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FdSc Uniformed Public Services

2013/13 SOUD1228: War & Conflict: Past, present & future.

Academic year 2012-13 Page 1


Contents 1

Module Aims

2

Module Team and key contacts

3

Teaching and Learning Strategy

4

Assessment

5

Date of Submission

6

Definitive Module Record

7

Scheme of Learning

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1

Module Aims

Welcome to module SOUD1228 This module aims to - Investigate the impact of war and conflict on military personnel and the civilian population. Explain the development of war and conflict from a historical context to modern warfare. Students will analyse theoretical causes of historical wars and conflict and apply those theories to better understand the causes of current conflict.

A copy of the full Definitive Module Record for this module can be found at the back of this guide.

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Module Team

Glyn Potter | Programme/module Leader Room – Singer t 01803 540328 | e glyn.potter@southdevon.ac.uk Key contacts: Gareth Day | Programme co-ordinator Media | Documentary and editing consultant T 01803 540335 | e gareth.day@southdevon.ac.uk Alex Small | Chief technical advisor and consultant T 01803 540347 | e alex.small@southdevn.ac.uk Rikki Passmore | Website builder/consultant T 01803 540641 | e rikki.passmore@southdevon.ac.uk

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Teaching and Learning Strategy

The War and Conflict module aims to The first part of the module will investigate the various experiences of war using an oral histories approach. The students will engage in a group project that will see the students create a website that will contain interviews of elders who have been a part of the ‘experience of war’. Students will research and learn interview techniques, develop sophisticated questions, conduct conversational style interviews, and then transcribe each interview to produce a full-text and full motion video content that will be available to all around the world. For full project working website can be found here The second part of this module will see the students explore war and conflict in the modern world. They will investigate the causes of war in the 21st century and how these have changed in response to a modern globalised world. They will also consider how the nature of warfare has changed over the last 100 years and how it might evolve over the next few decades in response to political, economic and cultural changes in the world. The students will do this in three 3 hour seminars.

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Assessment

Task 1 (30%): Essay 2000 words +/- 10% Essay titled ‘modern armed conflict – What is war & conflict in 21st century?’ 1. Analyse the causes of war and conflict in the modern world 2. Evaluate the growing complexity of modern warfare – how has conflict changed? Full assignment brief can be found here

Task 2 (70%): the students will be involved in the creation of website that is designed for users to ‘read watch and listen’ to interviews from a range of people of have engaged in some way with the experience of the war. Each student (or pair) will assume a range of roles and will be responsible for one interview and webpage each – (this might be assessed in pairs). You will be assessed in the following roles; Researching their topic area (10%) Designing the interview process (15%) Carrying out the interview and (15%) Entering the interview onto the website including transcribing and coding the interview (15%) Evaluating the project and own role within the project (journal project) (15%)

Note – you will not be assessed on your technical ability but it is a vital element of the project. Assignment brief can be found here

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Date of Submission

Task 1 (30%): Essay Formative Deadline: 24th May 2013 Summative Deadline: 05th June 2013 Task 2 (70%): Experience of War oral histories website Formative Deadline: 03rd May 2013 Summative Deadline: 15th May 2013

Submissions must be in-line with University of Plymouth and South Devon College academic regulations. Any extenuating circumstances must be applied for before date of submission. Failure to submit on time will result in a nil grade.

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Definitive Module Record

UNIVERSITY OF PLYMOUTH MODULE RECORD MODULE CODE:

CREDITS: 20

LEVEL: 4

MODULE TITLE: War and Conflict PRE-REQUISITE(S): None CO-REQUISITE(S): None COMPENSATABLE WITHIN THIS PROGRAMME: Yes SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTOR This module investigates the experiences of war and conflict, analyses the causes of war and conflict and growing complexity of modern warfare. ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT: (C1)COURSEWORK 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group to which module should be linked: TBC Minimum pass mark for professional body accreditation: N/A MODULE AIMS: Investigate the impact of war and conflict on military personnel and the civilian population. Explain the development of war and conflict from a historical context to modern warfare. Students will analyse theoretical causes of historical wars and conflict and apply those theories to better understand the causes of current conflict ASSESSED LEARNING OUTCOMES: At the end of a module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1Investigate various experiences of war and conflict. 2Analyse the causes of war and conflict and be able to apply those to a variety of historical and current events. 3. Evaluate the growing complexity of modern warfare. INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT: Definitions, Impact of War and Conflict, Causes of war and conflict, Spectrum of war, Modern Warfare and technology, the Multi Task force battlefield, the Historical battlefield, Veteran experience. Impact on Civilian population, utility of force. APPROVAL: DATE OF APPROVAL: DATE OF IMPLEMENTATION: September 2012 DATE(S) OF APPROVED CHANGE: 13/12/11 FACULTY: SCHOOL: PARTNER (For FHSW) NAME OF University of Plymouth INSTITUTION: SITE: Colleges South Devon College MODULE LEADER: Glyn Potter Term: 2

