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Academia of knowledge and wisdom! CRICOS No: 03167G | RTO No: 22218

STUDENT INFORMATION BOOK 1


Message from Head of Studies St. Peter Institute is a Registered Training Organization (RTO) accredited with all Australian Government bodies. Its campus is located in the city of Melbourne CBD. The College provides high-level, internationally recognized courses for international students. St. Peter Institute is also a member of the Australian Council for Private Education and Training (ACPET). Courses available for international students at our Institute can be found on this website or alternatively at www.cricos.deewr.gov.au Students who have studied at St. Peter Institute speak of their positive and enlightening experiences. St. Peter Institute offers to all students an excellent education experience in a pleasant environment. Our qualified teachers have extensive industry experience and our administrative staffs at the Institute are well prepared professionals with the necessary experience to advance the progress of each student. St. Peter Institute is committed to provide to the students the necessary academic and professional career developmental skill needs, and by doing so our experienced Management team is constantly responding to those needs as we educate our students for life and life long career prospects. St. Peter Institute is an enriching and positive place. After successful completion of their course, our students are given a choice to continue studies through St. Peter Institute’s Degree – Partner Program of a reputable university to further their studies, or select education provider of their own choice. Institute provides a superior level of academic and recreational services to all its students. We look forward to seeing you at the Institute to become a part of the St. Peter’s Institute family.

Roman Petelinek Head of Studies


index

About St. Peter Institute

4-7

Information for students

8 - 11

Student Support, Welfare and Behavior

12 - 15

Visa Requirments

16 - 17

Satisfactory Progress

18 - 19

Courses, Entry Requirements & Fees

20 - 21

Language Literacy and Numeracy Requirements

22 - 23

Courses - Certificate IV in Business

24 - 25

- Diploma of Management

26 - 27

- Advanced Diploma of Management

28 - 29

Living in Melbourne

30 - 35

Cost of Living and Money Matters

36 - 39

ESOS Frame Work

40 - 41

Refound Arrangements

42 - 43

Courses Progress and Intervention Strategy (National Code 10)

44 - 45

Student Complaints and Appeals (National Code 8 )

46 - 48

Student Transfer (National Code 7 )

49

Pathway to a University

50 - 51

Newsletter

52

Student Enrolment Form

53 - 58


About Us Our Mission St.Peter Institute is a comprehensive, learner-centered institution which strives to become the standard of excellence for fostering intellect, creativity, and character in an active, student-centered learning community. The Institute provides career and continuing education coursework and programs that anticipate and meet the dynamic intellectual, cultural and, economic development challenges of Australia. Through support services and a technologically enriched learning environment, the Institute strives to empower each learner with

skills, knowledge, and values needed for Institute preparation, workforce entry or advancement, and personal enrichment. Further, St.Peter Institute promotes an appreciation of cultural diversity, social responsibility, and academic excellence. The mission of St. Peter Institute is to educate and develop the whole person. As an Institute uniquely situated in the heart of Melbourne CBD, we are committed to providing training that makes an important contribution to the lives of our students in Victoria, the nation and the worldwide,

Our Core Values Our Vision

St. Peter Institute will be a world leader in the integration of

We value:

(a) Teaching and learning, (b) Advancement of the knowledge base, and (c) Leadership in service and outreach.

Quality - The Institute advances quality standards through faculty, academic offerings and support services provided to students. This is evidenced in institutional practices learning and administrative Further, the Institute will be a world leader in preparing outcomes. professionals who provide leadership and exemplary educational and related services to improve the lives of Learner-Centered - The Institute maintains a strong individuals in a changing and complex global society. commitment to all learners and their emerging needs, Affirming and building upon its heritage, St. Peter Institute will by fulfilling the academic and cultural needs of the become the recognized leader in transformative education region. of the whole person through engaged learning, community participation, and the development of ethical leaders. The Diversity - The Institute embraces diversity in its campus will be the model of a diverse, civil, involved, and curriculum, activities, student population, and staff. ethical community in which civic responsibility, intellectual activity, and cultural expression are taken seriously. In St. Inclusiveness - The Institute promotes a caring Peter Institute, we embrace a unique blend of values directed environment that is rooted in a participative at achieving the highest standards of the society. governance structure. Mutual respect and trust are evidenced in collaborative work teams, which cross over divisions,departments, and programs.

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Facilities & Equipment’s: Integrity - All policies and procedures of the Institute represent fair, responsible, and ethical practices and behaviors, to ensure standards of excellence. Innovation - The Institute promotes creative actions that result in the expedient development of educational programs and workforce solutions for the communities we serve. Growth - The Institute continuously strives to expand accessibility to the institution by increasing enrollment and enhancing educational offerings, fiscal and human resources, and campus facilities. Accountability - The Institute is accountable for strategies and actions that produce measurable outcomes. Datadriven decision making is a standard in the planning process, with special emphasis on strategies that result in enhanced effectiveness.

Location: St Peter Institute is located in the heart of Melbourne CBD (Central Business District). Easily accessible by public transport and just a few minutes’ walk from Parliament Station. A few minutes’ walk to main shopping centre, banks, doctors & dentists, food-courts, and libraries of Melbourne. Computing Facilities: Students have internet access. MS Office Word and Powerpoint for assignments and presentations in the class.Photocopier is available to the student for printing. Data projectors are used to enhance the quality of training. Resources: Resource centre access for the students to read books.

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Institute Contact Details Contact Details Address: Level 1 – 237 Exhibition Street, Melbourne, Victoria - 3000 Email: info@spi.vic.edu.au Website: www.spi.vic.edu.au Phone: +613 9077 8276 Fax: +613 9639 8882 24/7 Emergency Contact Number: 0422 255 201 RTO Operating Hours: Monday to Sunday Time: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM Office Hours: Monday to Friday Time: 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM Send all applications agreements and supporting documentation to the above address.

Student support contact details

The Training manager, student contact officer, teaching staff and administrative staff of the Institute are available to provide general advice and assistance with matters such as studying, homework, accommodation, English language problems and counselling. Students requiring special or intensive assistance must contact the Training Manager or the Student Contact Officer who may refer them to external support services if required. The Institute will not charge for support services it supplies or for referring students to external support services. Students will have to pay fees charged by external support services that they use.

Student contact officer details are: DEPARTMENTS

CONTACT PERSON

PHONE

EMAIL

Academic Assistance

Eshwar Lakavathu Roman Petelinek Praveen Kumar Kamalpreet Waraich

+61 3 9077 8276

eshwar@spi.vic.edu.au roman@spi.vic.edu.au praveen@spi.vic.edu.au kamalpreet@spi.vic.edu.au

Administrative Assistance

Eshwar Lakavathu Sukhraj Singh

+61 3 9077 8276

eshwar@spi.vic.edu.au sukhraj@spi.vic.edu.au

Non-academic Assistance

Fees & Refunds

Enrolment Matters

Rajan Chopra Eshwar Lakavathu Sukhraj Singh Sheeba Nelson Eshwar Lakavathu Sukhraj Singh Eshwar Lakavathu Sukhraj Singh Sheeba Nelson

+61 3 9077 8276

rajan@spi.vic.edu.au eshwar@spi.vic.edu.au sukhraj@spi.vic.edu.au admin@spi.vic.edu.au

+61 3 9077 8276

eshwar@spi.vic.edu.au sukhraj@spi.vic.edu.au

+61 3 9077 8276

eshwar@spi.vic.edu.au sukhraj@spi.vic.edu.au admin@spi.vic.edu.au

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“St Peter Institute embraces

Information for Students

a unique blend of excellence

and accountability. I am a full time student of this Institute, enrolled in Cert IV & Diploma of Management. I have found the course very informative & helpful in my work as an Interior Designer. The teaching skills & the friendly approach of the faculty make the learning more educative & innovative. I would like to thank my mentors for the tremendous assistance and support they have provided to me for the duration of my course. I would recommend each student to be a part of the wonderful environment of SPI where you live a different experience. Latika Saini (Student) Cert IV & Diploma of Management

Course Assessment

Credit Transfer

Credit Transfer applies to situation where students have completed units identical to those they are currently enrolled for at another provider. Credit will be granted in accordance with the Credit Transfer procedure. To apply for Credit Transfer students must complete the Credit Transfer application form and attach copies of verified documents to support Students will be given advance warning of the application. There is no reduction in the time and form of any assessment and tuition fees if Credit Transfer is applied for will not be expected to sit an assessment or granted. they have not prepared for. A number of approaches to course assessment are used by Institute staff. Assessment approaches may include: observation of performance in class, workshops or laboratories; case studies; projects; assignments; presentations; role plays; written tests and exams; work experience or work placement

Students are entitled to a maximum of three assessment attempts for each unit. If after three assessment attempts student’s status is “not yet competent” they will be required to repeat the unit and pay any fees associated with repeating the unit.

Pathways

Graduates of the Institute may seek credits to the relevant degree programs in Australian Universities. The Institute has special arrangements with an Australian University (Stotts College) and there is guaranteed entry into University programs. As a general rule students with Not attending for an assessment will be high marks will have the best chance of counted as one assessment attempt for being accepted by the University. each occurrence unless: a) the student can provide a certificate from a registered medical practitioner indicating that the student was medically unable to attend the assessment; or b) the student can provide independent evidence of exceptional compassionate circumstances beyond the student’s control, such as serious illness or death of a close family member to explain the non-attendance at the assessment

Qualifications to be issued Students completing all assessment requirements for a qualification will be awarded a certificate corresponding to the completed course. Students completing assessment requirements for part of a qualification will be awarded a Statement of Attainment indicating which modules or Units of Competency they have completed.

Course Delivery A number of approaches to course delivery are used by Institute staff. Course delivery approaches may include teacher led classroom delivery; workshops; seminars; tutorials and supervised study. During class time students will be expected to participate by answering questions, giving opinions, demonstrating tasks, working with others in groups, making presentations, role playing situations etc.

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Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) is a process designed to recognise previous formal or informal learning, work and life experiences that the student may have had to the extent that they are relevant to the course outcomes. The RPL process allows students to receive recognition under these circumstances and therefore enable them to focus more on areas they need to achieve competencies in order to gain their qualifications. Students who believe they already have some of the competencies in the course may apply for Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL). An essential requirement of RPL is that you can prove that you currently have the required competencies. Application may only be made after enrolment and payment of fees and must be made using the RPL application form that will be provided during orientation. Students must attach verified copies of all relevant documents to the RPL application form. There is no reduction in tuition fees if RPL is applied for and granted. It is recommended that student seek advice from the Institute before commencing an RPL application

Training Facilities The training classrooms and administration of the RTO is located at Level 1, 237 Exhibition Street Melbourne Vic 3000. This location is on a main road of Melbourne Central Business District (CBD). It is easily accessed by train with frequent services to Parliament Station, which is a gentle 5 minutes walk from the Institute. Details: • Data projectors and high-resolution scanner with the ability to do two-way and negative scanning. • A student lounge equipped with latest computer and colour laser printer for use and surf with the super fast ADSL2+ connection. • A fully-furnished kitchen for students. • Spacious and modern class rooms with data projectors. • Climate control premises to suite all seasons. • Centralized staff-room and separate student counselling area. • Colourful, vibrant and multi-cultural environment • Friendly, approachable and qualified staff.

