Page 1

Gluten&Free MORE

45 Delicious Recipes for a Cozy Winter

Classic Gooey MAC & CHEESE Sandwich Bread & Hot Cross Buns

3 EASY MEALS

Stovetop Mac & Cheese,

in your

Slow Cooker

page 37

Smart

$avings

at Club Stores

DESSERTS

February/March 2016

GLUTEN & Your BABY

No-Guilt Chocolate

Spotting Hidden ANAPHYLAXIS Display until March 7, 2016

GlutenFreeandMore.com 1

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE


Gluten&Free MORE

contents February/March 2016

features 27 Great Grains Nutritious whole grains for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

34 Ooey-Gooey Mac & Cheese Our expert chefs rework America’s favorite comfort food.

Luscious low-glycemic chocolate desserts for you and your sweetie.

on the cover

Stovetop Mac & Cheese, page 37.

Gluten&Free MORE

45 Delicious Recipes for a Cozy Winter

Classic Gooey MAC & CHEESE Sandwich Bread & Hot Cross Buns

Stovetop Mac & Cheese,

in your

Slow Cooker

page 37

Smart

$avings

at Club Stores

No-Guilt Chocolate

DESSERTS

GLUTEN & Your BABY

Spotting Hidden ANAPHYLAXIS Display until March 7, 2016

GlutenFreeandMore.com

Amazing gluten-free baked goods without xanthan gum.

50 Broil Away Delicious food in a flash.

56 Chinese Finger Foods Three tasty Asian-style appetizers made with one easy dough.

63 Step-by-Step How to roll an egg roll.

in every issue

3 EASY MEALS

February/March 2016

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM HOREL; CUPCAKE BY RICKI HELLER

40 Sweet Treats, Without Guilt

46 Baking, Pure & Simple

6 8 9 84 85 86 87 88

Editor’s Note We Hear You Contributors GF Flour Replacements Gluten-Free Diet Quick Guide Casein-Free Diet Quick Guide Substitution Solutions Recipe & Allergen Index

64 Love Your Beets Mouthwatering recipes get you back to your roots.

69 Easy Masterpieces in Your Slow Cooker

Slow down. Eat clean. Savor your food.

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

3


64

56

72

departments lifestyle

health

10 You Said It

72 Gluten & Your Baby

We asked you, “How do you handle your food issues when you’re on the go?” Here’s what you told us.

Should you feed gluten to your child? If so, when should you start?

74 Anaphylaxis

12 We’ve Got “Issues”

How to spot (and stop) hidden life-threatening reactions.

Irreverent solutions to your real life food dramas.

14 Move!

78 Post-Concussion Syndrome

Yoga for weight loss.

Can the gluten-free diet help?

how tos

80 Research Roundup The latest medical news for people with allergies and food sensitivities.

22 Ask the Chef Food editor Beth Hillson answers your baking questions.

82 Prebiotics Probiotics are important for digestive health. So are prebiotics.

25 Buy & Save in Bulk Nine budget-stretching strategies at your local club store.

food for thought

must haves

90 The Accidental Expert

18 Mac & No Cheese. Please. No time for homemade? Surprisingly delicious options come out of a box. Practical info to make your life easier, pages 84–89.

20 Don’t Miss This!

gluten-free flours

GLUTEN-FREE DIET | Quick-Start Guide

Use this chart as a guide to help select replacement gluten-free flours for all your baking. If you can’t tolerate a certain flour or you’ve run out, find another flour in the same column (not row) and use it as a substitute. While not identical, the flours in each column have comparable baking characteristics and serve a similar function in building the structure in a particular recipe.

Neutral (light) Flours

Brown Rice Flour

Amaranth Flour

Stabilizers (add texture and moisture)

Starches

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup buttermilk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup yogurt with 1 of the following:

1 cup rice milk 1 cup fruit juice 1 cup coconut milk 1 cup goat's milk, if tolerated 1 cup hemp milk

1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon

1 cup soy, rice or coconut yogurt

Arrowroot Powder Agar Powder

Buckwheat Flour

Coconut Flour

Cornstarch

Chickpea Flour

Flax Seed Meal

Sweet Rice Flour

Millet Flour

Corn Flour

Locust Bean cups white or brown rice flour (or 1½ Gum

1 cup brown rice flour or sorghum flour ½ cup teff flour (preferably light) ½ cup millet flour or amaranth flour 2⁄3 cup tapioca starch/flour

MAKES 3 CUPS

This nutritious blend works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps and pie crusts. 1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) ¾ cup bean flour or chickpea flour ¾ cup arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch ½ cup tapioca starch/flour Each cup contains 588 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, g fiber,

about flax alcohol? 1 tablespoon Gel:How ➥ Flax or Chia➥ seed + 3 beverages and vinegars (except malt vinegar) are gluten free. or salbaalcoholic meal, chia seed Distilled Distilled products stir-harmful gluten peptides. Wine and hard liquor beverages (Let stand, water. hotnot tablespoonsdo contain any are gluten free. or 10 minutes about ring occasionally, Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten free. until thickened. Use without straining.) Always read egg the label Ener-G Foods ➥ Egg Replacer: key totopackage understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. according replacer, The directionsDon’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can verify they do not contain or are not derived from prohibited grains. Labels must pureed silken tofu ➥Tofu: 4 tablespoons be read every time foods are purchased. Manufacturers can change ingredients powder baking + 1 teaspoon at any time. As of 2006, wheat used in products is identified on the label. As of August 2014, products unsweet- bearing “gluten free” on the package must contain less 4 tablespoons ➥ Applesauce: than 20ppm fruit puree) (or othergluten. ened applesauce

Toaster Pastries Salad Dressing

Keep in mind Berry Red Vinaigrette

Starting the gluten-free Soups diet before being tested for celiac disease makes an Avo and Cuke Soup Chilled accurate diagnosis difficult. Watermelon Gazpacho Is The Bomb!

Entrees Black Bean Burgers LIVING WITHOUT’s Chicken Mole Stew Veggie Quice with Polenta Crust The magazine with & MORE Happy HalloweenDesserts & Bars the answers ! Chocolate Macroon Squares Thanksgiving Gluten Free & More Made Perfect Chocolate Maple Sunflower Squares GutenFreeandMore.com One-Pot Chocolate Teff Pudding Meals ■ recipes, recipes, recipes Baking Secrets Classic Apricot Bars from America’s Test Kitchen ■ expert advice Heal Your Gut Granola Bars with Fermented Foods ■ latest research Pumpkin Pie Bar Personal Care

Gluten Free

Spooky Treats Goblins of All for Ages

We Show You

How

Cozy Foods You

Crave

FARE I GLUTEN &

saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 99g carbohydrate, 3mg sodium, 2g fiber, 5g protein.

High-Protein Flour Blend

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AMERICA’S #1 M AGAZINE FOR PEOPLE ALLERGIES AND FOOD SENSITIVITIESWITH

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1

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Breads

I ONE-POT MEALS I TIPS FROM AMERICA’S TEST KITCHEN I FERMENTED

XanthanEach Gum cup contains 436 calories, 1g total fat, 0g

MAKES 3 CUPS

This high-fiber blend works for breads, pancakes, snack bars and cookies that contain chocolate, warm spices, raisins or other fruits. It is not suited to delicately flavored recipes, such as sugar cookies, crepes, cream puffs, birthday cakes or cupcakes.

Appetizers Artichoke and White Bean Dip

Wheat Free Is NotCinnamon Raisin Bread Gluten Free Coffee Cake

TREATS I A PERFECT THANKSGIVING

combination) ¾ cup tapioca starch/flour ¾ (not potato flour)

Psyllium Huskcup cornstarch or potato starch

High-Fiber Flour Blend

recipe index & Allergen Guide

Products labeled wheat Flax Garlic Flatbread free are not necessarily Oat Bread gluten free. They may Molasses still contain spelt, rye or barleyMultigrain Bread based ingredients thatSesame are Seed Italian Bread not gluten free. Spelt is a Teff Pumpernickel form of wheat.

HALLOWEEN

Teff Flour

for most gluten-free baking.

