not the one to ask and it is certainly very hard to give you an unbiased answer! History is an exciting, challenging and extremely rewarding subject at A-level, and is highly valued by universities, regardless of which subject you want to study at university. Studying History is, of course, also immensely interesting and great fun! Our course looks at some fascinating, but very different sixteenth and seventeenth century monarchs.

If you care about people, if you enjoy discussion and debate and relish the chance to reach your own conclusions, you will be very pleased that you chose History. You will develop the ability to present cogent and coherent arguments in discussions and on paper.

Assessment AS: Unit 1: 1 hour 15 minutes paper: two short questions

and two essays. Unit 2: 1 ½ hour paper: two source based questions and two essays. A2: Unit 3: 1 ½ hour paper: two essays. Unit 4: Historical Enquiry: coursework assignment of 3,500 words and a critical evaluation of the sources.

Course content AS: Unit 1: The personal reign of Louis XIV, 1661-1715.

Louis XIV was a very powerful and glamorous king, but how strong was he really? Did he spend too much time on image and waging war? Your understanding of this remarkable king and his reign will be enhanced by visiting Versailles and Vaux-le-Vicomte. Unit 2: Britain, 1625-1642 (The failure of Absolutism?) This course examines the reign of Charles I up to the outbreak of the Civil War. A great contrast to Louis, Charles seemed unable or unwilling to understand that his polices were at odds with the wishes of his subjects. You will be able to develop your own opinions, based on historical facts and sources to decide to what extent he was to blame for the English Civil War and you will also discover that historians have very differing opinions! A2: Unit 3: British Monarchy: the Crisis of state, 1642-1689.

History is a demanding A-level, but highly regarded by admissions tutors because of its rigour and transferable skills of analysis and communication.

Building on the AS course on Charles I, this unit explores the significance of the Civil War and the execution of the king and then the period of republican government, 16491660. You will compare the reign of Charles II with that of his father, and then learn how his brother’s unpopular policies, along with events in Europe, contributed to the ‘Glorious Revolution’.

This is a particularly good course as all of the units complement each other and give you a sound understanding of Early Modern History, which will be respected by university History Departments. Your knowledge and understanding of the period will be enhanced through seminars and lectures by academics from Bristol and Southampton Universities.

Unit 4: Coursework: Did the short reigns of Edward VI and Mary I amount to a ‘mid-Tudor crisis’? You will be taught an outline of the Tudors in the Autumn Term before independently undertaking the deeper research for your assignment. You will then have regular tutorials to support you and monitor your progress. You will submit your coursework at the end of the Spring Term.

Tell me more…

28


HISTORY OF ART Head of Department: Mrs Sara Radice Examination board: AQA

Why study History Of Art?

Will I enjoy it?

If you have ever been curious about what Art means or how and why it was made, then History of Art could be for you. An endlessly fascinating subject, it connects everything else you have ever learnt. Obviously, Arts subjects are good A-level partners, but, perhaps surprisingly, it works just as well with Sciences as we need to explore how buildings stand up, the influence of the science of light and the maths behind harmonious proportion. It is important to be able to engage with the ideas that have shaped our culture. Artists express ideas about society, history, politics, wars, religion, power and all the big questions in life: love, death, joy and sorrow. Studying History of Art opens your eyes to the world and helps you understand what it is to be human.

Yes! You will be surprised, intrigued and even provoked by your discoveries. The lessons - exploring art through talks, film and discussion - are taught in a relaxed, but intellectually vigorous, atmosphere more like university than school. You will need to learn to use the correct artistic vocabulary in your essays to articulate your enthusiasm and knowledge (though help is on hand for those who need to develop their writing skills). While you don’t need to be able to draw, you do need to be academically curious, enthusiastic, and open minded! Most importantly of all, History of Art will equip you for a lifetime’s pleasure in your knowledge of a subject whose possibilities are limitless.

Course content You will be taken on a visual journey from ancient Greece to contemporary Europe, exploring the evolution and function as well as historical and social contexts of Art. AS:

There are two exam papers: photographs to examine your observational, analytical and descriptive skills, and essays which allow you to explore themes such as patronage and identity and make connections across different societies and cultures. The course includes visits to London and Paris to see everything from Greek sculpture and Gothic cathedrals to Pointillism and Picasso; from paintings of revolutions to revolutions in painting. A2: We specialise in the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries

(with visits to London and Florence). The themes are similar to those at AS, but are studied in greater depth. Whether it is stately homes or slums, banks or bawdy houses, contemporary life has a massive impact on art. It is fascinating to explore eighteenth century high and low life, to think about topics as diverse as slavery and clothes: how philosophical ideas about the ‘noble savage’ could be expressed in the fall of a cloak; the role of corsets in the suppression of women and the fatal consequences of a clean shirt in Revolutionary France. In fifteenth century Florence, the clothes of the fabulously rich banker boys had equally complex social connotations, and the combination of republican civic pride and fears of damnation for sin led to breath-taking spending on art.