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL)

Student Orientation Orientation is conducted either within two weeks prior to the commencement of course or within the first week of your course. Its purpose is to fully inform new students of most aspects of life at the Institute and to provide an introduction to studying, Melbourne’s costs of living, transportation, facilities, banking and accommodation. In addition Institute staff will be introduced, a tour of the Institute and the local area will take place and an opportunity to ask questions will be given. It is essential that you attend the orientation program otherwise you may miss out on information that affects your study, your visa or your enjoyment of your stay in Australia.

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St. Peter Institute Equity Commitment All St. Peter Institute staff will adhere to the principles and practices of equity in education and training; they will treat every student fairly and without discrimination. St. Peter Institute has procedures in place to ensure any student concerns are dealt with immediately and appropriately (refer to the Complaints and Appeals policy). St. Peter Institute acknowledges its legal obligations under State and Federal equal opportunity law, including: • • • •

The Racial Discrimination Act, 1975 (Commonwealth) The Sex Discrimination Act, 1975 (Commonwealth) Disability Discrimination Act, 1992 (Commonwealth) The Equal Opportunity Act, 1995 (Victoria)

All legislation can be accessed at: www.comlaw.gov.au St. Peter Institute fosters equality and access in a training environment that is fair and conducive to learning at all levels. Our training services are available to all participants regardless of ethnicity, gender, age, marital status, and sexual orientation, physical or intellectual impairment. All St. Peter Institute staff is required to have an awareness and understanding of access and equity issues and are required to demonstrate access and equity principles in all dealings with students and other staff. If you believe you have been treated unfairly by a St. Peter Institute Representative, please contact the Training Manager, on 90778276.

Occupational Health and Safety

Access to Student Records

St. Peter Institute complies with all relevant Occupational Health and Safety legislation. Trainers will actively take steps to identify hazards that could cause harm to participants in the classroom and learning environment. Where possible, the trainers will take action to remove or control these hazards, and will report the hazard to the appropriate on site personnel. Where practicable, students must take responsibility for their own health and safety and that of their fellow students, or employees. This means students must follow all safety rules, procedures and the instructions of their trainer while in attendance at St. Peter Institute premises.

Students may access their personal records held by St. Peter Institute at any time. Students may contact student administration to discuss a suitable time to view their file and access will only be granted once a student can confirm their identification. Student Access to the file will be granted within 2 days of confirming the student’s identification.

Privacy In accordance with our Privacy policy, we are committed to protecting the privacy and personal information of all of our students. Except as required under the Australian Quality Training Framework 2007 (AQTF2007) Standards for Registered Training Organisations, Government Contracts or by law, information about a participant will not be disclosed to a third party without the consent of the participant. A copy of the Privacy Policy Statement is available upon request.

Student Safety The RTO has a number of processes to provide a safe and secure learning environment to all students. These include hours of operation and access to staff to assist students where required. When travelling to and from your RTO premises it is important to ensure your own safety at all times. The following are some tips to follow to ensure your safety and all staff is able to assist you with strategies to improve your safety.

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Student Safety Tips: • •

• •

• • •

Don’t openly carry valuables, including iPods, mobile phones, laptops, etc. Find suitable and safe routes to petrol stations, shops and your local police station. Try to find routes that are well lit and busy. Avoid confrontation - it is better and safer to walk away if you are being provoked. If you feel you are being followed, cross the street, and if you are still worried, move as quickly as possible to a public area (such as a restaurant) and then telephone for help. At night, walk in pairs in well-lit areas and on busier streets, not dark alleyways and side-streets. Use the Lonsdale street Bus to get to a nearby car park or public transport. Have your keys ready well before you reach the door of your car or house. If you are going away, tell someone you trust where you are going and when you will be back. If travelling by bus or tram at night, try not to wait alone at the bus or tram stops. Arrange for others to meet you at your home stop if you are returning late and have a long way to walk home.

Academic Misconduct Students at St. Peter Institute are expected to maintain the highest standards of academic conduct. We know that most students conduct themselves with integrity and are disturbed when they observe others cheating. The following information should help you avoid unintentional academic misconduct and clarify the consequences of plagiarism and/or cheating.

Plagiarism It is the act of presenting another person’s work as your own, and failing to acknowledging that the thought, ideas or writings are of another person. Specifically it occurs when: • Other people’s work and/or ideas are paraphrased and presented without a reference; • Other students’ work is copied or partly copied;

phrases and passages are used verbatim without quotation marks and/or without a reference to the author or a web page;

Cheating To act dishonestly or unfairly in connection to an assessment conducted by the RTO. Academic misconduct is considered a serious offence at St. Peter Institute for students who have been deemed to intentionally plagiarise/ cheat, it may result in being suspended, or permanently removed from the course. To avoid plagiarism and/ or cheating and its penalties, students are advised to note the following: • You may quote from someone else’s work (for example from textbooks, journals or other published materials) but you must always indicate the author and source of the material. • You should name sources for any graphs, tables or specific data, which you include in your assignment. • You must not copy someone else’s work and present it as your own • If the student does not agree with the RTO’s decision, then they are able to access the Complaints and Appeals Policy and Procedure. All students have access to the Academic Misconduct Policy and Procedure and a copy can be produced by the Student Administration Department at any time upon request.

Language Literacy and Numeracy St. Peter Institute recognises that reading, writing, listening, speaking and understanding mathematical concepts and processes are integral skills required for work and are therefore an important component of training. As all students are individuals with different life experiences, literacy and numeracy skills vary. We encourage students with Language Literacy or Numeracy concerns to undertake training. A range of support services can be provided for the student upon request. If you have a Language Literacy or Numeracy concern that is affecting your training program, we encourage you to raise the matter directly with your Trainer.

I am Rea Grandos Sergio Alejandro from Malaysia, enjoying the beautiful city of Melbourne, where I study Certificate IV and Diploma of Management at St. Peter Institute. Studying at SPI has enormously improved my business skills and tremendously increased my confidence. I feel more confident in many areas of my life. Trainers at SPI are very helpful, and are highly qualified in the areas of the Business. SP Institute is equipped with variety of text books and training resources. Classes are small, so that interaction between trainers and students is comfortable. I would recommend St. Peter Institute to anyone; it is a great place to study and due to its location, it is very safe too.

- Rea Grandos Sergio Alejandro

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Student Support, Welfare and Behavior Access and Equity Policy The Institute Code of Practice includes an access and equity policy. This document is available on request. It is the responsibility of all staff to ensure the requirements of the access and equity policy are met at all times.

Dispute Resolution Procedure The Institute has a dispute resolution procedure to provide students with a fair and equitable process for resolving any disputes or complaints they may have. The dispute resolution procedure includes a requirement that an independent mediator will be appointed at no expense to the student if the student, is dissatisfied with the resolution process undertaken by the Institute. The Institute will make no charge to the student for its dispute resolution process or referral to the independent mediator. If you have a complaint or appeal you should take the following steps: • • •

Contact the Institute to obtain a copy of the complaints and appeals procedure and the application form Complete the application form and lodge it with the Institute. Follow up with the Institute

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CONTACT DETAILS

St Peter Institute 24/7 Emergency Number

0422 255 201

Fire, Ambulance & Police Emergency

Phone 000

Translating & Interpreting Service

Phone 131 450

Life Line 24 hour Counselling Services

Phone 131 114

Doctor

Collins Place Medical Clinic Level 3, Harley House 71 Collins St Melbourne VIC, 3000 Ph: (03) 9650 4218 Fax: (03) 9650 6315 Collins Street Medical Centre 8th Floor 267 Collins St Melbourne VIC, 3000 Ph: (03) 9654 6088 Fax: (03) 9654 7028

Dentist

Smile Solutions Level 1, Manchester Unity Building, 220 Collins St Melbourne VIC, 3000 Ph: (03) 9650 4920 Mobile: 0419 555 011

Community Health Centre

Carers In Attendance Melbourne VIC, 3000 Ph: (03) 9329 5951

Physiotherapist

Religious institutions

Melbourne Sports Medicine Centre General & Sports Medicine, Physiotherapy, Podiatry, Nutrition, Massage Level 4, 250 Collins St Melbourne VIC 3000 Ph: (03) 9650 9372

Anglican St John’s, Heidelberg, 1 Burgundy St, Heidelberg, Victoria, 3084 Catholic St Pius X, 419 Waterdale Rd, Heidelberg West, VIC 3081 Islamic Council Of Victoria 66 Jeffcott St West Melbourne VIC 3003 ph: (03) 9328 2067 Hindu Hindu Society Of Victoria Shri Shiva Vishnu Temple 52 Boundary Rd Carrum Downs 3201 Buddhists Melbourne Buddhist Centre, 1 Pitt Street Brunswick

Immigration agent / Lawyer

James Au & Associates, Level 2, 417 Collins Street Melbourne Vic 3000 ph 9614 8887

Study in Australia

http://studyinaustralia.gov.au/Sia/en/Home.htm

Youth Central

http://www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au/

STUDENT SUPPORT, WELFARE AND BEHAVIOR

EMERGENCY CONTACTS

It is the responsibility of all staff to ensure the requirements of relevant legislation are met at all times. Use the web sites indicated, or contact the General Manager if you require further information. There may be additional, course-specific, legislation that is relevant. Information about this legislation will be communicated during the course.

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Student Code of Behavior Purpose

The purpose of this procedure is to outline the system used to ensure that the students meet the behaviour requirements of the Institute. Responsibility The CEO is responsible for the implementation of this procedure and to ensure that staff and students are aware of its application and implement its requirements The Student Code of Behaviour requires the following rights and expectation to be respected and adhered to at all times. • • • • • • • • • • •

• •

The right to be treated with respect from others, to be treated fairly and without discrimination, regardless of religious, cultural, racial, age, disability or socio-economic status sexual differences. The right to be free from all forms of intimidation. The right to work in a safe, clean, orderly and cooperative environment. The right to have personal property (including computer files and student work) and the Registered Training. Organisation property protected from damage or other misuse. The right to have any disputes settled in a fair and rational manner (this is accomplished by the Grievance Procedure). The right to work and learn in a supportive environment without interference from others. The right to express and share ideas and to ask questions. The right to be treated with politeness and courteously at all times. The expectation that students will not engage in cheating or plagiarism. The expectation that students will submit work when required. o The expectation that students will maintain consistent participation, by attending all required classes and assessments. o The expectation that the students will maintain satisfactory course progress. Course progress will be reviewed after the end of the study period. The expectation that students will at all times meet the requirements, terms and conditions in the Student Agreement. For non-compliance with the Student Code of Behaviour the following procedure for discipline will be followed:

(Step 1)

(Step 3)

A member of the Registered Training Organisation staff will contact students in the first instance and arrange a counselling meeting to discuss the issue or behaviour & to determine how the issue might be rectified. This meeting and its outcomes will be documented, signed by all parties and included on the student’s personal file.