➥ Grains not allowed in

2014

Quinoa Flour

Teff Flour

MAKES 3 CUPS

Depending on the recipe, use this blend Guar Gum

➥ Grains allowed

any form Tapioca, Beans, recipe, replace Depending on the Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, Wheat (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, the with 1 of Amaranth, 8 tablespoons butter Arrowroot, Teff, Montina, Flax and Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale. following: Nut Flours. 8 tablespoons Earth Balance (Non➥ Foods/products Spread or Sticks that may contain gluten Dairy) Buttery Spectrum 8 tablespoons Beers, Ales,Organic Lager Marinades Shortening Breading & Coating Mixes Nutritional Supplements oil Syrup coconut 8 tablespoons Brown Rice Pastas oil vegetable or olive 8 tablespoons Communion Wafers Processed Luncheon Meats For reduced fat:Croutons Sauces, Gravies unsweetened apple6 tablespoons Dressings Self-basting Poultry fat of choice tablespoons sauce + 2Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Soy Sauce and Soy Sauce Solids Energy Bars Soup Bases -------Flour & Cereal Products Stuffings, Dressings Eggs Herbal Supplements Thickeners (Roux) Bacon Vitamins & Mineral Supplements 1 large the recipe, replace Depending on Imitation Imitation following:Seafood egg with 1 of the

= ½ cup = 4 ounces) (1 stick = 8 tablespoons Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato,

OCTOBER /NOVEMBER

Oat Flour

Sorghum Flour

To make a flour blend, thoroughly combine all ingredients. You can double to make as much blend as you need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator until used.

Carrageenan

Gelatin All-Purpose Powder Flour Blend

Butter

If In Doubt, Go Without

Don’t eat a food if youBeverages are unable to verify Chai Sweet Potato Smoothie the ingredients or if Pineapple Salsa Smoothie the ingredient list is Raspberry-Lemon Cheesecake Smoothie unavailable. Regardless Taste-Like-Ice-Cream Kale Smoothie of the amount eaten, if you have celiac disease, Breakfast damage to the small Acai Granola Bowl intestine occurs every Overnight French Toast Casserole time gluten is consumed, Quinola Cereal whether symptoms are present or not. Whole Grain Matcha Cereal

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

Quinoa Flour

1 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 cup fruit puree

Gluten-Free Flour Substitutionsor triple these recipes

Almond Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Mesquite Flour

lemon juice or 1 tablespoon cider vinegar (Let stand until slightly thickened.) 1 cup coconut milk 7⁄8 cup rice milk 7⁄8 cup fruit juice 7⁄8 cup water

Gums

Chickpea Flour

Kudzu Root Starch or Kuzu Ground Chia Seed Potato Starch (not Potato Flour) Oat Bran Sweet Potato Flour Potato Flour Tapioca Starch or Tapioca Flour

Yogurt

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup cow's milk with 1 of the following:

Corn Flour

Oat Flour

Buttermilk

Milk

Gluten Free & More Pantry

Be a food detective Call First

You can verify ingredients by calling or e-mailing a food manufacturer and specifying the ingredient and the lot number of the food in question. State your needs clearly—be patient, persistent and polite.

Lo w

Substitution Solutions

Sorghum Flour

White Rice Flour

Amaranth Flour

High-Fiber Flours

LIVING WITHOUT’s

4 www.GlutenFreeandMore.com February/March 2016

High-Protein Flours

ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free diet. Not all areas of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intended to be used as a temporary survival tool until additional information can be obtained. Understanding these dietary requirements will enable the newly diagnosed to read labels of food products and determine if a product is gluten free. Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect those with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the absence of symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of proteins contained in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. Video Instructions blend indicates that pure, uncontaminated For step-by-step flour Research oats consumed in moderation (up to ½ cup dry instuctions, go to oats daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free oats are currently available in the United States. LivingWithout.com/flourblend. Consult your physician or dietitian before including oats in your diet and for regular monitoring.

Qu ick

GF Flour Replacements

H

Glu te n-F re Dai e ry -F re e Eg g-F re e No Pe an uts So ,N yFr o ee

Summer weather means more time spent outdoors. It can also mean sunburn, insect bites and dry, chlorine-damaged hair.

PHOTO © SIRYNA MELNYK/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Special products for your special diet. Research Roundup

PHOTOGRAPHY: BREAD BY JENNIFER MAY; PIGGY BANK © GUNNAR PIPPEL/123RF; WONTON WRAPPERS BY JEFF RASMUSSEN; BEETS BY COREY DERUSSEAU; BABY © BANANA STOCK/THINKSTOCK

46

25


editor's note

Are You Hungry?

February/March 2016

M

y 3-year-old grandson has always been a delight and a pistol. Often stubborn and always full of opinions, this strong-willed little guy keeps his parents on their toes. Recently, he’d been complaining about “tummy aches” and was running to the bathroom more than usual. (Sound familiar?) His mother (my daughter) has a GI tract made of steel. His father does not, nor does his uncle (my son). So my daughter took him to the pediatrician, explained the family history and asked for a celiac screening. There was some discussion, with the doctor describing gluten issues as “overblown.” If anything, it’s milk intolerance, she told my daughter. However, the celiac test was administered and the results came back positive.

So what did I do when my daughter called me with this out-of-the-blue news? I went into bossy mother mode and gave her lots of really great advice. I cited celiac stats (all family members must be tested!). I shared the latest celiac research (an endoscopy may not be necessary!*). I told her about some great GF products (buy this new pasta—tons of protein!). I even alerted her to the obvious, that there’s a major celiac center in her city (make an appointment now!). It was well after we hung up the phone that it hit me. I’d been so intent on giving solutions that I hadn’t heard a thing she said or listened to her mother’s heart. She was grieving the losses for her son and I had completely barreled over that. Yes, it’s a grand time to be gluten-free. But in my exuberance, I’d missed the immediacy of the issue for my daughter and her son: the implications of a brand new diagnosis. A lifetime of dietary adjustments is an enormous notion. It takes time to get used to it. So thanks, little guy, for reminding me of the heart of the matter. I am listening. We are here for you and your mom. And P.S. It’s going to be OK.

Alicia Woodward Editor-in-Chief

*Although an endoscopy is the gold standard for diagnosing celiac disease, recent research suggests it might be avoided in select cases of young children with symptoms consistent with celiac, along with compatible test results and family history.

Our Recipe Pledge Gluten Free & More strives to be your leading resource for a delicious life, lived well. Our recipes, created by chefs who are special-diet experts, are 100 percent gluten-free. Ingredient substitutions are provided for common food allergens like dairy, egg (recipe permitting), peanut, soy and tree nuts.

6 www.GlutenFreeandMore.com February/March 2016

These amazing potstickers and other Asian-style appetizers are made with one easy gluten-free dough. Turn to “Chinese Finger Foods,” page 56.

Beth Hillson, Jules Shepard and I had a great time preparing potstickers in Jules’ kitchen. They were as much fun to make as they were to eat.

The Chocolate Bundt Cake in our December/January issue was a hit with readers. Find it at GlutenFreeAndMore.com. “This cake was unbelievably moist and chocolaty—a real treat for Valentine’s Day!” Oksana Charla Design Director

For delicious chocolate desserts that are low-glycemic, turn to “Sweet Treats, Without Guilt,” page 40.

Follow GlutenFreeAndMore


ISSN 2379-9323 (print) ISSN 2379-9331 (online)

February/March 2016, Vol. 19, No. 2

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alicia Woodward, LCSW DESIGN DIRECTOR Oksana Charla MANAGING EDITOR Erica Dermer FOOD EDITOR Beth Hillson HEALTH EDITOR Christine Boyd, MPH ASSOCIATE EDITORS Eve Becker Jules Shepard TEST KITCHEN Madalene Rhyand CONTRIBUTORS Rachel Begun, RS, RDN Nancy Cain Ricki Heller, PhD, RHN Matthew Kadey, RD Wendy Mondello Jax Peters Lowell April Peveteaux Lisa Stander-Horel Sueson Vess Danielle Walker CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Ricki Heller Tim Horel Matthew Kadey, RD Jennifer May Jeff Rasmussen Cory Derusseau Danielle Walker ADVERTISING SALES Susan Tauster National Accounts Manager 630-858-1558 stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com MEDICAL ADVISORS Amy Burkhart, MD Shelley Case, BSc, RD Christine Doherty, ND Glenn T. Furuta, MD Stefano Guandalini, MD Joseph Murray, MD ADVISORY BOARD Cynthia Kupper, CRD Executive Director Gluten Intolerance Group Marilyn Geller, CEO Celiac Disease Foundation PUBLISHER Philip L. Penny

Gluten Free & More is a lifestyle guide to achieving better health. It is written with your needs in mind but it is not a substitute for consulting with your physician or other health-care providers. The publisher, editor and writers are not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences resulting from the use of suggestions, products or procedures that appear in this magazine. All matters regarding your health should be supervised by a licensed health-care professional. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation. The acceptance of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement by Gluten Free & More or Belvoir Media Group LLC of any advertised product or service. Gluten Free & More and Belvoir Media Group LLC accept no responsibility for claims made in advertisements in this publication.