Tell me more… There is no coursework, so if you are planning to read History of Art at university, you will be encouraged to take the EPQ to develop independent learning skills. Having chosen the topic, you will learn to research, analyse, evaluate and present your ideas in writing and to an audience. Cross-curricular Art activities abound through the Scholars’ Programme and Exploring Art Society. History of Art stimulates intellectual enquiry and encourages independent thought as it requires observation, reflection and analysis. It is thus brilliant preparation for university. History of Art graduates have a wide range of career opportunities open to them: research, publishing, journalism, the art market, exhibitions, restoration, museums, teaching and television.

Assessment AS: Unit 1 (1 hour photograph paper). Unit 2 (1 ½ hour thematic paper) A2: Unit 3 (1 ½ hour paper). Unit 4 (1 ½ hour paper) 29


LATIN

Head of Department: Mr Andrew Mackay Examination Board: OCR

Why study Latin?

Will I enjoy it?

“I will say at once, quite firmly, that the best grounding for education is the Latin grammar”. So said Godolphin’s most famous alumna, Dorothy L. Sayers. However, there are many other reasons to study Latin to A-level. The experience of reading some of the world’s greatest literature in the original language is exhilarating, and you will never forget it, whatever your subsequent career. Latin goes well with both Science and Arts subjects: the literature feeds one’s imagination; the language requires intellect and fastidious attention to detail. If you want a job done properly, you ask a classicist. That is why employers love them!

Predicting the future is the sort of thing classicists do with extreme caution. You will not enjoy Latin unless you are prepared to work hard, have a reasonable gift for languages, and would enjoy (for example) finding out what an ascending tricolon is and realising that you are reading one right now. You should enjoy the poetry a great deal if it is anything like this year’s set texts, which include Ovid being so outrageous that he was banished to the Black Sea by Augustus, and Catullus so rude that some of his insults have no English equivalent, and are bowdlerised or left out by embarrassed lexicographers.

Assessment AS: 2 x 1 ½ hour papers: Language; and Latin Prose and Verse A2: 2 x 2 hour papers: Latin Prose and Latin Verse - the papers combine unseen and prepared passages. There is no coursework.

Course content You can view the specifications at www.ocr.org.uk. The key components of study are Language and Literature. The current AS set texts are taken from Ovid’s Amores and Cicero’s Against Verres. Ovid is famous for his amazing facility with words and metre, and his poems have had a huge influence on Western art and culture for two millenia. The Amores show Ovid as love poet, but with many deeper currents to explore, as not all is what it seems. Cicero is very different: probably the greatest orator the world has ever known, he is here attacking Verres, the corrupt governor of Sicily, for all sorts of dreadful crimes he committed during his term of office. Cicero was so successful that Verres fled before Cicero had delivered all the speeches, but Cicero, a great self-promoter, published the speeches anyway; an immodest man who at least had something to be immodest about. At AS, the language paper involves unseen translation and optional English-Latin sentences. If you enjoy being precise and accurate then translating into Latin can be very satisfying, but it is no longer obligatory.

Tell me more… A good pass at either AS or A2 level will provide convincing evidence of analytical ability and intellectual strength; the subject is specifically valuable for Languages, Law, History, Archaeology, etc, but is of far greater significance as an indicator of mental flexibility - in other words, classicists’ minds are trained to flourish in almost any discipline. Latin is one of those relatively few subjects that have been identified by leading universities as particularly testing and academically significant. Though often taken with other Arts subjects, it also usefully complements two or three scientific or mathematical subjects at A-level. 30


MATHEMATICS & FURTHER MATHEMATICS Joint Heads of Department: Mrs Katy Healey and Mrs Janet Robson Examination Board: Edexcel

Why study Mathematics?

Will I enjoy it?

Studying Mathematics improves your logical thought processes, enhancing your ability to reason and argue. You learn the fundamentals of proof and learn to appreciate the beauty of mathematics. Mathematics is very highly regarded by universities and by employers. It is preferred in a number of subject areas including natural sciences (especially physics/ engineering), computer science, economics and medicine. Any students considering reading mathematics, engineering, physical sciences, computer science or economics at Oxbridge should consider taking the Further Mathematics course. Mathematics (either on its own or in combination with another subject) is arguably one of the most flexible of all degrees, leaving graduates with an unsurpassed range of openings.

If you enjoy puzzles and patterns, then Mathematics is a good choice. Also if you have enjoyed algebra and differentiation in your IGCSE course then that is a good indication that you will enjoy Mathematics A-level.

Assessment All modules are assessed by means of examination papers lasting 1½ hours each. The first module of AS is a non-calculator module, but all others allow the use of standard calculators or graphic calculators. There is no coursework element.

Tell me more‌ We normally expect you to have achieved a grade A or above in your IGCSE before you embark on this course. Having said that, we do achieve exceptional AS and A-level results, so why not give it a go!

Course content Mathematics AS: 2 modules of pure mathematics (e.g. algebra, geometry,

calculus - differentiation) and 1 module of applied mathematics (statistics). A2: 2 more modules of pure mathematics and 1 module of

applied mathematics (decision maths - minimising routes, scheduling, profit equations). Further Mathematics AS: 1 further pure module (including complex numbers

and formal proof ) and 2 applied modules (mechanics and further statistics). A2: 2 further pure modules (including matrices, hyperbolic

functions, ellipses) and 1 applied module (further mechanics). 31


MODERN LANGUAGES

Head of Department: Mrs Sarah Smith Examination Board: AQA

Why study Modern Languages?