Should a third breach of the Student Code of Behaviour occur after the stage 2 meeting, the student will be provided with a final warning in writing & a time frame in which to rectify the issue. A copy of this letter will be included on the student’s personal file.

(Step 2) Where there is a second breach of the Student Code of Behaviour, students will be invited for a personal interview with the Training Manager to discuss the breaches further. This meeting and its outcomes will be documented, signed by all parties and included on the student’s personal file.

After the three steps in the discipline procedure have been followed, and breaches of the Code of Behaviour still continue, training services will be withdrawn and the student will be sent a student deferral, suspension or cancellation warning letter. Failure to attend scheduled meetings may result in the Institute deciding to defer, suspend or cancel a student’s enrolment

If the Institute intends suspending or cancelling the student’s enrolment where it is not at the student’s request, the student must be informed they have 20 working days to appeal to the Institute. If the appeal is not upheld then the Institute must report the student to DEERW and DIAC via PRISMS. The suspension or cancelling of the student’s enrolment cannot take effect until the appeal process is completed unless there are extenuating circumstances relating to the student’s welfare. Suspension or cancellation of your enrolment has to be reported to DIAC and may affect the status of your VISA. At any stage of this procedure students are able to access the Institute Complaints and Appeals Procedure to settle any disputes that may arise.

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VISA REQUIREMENTS

Visa Requirements The Department of Immigration and Citizenship publishes a full list of mandatory and discretionary student visa requirements on their web site. Follow the Student Visa Conditions link for details.

Change of address Upon arriving in Australia you are required to advise the Institute of your residential address and telephone number and of any subsequent changes to your residential address. This is extremely important. Under Section 20 of the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000 the Institute is obliged to serve a notice at your last known address if you breach a student visa condition relating to academic performance. The Institute may also send warning notices to you which are aimed at helping prevent breaches of your visa conditions. It is your responsibility and in your own interests to ensure that you always update your address details at the Institute to ensure you receive important information about your course, fees and possible breaches of your student visa. Additional information on student visa issues is available on the DIAC web site.

Student cancellation of enrolment Cancellation of enrolment will trigger the refund arrangements in the Written Agreement between the Institute and the student. Students who cancel their enrolment and think they are due for a refund must also apply for a refund. Refund applications must be made in writing to the Institute Training Manager. The student refund application form, available from the Institute, may be used as the written application. Written applications for refunds will also be accepted by mail or by email. Refunds will be made within 28 days of receipt of a written application and will include a statement explaining how the refund was calculated. The Institute will report your cancellation of studies to DIAC which may affect the status of your visa. If you require more information as to how this action may affect your visa status, contact your local DIAC office or phone the DIAC helpline 131 881.

Student initiated Deferral or Suspension of Enrolment Students may initiate a request to defer commencement of studies or suspend their studies on the grounds of compassionate or compelling circumstances. Students wishing to defer the commencement of studies or suspend their studies must apply to do so in writing to the Institute using the student deferral, suspension or cancellation application form or in writing by email, fax or post. Full details and documentary evidence of the compassionate or compelling circumstances must be included with the application for it to be considered. If approved, the Institute will report your deferral of commencement or suspension of studies to DIAC which may affect the status of your visa. If you require more information as to how this action may affect your visa status, contact your local DIAC office or phone the DIAC helpline 131 881.

Institute initiated Suspension or Cancellation of Enrolment The Institute may decide to suspend or cancel a student’s enrolment on its own initiative as a response to breaching the student code of behaviour through misbehaviour or a poor academic record by the student. If the Institute is intending to initiate a suspension or cancellation of enrolment, a warning letter will be sent to the student’s currently notified address and the student will have 20 working days from the date of the warning letter to complain or appeal against the Institute suspension or cancellation. The Institute will report any suspension or cancellation to DIAC which may affect the status of your visa. If you require more information as to how this action may affect your visa status, contact your local DIAC office or phone the DIAC helpline 131 881

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The Institute may also decide to defer the commencement of a course. If the Institute defers the commencement of a course, the provider default conditions in the Written Agreement between the Institute and the student will be triggered and the Institute will be obliged to repay all course money within 14 days of the date of deferral unless alternative arrangements can be made which are acceptable to students. If approved, the Institute will report its deferral of commencement to DEEWR which may affect the status of your visa. If you require more information as to how this action may affect your visa status, contact your local DIAC office or phone the DIAC helpline 131 881.

Full time study and participation Australian law requires International students to study at a full time study load. A full-time study load is normally a minimum of 20 hours per week for 40 weeks each calendar year or continuous 12-month period. Lack of participation in the full-time study load can result in unsatisfactory progress. The Institute has initiated the DEST / DIAC Course Progress Policy and Procedures. This means that students who have unsatisfactory academic progress will be reported to DIAC which may affect the status of their visa. Unsatisfactory academic performance is defined as failing more than 50% of units in two consecutive study periods or no attempt at all in doing any assessment for two consecutive study periods. The Institute is required to monitor, review and take intervention action when a student is in danger of not progressing satisfactorily or completing their course.

If you are an international student studying in Australia, you must purchase an approved OSHC policy from a registered health benefits organisation - commonly referred to as Health Funds before applying for your visa. You will need to buy OSHC before you come to Australia, to cover you from when you arrive. You will also need to maintain OSHC throughout your stay in Australia. You can find out more about purchasing OSHC at the Department of Health and Aging.

Department of Immigration and Citizenship According to the Dept of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC) you must provide evidence that satisfies the assessment factors applicable to you to be granted a student visa. Assessment factors include your financial ability, English proficiency, likely compliance with the conditions of your visa and any other matters considered relevant to assessing your application�. Additional information on student visa issues is available on DIAC Website and the Study in Australia Website.

VISA REQUIREMENTS

Institute deferral of commencement

Overseas Student Health Cover Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) is insurance that provides cover on the costs for medical and hospital care which international students may need while in Australia. OSHC will also pay for most prescription drugs and emergency ambulance transport.

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SATISFACTORY COURSE PROGRESS

Satisfactory Course Progress The Institute has initiated the DEEWR / DIAC Course Progress Policy and Procedures. This means that students who have unsatisfactory academic progress will be reported to DIAC which may affect the status of their visa. If you do not have satisfactory academic progress you will be reported to DIAC which may lead to cancellation of your visa. Unsatisfactory academic progress is defined in the ESOS legislation as failing more than 50% of units in any two consecutive study periods. If this occurs the Institute will report you to DIAC. A study period is one term of study. The Institute will monitor your academic progress, identify students who are “at risk” of breaching this requirement and act to assist students who are “at risk” through meetings and counselling sessions. Being “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements occurs when a student: Fails more than 50% of units in a study period; or Fails two or more core units in a study period; or Is unable to complete a course within the expected duration of study as recorded on the CRICOS register after having their program reviewed by the Training Manager; or Failing a unit means being assessed as “Not Yet Competent” for a completed unit In order to have the best chance of maintaining satisfactory progress you must: Attend all theory and practical classes and pay attention to the work and activities undertaken in class; Study the theory and practice the skills that are taught in class; Ensure that you are present for all assessment activities scheduled by the teachers; Make an appointment with the Student Contact Officer if you are having any difficulties with your studies.

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Students do not need a letter of release if: They have completed more than 6 months of their principal course, they are a government sponsored student, and their sponsor supports a transfer, their current education provider or course has ceased to be registered or a sanction has been imposed that prevents your provider from continuing to deliver your principal course

Use of personal information Information is collected during your enrolment in order to meet the Institute obligations under the ESOS Act and the National Code 2007; to ensure student compliance with the conditions of their visas and their obligations under Australian Immigration laws generally. The authority to collect this information is contained in the Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000, the Education Services for Overseas Students Regulations 2001 and the National Code of Practice for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students 2007. Information collected about you during your enrolment can be provided, in certain circumstances, to the Australian Government and designated authorities and, if relevant, the Tuition Assurance Scheme and the ESOS Assurance Fund Manager. In other instances information collected during your enrolment can be disclosed without your consent where authorised or required by law.

THAT'S IT

It is a requirement of the Australian Quality Training Framework that students can access personal information held by the Institute and may request corrections to Under the ESOS Framework, the Institute cannot enrol information that is incorrect or out of date. Apply in writing students seeking to transfer from another Institute before to the General Manager if you wish to view your own the students have completed 6 months of their principal records. course of study except in some circumstances. If you want to transfer before completing 6 months of your principal course, you need to ask the Institute for a letter Working in Australia of release. The six months is calculated as six calendar months from the first day of your principal course. Your Immigration laws allow students to work for a limited principal course is usually the final course of study you number of hours whilst studying on a student visa in will undertake. For example, if you are studying ELICOS Australia. Students can currently work 20 hours per followed by a Diploma program, the Diploma program is week during the Institute study time and full-time during your principal course. If you are considering requesting breaks. However, work is not always easy to find and a transfer before completing 6 months of your principal under no circumstances can students rely on income course of study please contact the Institute administration earned in Australia to pay tuition fees. Students are not for a copy of the transfer procedure and the application permitted to work if it interferes with their study. form.

L E LEARN D

FIXED

RESULTS SOLUTIONS

SATISFACTORY COURSE PROGRESS

Student transfer


Courses, Entry Requirements & Fees Introduction St. Peter Institute is a Registered Training Organisation and meets administrative, delivery, staffing, facility, marketing, financial, quality assurance and assessment standards agreed to by Federal, State and Territory Governments in Australia. The State Government registering authority monitors and subjects us to regular external audit to verify adherence to these standards.

Qualifications offered St. Peter Institute offers the following accredited and nationally recognised qualifications to overseas students 18 years or older. BSB40207 Certificate IV in Business [070178E] BSB51107 Diploma of Management [070179D] BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management [074420A]

Student recruitment, selection and enrolment process Applications for admission for students on a student visa must be made using the student application form. Students must complete the student application form and send the completed form to the Institute along with the Application Fee. Completed student application forms will be processed by the Institute and the application assessed on the basis of the information supplied. The participants for each program offered by the Institute will be selected in a manner that reflects access and equity principles. Completion of the student application form does not imply that the Institute will make an offer to the student. When prospective students apply to enter the Institute to study, the following procedure applies to the processing of applications: The Institute will assess the applicant’s previous educational qualifications (either obtained in Australia or overseas) necessary for studying at the required level of the proposed qualification. The application is also assessed to determine whether the applicant meets the required entry level competencies for the particular qualification in which the applicant wants to enroll. If the applicant’s educational qualifications do not meet the Institute’s admission requirements, other factors may be considered at the discretion of the Institute. Verified evidence of these other factors must be included with the application. These other factors may include: - Mature age, and or proof of being18 years or older at the proposed date of commencement - Work experience, - Attitude and aptitude, - Previous academic results, - Attendance rate in the previous Institute, - Ability and skills to function in an academic environment, - Possibility to succeed in his/her academic endeavours. Having arrived at an admission decision, the English language skills (language and literacy) will be assessed. If student has a satisfactory IELTS score (listed under entry requirements), the applicant will be offered a place in the chosen course.