Subscriptions $36 (U.S.) annually to Gluten Free & More, P.O. Box 8535, Big Sandy, TX 75755-8535. Call toll free 800-474-8614 or subscribe online at GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Reprints Contact Jennifer Jimolka at 203-857-3143, jjimolka@belvoir.com. Minimum order 1,000. Attention Retailers Sell Gluten Free & More in your store. Contact us at retail@Belvoir. com for more information. Write to Us We want to hear from you. Send your comments, questions or concerns to Gluten Free & More, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713 or e-mail editor@ GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Send product samples to Gluten Free & More, 4351 N 36 Place #2, Phoenix, AZ 85018. All submissions become the property of Belvoir Media Group LLC and cannot be returned to the sender. Submissions chosen for publication may be edited for length or clarity. Gluten Free & More (ISSN 2379-9323) is published bi-monthly by Belvoir Media Group LLC, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713.

Robert Englander Chairman and CEO; Timothy H. Cole Executive Vice President, Editorial Director; Philip L. Penny Chief Operating Officer; Greg King Executive Vice President, Marketing Director; Ron Goldberg Chief Financial Officer; Tom Canfield Vice President, Circulation

www.belvoir.com

Š2015 Belvoir Media Group, LLC and Gluten Free & More are registered trademarks. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. Printed in the U.S.A. Revenue Canada GST Account #128044658. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gluten Free & More P.O. Box 8535, Big Sandy,TX 75755-8535. Periodicals Postage Paid at Norwalk, CT, and at additional mailing offices.

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February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

7


we hear you

Gluten&Free MORE

Holiday Shortcut! Best GF Dinner Rolls You Can Buy

45Delicious FESTIVE RECIPES

Celiac & Your Teeth About “Gluten & Your Teeth” in your December/January issue, I suspect my son was celiac in utero. At 19 months, we finally got a

Easy Classic COOKIES Editors’ Choice

tentative diagnosis. At the time, he had zero

Irresistible Bundt Cakes

vitamin D in his blood. He had 4 cavities in his

CHRISTMAS DINNER

Tasty Turkey Leftovers

+ Race for a CELIAC CURE

Holiday Pizza Bites

page 34

DIY Gifts in a Jar

baby teeth. As a toddler, he fell and chipped a front tooth that seemed softer than his broth-

Yum!

ers’ at the same age. We haven’t changed his

The day the magazine arrived, I made the Pumpkin Spice Bundt Cake (“Bundt Cakes,” December/ January). Amazing! Hubby shared it at work and no one knew it was gluten-free. Great mag! Great recipes!

since we took gluten out of his diet 1½ years

Nancy H. Twin Falls, ID

dental routine, yet he’s had no new cavities ago. It seems obvious to me that vitamin D is at least part of the answer to celiac and dental disease.

Lori F. Broad Run, VA

Happy Baker I love your magazine! I was a confirmed baker until a biopsy informed the doctor (and me) that I didn’t have cancer but I did have celiac. I struggled for over a year to find recipes that allowed me to bake without gluten. Thank

Holiday Streusel

Bakery Resource

The Apple Cran-

We love your magazine! We keep an issue

Crumble recipe in your Gluten Free Holidays special issue is absolutely delicious and satisfying. Perfect for serving to family

Glu tenFree HOLIDAYS 100

Best Festive Recipes

Too busy to cook?

Holiday In a Box

Easy & Delicious

Classic Holidays Indulge! Cookies Breads Cakes Pies

Plus!

Breakfast Sides & Salads Appetizers Party Drinks America’s #1 magazine for people with allergies & food sensitivities

Display until December 31, 2015

Special Holiday Issue 2015

berry Streusel

COLLECTOR’S EDITION

GlutenFreeandMore.com

in our gluten-free bakeshop for all our staff. who aren’t gluten-free more informed

Wendy E. Placentia, CA

about what gluten-free is all about. At the

Cuban Comfort

same time, it gives everyone fun ideas.

“Cuban Comfort Food” (DecemberJanuary) is

We’ve even had some employees bring in

an excellent article with easy-to-follow recipes.

recipes they’ve made (which they were so

I’ve made several and they’ve been delicious. Evelyn C. Sun City, AZ

proud of ) from your magazine. Krizha B. Posh Pop Bakery Haddonfield, NJ

it with minor adjustments for my husband who is diabetic. Loved it! Full of flavor, great “mouth feel” and the aroma is tantalizing. I both versions to family members. They

Autoimmune Solution

declared it a winner! Just love, love, love

I can tell you firsthand that the Myers Way

this recipe. Thank you, GF&M! I am a very

(“Autoimmune Solution,” December/Janu-

happy subscriber.

ary issue) helped my rheumatoid arthritis

Iris M. online comment

serve me well.

I love the fact that it keeps my employees

and guests. I made

also followed the recipe exactly and served

you for your invaluable magazine. Your recipes

symptoms within four days of starting it. And I’ve kept getting better the entire time I’ve been on this program. I really know if I’ve eaten something I shouldn’t, because my body tells me almost immediately. This is the way I will be eating the rest of my life. Thank you, Dr. Amy Myers. Louise G. North Port, FL

8 www.GlutenFreeandMore.com February/March 2016

We Want to Hear from You! Contact us at editor@GlutenFreeAndMore.com or write to us at Gluten Free & More, Belvoir Media Group, LLC, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713. Visit us on Facebook at Gluten Free and More Magazine. Follow us on Twitter at @GlutenFreeMore. Check us out on Instagram at @MyLifeWithFoodAllergies and our product review hashtag #WhatsInOurMailbox. Letters may be edited for length, clarity and style. Please include your first and last names, complete address and daytime telephone number. Your correspondence is important to us and we value your input. However, we are unable to print or respond to every letter. All letters become the property of Belvoir Media Group, LLC, and Gluten Free & More magazine.


contributors Nancy Cain Forty years ago, best-selling author Nancy Cain (“Baking, Pure & Simple,” page 46) was crouched in a marsh, recording redwing blackbird vocalizations and looking for patterns. “If you’d told me then that gluten-free baking was my destiny, I wouldn’t have believed it. I was in a doctoral program in Experimental Psychology, testing a hypothesis by holding certain variables constant and systematically manipulating others. In retrospect, it was the perfect training.”

Beth Shaw Author, wellness entrepreneur and yoga expert Beth Shaw, featured in “Move! Yoga

YUM.

for Weight Loss,” page 14, discovered she had a gluten intolerance in 2012. “There are so many different levels to wellness—physical, spiritual, emotional, energetic,” says Shaw, who approaches health as a lifestyle. “My goal is to help people wherever they are on their wellness journey. Nothing feels as good as being healthy.”

Wendy Mondello The mother of a 12-year-old with asthma and multiple food allergies, contributor Wendy Mondello (“Anaphylaxis,” page 74) has witnessed firsthand the rapid onset of anaphylaxis. “It’s not uncommon to wonder if an itchy tongue or cough is the start of an anaphylactic episode or something less terrifying,” she says. “The quick use of epinephrine is a lifesaver, especially given the unpredictable nature of allergic reaction and its sometimes hard-to-distinguish symptoms.”

Sueson Vess Special diet chef Sueson Vess (“Love Your Beets,” page 64) has always enjoyed eating beets— but her husband was not a fan. “The antioxidant and detoxifying properties in beets have been essential to my healing and I love the taste,” she says. “It took my finding the right flavor profile, plus his willingness to overcome his unpleasant early beet experiences, to finally win him over.”