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Assessment Criteria: Task 1 – (LO) 2&3 Essay Task 2 – (LO) 1 Webpage/website – portfolio/reflection Assessment Mode: Task 1 essay (30%) Essay titled ‘modern armed conflict – what is war & conflict in 21st century?’ 1. Analyse the causes of war and conflict in the modern world 2. Evaluate the growing complexity of modern warfare – how has conflict changed?

Task 2 Group website project (70%) the students will be involved in the creation of website that is designed for users to ‘read watch and listen’ to interviews from a range of people of have engaged in some way with the experience of the war.

Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Contact Time: Lectures, visits, interviews, case studies, practical sessions, seminars, and presentations derived from practice and workshops. Non-contact Time: Directed and non-directed reading, collection of information and review of information, discussion and reflection about development in the work placement, preparation and completion of assessment task. Recommended Texts and Sources British Military Doctrine Van Cevald (M), (2008) The Culture of War. Presidio Press. New York Clausewitz, Carl Von (1976, rev.1984). On War. Edited and translated by Michael Howard and Peter Paret Princeton: Princeton University Press. Frank, Anne and Netherlands State Institute for War Documentation (1989). The Diary of Anne Frank, The Critical Edition. Doubleday Collins, T (2006) Rules of Engagement. Headline review. London Dannatt, R (2011) Leading from the front. Corgi Books. Ambrose, S (2001) Band of Brothers. Simon and Shuster. London Kingseed, C. & Winters, R (2011) Beyond Band of Brothers: The War Memoirs of Major Dick Winters. Ebury Press Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Websites: http://www.ohs.org.uk/ http://www.oralhistory.org/ http://www.tellingstories.org/

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http://www.iwm.org.uk/

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Scheme of Learning

Week

Topic

1 – 01.02.13

Using oral and visual histories to investigate the experience of war. Trip to RN&RM museums where the curators will talk through and demonstrate the techniques and skills that are required to develop oral and visual histories. Introduction to module, project and assessments.

2 – 08.02.13

Project overviews – expectations and project teams

Suggested Reading Topic /Activity Start some secondary research into the d-day landings and their links with the people of South Devon.

Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Chapter 2 the voice of the past http://www.ohs.org.uk/

Introduction to oral histories An overview of the D-day landings including sharing last week’s research. Interviewing veterans – understanding trauma. You will analyse the following trauma interview from a trauma expert to produce a trauma guidance handout for our wiki page. The analysis will also form the interview questionnaire for your interview with Captain Skelton, a PTSD/trauma specialist.

3 - 15.02.13

http://www.oralhistory.org/

For next week 15/02/13 – watch a full interview on the http://www.tellingstories.org/ You need to consider the following areas; What did you learn about the events? What did you learn about the individual? What types of questions created the best responses? Where there any missed opportunities? What would you do different on a follow-up interview? What good practice will you borrow?

Planning for an interview Pre – interview considerations how to build a case for a conversational oral history interview. Planning for a pre-interview

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Work based task for 01.03.13 Read through the two papers on oral history interview techniques identifying ways in which the interviewer can increase their ability to listen to enrich the


interview.

interview process.

Establish interview teams.

This week’s independent work based task is as follows: this is to be completed for 08.03.13 discussion Analyse a second interview from a different genre:

4 – 01.03.13

Setting up the studio: learning to use the camera, lights & microphone. A short workshop part one. Interview techniques – Learning to listen: interview techniques and analyses. Ways of listening. Interview preparation: analysing the pre-interview questionnaire to guide final interview. Organising themes for discussion. Pre-interview checklists: Equipment, consent and comfort. Conducting the interview with Captain Skelton.

Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Chapter 10 Learning to listen: interview techniques and analyses. Anderson & Jack. While this chapter is written with focus on women’s perspectives its key themes of learning to listen more carefully and the role of interviewer are transferable to any genre. It offers some interesting reflective insights into the growing role of the interviewer and offers some tips to help explore beyond facts and events.