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In a situation where the student can demonstrate that he or she can communicate in English but cannot produce any formal English qualification as described above, then the student will be required to complete an IELTS test in Melbourne.

Applicants must then apply for a student visa at their Australian Student Visa issuing centre and make travel arrangements to arrive in Australia in time to commence their course along with their. application fee and the Applicants wishing to accept the offer completed written agreement. must pay the fee requested in the letter of offer, complete the written A request for payment of tuition agreement and send it to the Institute. and other fees will be made if you Once the completed written agreement receive an offer letter and the fee is received (and cleared by the bank) an Electronic Confirmation of Please make your payment by Offer will be generated and sent to the Bank Draft to Angel United Group Australian Student Visa issuing centre Pty Ltd. No obligation is created to facilitate the issuing of a student on St. Peter Institute until funds visa. are cleared and an official receipt is issued. Successful applicants will be sent an offer letter, a written agreement and a request for payment by the Institute. Written agreements must be completed in full, signed by the applicant, dated and returned to the Institute

Application Fee (Not refundable)

AU$150

Materials fee Not refundable after the material is provided

N/A

RPL / Credit transfer fee

No Charge

Repeat Unit Fee

$300 per unit

Reassessment fee (2 additional attempts) * (Condition’ s Apply )

No Charge

Written Agreement variation fee

No Charge

Bank Transfer Fee

What the bank charges for the transfer

Accommodation Services

Out sourced contact staff for details

Airport meeting

Out sourced contact staff for details

**Formal Statement of Attainment on withdrawal, cancellation or transfer prior to completion of qualification/Completion of course Duplicate Copy of Statement of Attainment on student request

No Charge

$25.00

Fee changes Prior to a student enrolling, fees may be altered without notice. Once a student has completed enrolment, fees will not be subject to change for the normal duration of the course. If a course length is extended by the student then any fee increases will be required to be paid for the extended component of the course. Conditions Apply: *Students are entitled to 2 additional reassessment attempts for each unit, where a student has undertaken an assessment and it has been marked as NYC (Not Yet Competent), they will be reassessed for that assessment and if they are deemed NYC in both additional attempts, they have to re-enrol into that unit / subject. This will include retraining and therefore students need to pay the repeat unit fees. **Students will be provided with a statement of attainment for completed units if tuition fees relation to those completed units has been paid. Where there remain unpaid tuition fees that are directly related to a completed unit, the Institute may withhold the statement of attainment only for those units for which tuition fees remain outstanding

COURSES, ENTRY REQUIREMENTS & FEES

If an applicant cannot produce a satisfactory IELTS score, and there are doubts about the English language skills to cope in an academic environment, the applicant will be advised to enroll in an English (ESL or ELICOS) course for an appropriate duration until the student achieves an IELTS score of 5.5.


LANGUAGE LITERACY AND NUMERACY REQUIREMENTS

Language Literacy and Numeracy Requirements Students require language, literacy and numeracy capacity equivalent to the descriptions below

Qualification level

Certificate III And Certificate IV

Qualification level

Diploma

Reading

Read and interpret texts that have several ideas which are nonroutine, but simple. For example read workplace newsletters or read an agenda for a meeting

Reading

Read and understand texts with some complex ideas and non-routine vocabulary For example read a workplace report recommending a change or read a memo providing new instructions on workplace Health and Safety

Writing

Produce and sequence several paragraphs to make meaning. For example fill in an accident report form or write a set of procedures for a new work task for personal reference

Writing

Write texts which convey ideas beyond everyday concepts For example write the minutes for a workplace meeting or write a memo to colleagues to inform them of a temporary change to the workplace routine

Maths

Use operations and % and fractions to solve problems For example calculate and compare costs of similar items/services from two sources or measure items for work tasks using formal units (milliliters. of hair dye, grams of flour etc)

Maths

Use a range of algebraic formulae and calculating tools to solve work based problems For example apply formulae to measure heights, 2 and 3 dimensional spaces or use memory/ square root functions on calculator to solve multi-step problems

Oral Communication Participate in oral exchanges where listener/speaker is required to vary and/or understand concepts which are simple, but non-routine. For example provide instructions for a new worker on how to perform a simple workplace task or listen to, and respond to a routine customer complaint.

Oral Communication Participate in oral exchanges that require control of nonroutine language and structures. For example deliver a presentation about a new workplace practice to a group of colleagues or listen to a complicated customer complaint and be able to summarise the customer’s concerns.

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Advanced Diploma

Reading Read and understand texts with some complex ideas and nonroutine vocabulary For example design a workplace report recommending a change or read a memo providing new instructions on workplace health and safety

Writing

Maths

Oral Communication

Design procedures which convey ideas beyond everyday concepts For example write the memos for a workplace meeting or write a memo to colleagues to inform them of a temporary change to the workplace routine

Introduce more advanced tools/equipment to tackle every day problems For example apply formulae to use memory/square root functions on calculator to solve multi-step problems

Manage verbal exchanges that require control of nonroutine language and structures. For example deliver a power point presentation about a new workplace practice to a group of employees or listen to a complicated customer complaint and be able to summaries the customer’s concerns.

Entry requirements Selection for enrolment in our courses will be approved for applicants who meet the qualification selection criteria. In line with Government policy students with intellectual and physical disabilities are encouraged to participate in training. Qualification level

Business

Management

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

18 years or older IELTS 5.5 or higher* Satisfactorily completed year 12 or equivalent

Not Applicable

Diploma

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Advanced Diploma

Not Applicable

Not Applicable

Certificate III Certificate IV

18 years or older IELTS 5.5 or higher* Satisfactorily completed year 12 or equivalent Minimum IELTS Requirements

AND

Maximum ELICOS

English language proficiency satisfies OR education provider or 5.5 bands in IELTS or equal

4.5

AND

30 weeks

Assessment level Assessment level 1 & 2*

18 years or older IELTS 5.5 or higher* Satisfactorily completed year 12 or equivalent

IELTS Requirements

OR

Assessment level 3

5.5

OR

4.5

AND

30 weeks

Assessment level 4

5.5

OR

5.5

AND

20 weeks

Assessment level 5

7.0

7.0

Satisfactory outcome of interview with SPI selection admission staff or with and authorized representative of SPI. • English language proficiency satisfies education provider. Minimum English language proficiency •

Student should qualify in any one of the following: • Successful completion of Senior Secondary certificate of education in Australia conducted in medium of English • IELTS overall band of 5.5 • Completion of a full time studies in Australia towards a Certificate IV or above • English as first language • A satisfactory outcome of interview(s) with the SPI admission staff or with and authorized representative of SPI*

LANGUAGE LITERACY AND NUMERACY REQUIREMENTS

Qualification level


CERTIFICATE IV INBUSINESS

BSB40207 Certificate IV in Business

LOCATION Melbourne DURATION Term one : 10 Weeks Term two : 10 Weeks Total Duration : Twenty Six Weeks (including 6 weeks of holidays) FEES Enrolment AUD 150 (non-refundable) Material AUD 250 (One Semester) Course AUD 3995 CRICOS PROGRAM CODES 070178E

Course Description This qualification reflects the role of individuals who use well-developed skills and a broad knowledge base in a wide variety of contexts. They apply solutions to a defined range of unpredictable problems, and analyse and evaluate information from a variety of sources. They may provide leadership and guidance to others with some limited responsibility for the output of others.

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Career Opportunities

Units of competency: Code

Title

Core/ Elective

Hours

BSBOHS407A

Monitor safe workplace

Core

50

BSBADM405B

Organise meetings

Elective

30

BSBCMM401A

Make presentation

Elective

30

BSBLED401A

Develop teams and individuals

Elective

50

BSBCUS403A

Implement customer service standards

Elective

40

BSBMKG414A

Undertake marketing activities

Elective

50

BSBREL401A

Establish networks

Elective

30

BSBRES401A

Analyse and present research information

Elective

40

BSBWOR404A

Develop work priorities

Elective

40

BSBCUS401A

Coordinate implementation of CS strategies

Elective Total

40 400

Entry requirements: English IELTS 5.5 and meeting requirements of DIAC visit: http://www. immi.gov.au/students/ Satisfactorily completed year 12 or equivalent, or relevant and sufficient work experience Be at least 18 years or over

RPL: Students will be made aware of the RPL options available prior to commencing study. If applications are valid the SPI Institute’s RPL process will be followed.

Pathways: Training Pathway After achieving the BSB40207 - Certificate IV in Business, candidates may undertake a range of Diploma level qualifications within the BSB07 Business Services Training Package, or other Training Packages. Employment Pathway Successful completion of this course will enable candidates to work in both commercial and nonfor-profit sectors. The skills students gain from completing this qualification could provide them with the competitive advantage required to achieve a successful career in today’s business world.

CERTIFICATE IV INBUSINESS

Provides participants with the skills to obtain the occupational position as Administrator.


DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT

BSB51107 Diploma of Management

LOCATION Melbourne DURATION Term one : 10 Weeks Term two : 10 Weeks Total Duration : Twenty Six Weeks (including 6 weeks of holidays) FEES Enrolment AUD 150 (non-refundable) Material AUD 250 (One Semester) Course AUD 3995 CRICOS PROGRAM CODES 070179D

Course Description This qualification reflects the role of individuals who are engaged to manage the work of others or to add value to or review management practices. Their role may be in any industry or organisational setting. Typically people in these roles will have considerable experience in their respective industries or vocational areas and combine an informed perspective of specific work requirements with their managerial approaches. The qualification requires a sound theoretical knowledge base and managerial competencies to plan, carry out and evaluate own work or the work of a team.

26


Career Opportunities

Units of competency: Code

Title

Core/ Elective

Hours

BSBWOR502A

Ensure team effectiveness

Core

40

BSBCUS501A

Manage quality customers service

Core

30

BSBMGT502B

Manage people performance

Core

80

BSBMGT516A

Facilitate continuous improvement

Core

60

BSBOHS509A

Ensure safe workplace

Core

60

BSBWOR501A

Manage personal work priorities and professional development

Elective

40

BSBADM502B

Manage meetings

Elective

40

BSBFIM501A

Manage budgets and financial plans

Elective

50

Total

400

Pathways:

RPL:

Entry requirements: English to IELTS 5.5 and meeting requirements of DIAC visit: http://www.immi. gov.au/students/ Study to at least Year 12 in Australia or equivalent Be at least 18 years or over

Students will be made aware of the RPL options available prior to commencing study. If applications are valid the SPI RPL process will be followed.

Training Pathway On successful completion of this qualification students may enrol into the BSB60407 - Advanced Diploma of Management or higher education. Employment Pathway Successful completion of this course will enable candidates to work in both commercial and non-for-profit sectors. The skills students gain from completing this qualification could provide them with the competitive advantage required to achieve a successful career in today’s business world.

DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT

Provides participants with the skills to obtain the occupational position as Leading Hand, Supervisor, Team leader and Manager.


ADVANCED DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT

BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management

LOCATION Melbourne DURATION Term one : 11 Weeks Term two : 11 Weeks Term three : 11 Weeks Term four : 11 Weeks Total Duration : Fifty two Weeks (including 8 weeks of holidays) FEES Enrolment AUD 150 (non-refundable) Material AUD 500 (One Semester) Course AUD 7990 CRICOS PROGRAM CODES 074420A

Course Description This qualification reflects the role of individuals who have senior or managerial responsibilities. They may oversee the work of others or have specialised roles where they do not supervise others but provide strategic leadership.

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Career Opportunities

Units of competency: Code

Title

Core/ Elective

Hours

BSBINN601B

Manage Organisational Change

Core

100

BSBMGT605B

Provide Leadership Across the Organisation

Core

100

BSBMGT616A

Develop and Implement Strategic Plans

Core

160

BSBDIV601A

Develop and Implement Diversity Policy

Elective

120

Elective

100

Elective

120

BSBSUS501A

Develop Workplace Learning Environment Manage Innovation and Continuous Improvement Develop Workplace Policy and Procedures for Sustainability

Elective

100

PSPGOV602B

Establish and Maintain Strategic Networks

Elective

80

Total

880

BSBLED501A BSBMGT608C

Entry requirements: English to IELTS 5.5 and meeting requirements of DIAC visit: http://www.immi. gov. au/students/ Study to at least Year 12 in Australia or (equivalent) Diploma Be at least 18 years or over

RPL: Students will be made aware of the RPL options available prior to commencing study. If applications are valid the SPI RPL process will be followed.

Pathways: Training Pathway After achieving the BSB60407 Advanced Diploma of Management, students will be able to further their studies with an Associated University of their choice. Employment Pathway Successful completion of this course will enable candidates to work in both commercial and non-for-profit sectors. The skills students gain from completing this qualification could provide them with the competitive advantage required to achieve a successful career in today’s business world.

ADVANCED DIPLOMA OF MANAGEMENT

After completing Advanced Diploma students may fill different job roles or title variation across various industry sectors. Possible tittles to this qualification may include: Area Manager, Department Manager, and Regional Manager


Living

in

Melbourne

Australia

Victoria

Australia is a land of contrasts: sweeping golden beaches, coral reefs rich with marine life, tropical rainforests, mountain ranges, vast grazing lands and sparse deserts. One of the oldest continents, Australia is the only country to occupy an entire continent.

About 36 per cent of Victoria is forest. The Murray is the State’s longest river and there are a number of large inland lakes. Victoria’s vast coastline extends over 1600 kilometres, bordering the Southern Ocean and Bass Strait and separating the Australian mainland from Tasmania.

Surrounded by the Indian and Pacific Oceans, Australia has many animals and plants, which are unique on the planet. The surface geology is typically old and flat with a major mountain range stretching down the eastern coast and another mountain range in the north west of the continent.

Victoria is the most densely populated of 8 States and Territories of Australia. Some 26 per cent of all Australians live in Victoria and, of those, most reside in Melbourne, the nation’s second largest city and capital of this state.

Melbourne

Melbourne is the capital of the State of Victoria. It is situated on the Yarra River and around Port Phillip Bay with its beautiful beaches and water sports facilities. It is a beautiful spacious city with all the parks, gardens, sporting venues and scenic places that Australian space and natural resources allow. Melbourne is a world-renowned cultural, artistic, financial and communications centre served by an international airport, a cargo and passenger seaport, and rail links to neighbouring States. Melbourne, once voted the world’s ‘most liveable city’, enjoys clean fresh air and beautiful parks and gardens. Melbourne is considered to be the shopping capital of Australia and offers some of Australia’s biggest

shopping complexes as well as sophisticated, exclusive boutiques and a host of lively and popular markets. One quarter of Melbourne’s population was born overseas making it one of the world’s most multicultural cities. There are now people from 140 nations living harmoniously together. This broad ethnic mix has brought many benefits to the city including a wide range of cuisines and over 2,300 elegant restaurants, bistros and cafes. Melbourne has an excellent public transport system with trams, trains and buses providing an extensive network throughout the city and suburbs. The population is approximately 4 million. Melbourne is a sprawling city with suburbs extending up to 50km from the centre of the city. The city centre is on the banks of the Yarra River, 5km from Port Phillip Bay. The city centre features world class department stores, historical, architecture, theatres, galleries and arts

centres. Melbourne is only a short distance from many beautiful beaches as well as the Victorian mountain regions, where skiing is popular during winter. The city and surrounding suburbs are well serviced by a public transport network of buses, trains and trams. A multicultural city enriched by 170 ethnic groups. Sometimes called the culinary capital of Australia, Melbourne has a vast array of restaurants, offering a variety of international cuisine. Bustling Chinatown in the heart of the city, serves up the finest of Asian cuisine and culture. Several other Melbourne streets are dedicated to Vietnamese, Japanese, Italian and Greek food - cuisine to suit every palate and many to suit a student’s budget.

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A Good Choice for Study There are more than 50,000 overseas students studying in Australia and each year approximately 15,000 students from the Asia Pacific region arrive in Australia to continue their education. They have chosen Australia for several reasons: • • • • •

Climate

Australia has a high quality education system, the equal of any country in the world Australia offers traditional education in reputable schools, Institutes and universities Awards from Australian institutions of higher education are recognized internationally Australian universities, Institutes and schools have established networks of support to help overseas students The Australian education system includes informality and accessibility of academic staff, the availability of computers, small group tutorials and close supervision Living costs and tuition costs compare well with other countries and most overseas students are permitted to work part-time. Australia is a safe and stable country with a pleasant climate.

Melbourne enjoys a temperate climate with four distinct seasons in the year - spring, summer, winter and autumn. Below is a guide to the average daily temperatures. Spring September - November 12-22 degrees Summer December to February 28-32 degrees Autumn March to May 12 - 20 degrees Winter June to August 10 - 15 degrees Melbourne does not have a specific wet season - it can rain at any time of the year. Sports and other outdoor activities are possible at all times of the year.

International sporting events: • • • • •

Spring Racing Carnival (Melbourne Cup) Australian Open (Grand Slam tennis) Grand Prix Motor Racing World Series and Test cricket Bells Beach Surf Classic

Festivals • • • •

International Comedy Festival International Festival of the Arts Chinese New Year Parade Moomba Festival.

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Art

Multiculturalism

Australian contemporary arts reflect the world’s oldest continuous cultural traditions and also a diverse, multicultural society. Our visual and performing arts communities receive international acclaim for their vibrancy, originality and cutting-edge work in the arts, literature, stage & cinema, dance, classical music and contemporary Australian rock music.

More than 100 ethnic groups are represented in Australia, making Australia one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world. Australia’s dynamic multiculturalism can be attributed to its unique combination of Indigenous cultures, early European settlement and immigration from all parts of the world.

The National Museum of Australia opened as part of Australia’s Centenary of Federation celebrations in 2001. It is co-located with the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies in the nation’s capital city of Canberra and adds to more than 1000 museums throughout Australia.

Australians value the wealth of cultural diversity and social sophistication that international students bring to our campuses and our communities. We take great care in looking after international students and helping them to adjust to the Australian way of life. International students also gain great benefits from their education in Australia and make lifelong friendships.

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Language

Although English is the official language, a host of other languages are spoken in Australia. As one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world many Australians are naturally fluent in other languages. More than 2.4 million Australians speak a language other than English at home. Within the education and training system about 15 per cent of those of working age studying for an educational qualification have English as a second language. More than 800,000 Australians speak a European Union language, apart from English, in the home. Another 800,000 Australians speak an Asian language at home. In Australia not only is there the opportunity to improve your English through specialist study in an Englishspeaking environment but all sectors of Australian education and training provide tuition in many other languages as well. English as it is spoken in Australia is very easily understood by nearly all people from other Englishspeaking nations. While there are some minor differences in accent between the cities and country areas the difference is much less than you will find in America, Britain and Canada where French is also spoken. As you improve your English in Australia you

will learn some of our slang, and have much fun explaining the meanings to your friends and relatives at home.

Religion Australia is predominantly a Christian country however; all religions are represented in our multicultural society. Australians respect the freedom of people to practice their choice of religion. Churches, mosques, temples and synagogues are located in most major cities. Some universities have their own spiritual groups on campus.

Clean, Safe, Cosmopolitan Students from all over the world come to Australia to take advantage of our world-class education and enjoy our friendly hospitality and cultural diversity. Australia has low crime rates and strict gun control laws providing a safe environment to learn and travel. With one of the highest standards of living in the world, Australia offers modern transport systems, convenient telecommunications, cosmopolitan shopping complexes and excellent health services.

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Visitors from many parts of the world are attracted by Australia’s spectacular natural environment and the distinctive personality and friendliness of the Australian people. Australia is rich in arts and is keen to preserve and display its diverse cultural heritage.

Electricity

Health Care

With one of the highest standards of living in the world, Australia offers modern transport systems. Australia has an extensive public transport system that includes trains, buses, trams, ferries, two major national airlines and a number of regional airlines. Metropolitan areas are divided into zones and your ticket type and cost depends on which zone you are going to travel in and for how long. Tickets can be bought at train stations, on buses and trams and at news agencies.

The electrical current in Australia is 240/250 volts AC, 50 cycles. The Australian three pin plug is extremely safe. Adaptors are usually required for most foreign appliances. A transformer may be required if you bring an Australians are also environmentally appliance from overseas that operates conscious and keen to preserve the on a different voltage. country’s natural beauty and scenery. Our ‘Clean up Australia’ campaign is Transport being adopted worldwide.

Australia has a very good health care system. All Australians pay a Medicare levy (additional tax) to fund the public health system and ensure everyone gets access to public system doctors, hospitals and other health care services. People who pay extra into a private health insurance fund receive certain privileges when they use private health care services, As well as the usual services available in just about any Australian suburb or town. Most Australian institutions also provide special health care services and advice for students. International students studying in Australia are required to have Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the duration of their student visa.

Food Australia has a fantastic variety of food. Our top quality meat, fish, fruits and vegetables are exported to markets all around the globe. There is a large range of fruit and vegetables available at Australian produce markets. You should have no difficulty in finding the foods that you are used to at home. You can sample almost every type of cuisine available throughout the world in our many restaurants. There are elegant restaurants or typical Aussie pubs. Ethnic restaurants offer cuisines from all around the world. Good food at reasonable prices can be found at bistros or cafes. And for those who like takeaway, most of the major global fast food chains are well represented. The adventurous can try some of our ‘bush tucker’.

Tourist students may drive in Australia on a valid overseas drivers licence but if the document is not in the English language the visitor must carry a translation with the permit. An international driving licence is not sufficient by itself. Metered taxicabs operate in all major cities and towns. You will find taxi ranks at transport terminals, main hotels or shopping centres or you can hail taxis in the street. A light and sign on the roof indicates if a cab is vacant. There is a minimum charge on hiring and then a charge per kilometre travelled. Taxi drivers do not have to be tipped.