AVAILABLE AT GLUTENFREEANDMORE.COM

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

9


Great Grains

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

BY BETH HILLSON

Delicious, nutritious gluten-free whole grains for breakfast, lunch & dinner

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

27


M

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

edical research shows a diet heavy in empty white carbs can mess with our metabolism and increase blood sugar levels and weight. Thank goodness for gluten-free whole grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, sorghum, teff, oats and quinoa. Packed with beneficial nutrients and fiber, they provide a powerhouse of goodness. Many have been shown to reduce the incidence of some cancers and stroke. Oats are called the heart-healthy grain because research reveals they lower cholesterol and reduce the incidence of heart disease. Buckwheat has been shown to help control diabetes and even reduce blood sugar levels. Quinoa contains many amino acids and loads of protein, a plant-based balanced meal. Alternative whole grains offer advantages in flour form, too. Most are high in protein, boasting 4 to 5 grams per serving. Protein translates into elasticity in gluten-free baking. Using one or more gluten-free whole grains in a baked product adds structure and better crumb to your recipes. Incorporate whole grains into your diet with these tasty, delicious dishes, perfect for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

TIP Short on time? Add cooked sorghum, tomatoes and corn to chopped salad blend. Toss with a gluten-free commercial salad dressing and enjoy! Sorghum Salad with Corn, Tomatoes & Tarragon

28 www.GlutenFreeandMore.com February/March 2016


Sorghum Salad with Corn, Tomatoes & Tarragon S E RV E S 6

Whole-grain sorghum is a relatively new product on the market. Rich in B vitamins and minerals, it promotes digestion, lowers blood sugar levels and reduces cholesterol. Whole-grain sorghum takes an hour to cook. Pearled sorghum contains fewer nutrients and less fiber but cooks in just 40 minutes. Both can be prepared a day ahead and refrigerated until used. 3 1 ½ 2 3 2 1½

cups water cup uncooked whole-grain sorghum or pearled sorghum teaspoon salt teaspoons cooking oil cups chopped kale or baby kale cups halved cherry tomatoes cups fresh or frozen (thawed) corn kernels

Dressing 2 2 1 2 2 2 ½ ¼

tablespoons olive oil tablespoons white balsamic vinegar tablespoon fresh tarragon teaspoons sugar, optional teaspoons Dijon mustard teaspoons crushed garlic teaspoon kosher salt teaspoon black pepper

1. Place water, sorghum and ½ teaspoon salt in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer until tender (60 to 75 minutes for whole-grain sorghum; 40 minutes for pearl sorghum). Drain and let cool. 2. To make the dressing, place olive oil, vinegar, tarragon, sugar (if using), mustard, garlic, ½ teaspoon kosher salt and pepper in a large bowl. Whisk well to combine. 3. Place 2 teaspoons cooking oil in a saucepan over medium heat. Add kale and sauté lightly until leaves are soft and wilted, 3 to 5 minutes. 4. Add cooked sorghum, sautéed kale, tomatoes and corn kernels to the bowl of dressing. Toss to evenly coat ingredients with dressing.

Nu Life Market’s gluten free All-Purpose Flour Mix is perfectly blended to be a cup-to-cup replacement for traditional recipes.

Each serving contains 232 calories, 8g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 432mg sodium, 39g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 2g sugars, 7g protein, 21Est GL.

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www.NuLifeMarket.com February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

29


Ooey-Gooey

Amazing adaptations of America’s classic favorite comfort food by our expert chefs

T

he GF&M team takes macaroni and cheese seriously. Very seriously. Yes, we must live without gluten and many of us have to nix cow’s milk, too— but we refuse to live without a delicious version (or two) of mac & cheese.

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So we asked our top chefs to re-create their dream version of mac & cheese. Take it to new heights, we told them. Gooey, gourmet, gluten-free— we want it all! And here are the mouthwatering results.

MAC & CHEESE PHOTO © REZ-ART/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Mac & Cheese


Jules Shepard

“Macaroni and cheese isn’t just for kids. This grown-up, veggie-packed version will get everyone—youngsters and adults—excited about dinner.”

Vegan Mac & Cheese M A K E S 8 S E RV I N G S

The spices and vegetables work together magically in this dish, transforming the ordinary into a flavorful meal that’s just as good the next day.

1. Heat oil in a large non-stick skillet and add potatoes, carrots, onions and 1 cup water. Cover and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Do not let the vegetables dry out; if they are cooked but water remains in the skillet, remove the lid to allow the excess water to cook off. Once they are fork tender, transfer to a blender or food processor and pulse until smooth. 2. Add nut or seed butter, vegetable oil, lemon juice, yeast, salt, garlic, Dijon mustard, yellow mustard powder, cayenne pepper,

black pepper and ¾ cup water. Pulse until fully integrated. Taste and add more of any particular ingredient to adjust taste to your preference. Thin with hot water, if desired. 3. Prepare noodles according to package directions. Drain. Add sauce, stirring to evenly coat noodles. Serve warm. Each serving contains 192 calories, 15g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 307mg sodium, 14g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 2g sugars, 3g protein, 5Est GL.

Associate editor Jules Shepard (jshepard@GlutenFreeAndMore.com, gfJules.com) is author of Free For All Cooking (DaCapo Perseus), The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living GlutenFree (DaCapo Perseus) and Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating (CreateSpace). Her books are available at GlutenFreeAndMore.com.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF RASMUSSEN

1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 2 medium white potatoes, peeled and diced 1 large carrot, peeled and diced ½ cup yellow onion, diced 1 cup water ¼ cup cashew, almond or peanut butter or sunflower seed butter 1⁄3 cup vegetable oil of choice 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons gluten-free nutritional yeast or brewer’s yeast 1 teaspoon sea salt ½ teaspoon minced garlic

½ teaspoon Dijon or spicy brown mustard ¼ teaspoon yellow mustard powder ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper ¼ teaspoon cracked black pepper ¾ cup water 1 (16-ounce) package gluten-free macaroni noodles

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Lisa Stander-Horel

“Goat dairy can be a viable alternative for some who have an intolerance to cow’s milk. This one-pot macaroni and goat cheese has a tangy, spicy bite—delicious!”

Stovetop Mac & Goat Cheese M A K E S 6 TO 8 S E RV I N G S

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM HOREL

Evaporated goat milk, available in many supermarkets and online, is the key to this easy recipe. Although the recipe suggests certain kinds of goat cheese, use whatever combination of semi-soft and soft goat cheeses you enjoy. Serve this dish immediately or top it with herbed bread crumbs and broil it to golden-brown goodness. 3 tablespoons goat butter 2 generous cups (8 ounces) semisoft goat cheese, cubed (Gouda preferred) 1¾ cups (8 ounces) dry plain chèvre, crumbled ¾-1 cup (4 ounces) goat brie, rind removed, cubed 1½ cups (12 ounces) evaporated goat milk 1½ tablespoons potato starch, cornstarch or tapioca starch/flour ½ teaspoon Tabasco sauce or to taste, optional ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper, optional ¼ teaspoon garlic powder, optional ¼ teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg, optional 1 (16-ounce) package gluten-free pasta of choice Chives, for garnish, optional

Crumb Topping, optional

4. Remove cover and gently stir mac and

1⁄3 cup gluten-free fresh or dried bread crumbs, finely ground ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ¼ teaspoon garlic powder

1. Cube goat butter into ½-inch pieces and set aside. Cube or crumble cheeses into ¼-inch pieces and set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together evaporated milk, potato starch, Tabasco (if using), mustard, salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, garlic powder (if using) and nutmeg until combined and mixture is smooth. 2. In an ovenproof pot, cook pasta according to package directions, except drain it 1 minute early and don’t rinse it. Place pasta back into the pot and set over medium-low heat. Add goat butter, folding until butter melts and coats the pasta. 3. Whisk milk mixture once more and pour over pasta, folding it in. Add cubed/ crumbled cheese and fold until cheese begins to melt and mixture begins to thicken, about 5 minutes. Cover pot. Reduce heat to low and cook 2 to 4 minutes.

cheese until all cheese has melted. Turn off heat and cover the pot, letting mixture rest 2 minutes before serving. If mixture seems too thick, stir in a few teaspoons water before serving. 5. To make crumb topping (if using), place bread crumbs, salt, pepper and garlic powder in a bowl and mix until well combined. Preheat the broiler. Remove cover of mac and cheese and sprinkle topping evenly over the top. Place pan under preheated broiler and broil until topping turns golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes. Garnish with chives and serve immediately. Each serving without topping contains 512 calories, 23g total fat, 15g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 66mg cholesterol, 502mg sodium, 49g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 2g sugars, 17g protein, 29Est GL. Each serving with topping contains 527 calories, 23g total fat, 15g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 66mg cholesterol, 574mg sodium, 52g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 2g sugars, 18g protein, 25Est GL.