Will I enjoy it?

The question is not: “Why on earth should languages be useful to me?” but “Why on earth would they not be?”

How could you not enjoy the satisfaction of expressing yourself and talking about the things you really want to (way beyond the confines of GCSE topics) in another language - and finding that it works?! You will broaden your mind through exploring and developing your ideas and opinions on a variety of stimulating topics.

Studying a foreign language and the culture of the people who speak it will: • Expand your horizons and outlook on the world (forever!) through exposure to other cultures and enhance your experience of foreign travel; • Increase your understanding of the priorities of countries that are of key significance to the future of the UK, especially in the EU; • Put you at an advantage over others in today’s globalised labour market, opening up career opportunities in Europe and beyond; • Help you to develop such important and transferrable skills as communication, analysis, problem solving, debate and independent and creative thinking.

You will be encouraged to go and practise your language in the relevant countries, either re-visiting former school trip haunts (La Rochelle, Berlin, Alicante) with increased independence or by branching out in your own right. You may, for example, be able to do your work shadowing week, or other work experience, using your language in another country. Here are a few comments from some of our former A-level language students: “It’s rewarding to find yourself talking about modern issues and current events and being able to express yourself in another language.”

Don’t allow yourself to be deceived into believing that all foreigners speak English - 75% of the world does not - and, for those that do, it is to their advantage, not yours! Be aware that demand for linguists is high in terms of employability: a large number get and keep jobs in the crucial first years after university, and horizons are much broader than the obvious translation or teaching. There are gaps waiting for you to fill in spying, marketing, engineering, interpreting - to mention just a few.

“The pace is very fast, so you cover many new topics.” “It’s been a very interesting couple of years, especially the civilisation topic. I’ve really enjoyed it all.” and … should you wish to take your language studies further, from students studying languages at Bristol and Exeter universities: “The teaching we received here at Godolphin prepared us so thoroughly for uni.”

Assessment AS: 1 x 2 hour paper (listening, reading and writing) and 1

x 15 minute oral examination. A2: 1 x 2 ½ hour paper (listening, reading and writing) and

1 x 15 minute oral examination. There is no coursework.

Sixth Form linguists sampling French, German and Spanish fare … Yes, food and drink form an important and integral part of the study of languages at A-level!

Course content AS: We focus on the family, relationships, sport, health,

holidays, leisure, fashion and the media. A2: We explore major social issues like poverty, crime,

immigration, the environment and developments in science and technology as well as two topics drawn from the history, geography, literature or culture of the countries speaking your chosen languages. 32


Tell me more…

Learning French can lead to further studies abroad and to interesting job opportunities. If you’re interested in working in tourism, don’t forget that over 3 million French tourists visit the UK every year; or why not use your language skills abroad? Apart from France itself, French is the official language of some wonderful places - tropical islands such as Mauritius, la Réunion, the Seychelles, Tahiti and there are many other francophone countries such as Quebec, Switzerland, Senegal, Morocco. The French film industry is one of the most successful in the world. FEMIS, the French national elite film school has an excellent international reputation. Do Vogue, Marie Claire, Elle sound familiar to you? These magazines are all French because France is home to Haute Couture. Ever since the days of designers such as Coco Chanel, fashion has been synonymous with France. About 2000 French companies or subsidiaries are in business and employ more than 350,000 people in the UK. Large French companies such as l’Oréal and EDF offer graduate schemes as well as internship and placement opportunities - what an excellent way to start building an international career!

Français If you’re interested in studying French, it’s probably because you’ve had a taste of French culture and decided that France lives up to its reputation as the cultural and gastronomic hub of Europe. The French way of life is known for how people love to spend time with family and friends around a good meal, accompanied by fine wines, and for the accessibility of culture. Every summer, music and drama lovers flock to the Avignon Festival or Carhaix, film lovers to Cannes. Art lovers have internationally renowned art museums and galleries to visit: the Louvre, Musée d’Orsay and Pompidou Centre in Paris for starters. A-level French gives you the opportunity to discover various cultural aspects of France for yourself.

Deutsch If you want to be a real player in the 21st century, A-level German will give you the edge you need and you will be able to communicate with 120 million native speakers worldwide! German is the most widely spoken language in Europe. Your increased knowledge of German language and culture will be personally enriching and make you valuable and highly marketable for a wide range of careers.

Researching Gauguin! Then there is the language! France celebrates its linguistic richness through “L’Académie Française”. Notable intellectuals form part of a rich heritage, among them Voltaire, Descartes and Victor Hugo - most famous here for the musical production of his literary masterpiece, ‘Les Misérables’. A-level studies provide you with the opportunity to develop and enrich your own French and understand how it has influenced English. You’ll explore the world of ‘faux amis’, and see how our own vocabulary incorporates many French words.