Telephones

Australia has a modern telecommunications system with mobile and internet access generally available at low cost. Public telephones are available at all Post Offices, shopping centres and are often situated on street corners. Public pay phones accept a variety of coins and Phone cards. Phone cards are pre-paid for use in public pay phones and can be bought at a large number of retail outlets in denominations of $A5, $A10, $A20 and $A50. Credit phones take most major credit cards such as American Express, Visa, Master card and Diners. International and can

34


be found at international and domestic • airports, central city locations and hotels. • Mobile phones are very popular and can be purchased from a number of retailers.

contribute to the Australia’s research capability Develop cultural, educational and economic links between Australians and people of other nations.

Australia has a long history of involvement in international education development, Australians are very keen on sport and staff and student exchange programs outdoor activities and have gained a and scholarships. worldwide reputation, both as individuals and as teams. Hosting the Year 2000 Study Methods Olympic Games in Sydney highlights Australia as a leading destination for In Australia, much emphasis is placed international events. upon private (individual) study along the lines of assignments, on research and Australia has more than 120 national learning to analyse data and present sporting organisations and thousands arguments about subject matter, and on of state, regional and club bodies. It is being willing to defend one’s argument. estimated that 6.5 million people, about All these involve heavy use of libraries, a third of the population, are registered intensive note taking in lectures, and sports participants. While there are over active participation in the learning 120 sporting organisations, Australians process (as opposed to passive listening also take part in bush walking, fishing, and rote learning). boating and water sports. To be a successful student in Australia, you will need to adapt to these methods Entertainment of learning, but most education Campuses offer spacious surroundings institutions in Australia are very willing suitable for social, sporting and other to help as they offer counselling services outdoor activities. They are also centrally and assistance to develop effective located for students to experience the study skills. Many lecturers in Australia sophistication of our cities and excitement have vast experience teaching overseas of our entertainment facilities. There are students, they understand the difficulties plenty of opportunities for international in getting used to different study methods students to have an enjoyable time with and they will be patient in helping you to develop new skills friends.

Sports and Recreation

Travel During semester breaks, you may like to venture beyond the capital cities to experience more of Australia’s spectacular natural environment and great physical beauty—national parks, The Great Barrier Reef, Kakadu, Uluru and the Tasmanian Wilderness.

Australia Welcomes Overseas Students Overseas students are welcomed in Australia because they: •

Contribute to the development of people and institutions both in their home country and in Australia.

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Cost of Living and Money Matters

Money and Banks

Normal Bank Trading Hours

Australian currency is the only legal tender in Australia. When you first arrive, money from other countries can be changed at the exchange facilities located at international airports, banks and major hotels. Travellers cheques are easier to use if already in Australian dollars, however, banks will cash travellers cheques in virtually any currency. Major hotels and some shops, depending on individual store policy, will cash travellers cheques. It is a good idea to set up an Australian bank account. You will need to provide your visa and evidence of residency. Banking services in Australia are extremely competitive. Over 20 local and numerous international banking groups are represented in Australia. All major banks have a branch in cities and regional centres. Most shopping centres have Automatic Teller Machines (ATM) facilities. These machines can be used for deposits and, in many instances, withdrawals 24 hours a day. Many department stores, supermarkets and specialist shops have electronic transfer terminals (EFTPOS) where cash withdrawals can also be made in addition to purchasing goods.

9.30 am – 4.00 pm Monday to Thursday 9.30 am – 5.00 pm Friday Some banks are open Saturday mornings

Currency Australia uses a dollars and cents system of decimal currency with 100 cents in a dollar. The bank notes in use are $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100. Coins used are the silver coloured 5 cent, 10 cent, 20 cent and 50 cent and the gold coloured $1 and $2 coins. Australia’s development of the polymer (plastic) banknote heralds the introduction of advanced banknote technology for the new millennium and rewrites world standards in design. Not only does this leading-edge polymer technology offer immense security benefits but its concepts of cleanliness, environmental responsibility and recyclability set an example for the world to follow.

Credit Cards Credit cards are widely accepted around Australia. The most commonly accepted credit cards are American Express, Bankcard, Diners International, Master card, Visa and their affiliates.

Tipping Tipping is not the general custom in Australia and service charges are not added to accounts by hotels and restaurants. In better-class restaurants, it is usual to tip food and drink waiters up to 10 per cent of the bill for good service. Porters have set charges at railway terminals, but not at hotels. However, at any time, tipping is a matter of individual choice.

Accommodation The following types of accommodation are available for International students:1. Full Board (Home stay) AU$200 - AU$270 per week 2. Student house AU$150 - AU$200 per week 3. Half - Board AU$150 - AU$200 per week (plus expenses). 4. Leasing a House/Flat AU$200 - AU$350 per week (unfurnished)

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This accommodation can be booked prior to arrival. Two There are also train, bus and air services between cities weeks advance notice is required before you depart and towns. for Australia. Further details can be obtained from the Overseas Student Health Cover International Student Welfare Officer. Some useful internet sites for housing are: Student Housing Australia – http://www.s-h-a.com.au/ Share Accommodation – http://www.find-studentaccommodation.com Youth Central Housing and Accommodation – http://www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au Study in Australia Accommodation Options and Costs – http://studyinaustralia.gov.au/Sia/en/StudyCosts/Accommodation

Budgeting

(OSHC)

International students are required by the Government to join a private health insurance scheme. The OSHC premium cover must be paid before a student visa is issued. You will need to pay the OSHC premium at the same time as the tuition fees. The OSHC entitles you to free hospital cover and 85% of standard doctor’s fees. Annual rates are AU$388* for single coverage and AU$778* for family coverage. OSHC is also charged on a pro-rata basis for shorter courses.

Cost of Living Melbourne is a reasonably priced city providing good quality affordable living and abundant accommodation. Students will need about AU$18,000 per year (excluding tuition) to cover living expenses. According to the Government Website, Study in Australia, Australia is a sophisticated, friendly and affordable country which enjoys one of the highest standards of living in the world. The average international student in Australia spends about $360 per week on accommodation; food; clothing; entertainment; transport; international and domestic travel; telephone; incidental costs.

You should work out a budget covering accommodation, food, transport, clothing and entertainment. Childcare, if applicable, should also be taken into account. The average international student in Australia spends about $360 per week on accommodation, food, clothing, entertainment, transport, international and domestic travel, telephone and incidental costs. School students in Australia typically spend a little less - about $265 a week - on accommodation and food, entertainment, transport and associated items. While this is a realistic guide, it is important to remember that individual circumstances will The cost of living depends a lot on the kind of accommodation a student chooses. A married student vary by location, course and lifestyle. with dependent will need approximately an additional AU$4,000 per year for each dependent. The lifestyle in Australia is safe and friendly. Australians Transport have a high standard of living. The climate is pleasant, there is plenty of food and the vast natural resources in Australia has an efficient public transport system (buses, Australia enable most people to live well. trains and trams) in all cities. Many students ride bicycles on campus and some even have their own cars for longer travel.

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Fruit, vegetables and meat are available fresh and at reasonable prices. Clothing and personal effects are usually good quality and available at a wide variety of prices. Below is a price table of typical daily items. This is only a guide. Remember that you can shop around for items such as clothing and shoes to find a cheaper source.

Food

Personal Effects/Services

Milk 1 litre $1.80

Shoes 1 pair $70.00

Bread 1 loaf $2.50

Jeans 1 pair $80.00

Apples 1 kg $4.00

Toothpaste 140g $2.50

Potatoes 1 kg $1.00

Shampoo 500ml $3.00

Beefsteak 1 kg $15.00

T-shirt $20.00

Eggs 1 dozen $4.00

Hairdresser $20.00 to $40.00

Cereal 1kg $3.00

Newspaper $2.00

Fruit Juice 2 litres $4.00

Cinema ticket $15.00

Rice 1 kg $2.00

Public transport city an inner suburbs $7.00 for a day pass

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ESOS FRAMEWORK

The ESOS Framework - Providing Quality Education and Protecting Your Rights The Australian Government wants overseas students in Australia to have a safe, enjoyable and rewarding place to study. Australia’s laws promote quality education and consumer protection for overseas students. These laws are known as the ESOS framework and they include the Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS) Act 2000 and the National Code 2007. Protection for overseas students: As an overseas student on a student visa, you must study with an education provider and in a course that can be found on the Commonwealth Register of Institutions and Courses for Overseas Students (CRICOS) at http://cricos. deewr.gov.au CRICOS registration guarantees that the course and the education provider at which you study meet the high standards necessary for overseas students. Please check carefully that the details of your course − including its location − match the information on CRICOS. Your rights: The ESOS framework protects your rights, including: • Your right to receive, before enrolling, current and accurate information about the courses, fees, modes of study and other information from your provider and your provider’s agent. If you are under 18, to ensure your safety, you will be granted a visa only if there are is arrangements in place for your accommodation, support and welfare. • Your right to sign a written agreement with your provider before or as you pay fees, setting out the services to be provided, fees payable and information about refunds of course money. You should keep a copy of your written agreement. • Your right to get the education you paid for. The ESOS framework includes consumer protection that will allow you to receive a refund or to be placed in another course if your provider is unable to teach your course. The ESOS framework sets out the standards Australian education providers offering education services to overseas students must obey. These standards cover a range of information you have a right to know and services that must be offered, including: • Orientation and access to support services to help you study and adjust to life in Australia • Who the contact officer or officers is for overseas students • If you can apply for course credit • When your enrolment can be deferred, suspended or cancelled • What your provider’s requirements are for satisfactory progress in the courses you study and what support is available if you are not progressing well • If attendance will be monitored for your course, and • A complaints and appeals process. One of the standards does not allow another education provider to enrol a student who wants to transfer to another course, but has not completed six months of the final course of study you plan to undertake in Australia. If you want to transfer beforehand you need your provider’s permission. If you are under 18, to ensure your safety, you will be granted a visa only if there are arrangements in place for your accommodation, support and welfare. Your responsibilities: As an overseas student on a student visa, you have responsibilities to: • Satisfy your student visa conditions • Maintain your Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the period of your stay • Meet the terms of the written agreement with your education provider • Inform your provider if you change your address • Maintain satisfactory course progress • If attendance is recorded for your course, follow your provider’s attendance policy, and • If you are under 18, maintain your approved accommodation, support and general welfare arrangements.

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ESOS FRAM WORK Contact Details Who?

Why?

How?

Your provider

For policies and procedures that affect you

Speak with your provider. Go to your provider’s website

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)

For your ESOS rights and responsibilities

www.deewr.gov.au/international/programs/pages/qualityassurance.aspx Phone: 1-DEEWR (133 397)

Department of Immigration and Citizenship (DIAC)

For visa matters

www.immi.gov.au Phone 131 881 in Australia Contact the DIAC office in your country.