Contributing chef Lisa Stander-Horel (glutenfreecanteen.com) is author of Nosh On This: GlutenFree Baking from a Jewish American Kitchen (The Experiment Publishing).

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BY RICKI HELLER

Sweet Treats, Without Guilt Luscious low-glycemic chocolate desserts for you and your sweetie

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t’s tough to imagine a world without sugar. We’re hardwired to love the white stuff, starting with mother’s milk (high in the natural sugar, lactose) and moving through childhood (sweet rewards for good behavior) and into adulthood (comfort in the form of fudge ripple ice cream). Given our natural attraction, it’s no wonder sugar is everywhere. From breakfast cereal and morning latte to lunchtime dessert, afternoon snack and even dinner (yes, packaged deli meats, salad dressings, soups and stews can all be laced with the stuff), sugar is so ubiquitous, it seems impossible to eliminate it entirely. After eating my way through decades of baked goods, junk food, sweet treats and pretty much everything else brimming with sugar, I was forced to take a hard look at my sugar habit. A diagnosis of candida-related complex (an overgrowth of yeast in my body) imposed a sobering ultimatum: Either give up sugar or abandon my last chance at good health. Needless to say, I gave up sugar. Since that fateful decision, I’ve regained my health. I’ve also learned that quitting sugar doesn’t mean you have to give up sweet treats. These recipes prove the point. They use low-sugar and sugar-free sweeteners to replace the white table sugar—with amazingly tasty results.

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sweets Pink Velvet Cupcakes MAKES 6 CUPCAKES

Cooked beets are a natural alternative to artificial red food dye, enhancing the ruddy undertones of cocoa. Keep these cupcakes covered in the refrigerator up to 2 days or freeze for longer storage. 2 medium raw beets, peeled and cut into chunks ½ cup xylitol or coconut sugar 1 tablespoon ground flaxseed (flax meal) ½ cup + 2 tablespoons water 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar ¼ teaspoon pure plain or vanilla stevia liquid, to taste 1 cup Ricki’s All-Purpose Gluten-Free Flour Mix (page 44) ¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon xanthan gum ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt Buttercream Frosting (page 42) 1 ounce dark chocolate or sugar-free dark chocolate, for garnish, optional

CUPCAKE PHOTO BY RICKI HELLER; HEART RIBBON © IVAN MIKHAYLOV/123RF

1. To make cupcakes, place beets in a small pot. Cover with water and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and cook until beets are very soft and water is deep crimson, at least 30 minutes. Drain and reserve cooking liquid. 2. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 6 muffin cups with paper liners or spray with non-stick spray. 3. In a small food processor or blender, puree cooked beets until they’re the consistency of applesauce. Remove from processor and measure out ½ cup of puree. Save extra for another purpose. 4. In the processor bowl, whir together ½ cup beet puree, xylitol, flax, water, vanilla, vinegar and stevia until smooth.

5. In a medium bowl, sift together flour mix, cocoa, baking powder, baking soda, xanthan gum and salt. Whisk to blend well. Pour beet mixture over dry ingredients and stir just to blend; do not overmix. 6. Using a large ice cream scoop or 1⁄3-cup measuring cup, scoop batter into prepared muffin cups, distributing evenly. 7. Place in preheated oven and bake 25 to 30 minutes until a tester inserted in the center of a cupcake comes out clean. Rotate pan once about halfway through baking. 8. Remove from oven and let cool 5 minutes. Remove cupcakes from pan and let cool completely on a wire rack before topping with Buttercream Frosting. 9. To garnish with chocolate, gently melt dark chocolate and spread it in a thin layer on waxed paper. Let cool. (It will firm up at room temperature.) Cut into heart shapes using a cookie cutter. Place hearts on cupcakes to garnish. Alternately, drizzle melted chocolate directly over frosting in a decorative pattern. Each cupcake without frosting contains 149 calories, 1g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 231mg sodium, 22g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, 2g sugars, 3g protein, 11Est GL. Each cupcake with frosting contains 538 calories, 30g total fat, 10g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 252mg sodium, 53g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 20g sugars, 12g protein, 24Est GL

TIP To ward off any “earthy” flavor, boil

the beets until they’re soft and then 10 minutes longer. Don’t discard the cooking liquid—it’s full of minerals. Use it as a stock base or pour it into soups, smoothies and juices.

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BAKING Pure & Simple

BY NANCY CAIN

Delicious gluten-free baked goods without xanthan gum

T

welve years ago when my husband and two teenagers were diagnosed with celiac disease, the gluten-free industry was in its infancy. If you wanted a tasty bakery item, you had to learn to make it yourself. A scientist by training, I decided to go back to the basics: How exactly do various flours, starches, fats and liquids affect the taste, texture, aroma and shelf life of baked goods? Investigating further, I learned that starch is insoluble in cold water; when heated, it forms an elastic gel. This gel creates structure, contributes to the crumb and aids in moisture retention. So I asked myself, why do we need binders like xanthan, guar gum, psyllium husks or other gels? And I concluded that gums are not necessary for successful gluten-free baking. This is welcome news for people who can’t tolerate gums. It’s also great news for those who want only pure ingredients in their baked goods. How can you bake successfully without xanthan gum or guar gum? Here are a few techniques and tips. Turn the starch into a gel. Starch is made soluble in liquid by adding heat, an effect called pre-gelatinization. In almost all my yeast-leavened recipes, the first step is to bring the liquid (milk, water, potato cooking water) and the fat (shortening, butter, oil) to a boil, stirring vigorously to emulsify the two. This mixture is poured over the flour and mixed until the flour is just uniformly moistened. Don’t over-mix. Depending on the recipe, the result may look like moist sand or a kind of rubbery gel. As the dough cools (15 to 20 minutes), the starch becomes gelatinous.

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Use a combination of gluten-free flours. Mixing at least two different flours (one a pure starch) will significantly improve the structure and integrity of gluten-free baked goods. Which flours to choose? Contrary to popular belief, you can’t apply a standard formula for substituting. Most pure starches—tapioca, arrowroot, potato and cornstarch—are pretty much interchangeable but many gluten-free flours are not. Some are grains. Some come from nuts and seeds, and some come from legumes and other less conventional sources, like banana, cassava and grape skins. Glutenfree flours have different weights, different absorption rates and different flavors. There are also many varieties of the same flour and they differ from brand to brand. In addition, protein and fiber contents vary considerably among gluten-free flours. All these factors impact baking characteristics. What’s a gluten-free baker to do? Think carefully before making substitutions and expect to have to adjust the recipe by adding a little additional flour or liquid in order to obtain the desired batter/dough consistency. You also can make your own flour blend using a trusted recipe or you can purchase a commercial flour blend with a flavor and nutritional profile that appeals to you. Use natural binders, thickeners and emulsifiers. Many real foods perform the same functions as xanthan gum. That is, they aerate dough, bind together liquids, fats and flour, and assist in creating structure. Eggs do the trick. Other foods include aquafaba (the liquid from chickpeas), chia seeds, flax seeds, oatmeal, bananas, avocados, sunflower seeds and pectin.


Bake with small, high-walled pans. Gluten-free bread dough is generally wetter than wheat-based dough, more like a batter than a dough. This typically impacts baking time, making it longer than you’d expect. It also impacts crumb and loaf shape. One of the greatest challenges of gluten-free baking is to create breads that have a moist, tender crumb and that hold their shape. Higher-walled baking pans are the key to supporting loaf structure. Choose a small, deep loaf pan (8½ x 4½ inches) for a 1-pound loaf. There are no added gums or artificial binders in these recipes. You don’t have to lower your expectations, make excuses or bake with gum just because you’re gluten-free.