Germany is the UK’s most important trading partner and remains the powerhouse of the European Union. Germany has the largest economy in the EU and the third largest in the world. Think of all those ‘household names’: Bosch, Miele, Siemens; and the quality makes of car: BMW, Volkswagen/Audi, Mercedes. German-speaking writers, thinkers and artists have long been at the forefront of intellectual life. „Deutschland“ is known as „das Land der Dichter und Denker“ (the country of poets and thinkers). 10 Nobel prizes for literature have been awarded to German, Austrian and Swiss authors. The world of classical music is inseparable from the names of Mozart, Bach, 33


Beethoven to name but a few. Berlin, Bayreuth and Vienna remain international centres for music today. Philosophy and the sciences would also be unthinkable without the contributions of German speakers. The philosophies of Kant, Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche and numerous others have had lasting influences on modern society. A-level German will enable you to indulge in reading and/or listening to their works in the original language.

speaking countries? Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, Mexico, Ecuador, Peru? Did you know that Spanish is an official language in the United States, and that in some states Hispanics outnumber English speakers? Have you ever been enchanted (or horrified) by a bullfight, flamenco, throwing tomatoes, Mayan temples, a huge dish of paella, young men diving off a sheer cliff? Have you ever been to a tapas bar for a media ración of tortilla or setas at 10 o’clock in the evening and ended up partying all night until dawn? Chances are, you already know quite a bit about Hispanic culture and, if so, you will want to know more!

If you develop a taste for it, you can take it further. Among many university courses keen on German are anatomy, art history, biomedical studies and philosophy. Almost every discipline in the humanities, sciences and social sciences has a strong German tradition, in many cases one that largely defines the field. There are interesting training, study and employment opportunities in the European Union for specialists who speak German. Germany awards a generous number of scholarships and other support to study in Germany, and foreign students pay low or no tuition fees. The German language is a passport to a rich and diverse community, to a treasure house of European culture and to a major economy whose influence reaches across the world.

Studying any foreign language is to learn how another society confronts its past and looks forward to the future. Spain’s attitude to the euro and the EU in general derives fundamentally from its desire to escape from the memories of Francoism. Latin American countries still feel the need to assert their own identity, both with regard to their colonial past and to their neighbour to the North, the United States. Former students of Spanish at Godolphin have shared a ramshackle bus with goats and chickens in Ecuador, taught the children of disadvantaged families in Chile, climbed up Machu Pichu in Peru and slept in hammocks on an isolated beach in Mexico. A few may have spent the odd minute or two in the clubs on Ibiza. They have all ended up in exciting, fulfilling jobs.

Español To study Spanish in the Sixth Form is to embark on a journey of discovery. We discover how Spanish speakers use their grammar, rather than intonation as we do in English, to express subtle differences in meaning. We study how the Spanish are only now facing up to their past, free to embark on their own voyage of discovery, after decades of silence, as new laws permit them to unearth the mass graves of those who disappeared during the Spanish Civil War and its aftermath. We see the huge impact that a fabulously vibrant Hispanic culture has on all our lives. Do you know any famous Spanish speakers? Goya, Picasso, Lope de Vega, Blasco Ibañez, Enrique Iglesias, Penélope Cruz, Shakira, Cristina Aguilera, Lorca, Guillermo del Toro, Pedro Almodóvar, Salvador Dalí, García Marquez, Alejandro Amenábar, Javier Bardem? Have you been to any Spanish 34


MUSIC

Head of Department : Mr Robin Highcock Examination Board: OCR

Why study Music?

Will I enjoy it?

Music is thrilling, busy, thoughtful, and demanding. It is a world apart from the daily routine of school life. It is both scholarly and practical; it is highly regarded by universities who recognise the dedication that is required of musicians as well as the cultural breadth that a musical education has given them.

If you enjoy music then you will enjoy this. It gives you many opportunities to play, to compose and to listen to a lot of music. You will be taught in small classes, in a relaxed atmosphere, with other pupils who enjoy music. You will be given an individual accompaniment session each week and you will have concerts especially organised just for you.

Course content You will play, compose and listen to music. At both AS and

A2 you will give a solo recital and at AS you will also play in an ensemble or on your second instrument. At A2, your performance will be made up of a set of related pieces and you will also research professional performances of those pieces. You will carry on composing pieces in your own style as you did at GCSE. At AS, you will focus on Instrumental Music, and at A2 you will be able to choose between Vocal Music, Programme Music and Film Music. You will also start to learn the principles of formal harmony starting with twopart writing and moving onto piano writing. In the third part of the course, listening, you will study a wide range of music from the history of western music as well as looking at Jazz in the twentieth century. You will analyse works in depth as well learning about the historical periods in which their composers lived. You will also develop your practical listening and aural skills.

Assessment Performance (assessed by a visiting examiner): AS: One recital of 8 minutes on first instrument, one recital

of 5 minutes in an ensemble or on second instrument. A2: One recital of 15 minutes on first instrument of a set

of linked pieces with a viva exploring research upon other performances of those pieces. Composition (marked internally and then moderated): AS: Seven harmony exercises and one composition of three

Tell me more‌

minutes long.

Nearly 80% of students at Godolphin gain an A grade at A-level. Girls regularly go on to read Music at university and Music College (one or two each year).

A2: Eight harmony exercises and one composition of four

minutes long. Listening (marked externally):

Girls gain choral and organ scholarships at Oxford and Cambridge. If you wish to apply for Oxford or Cambridge, we will give you special coaching.

AS: One written paper lasting 1 ½ hours. A2: One written paper lasting 2 hours. 35


PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Head of Department: Mrs Sarah Pokai Exam Board: OCR

Why study Physical Education?

Will I enjoy it?