REFUND ARRANGEMENTS

Refund Arrangements If a visa is refused by the Australian Government

Where a prospective student is refused an initial student visa by the Australian Government a full refund of course fees will be made. In order to receive the refund students will have to provide authenticated evidence of the student visa refusal to the Institute and attach this to a completed refund application form which is available from the Institute and can be sent by post, fax or email. The refund application must be used to apply for refunds and must be addressed to the CEO of the Institute.

If the Institute defaults on delivery of qualifications

In the unlikely event that the Institute is unable to deliver your course in full, you will be offered a refund of all the course money you have paid to date. The refund will be paid to you within 2 weeks of the day on which the course ceased being provided. Alternatively, you may be offered enrolment in an alternative course by the Institute at no extra cost to you. You have the right to choose whether you would prefer a full refund of course fees, or to accept a place in another course. If you choose placement in another course, we will ask you to sign a document to indicate that you accept the placement. If the Institute is unable to provide a refund or place you in an alternative course our Tuition Assurance Scheme (TAS) provided by ACPET will place you in a suitable alternative course at no extra cost to you. Finally, if ACPET cannot place you in a suitable alternative course, the ESOS Assurance Fund Manager will attempt to place you in a suitable alternative course or, if this is not possible, you will be eligible for a refund as calculated by the Fund Manager. In the case of provider default there is no requirement for a student to lodge a refund application form as the Institute will initiate payment of the refund.

If a student defaults on their written agreement

If students want to withdraw from their course after fees have been paid then refunds will be made in accordance with the written agreement that the student signs with the Institute. The written agreement will be sent to students who are accepted into a course and will not take effect until it is signed and dated by the applicant and received by the Institute. Refund conditions • Refund applications must be made in writing to the Institute. The student refund application form, available from the Institute, may be used as the written application. Written applications for refunds will also be accepted by mail or by email. Refunds will be made within 28 days of receipt of a written application and will include a statement explaining how the refund was calculated

Visa refused prior to course commencement

100 % of your deposit will be refunded Registration fees won’t be refunded

Withdrawal 60 days or more prior to agreed start date of the initial enrolled course as indicated on the current Letter of Offer

100 % of your deposit will be refunded Registration fees won’t be refunded

Withdrawal less than 60 days but more than 28 days of the agreed start date of the initial enrolled course as indicated on the current Letter of Offer

50 % of your deposit will be refunded Registration fees won’t be refunded

Withdrawal less than 28 days of the agreed start date of the initial enrolled course as indicated on the current Letter of Offer

No refund of deposit or registration fees

On shore course withdrawal

No refund

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No refund

Course withdrawn by Institute, The Institute is unable to provide the course for which the original offer was made

100 % of your deposit will be refunded including registration fee In the case of provider default, refunds will be granted in accordance with the provisions of the ESOS Act 2000 and the ESOS regulations 2001

Visa extension is refused

No refund of pre paid fees

Course Material

Costs related to course equipment or training material are non-refundable once the student has collected the equipment or training materials

In the unlikely event that the Institute is unable to deliver your course in full, you will be offered a refund of all the course money you have paid to date. The refund will be paid to you within 2 weeks of the day on which the course ceased being provided. Alternatively, you may be offered enrolment in an alternative course by the Institute at no extra cost to you. You have the right to choose whether you would prefer a full refund of course fees, or to accept a place in another course. If you choose placement in another course, we will ask you to sign a document to indicate that you accept the placement. If the Institute is unable to provide a refund or place you in an alternative course of our Tuition Assurance Scheme (TAS), ACPET will place you in a suitable alternative course at no extra cost to you. Finally, if ACPET cannot place you in a suitable alternative course, the ESOS Assurance Fund Manager will attempt to place you in a suitable alternative course or, if this is not possible, you will be eligible for a refund as calculated by the Fund Manager.

Fees not listed in this refund section are not refundable. (Application fees is non refundable) Material fees non refundable after the material is provided.

Prior to a student enrolling, fees may be altered without notice. Once a student has completed enrolment, fees will not be subject to change for the normal duration of the course. If a course length is extended by the student then any fee increases will be required to be paid for the extended component of the course.

Students will be provided with a statement of attainment for completed units if tuition fees in relation to those completed units has been paid. Where there remain unpaid tuition fees that are directly related to a completed unit, the Institute may withhold the statement of attainment only for those units for which tuitions fees remain outstanding

Duplicate Copy of Statement of Attainment on student request for $25

Full details of refund arrangements and conditions are on the Written Agreement that the student and the Institute will sign once an application has been received, accepted by the Institute and an offer made to the student. There is no obligation on the student of the Institute until the Written Agreement is signed by all parties.

REFOUND ARRANGEMENTS

Withdrawal after the agreed start date of the initial enrolled course , Course abandoned without notification Student breaching their Visa conditions Visa cancelled due to actions of the student


COURSE PROGRESS AND INTERVENTION STRATEGY

Course Progress and Intervention Strategy [National Code 10] Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to ensure that student course progress is monitored and reviewed, that the Institute takes intervention action when a student is in danger of not progressing satisfactorily or completing their course and the requirements of the National Code of Practice for Registration Authorities and Providers of Education and Training to Overseas Students are met. Responsibility The CEO is responsible for the implementation of this procedure and to ensure that staff and students are aware of its application and that staff implement its requirements. Requirements • • • • • • • • • • •

Students who have unsatisfactory academic progress will be reported to DIAC. Unsatisfactory academic performance is defined as failing more than 50% of units in two consecutive study periods. Students who are “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements will be interviewed, counselled and will be placed on a course intervention strategy. All causes of unsatisfactory progress or being “at risk” are to be considered including academic causes and non academic causes such as personal issues. The progress of each student is monitored, recorded and assessed. The Institute has documented course progress policies and procedures. The Institute assesses each student at the end point of each study period according to its course progress policy. The Institute has an intervention strategy that identifies and assists students who are at risk of not making satisfactory course progress. Where the Institute has assessed the student as being “at risk” the Institute will inform the student and implement an intervention strategy where warranted. Where the Institute has assessed the student as not meeting satisfactory course progress, the Institute will inform the student in writing of its intention to report the student and that he or she is able to access the Institute complaints and appeals process within 20 working days. The provider notifies the Secretary of DEEWR through PRISMS of the student not achieving satisfactory progress after the appeals process (if actioned) is finalised and upholds the provider’s decision to report The method section defines the procedure used for monitoring progress, taking intervention action and reporting students who breach the requirements

Definitions • •

• • • • • •

Study period means one term of study. Being “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements means: • Failing more than 50% of units in a study period • Failing two or more units in a study period • Being unable to complete a course within the expected duration of study as recorded on the CRICOS register after having their program reviewed by the Training Manager. Failing a unit means being assessed as “Not Yet Competent” for a completed unit. Satisfactory progress means that students have not been identified as being “at risk”. Method Reporting to DIAC Within 10 working days of the completion of a study period the Training Manager and/or Course Coordinator will review the academic progress of all students and identify those students who have failed 50% or more units in two consecutive study periods. If a student fails more than 50% of units in two consecutive study periods or otherwise fails to meet course progress requirements (5.8, 5.10 or 5.11) then the Institute must notify the student in writing of its intention to report the student for not achieving satisfactory academic progress using the appropriate student course progress warning letter (case 2). The student must be informed they have 20 working days to appeal to the Institute. If the appeal is not upheld or the student withdraws from the appeal process then the Institute must report the student to DIAC. If a student is reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory progress a Section 20

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Intervention Strategy (for students identified as being “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements) • • •

The Training Manager is responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the intervention strategy. Within 10 working days of the completion of a study period, the Training Manager will review the academic progress of all students and identify those students who are “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements. The identification of students “at risk” will be accomplished by reviewing a current transcript of student progress and establishing if any one, or more, of the following situations apply: • The student has failed more than 50% of units in a study period. • The student has failed two or more units in a study period. • The student has been identified as unable to complete a course within the expected duration of study as recorded on the CRICOS register after having their program reviewed by the Training Manager in accordance with the Completion within the expected duration procedure.

• • • •

Within 10 working days of the completion of a study period, all students identified as being “at risk” of not meeting satisfactory course progress requirements will be sent a warning letter requiring them to attend a course counselling interview using the appropriate student course progress warning letter (case 1). A copy of the warning letter and all other relevant documents will be placed in the students file. The course counselling interview and fortnightly intervention meetings will be initiated by the Training Manager and/or Course Coordinator however appropriate personnel such as student contact officers or counsellors may be called on to assist with the process or to delegate for the training manager. At the course counselling interview academic and non-academic issues are to be explored, solutions sought and the following intervention strategies will be put in place where appropriate: • • • • • •

Programs to address academic and non-academic issues Student attendance timetable drawn up Student study time table drawn up A fortnightly academic involvement report requested from each subject teacher. Resitting assessments Undertaking additional units in subsequent study periods to “catch up” with the training program schedule. • Optional holiday programs to “catch up” or undertake additional units. Details of the intervention strategy proposed by the Institute will be recorded, transmitted in writing to the student by email or mail and a copy of the written document sent to students placed in their file.

Students will be required to accept the intervention strategy proposed by the Institute. Students failing to accept the proposed interventions strategy may be reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory academic progress. If a student is reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory progress a Section 20 breach notice will be generated by PRISMS, sent to the student’s current address held by the Institute and a copy placed on the students file.

Students failing to attend the course counselling interview without a reasonable excuse may be reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory academic progress. If a student is reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory progress a Section 20 breach notice will be generated by PRISMS, sent to the student’s current address held by the Institute and a copy placed on the students file.

During the intervention period, students who fail to achieve satisfactory academic involvement or fail to implement the study timetable may be reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory academic progress. If a student is reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory progress, a Section 20 breach notice will be generated by PRISMS, sent to the student’s current address held by the Institute and a copy placed on the student’s file.

Students failing to attend the fortnightly intervention meeting without a reasonable excuse may be reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory academic progress. If a student is reported to DIAC for unsatisfactory progress, a Section 20 breach notice will be generated by PRISMS, sent to the student’s current address held by the Institute and a copy placed on the students file.

Where a student on the intervention strategy requires more time to complete their qualification a new Confirmation of Enrolment must be completed by the Training Manager or CEO and lodged on PRISMS. The new Confirmation of Enrolment must indicate the revised completion date and the reasons for the revised date.

COURSE PROGRESS AND INTERVENTION STRATEGY

breach notice will be generated by PRISMS, sent to the student’s current address held by the Institute and a copy placed on the students file.