Hot Cross Buns MAKES 8 BUNS

This old-fashioned recipe is warmly spiced with bits of dried fruit. You’ll love the smell of the buns baking. For best results, do not replace the eggs in this recipe. 21⁄3 1 1 1 ¼ ¼ 1 ½ 1 2 ¼ ¼

cups tapioca starch/flour teaspoon salt teaspoon ground cinnamon teaspoon ground allspice teaspoon ground cloves teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg cup milk of choice cup canola oil tablespoon granulated sugar large eggs cup chopped dried pineapple cup chopped fruit-sweetened dried cranberries ½ cup golden raisins 1 tablespoon honey

PHOTO BY JENNIFER MAY

Icing ½ cup confectioners’ sugar ½ teaspoon pure vanilla extract 2 teaspoons milk of choice

1. In a food processor, combine tapioca starch/flour, salt, cinnamon, allspice, cloves and nutmeg. Pulse to combine.

6. Place buns in preheated oven and bake

2. In a medium saucepan, bring 1 cup milk, oil and granulated sugar to boil, stirring constantly. Immediately pour hot mixture into flour mixture and process until dough is moist with a sand-like texture. Let dough cool 20 minutes. 3. Add eggs to dough and process until smooth. Dough will be sticky and runny like pancake batter. Scrape dough into a bowl and fold in dried pineapple, cranberries and raisins. Let dough rest 15 minutes to thicken. 4. Meanwhile, position an oven rack in the center of oven. Preheat oven to 325°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. 5. Using a spoon dipped in water, drop 8 spoonfuls of dough onto prepared baking sheet. Wet your hands and smooth the top and sides of the buns to round them.

55 minutes or until tops are lightly browned.

7. Remove buns from oven and immediately brush tops with honey. Let cool completely on a cooling rack. 8. To make icing, combine confectioners’ sugar, vanilla and 2 teaspoons milk, stirring until lumps dissolve. Spoon icing into a pastry bag or sealable plastic bag with a corner cut off and pipe crosses on the tops. Each bun contains 369 calories, 16g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 56mg cholesterol, 325mg sodium, 56g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 21g sugars, 3g protein, 37Est GL.

For Gingery Orange Hot Cross Buns, replace the pineapple with ¼ cup chopped crystallized ginger and add 2 tablespoons orange zest. Replace the vanilla extract with ½ teaspoon orange extract.

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

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By M atth e

wK ade y, R

D

PHOTO BY MATTHEW KADEY PHOTOGRAPHY BY ASHLEY CAMPION

Broil Away Delicious food in a flash

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I

f late-night infomercials peddled a cooking appliance that produced

the concentrated flavors of outdoor grilling within the cozy confines of your kitchen and got the food on the table in half the time, they’d make a mint. But hold onto your cash! You already own such a gizmo and it’s as close as your oven. Say hello to your broiler. It’s underappreciated and needs some love. Think of broiling as essentially upside-down grilling, where a blast of high heat penetrates the food from above. There’s no more delicious way to sear, char, bubble, crisp and caramelize a panoply of foods to lip-smacking perfection, all in a flash.

CHILI-ORANGE CHICKEN WITH MASALA CARROTS M A K E S 4 S E RV I N G S

India meets Mexico in this quick weeknight meal. A broiler blasts out heat around 500°F, the perfect temperature for giving meat a flavor-packed crust. This sweet and fiery sauce can be made a few days in advance; any extras can be frozen. For safety, don’t reuse sauce that’s been brushed on raw meat. If you’re going to reserve some sauce for serving, keep it separate.

PHOTO BY MATTHEW KADEY

Sauce 2 dried ancho chili peppers 1 tablespoon honey 2 teaspoons orange zest Juice of ½ orange 1 garlic clove, chopped 2 teaspoons chopped rosemary ¼ teaspoon salt + 2 pinches salt, to taste

1 2 1½ 1½

(1-pound) bag baby carrots teaspoons oil teaspoons garam masala pounds boneless, skinless chicken thighs

1. Place ancho chilies in a bowl and cover with hot water. Let soak 15 minutes or until soft. Reserve 1⁄3 cup soaking liquid. Slice off stems of peppers and remove the seeds. Reserve the seeds. 2. Place ancho chilies, reserved soaking water, honey, orange zest, orange juice, garlic, rosemary and 2 pinches of salt in a blender or food processor container and process until smooth. Taste the sauce. If it’s not hot enough for your liking, blend in some of the reserved seeds. Set aside half the sauce for brushing the chicken before serving. 3. In a bowl, toss carrots with oil, garam masala and ¼ teaspoon salt. 4. Preheat broiler with rack 4 inches from

the overhead heat. Place chicken on a baking sheet and scatter carrots around chicken. Broil 7 minutes, brush half the ancho sauce on chicken and stir around the carrots. Broil an additional 3 minutes or until internal temperature of chicken reaches 165°F. Brush reserved sauce on chicken and let rest a few minutes. Serve warm with carrots. Each serving contains 315 calories, 10g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 139mg cholesterol, 419mg sodium, 21g carbohydrate, 5g fiber, 11g sugars, 35g protein, 8Est GL.

Make extra sauce and freeze it for future use. Try it on beef, pork and fish.

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Chinese Finger Food

BY JULES SHEPARD

1 easy dough, 3 tasty appetizers

Potstickers, page 57 Egg Rolls, page 58 Wonton Cups, page 60 Wonton Wrappers, page 62

Egg Rolls, Potstickers and Wonton Cups are made with one versatile dough—Wonton Wrappers—that’s been reworked to meet your gluten-free needs. Enjoy these tasty,

bite-size gems as a light supper or lunch. Serve them as hors d’oeuvres before dinner or at your next party. They’re also the perfect addition to a Chinese New Year menu.

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PHOTO BY JEFF RASMUSSEN

I

f you’ve been missing popular Asian-style finger foods, you’re in luck. These classic


1

Potstickers

M A K E S 2 0 P OT ST I C K E R S

Chinese potstickers served at restaurants are generally off-limits for those avoiding gluten. This recipe duplicates all the flavor and texture without the gluten. Pair with a dipping sauce or two (gluten-free tamari, hot chili oil or sweet chili sauce). For vegetarian potstickers, omit the meat. 1 1 2⁄3 2 1⁄3 1 1 2 1 ¼ 1

cup shredded fresh cabbage large carrot, shredded cup shiitake mushrooms, diced green onions, diced (1⁄3-½ cup) cup diced eggplant teaspoon freshly grated ginger tablespoon gluten-free soy sauce or tamari teaspoons sesame oil teaspoon Sriracha teaspoon white pepper pound protein of choice (cooked pulled chicken, cooked ground pork, diced tofu), optional 2 recipes Wonton Wrappers (page 62) 2 tablespoons high-heat cooking oil (avocado oil, refined coconut oil) Gluten-free tamari, soy sauce or hot chili oil, for serving

TIP

To freeze, place uncooked potstickers in a single layer on a baking sheet, cover them with plastic wrap and place them in the freezer overnight. When frozen, transfer potstickers to freezer bags, placing wax paper between them so they don’t stick together. Thaw slightly and cook as directed.

1. In large bowl, place cabbage, carrot, mushrooms, onions, eggplant, ginger, soy sauce, sesame oil, Sriracha and white pepper. Stir to mix well. Cut cooked protein, if using, into small pieces and mix in. 2. Prepare Wonton Wrapper dough but cut rolled dough into circles, not squares. Spoon 1 tablespoon vegetable filling in the left-center of the circle. Dip a finger in water and rub gently around the perimeter of the dough circle to wet it. Fold the right side of the circle over to touch the left side of the dough edge, pressing gently to seal in a half-moon shape. Pinch edges between your fingers to create a scalloped sealed edge. 3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Place some potstickers in the skillet, leaving room to turn them. Fry one side until golden; then flip and fry the other side until golden, about 2 to 3 minutes per side, depending on the temperature of your oil. (Alternatively, fry one side, flip and add water to the pan; cover pan and let steam.) Remove to drain and cool slightly on a wire rack before serving. Repeat with remaining potstickers. Serve with gluten-free tamari. Each potsticker contains 144 calories, 3g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 38mg cholesterol, 362mg sodium, 20g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 4g sugars, 8g protein, 12Est GL.

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BY SUESON VESS

Love Your Beets

Delicious ways to get back to your roots

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aturally sweet and flavorful, beets are loaded with antioxidants and antiinflammatory properties. Whether roasted, pickled, pureed or grated raw, they complement any meal. And they can sweeten, moisten and delicately color your desserts. There are many delicious ways to add this beautiful, beneficial root vegetable to your plate. These recipes show you how.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CORY DERUSSEAU

Quick Pickled Beets


Available in a gorgeous range of colors, beets are a beautiful super-food, boosting health while they brighten up the table.

Red Slaw with Beets & Fennel

Quick Pickled Beets

S E RV E S 8 TO 1 0

Pickled beets have a reputation. Many people have unpleasant memories of grandmother’s pickled beets and they need some serious persuading to try beets again. This simple recipe wins over even the most serious beet haters! Serve as an appetizer, add to an antipasto platter or toss in a salad.