This is an excellent grounding for anyone who wants to understand the theoretical concepts of physical activity and how to apply them to the sports you play. The course covers the physiology, psychology and socio-cultural aspects of sport. You will learn how to improve your own practical skills and performance and how to coach others to improve theirs. It is particularly useful if you wish to further your studies in Sports Science, Sports Medicine, Sports Psychology, Physiotherapy, Teaching or Sport and Leisure Management.

This is a fabulous course if you enjoy sport. You will be surprised at how much you already know and do without realizing it, and you can learn so much more about an aspect of your life you already enjoy. The course offers a huge range of options in which to specialise in the future. Careers in sport are opening up and can include not only performance, but also training, coaching, management, business and marketing here in the UK and overseas.

Tell me more… You will have fun while learning much more about something you already enjoy. We try to attend at least one conference/exhibition each year (e.g. ‘Girls Go Gold’) - events that help bring the theory to life!

Course content AS: Focuses on the anatomy and physiology of the body,

the acquisition of movement skills and how they affect people’s participation and performance in physical activity and also looks at socio-cultural factors and how a country’s sport and physical activity reflect its society. You will find out how the mind interprets and develops physical skills, and explore the teaching and learning of sports skills, the social issues in sport such as drugs, etc., and will compare other countries with the UK in how they achieve sporting excellence. The practical looks at your skill in two chosen sports and evaluating others and planning for the improvement of performance. A2: Focuses on the history of sport in the UK, the psychology

of sport and on exercise and sport physiology. You will look at factors such as individual differences and group dynamics, how they affect participation and can improve competence in sport, and at issues such as self-confidence and goal setting. The practical focuses on demonstrating skill and tactical awareness in competitive situations in one sport and evaluating others and planning for the improvement of performance.

Assessment AS: 1 x 2 hour paper. A2: 1 x 2 ½ hour paper. Practical Coursework: AS: Assessment in two sports and an Oral evaluation and analysis. A2: Assessment in one sport and an Oral evaluation and analysis. 36


PSYCHOLOGY

Head of Department: Miss Alison Bowler Examination Board: AQA

Why study Psycholog y?

Will I enjoy it?

Psychology is the science of mind and behaviour. Over the course, you will study psychological theories about human and animal behaviour and what drives them, looking at the strengths and weaknesses of the vast area of research upon which these theories are based. For example, you will study the biological approach, which explains human behaviour in terms of genetics and neurobiology. This suggests that we are a product of nature, whereas the behavioural approach explains human behaviour in terms of our learning and experience of our environment. This suggests we are a product of our nurture.

You will learn answers to questions like: Why do I think like this? Why do others behave like this? It will enable you to objectively understand the nature and experience of the human world around you, based on scientific research and theory. Psychology extends into real life and has crossover links with a range of subjects; it goes well with both Arts and Science subjects.

Course content AS: You will learn how the type of attachment you have

to your primary caregiver (parent) can affect you for the rest of your life and can influence your personality and romantic relationships. Also, how your memory works in the short term and long term and how better to remember things! You will also study why atrocities and genocide occur around the world and why people are able to commit destructive crimes by merely obeying orders. You will gain insight into the causes and treatments for mental disorders. A2: You will study whether it is true or not that men and

women are fundamentally different. Is your gender identity and behaviour due to your biological makeup or your culture and environment? What is Schizophrenia and what are its causes and treatment?

Assessment AS: Two modules of 1½ hours each. A2: Two modules one of 1½ hours duration and one of 2

hours, based on longer essays and some short questions. There is no coursework.

Tell me more… Psychology is well received at all universities; and some universities accept it as a science. Career prospects in Psychology are wide and varied such as child psychology, occupational, forensic, clinical, sports psychology and psychiatry. The subject is also highly rated by employers in business, marketing, the media, teaching, and all general employment areas. 37


PHYSICS

Head of Department: Mr Julian Eyre Examination Board: AQA

Why study Physics?

Will I enjoy it?

Physics is a highly regarded subject because it shows you are capable of grasping complex concepts, yet coming up with practical solutions. There is a tremendous satisfaction in understanding the underlying, fundamental principles of cause and effect in the universe. Physics is also for those who enjoy finding out the ‘How’ and ‘Why’ nature works the way it does, as well as for those who are fascinated by more philosophical, existential questions such as the true nature of reality, and the role of the observer in the universe. These more ‘metaphysical’ concepts, encountered in the world of Particle and Quantum Physics in particular, are often of great interest to those considering Religious Studies, and the two disciplines are more closely intertwined than many realise.

Many of those who study A-level Physics comment upon how very different it is from IGCSE Physics, that they were so glad that they had chosen the subject, and how much they enjoyed it. Quantum Physics and Particle Physics are remarkable topics which challenge our very notions of how the universe works, and which never fail to enthuse the students who tackle them.

Course content AS: You will encounter totally new topics such as

Fundamental Particles and Quantum Phenomena, as well as taking familiar topics such as Electricity, Forces and Motion (Mechanics), and Materials and Waves to a more advanced level. A2: You will study the theory of Gravitational, Electrostatic

and Magnetic Fields, as well as Advanced Mechanics. You will also learn about the theories of Nuclear and Thermal Physics, and have the chance to choose an optional topic from Astrophysics, Medical Physics, Applied Physics, or Turning Points in Physics. Full details of the syllabus studied may be found at: www.aqa.org.uk (Physics A Specification).