STUDENT COMPLAINTS AND APPEALS

Student Complaints and Appeals (National code 8) Purpose The purpose of this procedure is to define the system available to students for dealing with student complaints and appeals. Responsibility The CEO is responsible for implementation of this procedure and ensuring that staff and students are made aware of its application. Requirements • Students who are concerned about the conduct of the training provider are encouraged to attempt to resolve their concerns using this procedure. • The procedure will be implemented at no cost to the student. • The procedure will commence within 10 working days of the formal lodgement of the complaint or appeal and supporting information. • All prospective students will be provided with information about the complaints and appeals procedure before making an agreement to enrol. • All complaints and appeals will be handled professionally and confidentially in order to achieve a satisfactory resolution that is fair and equitable to all parties. • Students will be provided with details of external authorities they may approach, if required • At any stage in the internal complaint or appeal process, students are entitled to have their own nominee included to accompany and support them. • Students may raise any matters of concern relating to training delivery and assessment, the quality of the teaching, student amenities, discrimination, sexual harassment and other issues that may arise. •

For internal complaints and appeals: • • •

The student will have an opportunity to formally present their case, in writing or in person at no cost to the student The student may be accompanied and assisted by a support person at any relevant meetings. At the conclusion of the complaint or appeal the student will be given a written statement of the outcome, including details of the reasons for the outcome and the record of the complaint and outcome will be placed in the student file

A student’s enrolment must be maintained whilst a complaint or appeal is in progress and the outcome has not been determined except in cases where the provider is intending to defer or suspend a student’s enrolment due to misbehaviour or to cancel the student’s enrolment.

In cases where the provider is intending to defer or suspend a student’s enrolment due to misbehaviour or to cancel the student’s enrolment, the provider only needs to await the outcome of the internal appeals process (supporting the provider) before notifying DEEWR through PRISMS, of the change to the student’s enrolment.

The Institute will encourage the parties to approach a complaint or appeal with an open view and to attempt to resolve problems through discussion and conciliation. Where a complaint or appeal cannot be resolved through discussion and conciliation, we acknowledge the need for an appropriate external and independent agent to review the process implemented by the Institute.

If there is any matter arising from a student complaint or appeal that is a systemic issue which requires improvement action, this will be reported to the RTO management meeting as part of the continuous improvement process.

Nothing in this procedure inhibits student’s rights to pursue other legal remedies. Students are entitled to resolve any dispute by exercising their rights to other legal remedies. Students wishing to take this course of action are advised to:Contact a solicitor; orContact the Law Institute of Victoria, 470 Bourke St Melbourne 3000, and telephone 9602 5000for a referral to a solicitor.

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Method Informal Complaint Process •

Any student with a question or complaint may raise the matter with staff of the Registered Training Organisation and attempt an informal resolution of the question or complaint.

Questions or complaints dealt with in this way do not become part of the formal complaint process and will not be documented, recorded or reported on unless the Institute staff member involved determines that the issue question or complaint was relevant to the wider operation of the Institute.

At the stage of the complaint meeting the complaint must be recorded in writing and signed and dated by the complainant and the Administration Manager. The complaint is recorded in writing by completing the student complaint form prior to the meeting or a new document can be prepared and signed during the meeting.

Students who are not satisfied with the outcome of the informal process, or, who want to register a formal complaint may do so. To register a formal complaint a student must complete the student complaint form and contact the Institute Administration Manager to arrange a meeting. At this meeting the complaint can be raised and a resolution attempted.

The following matters must be lodged as formal complaints within 20 working days of notification of an intention to report the student to DIAC in order to be considered by the Institute. • • •

Deferral of commencement, suspension or cancelling a student enrolment Non achievement of satisfactory attendance Non achievement of satisfactory course progress

If a student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the formal complaint process then they may Institute an internal appeals process by completing the appeals form.

Internal appeals may arise from a number of sources including appeals against assessment, appeals against discipline actions and appeals against decisions arising from complaints. The essential nature of an appeal is that it is a request by a student to reconsider a decision made by the Institute.

A student’s enrolment must be maintained whilst an appeal is in progress and the outcome has not been determined.

At the end of the resolution phase the Training Manager will report the Institute decision to the student. The Institute decision and reasons for the decision will be documented by the Training Manager and placed in the students file. A copy of this document will be provided to the student.

The appeals process is initiated by a student completing the student appeals form.

The appeal resolution phase must commence within 10 working days of the internal appeal being lodged in writing.

Following the resolution phase the Institute will implement the decision as conveyed to the student and undertake any improvement actions arising from the complaint

A maximum time of 30 working days from the commencement of the appeal resolution phase will be allowed for the appeal resolution unless all parties agree in writing to extend this time.

The Administration Manager will then attempt to resolve the complaint with the student and any other parties who may be involved. The resolution phase must commence within 10 working days of the complaint being lodged in writing.

A maximum time of 20 working days from the commencement of the resolution phase will be allowed for the resolution unless all parties agree in writing to extend this time. This period is called the resolution phase.

Students who are not satisfied with the outcome of the question or complaint are encouraged to register a formal complaint.

Formal Complaint Process


Appeal Process Internal Appeal Process •

After a student makes an internal appeal, the registered training organisation will appoint a person or body to hear the appeal and propose a final resolution. This • person or body must not be the same as any person or body that heard the original complaint Students appealing an assessment or RPL outcome will be given the opportunity for reassessment by a different assessor selected by the Institute. Costs of reassessment will be met by the Institute. The • recorded outcome of the assessment appeal will be the most favourable result for the student from either the original assessment or the reassessment. The outcome of the internal appeal and reasons for the outcome will be recorded in writing and signed and dated by the student and the Institute and placed in the student file. A copy of this document will be • provided to the student.

Following the internal appeals phase the Institute will implement the decision as conveyed to the student and undertakes any improvement actions arising from the complaint.

There are no further avenues within the Institute for complaints or appeals after the internal appeals process has been completed, however an external appeals process is available.

The external appeals procedure will be determined by the independent mediator. Following the receipt of the outcome of the external appeal the Institute must immediately implement the decision, convey the outcome to the student , place a copy of the documentation on the student file and undertake any improvement actions arising from the complaint. If an appeal is against the Institute decision to report the student for unsatisfactory course progress or unsatisfactory attendance the Institute must maintain the student’s enrolment (i.e. not report the student for unsatisfactory progress or attendance) until the external appeals process is complete and has supported the provider’s decision to report. If an appeal is against the Institute decision to defer or suspend a student’s enrolment due to misbehaviour or to cancel a student’s enrolment the Institute only needs to await the outcome of the internal appeals process (supporting the provider) before notifying DEEWR through PRISMS of the change to the student’s enrolment.

External Appeal Process •

The purpose of the external appeals process is to consider whether the Institute has followed its student complaint and appeals procedure, not to make a decision in place of the Institute. For example, if a student appeals against his or her subject results and goes through the Institute’s internal appeals process, the external appeals process (if accessed) would look at the way in which the internal appeal was conducted; it would not make a determination as to what the subject result should be.

For external appeals the independent mediator will be the Australian Council of Private Education and Training. Phone (03) 9416 1355. The Institute will pay for costs of mediation.

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Student Transfer [National code 7] Purpose A letter of release will be granted, within 5 working days of The purpose of this procedure is to address standard 7 the application, in the following situations: of the revised National Code 2007 transfer between registered providers • The Institute is unable to continue to provide the course; or Responsibility • The student can demonstrate they are experiencing The CEO is responsible for the implementation of this threat to physical or mental health or safety by remaining procedure and to ensure that staff and students are at the Institute and can demonstrate clearly how this will aware of its application and that staff implement its rebe alleviated through a transfer; or quirements. • The current course of study is clearly not consistent with documented course requested for on their application. Requirements • In exceptional compassionate circumstances beyond The RTO must not actively recruit students where the the students control, such as serious illness or death recruitment would conflict with the requirements of this of a close family member (independent evidence of procedure and/or Standard 7 of the National Code the exceptional circumstances is required) and the exceptional compassionate circumstances has led to No fee can be charged to the student by the Institute for a permanent change in the student’s circumstances that issuing a letter of release makes continued enrolment inappropriate. Registered providers are restricted from enrolling A letter of release will normally not be granted in the transferring students in the first six months of their following situations: principal course of study except in accordance with • The requirements of the written agreement have not Standard 7 of Part D the National Code. been met by the student; or • The student does not satisfy any of the situations which If a letter of release is refused by a registered provider a normally lead to a letter of release being granted; or student may appeal the provider’s decision. • The proposed transfer will jeopardise the student’s progression through a package of courses; or Method • The student has unsatisfactory academic progress and Letter of Release has been or is about to be reported to DIAC; or • Students must apply for a letter of release on the • The student has unsatisfactory behaviour and has been appropriate form or is about to have their enrolment suspended or • Applications for a letter of release will be assessed cancelled and be reported to DIAC; or by the Training Manager and responded to within 14 • The student cannot provide a letter from another days of being received by the Institute. registered provider confirming that a valid enrolment • A letter of release will be granted in accordance with offer has been made. this procedure and only if the student can provide • If a letter of release is refused, reasons for the refusal written confirmation that a valid enrolment offer has will be documented in writing and the student will be been made by another registered provider. informed of their rights of appeal using the Institute complaints and appeals procedure.

A copy of the student’s letter of release application; notes recording the assessment of the application and a copy of the response letter sent to the student by the Institute must be placed in the student’s file The Institute will not knowingly enrol a student wishing to transfer from another registered provider’s course prior to the student completing six months of his or her principal course of study except where: • the original registered provider has ceased to be registered or the course in which the student is enrolled has ceased to be registered; • the original registered provider has provided a written letter of release; • the original registered provider has had a sanction imposed on its registration by the Australian Government or state or territory government that prevents the student from continuing his or her principal course, or • Any government sponsor of the student considers the change to be in the student’s best interest and has provided written support for that change. • •

In the event that the Institute knowingly enrols a student wishing to transfer from another registered provider’s course prior to the student completing six months of his or her principal course of study documentary evidence of at least one of the four conditions listed above must be obtained and placed in the transferring student’s file. The Institute will not seek to enrol a student who has not yet completed six months of their principal course of study with another registered provider unless the requirements of the National Code are met and then only in accordance with this procedure.


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University Level

Pre University Level

Or Equivalent

Or Equivalent

Secondary School Level

Year 11

Year 12 Certificate IV Foundation course

Diploma

Advanced Diploma

Pathway to a university degree Central Queensland University

Year Degree 1

Year Degree 2

Year Degree 3

Bachelor Degree

Stott’s College


St. Peter Institute Business Education Framework

DOCTORATE DEGREE VOCATIONAL EDUCATION St. Peter Institute St Peter Institute Advanced Diploma

St Peter Institute Diploma

POST GRADUATE

UNDER GRADUATE UNIVERSITY

Honours Year 4

Bachelor Degree Year 3 St. Peter Institute Certificate IV

Bachelor Degree Year 2

Bachelor Degree Year 1 XYZ Institute Certificate III

Senior High School Year 10 to 12

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For more information http://www.spi.vic.edu.au

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Level 1, 237 Exhibition Street, Melbourne, Victoria - 3000. (Close to Parliament Station) T: +61 3 9077 8276 | F: +61 3 9639 8882 Academia of knowledge and wisdom! CRICOS No: 03167G | RTO No: 22218

Email: info@spi.vic.edu.au Web: www.spi.vic.edu.au

COURSE OUTLINE BROCHURE: 2011-2012

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St Peters Student Information Booklet