Work based task continue to analyse your second interview now Conducting post-interview tasks – considering how you could improve Archiving the footage for further certain aspects of the interview by analysis. using your listening techniques. You De-brief and reflection on the first need to be able to provide specific examples for next week’s discussion interview. of effective oral history interviewing.

5 – 08.03.13

Workshop on editing and analysing the trauma expert’s interview. Discussion based on last week’s interview analysis. With the focus on ways to listen and navigating life reviews.

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Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Chapter 16 Mark Kempner – navigating life review interviews with survivors of trauma. Send out invitations to introduction


brunch. Letter writing and invitations & completion of all interview forms/documentation for preinterviews.

6 – 15.03.13

Organise lunch venue, transport and itinerary for lunch conversation and next interview stages.

Website workshop with Rikki Passmore The session will begin with a short workshop on reflection using Jenny Moons work as a basis for reflective practice.

Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Chapters 17 & 18 These chapters explore the interpretations of memory. One Pre-interview interviews to be chapter explore s the conflicting carried out and analysed. Once analysed background research and memories of a Marine officer in interview planning can take place. Vietnam and the other investigates a holocaust survivor’s conflicted Note some of these interviews account of her time in the might take place on the 13.03.13 concentration camps in WW2. Changing perspectives over time a group discussion on the analysis of the Moon, J. (2006) Learning two papers of interpreting memories. Journals: A Handbook for Reflective Practice And Professional Development

The students are aware that the interviews are to be arranged at the comfort of the interviewee and are therefore likely to be held outside of these session times. During this period the students will have a theoretical input each week and will have time and space to complete transcriptions, editing equipment and interview analysis ready for the website. Students will also be briefed on where and when they can access the facilities for transcription, chapter creation and website creation throughout the semester. Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The 7 – 22.03.13 Making Histories Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Transcription processes Chapter 27 Voice, Ear and Text: Express Scribe - free transcription words, meaning and software Mac/PC transcription. Express Scribe Demo - 7 minute "how to" Transcript-Template.doc - MS Word document 1 - Raw Transcription 2 - Transcript Cleaning Style Guide Transcription Steps -

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Correction Example - Sample transcript segment - 3 versions of edits. 8– 29.03.13 9 – 19.04.13

Good Friday No Teaching Analysing and coding interviews – A lecture and workshop on coding interviews using excel. Workshop in Chapter creation

10 – 26.04.13

11 – 03.05.13

12 – 10.05.13

Advocacy and empowerment – group discussion/seminar around some key papers in this area First draft of webpage to be completed and shared with the group – website workshop Rikki Passmore Formative assessment for the website – peer reviews for each interview and webpage. Group discussion offering feedback on webpage. Seminar – conflict in Iraq, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan a British perspective Seminar – This seminar will be hosted by Major in the British Army. The seminar will focus on the changing nature of conflict through the eyes of the UK forces. It will consider the role of the UK forces moving towards 2020 and a ‘brave new world.’

13 – 17.05.13

Lecture – opening the session will be a short lecture that explores the nature of modern conflict, in particular civil war, using the Arab spring as a basis for discussion. Seminar – modern conflict in the 21st century – a more balanced view This seminar will be a discussion

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Perks, R. & Thomson, A. (2006). The Oral History Reader: second edition. Routledge: London. Chapter 41 ‘you understand again’: testimony and post conflict transition in the North of Ireland.

See making criteria and peer review forms for guidance on peer assessment

In preparation for the seminar students should become familiar with the ‘Securing Britain in an Age of Uncertainty: The Strategic Defence and Security Review’ document found here. Essential reading for this seminar Tony Blair’s memoirs : A Journey Chapters 12, 13 & 15 Student led reading around experiences of modern conflict with a foci on civil war and the Arab spring


based on the student’s autoethnographic reading of conflict in modern world base around the events in the middle East and Northern Africa.

14 – 24.05.13

15 – 07.06.13

There may be a panel for questioning at the end of this session, but this depends on availability of military staff due to deployments. Formative peer review session – essay In teams of three you will assess and feedback on each other papers offering feedback and areas of strength and areas for improvement. Module review and updating the website – tidying up the wiki space ready for the next groups Final reflections on war & conflict – changing perspectives.

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War & Conflict: Past, Present & Future  

Module guide for 2013

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