Tell me more… Find out about Schrodinger’s famous cat; why you can’t travel faster than light; how mass and energy can be created and destroyed; and how electrons behave like waves! Get the chance to become involved in the Engineering Education Scheme, where you will tackle a real-life engineering problem and experience university student life on a three day residential event, as well as gaining the nationally accredited Gold CREST (CREativity in Science and Technology) award. More Chief Executive Officers of multinational companies have degrees in engineering than any other subject. Physics is the preferred degree for city brokerage firms. Many top-rated research-led universities, including Cambridge and Oxford, include Physics in their list of subjects which provide most options for course choice at university. During the course you will learn how to analyse situations, think logically, and develop workable solutions. This makes Physics A-level a passport to a huge number of degrees and careers.

Assessment AS: Particles, Quantum Phenomena and Electricity - 1¼

hours. Mechanics, Materials and Waves - 1¼ hours.Practical Skills (Internal Assessment). A2: Fields and Further Mechanics - 1¾ hours. Nuclear &

Thermal Physics plus Optional Topic - 1¾ hours. Practical Skills (Internal Assessment). 38


RELIGIOUS STUDIES Head of Department: Mr Francis Spencer Examination Board: OCR

Why study Religious Studies?

Will I enjoy it?

Because it’s interesting, it’s about us, our world, how to change it and how to be happy! In the process it offers the most gob-smacking course in philosophy (east and west) imaginable. Hugely popular, RS is the ideal subject to combine with A-levels in both arts and sciences.

Of course! All you need is a genuine interest in people, ideas and the world around (and within) us! You don’t even need to be ‘religious’ or have GCSE Religious Studies. Any questions? Come and see your friendly, neighborhood RS staff and work out what’s best for you and your extraordinary, unique and beautiful life!

You need two As and a B to get into good universities these days, so you need to choose subjects you enjoy and will do well in. According to Russell Group advice, Religious Studies “provides a suitable preparation for entry to university generally” and is a “useful qualification” for degrees in Philosophy, History, English, History of Art, Religious Studies and other humanities, Psychology, Law and Medicine. Please ring and check this out with the Admissions Tutors at the universities!

Course content l. The Philosophy of Religion AS: After an introduction to Greek Philosophy (Plato,

Aristotle) and Judeo-Christian views of the world, traditional arguments for (and against) the existence of God are used to explore and test modern theories concerning the origins of the Universe; evolution (Darwinism); the possible conflict between science and religion as well as responses to the problem of evil & suffering. A2: The nature of the Soul and Mind-body problem (with related questions of life after death, NDEs, etc.), religious experience, the supernatural and the nature of language, myth and symbol.

Here’s what Sir Michael Heron (Former Chairman of Unilever and the GPO, Chairman of the NCVQ and Member of SCAA) has to say on the matter:

2. World Religion - Buddhism

Buddhism, an extraordinarily wise blend of agnostic humanism, rational analysis and spiritual awareness, is fast becoming one of the most popular, thought-provoking & scientifically compatible ‘religions’ in modern Britain. AS: An introduction to eastern thought & religion; the life & work of the Buddha, the main teachings of the Buddhist world-view. A2: Meditation, Buddhist Ethics and moral issues, as well as studying the rich and varied forms that the Buddha’s original thought developed as it moved on into other times and cultures, including Zen, Pure Land, Tibetan Buddhism and the modern West.

Assessment Students take two courses at AS, which can then be followed through to the A2 year. Assessment is by examination at the end of each year, which can be re-sat in January if you really enjoy exams.

Tell me more… Every two years we offer a genuinely life-changing trip to India, which includes inspiring slum projects in Delhi and hanging out with the Dalia Lama and the Tibetan Buddhists in their Himalayan home town at Dharamsala. The next one is planned for 2014. Un-missable! 39


UNIVERSIT Y DESTINATIONS 2012

2011

UNIVERSIT Y

COURSE

UNIVERSIT Y

COURSE

Australia (Queensland)