Get your red on! This bright-red coleslaw-like salad is deliciously sweet and sour. It has a surprising warm finish, thanks to the fresh ginger.

Fennel Dressing 1½ 2 ¼ 1⁄3

teaspoons ground fennel teaspoons Dijon-style mustard cup apple cider vinegar cup olive oil

Slaw 2 medium raw beets, peeled and shredded 4 large raw carrots, peeled and shredded, divided (reserve ¼ cup for garnish) 1 fennel bulb, shredded 1 small head red cabbage, shredded 1 Granny Smith apple, unpeeled and shredded (reserve 2 tablespoons for garnish) 1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger root, peeled and finely minced ½ teaspoon sea salt

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CORY DERUSSEAU

1. To make fennel dressing, place ground fennel, mustard and vinegar into a bowl and whisk to combine. Pour olive oil into mixture in a slow stream, whisking to create an emulsion. Set aside. 2. In a large bowl, place shredded beets, carrots (except ¼ cup), fennel, red cabbage, apple (except 2 tablespoons), ginger and salt. Toss to combine. 3. Pour fennel dressing over shredded vegetables and mix well until slaw is evenly coated. 4. Taste and adjust seasoning. Garnish with reserved carrots and apple and serve.

MAKES 2 CUPS

4 1 ¼ ¼

medium raw beets, peeled and cut into ¼-inch slices tablespoon olive oil teaspoon sea salt teaspoon pepper

TIP

Pickling Marinade ¼ cup balsamic vinegar or raspberry balsamic vinegar 2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard ½ cup olive oil

Purchase fresh beets with their stems and leaves still attached. The tender greens can be used in salads and stir-fried just like spinach and Swiss chard.

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a baking sheet or line it with parchment paper.

2. Put sliced beets into a bowl and drizzle them with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Spread beets in a single layer over prepared baking sheet. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. 3. Place beets in preheated oven and bake 45 minutes or until tender. 4. To make pickling marinade, place vinegar and mustard in a bowl and whisk to combine. Pour ½ cup olive oil into mixture in a slow stream, whisking to create a thick emulsion. 5. While beets are still warm, toss with pickling marinade and place them in a pint (2-cup) jar. Chill and serve. Each ¼ cup contains 160 calories, 15g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 124mg sodium, 5g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 4g sugars, 1g protein, 1Est GL.

R e d S l aw

with Beets & Fennel

Each serving contains 117 calories, 7g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 177mg sodium, 13g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 7g sugars, 2g protein, 4Est GL.

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BY DANIELLE WALKER

Easy Masterpieces in Your Slow Cooker Slow down. Eat clean. Savor your food.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIELLE WALKER

Thai Beef Stew

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aking a meal with real food takes a bit more effort than using prepared commercial products—but the results are well worth it! This time of year, we’re hungry for warm, cozy meals made with wholesome, nutrient-dense ingredients. With a slow cooker, it’s easy to have a delicious, nutritious,

home-cooked dinner waiting when the family gets home. So we asked Danielle Walker, the author of Against All Grain and Meals Made Simple, to share her favorite slowcooker recipes with us. Walker restored her health with Paleo-style recipes just like these. But you don’t have to be Paleo to enjoy them.

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Thai Beef Stew MAKES 8 SERVI NGS

Jicama adds a mildly sweet flavor and a slight crunch, similar to water chestnuts or bamboo shoots. Serve this stew over rice. For a complete Paleo-friendly meal, use cauliflower rice. (Process raw cauliflower into rice-like granules. Then gently sautée in a skillet, covered, until tender like rice.) Leftover meat tastes fabulous in scrambled eggs.

2 2 2 2 1

tablespoons coconut oil, divided pounds beef stew meat, fat trimmed medium yellow onion, thinly sliced cloves garlic, minced teaspoons peeled, minced fresh ginger (13.5-ounce) can full-fat coconut milk cup tomato paste cup red curry paste tablespoons fish sauce or coconut amino acids teaspoons fresh lime juice teaspoons sea salt cups broccoli florets cups julienned carrots cup peeled and julienned jicama Fresh cilantro

Braised Pork Shoulder

Braised Pork Shoulder

1. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over

M A K E S 8 TO 1 0 S E R V I N G S

medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown meat on all sides. Use a slotted spoon to transfer each batch of browned meat directly to the slow cooker. If a lot of liquid accumulates at the bottom of the skillet, wipe it out between batches to ensure even browning. 2. Wipe out skillet and add remaining 1 tablespoon oil, onion, garlic and ginger. Cook over mediumhigh heat 5 minutes. Pour in coconut milk and stir continuously to release browned bits on the bottom of the skillet. Add tomato paste, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice and salt. 3. Pour mixture over browned beef in slow cooker. Cook on high 5 hours or low 8 hours. 4. During the last 30 minutes of cooking on high or the last hour on low, add broccoli, carrots and jicama. Serve warm, garnished with cilantro.

This dish has a deep, robust flavor. Take the time to brown the meat and onions before adding them to the slow cooker. It adds to the rich taste and helps render some of the fat from the pork so it doesn’t all end up floating to the top of the sauce. Store the leftover meat with ½ cup of the juices in the refrigerator up to 5 days.

Each serving contains 581 calories, 43g total fat, 23g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 109mg cholesterol, 1036mg sodium, 13g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 5g sugars, 35g protein, 4Est GL.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIELLE WALKER

2 3 1 2 2 1 1⁄3 ½ 2

1 tablespoon ghee* or bacon fat 1 (5-pound) boneless pork shoulder roast, fat trimmed, cut into 4 large chunks Sea salt, to taste Cracked black pepper, to taste 6 ounces pancetta, diced 2 small yellow onions, diced 5 cloves garlic, minced 1½ teaspoons fennel seeds ¾ cup dry red wine 1 cup gluten-free chicken broth 1 pound carrots, peeled, cut into 3-inch pieces

*TIP

Ghee is clarified butter. It has a rich, fragrant, nutty taste. It can be found in most supermarkets and Indian grocery stores.


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gluten-free flours

GF Flour Replacements Use this chart as a guide to help select replacement gluten-free flours for all your baking. While not identical, the flours in each column have comparable baking characteristics and serve a similar function in building the structure in a particular recipe. If you can’t tolerate a certain flour or you’ve run out, find another flour in the same column (not row) and use it as a substitute.

Neutral (light) Flours

High-Protein Flours

Stabilizers (add texture and moisture)

Starches

Brown Rice Flour

Amaranth Flour

Amaranth Flour

Almond Flour

Arrowroot Powder Agar Powder

Corn Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Coconut Flour

Cornstarch

Sorghum Flour

Chickpea Flour

Chickpea Flour

Flax Seed Meal

Sweet Rice Flour

Millet Flour

Corn Flour

White Rice Flour

Oat Flour

Mesquite Flour

Quinoa Flour

Oat Flour

Sorghum Flour

Quinoa Flour

Teff Flour

Teff Flour

Kudzu Root Starch or Kuzu Ground Chia Seed Potato Starch (not Potato Flour) Oat Bran Sweet Potato Flour Potato Flour (not Tapioca Starch or Potato Starch) Tapioca Flour

Gums

Carrageenan Gelatin Powder Guar Gum Locust Bean Gum Psyllium Husk Xanthan Gum

Adapted from Gluten-Free Makeovers by Beth Hillson. Available from Da Capo Press, a member of The Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2011. Used with permission.

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GLUTEN-FREE FLOUR PHOTO © SIRYNA MELNYK/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

High-Fiber Flours


GLUTEN-FREE DIET | Quick-Start Guide

H

ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free diet. Not all areas of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intended to be used as a temporary survival tool until additional information can be obtained. Understanding these dietary requirements will enable the newly diagnosed to read labels of food products and determine if a product is gluten free. Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect those with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the absence of symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of proteins contained in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. Research indicates that pure, uncontaminated oats consumed in moderation (up to ½ cup dry oats daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free oats are currently available in the United States. Consult your physician or dietitian before including oats in your diet and for regular monitoring.

➥ Grains allowed Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato, Tapioca, Beans, Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, Arrowroot, Amaranth, Teff, Montina, Flax and Nut Flours.

➥ Grains not allowed in any form Wheat (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale.