Pharmacy

Bath

Biology

Bangor

Environmental Chemistry

Bath

Business Administration

Bangor

Psychology

Bath

Chemistry

Bath

Biology

Bath Spa

Business Management

Bath

Mathematics

Bath Spa

Drama Studies

Bath

Mathematics

Bath Spa

Education

Birmingham

Philosophy

Bath Spa

History/Study of Religions

Birmingham

Medicine

Bournemouth

Art Foundation

Bristol

Accounting & Finance

Bournemouth

Art Foundation

Bristol

Archaeology

Bristol

Chemistry

Bristol

French & Italian

Bristol

Theology & Religion

UWE, Bristol

Psychology

Cambridge

Music

Cambridge

Natural Sciences

Cambridge

Theology & Religious Studies

Cardiff

English Language

Cardiff

Human Geography

Cardiff

Music

Central Lancashire

Philosophy

UWIC, Cardiff

Events Management

Durham

Biological Sciences

Chinese University, HK

Psychology

Durham

Music

Edinburgh

Classics

Durham

Mathematics

Exeter

Economics & Finance

Edinburgh

Psychology

Falmouth

Art Foundation

Exeter

Biological Sciences

Falmouth

Art Foundation

Gloucestershire

Psychology

Falmouth

Events Management

Hong Kong

Architecture

Harper Adams

Land Management

Hong Kong

Economics

Hong Kong

Quantitative Finance

Imperial

Biology

Imperial

Materials Science

Imperial

Biomedical Engineering

Leeds

English Literature

Keele

Business Management

Leeds

Philosophy

King’s College London

Computer Science

Manchester

English Literature

King’s College London

English Literature

Manchester

History of Art

King’s College London

Philosophy

Manchester

Music

Leeds

Philosophy

Manchester Metropolitan

Fashion Buying

Newcastle

Business Management

Leicester

Criminology

Newcastle

Geography

Loughborough

English

Newcastle

Marketing & Management

Manchester

Management & Leisure

Newcastle

Medicine

Newcastle

Music

Oxford

Chemistry

Nottingham

Management Studies Physiotherapy

Oxford

Chemistry

Nottingham

Oxford

History

Oxford

French & Spanish

Portsmouth

Marine Biology

Oxford Brookes

International Hospitality

Plymouth

Psychology

Oxford Brookes

Nursing (Adult)

Roehampton

Classical Civilisation

Portsmouth

Biochemistry

Royal Holloway

Geography

Queen Mary, London

Drama

Southampton

English

Reading

Ancient History

Southampton

Mechanical Engineering

Royal Agricultural College

Business Management

Surrey

Mathematics

Swansea

Business Management

Royal Agricultural College

Business Management

UCL

Biomedical Sciences

Sheffield

Modern Languages

UCL

Medicine

Southampton

History

UCL

Modern Languages

St. Andrews

International Relations

Warwick

Engineering

Surrey

Business & Retail Management

Warwick

History of Art

Surrey

Theatre Studies

Warwick

History of Art

Trinity Laban

Music (Flute)

Warwick

History of Art

Warwick

Accounting & Finance

40


SUBJECT GRADE BREAKDOWN & ANALYSIS 2012 A*

A

B

C

D

E

U

Totals

ART

A2 Grades breakdown

8

2

2

1

1

0

0

14

BIOLOGY

4

4

5

2

1

0

0

16

BUSINESS STUDIES

0

1

2

1

0

0

0

4

CHEMISTRY

1

8

5

6

0

0

0

20

CHINESE

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

2

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

DRAMA

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

ECONOMICS

2

1

2

1

0

0

0

6

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

1

1

3

1

1

0

0

7

ENGLISH LITERATURE

2

3

4

1

0

0

0

10

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

1

2

2

0

0

0

0

5

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

FRENCH

1

1

2

2

0

0

0

6

GEOGRAPHY

0

2

6

4

0

0

0

12

GERMAN

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

HISTORY OF ART

1

7

2

1

1

0

0

12

HISTORY

3

4

1

0

0

0

0

8

LATIN

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

MATHEMATICS

5

11

5

3

1

0

0

25

MUSIC

2

2

0

0

0

0

0

4

PHYSICS

3

4

2

2

1

1

0

13

PSYCHOLOGY

0

1

2

2

0

1

0

6

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

3

2

5

2

1

0

0

13

SPANISH

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

2

A2 % breakdown

A*

A

B

ART

57

14

BIOLOGY

25

25

BUSINESS STUDIES

0

CHEMISTRY CHINESE

Grade Analysis A* 38 A 60 B 52 C 32 D 7 E 2 U 0 % Analysis

C

D

E

U

14

7

7

0

0

31

13

6

0

0

25

50

25

0

0

0

5

40

25

30

0

0

0

0

50

50

0

0

0

0

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

DRAMA

0

0

50

50

0

0

0

ECONOMICS

33

17

33

17

0

0

0

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

14

14

43

14

14

0

0

ENGLISH LITERATURE

20

30

40

10

0

0

0

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

20

40

40

0

0

0

0

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

0

0

0

100

0

0

0

FRENCH

17

17

33

33

0

0

0

GEOGRAPHY

0

2

50

33

0

0

0

GERMAN

0

100

0

0

0

0

0

HISTORY OF ART

8

58

17

8

8

0

0

HISTORY

38

50

13

0

0

0

0

LATIN

0

100

0

0

0

0

0

MATHEMATICS

20

44

20

12

4

0

0

MUSIC

50

50

0

0

0

0

0

PHYSICS

23

31

15

15

8

8

0

PSYCHOLOGY

0

17

33

33

0

17

0

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

23

15

38

15

8

0

0

SPANISH

50

50

0

0

0

0

0

41

A* A B C D E U

20% 31% 27% 17% 4% 1% 0% % Analysis

A* A*-A A*-B A*-C A*D A*E A*-U

20% 51% 79% 95% 99% 100% 100%


SUBJECT GRADE BREAKDOWN & ANALYSIS 2012 A

B

C

D

E

U

Totals

ART

AS Grades breakdown

10

0

0

0

0

0

10

BIOLOGY

11

2

4

5

1

1

24

BUSINESS STUDIES

1

1

1

2

1

0

6

CHEMISTRY

6

7

5

0

1

0

19

CHINESE

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

1

0

0

1

0

1

3

DRAMA

1

2

0

0

0

0

3

ECONOMICS

4

2

3

1

0

1

11

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

1

1

1

3

0

0

6

ENGLISH LITERATURE

4

3

1

1

0

0

9

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

4

0

0

0

0

0

4

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

2

1

1

0

0

0

4

FRENCH

3

1

1

0

0

0

5

GEOGRAPHY

7

4

1

1

2

0

15

GERMAN

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

GREEK

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

HISTORY OF ART

2

2

4

1

0

0

9

HISTORY

11

1

0

0

0

0

12

LATIN

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

MATHEMATICS

18

3

3

0

0

0

24

MUSIC

3

0

0

0

0

0

3

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

0

2

0

1

0

0

3

PHYSICS

5

2

0

0

0

0

7

PSYCHOLOGY

1

2

1

0

0

0

4

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

12

4

6

0

1

0

23

SPANISH

3

1

0

0

0

0

4

AS % breakdown

A

B

C

D

E

U

Totals

ART

100

0

0

0

0

0

10

BIOLOGY

46

8

17

21

4

0

24

BUSINESS STUDIES

17

17

17

33

17

0

6

CHEMISTRY

32

37

26

0

5

0

19

CHINESE

100

0

0

0

0

0

3

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

33

0

0

33

0

33

3

DRAMA

33

67

0

0

0

0

3

ECONOMICS

36

18

27

9

0

9

11

ENGLISH LANGUAGE

17

17

17

50

0

0

6

ENGLISH LITERATURE

54

33

11

11

0

0

9

FURTHER MATHEMATICS

100

0

0

0

0

0

4

FOOD TECHNOLOGY

50

25

25

0

0

0

4

FRENCH

60

20

20

0

0

0

5

GEOGRAPHY

47

27

7

7

13

0

15

GERMAN

100

0

0

0

0

0

2

GREEK

100

0

0

0

0

0

1

HISTORY OF ART

22

22

44

11

0

0

9

HISTORY

92

8

0

0

0

0

12

LATIN

100

0

0

0

0

0

2

MATHEMATICS

75

13

13

0

0

0

24

MUSIC

100

0

0

0

0

0

3

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

0

67

0

33

0

0

3

PHYSICS

71

29

0

0

0

0

7

PSYCHOLOGY

25

50

25

0

0

0

4

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

52

17

26

0

4

0

23

SPANISH

75

25

0

0

0

0

4

42

Grade Analysis A 118 B 41 C 32 D 16 E 6 U 3

% Analysis A B C D E U

55% 19% 15% 7% 3% 1%

% Analysis A A-B A-C A-D A-E A-U

55% 74% 88% 96% 99% 100%


AND FINALLY... Afterword The Sixth Form marks a significant change both academically and socially in your school life. It provides the culmination of your school career as you look forward to life beyond the Upper Sixth as well as offering you the opportunity to experience greater freedom and flexibility in how you manage your time. It is important that this stage is different from what you have experienced before and I have no doubt that you will very quickly appreciate these differences: the nature of A-level study, smaller class sizes, the Sixth Form Centre, Costa Coffee, a wealth of new opportunities through the Enhancement Programme, no uniform, increased access to town, and so the list goes on. Whilst our emphasis is to provide you with a Sixth Form experience which marks a transition from school to university, we place enormous value on continuity. There is no doubt that knowing your subject teachers, the tutors, the school systems and - for that matter - your peers, enhances your academic performance at A-level. No-one should underestimate the significance of the transition from GCSE to A-level study. Familiarity enables you to hit the ground running when you come back in September, and both our AS and A-level results this year are testament to this. Speaking with both past and current sixth form students, perhaps the most valued aspect of their sixth form years is the enhanced relationship with subject teachers, where you are treated as young adults. Teaching and tutor groups are smaller; lessons take a less formal seminar format; discussion and debate is central to your learning and an inevitable camaraderie develops amongst the teaching groups. These final two years also provide an important time for you to develop your leadership skills and to contribute to aspects of how the school is run. Taking responsibility is an essential skill for later life and at Godolphin is your opportunity to have your say, steer a new initiative and use your experience to support and guide the lower end of the school. The Sixth Form undoubtedly enables you to flourish and when we say farewell to the Upper Sixth girls on Parents’ Day, I feel extremely proud of the wonderful young women they have developed into and I am very touched by the enthusiasm, appreciation and loyalty they evidently feel for Godolphin. To quote one of last year’s leavers, “the Sixth Form has been the best part of my time at Godolphin - I’ve loved it - and although I am now ready to leave, I will miss my friends and the teachers enormously”. I hope this booklet will give you much of the information you need about the Sixth Form at Godolphin. The staff and current Sixth Form students are on standby to answer any further questions you may have and the aim of everyone is twofold: that you choose the right subjects for AS study, and that you will look forward to life in the Sixth Form at Godolphin.

Samantha Price Head

43


How to find us The Godolphin School Milford Hill Salisbury Wilts SP1 2RA Tel: +44(0)1722 430 500 Fax: +44(0)1722 430 501 ADMISSIONS: 01722 430 509 email: admissions@godolphin.wilts.sch.uk

44


Godolphin sixth form guide 2014  

Godolphin School's Sixth Form Guide 2014

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