➥ Foods/products that may contain gluten Marinades Nutritional Supplements Pastas Processed Luncheon Meats Sauces, Gravies Self-basting Poultry Soup Bases Soy Sauce and Soy Sauce Solids Stuffings, Dressings Thickeners (Roux) Vitamins & Mineral Supplements

Beers, Ales, Lager Breading & Coating Mixes Brown Rice Syrup Communion Wafers Croutons Dressings Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Energy Bars Flour & Cereal Products Herbal Supplements Imitation Bacon Imitation Seafood

Be a food detective Call First You can verify ingredients by calling or e-mailing a food manufacturer and specifying the ingredient and the lot number of the food in question. State your needs clearly—be patient, persistent and polite.

If In Doubt, Go Without Don’t eat a food if you are unable to verify the ingredients or if the ingredient list is unavailable. Regardless of the amount eaten, if you have celiac disease, damage to the small intestine occurs every time gluten is consumed, whether symptoms are present or not.

Wheat Free Is Not Gluten Free Products labeled wheat free are not necessarily gluten free. They may still contain spelt, rye or barleybased ingredients that are not gluten free. Spelt is a form of wheat.

Keep in mind

Starting the gluten-free diet before being tested for celiac disease makes an accurate diagnosis difficult.

➥ How about alcohol? Distilled alcoholic beverages and vinegars (except malt vinegar) are gluten free. Distilled products do not contain any harmful gluten peptides. Wine and hard liquor beverages are gluten free. Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten free.

Gluten Free

DELICIOUS SUMMER TREATS WITH DAIRY-FREE OPTIONS

Always read the label The key to understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. Don’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can verify they do not contain or are not derived from prohibited grains. Labels must be read every time foods are purchased. Manufacturers can change ingredients at any time. Wheat used in products is identified on the label. Products bearing “gluten free” on the package must contain less than 20ppm gluten.

The magazine with the answers Gluten Free & More GutenFreeandMore.com ■  recipes,

recipes, recipes ■  expert advice ■  latest research

57 Simple & MORE Recipes Super-Quick Weekday Meals

Tomah-to! Inspired Dishes

Pack & Go Lunches Discover Sorghum

+

Safety Tips DINING OUT GF Paradise Visit Hawaii

A Cheery Celiac

So easy!

Waffle cones

pg. 79

Elisabeth Hasselbeck

Celiac Disease Foundation 20350 Ventura Blvd., Ste 240 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 818-716-1513 celiac.org

Celiac Support Association PO Box 31700 Omaha, NE 68131-0700 877-272-4272 csaceliacs.info

Gluten Intolerance Group 31214 124th Ave. SE Auburn, WA 98092 253-833-6655 gluten.net

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness PO Box 544 Ambler, PA 19002-0544 215-325-1306 celiaccentral.org

2016 Note: This guide is not meant to be an exhaustive resource.

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Quick-Start Guide | CASEIN-FREE DIET

Ad Index

A

casein-free diet has been found to be beneficial for a number of people for a variety of reasons. A gluten-free and casein-free (GF/CF) diet has provided positive results for many people diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, such as autism, Asperger’s syndrome, atypical autism and pervasive developmental disorder.

February/March 2016

Currently, there are no double-blind studies proving the efficacy of the GF/CF diet in autism spectrum disorders. Several open studies conducted in Europe and the United States do provide strong positive data. There is also voluminous anecdotal evidence on the efficacy of the dietary approach. When removing dairy from the diet, it is vital that adequate calcium and vitamin D be added in the form of fortified milk substitutes or acceptable vitamin and mineral supplements. Guidance from a qualified physician or nutritionist is strongly advised.

AllergyHome.org.........................................................75 American Health/Ester-C..........................................5 Amy’s......................................................................................2

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➥ Foods that contain casein

➥ Casein-free alternatives

Celiac Disease Foundation. ..................................59

Milk, Cream, Half & Half Yogurt Sour Cream Cheese Butter Sherbet White Chocolate and Milk Chocolate Ice Cream Ice Milk Creamed Soups and Vegetables Soup Bases Puddings, Custard Whey

Rice, Soy, Hemp, Coconut and Potato-Based Milks Pareve Creams and Creamers Sorbet Italian Ices Ghee (if guaranteed casein free) Coconut Butter Coconut Milk

Doctor’s Office Offer..................................................67

Kosher is good Kosher pareve foods are casein free. Foods certified as kosher non-dairy or pareve are free of dairy proteins.

Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG)........................59

Domino Foods..............................................................33 Edward & Sons..............................................................75 Free for All Kitchen.....................................................11 General Mills/Cheerios ............................................15 Gluten-Free Food Allergy FEST ..........................77

Hatch Chile Company .............................................17 Living Now ......................................................................39 Nu Life Market...............................................................29

➥ Bovines and you

All bovine milk and milk products contain casein.

➥ Foods that may contain casein Margarine Tuna Fish Cosmetics, Medicines Lactic Acid Artificial Flavorings Semisweet Chocolate Hot Dogs Lunch Meats Sausage Ghee

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The people with the answers...

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Gluten Free & More magazine GlutenFreeandMore.com

The University of Chicago Celiac Disease

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Gluten Free 57 DELICIOUS

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recipes, recipes, recipesGREAT GRILLING! expert advice latest research

Center ..............................................................................83

SUMMER TREA TS WITH DAIR Y-FREE OPTIO

NS

Simple & MORE

Recipes

Super-Quick Weekday Meal s Tomah-to!

Inspired Dishes

Pack & Go Lunches Discover Sorgh um

+

Safety Tips DINING OUT GF Paradise Visit Hawaii A Cheery Celiac Elisabeth Hass elbeck

➥ Dairy free may contain casein Many non-dairy foods contain casein proteins. Avoid foods that contain any ingredient with casein or caseinate.

So easy!

Waffle cones pg. 79

The GFCF Diet Support Group P.O. Box 1692 Palm Harbor, FL 34682-1692 gfcfdiet.com

Don’t miss out on advertising in our April/May issue. Ad space deadline: 1/19/2016

Advertise in our Spring Special Issue Publication. Ad space deadline: 2/16/2016

t Be a food detective t Always read labels t If in doubt, go without t Call food companies if ingredients are suspect. 2016 Note: This guide is not meant to be an exhaustive resource.

©

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Contact Susan Tauster stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com or call 630-858-1558.


Substitution Solutions

Gluten Free & More Pantry For step-by-step flour blend instuctions, go to GlutenFreeandMore.com/flourblend

Milk

Buttermilk

Yogurt

Butter

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup cow's milk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup buttermilk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup yogurt with 1 of the following:

(1 stick = 8 tablespoons = ½ cup = 4 ounces)

1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon

1 cup soy, rice or coconut yogurt

lemon juice or 1 tablespoon cider vinegar (Let stand until slightly thickened.) cup coconut milk cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup water

1 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 cup fruit puree

1 1 1 1 1

cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup coconut milk cup goat's milk, if tolerated cup hemp milk

1 7⁄8 7⁄8 7⁄8

Gluten-Free Flour Substitutions

Depending on the recipe, replace 8 tablespoons butter with 1 of the following: 8 tablespoons Earth Balance (NonDairy) Buttery Spread or Sticks 8 tablespoons Spectrum Organic Shortening 8 tablespoons coconut oil 8 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil For reduced fat: 6 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce + 2 tablespoons fat of choice

--------

To make a flour blend, thoroughly combine all ingredients. You can double or triple these recipes to make as much blend as you need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator until used.

Eggs

All-Purpose Flour Blend

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 large egg with 1 of the following:

MAKES 3 CUPS

Depending on the recipe, use this blend for most gluten-free baking. 1½ cups white or brown rice flour (or combination) ¾ cup tapioca starch/flour ¾ cup cornstarch or potato starch (not potato flour) Each cup contains 436 calories, 1g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 99g carbohydrate, 3mg sodium, 2g fiber, 5g protein.

--------

Self-Rising Flour Blend MAKES 3 CUPS

Use this blend for muffins, scones, cakes, cupcakes or any recipe that uses baking powder for leavening. 1¼ cups sorghum flour 1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) ¾ cup tapioca starch/flour 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt Each cup contains 514 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 113g carbohydrate, 1163mg sodium, 8g fiber, 10g protein.

High-Fiber Flour Blend

High-Protein Flour Blend

MAKES 3 CUPS

MAKES 3 CUPS

This high-fiber blend works for breads, pancakes, snack bars and cookies that contain chocolate, warm spices, raisins or other fruits. It is not suited to delicately flavored recipes, such as sugar cookies, crepes, cream puffs, birthday cakes or cupcakes.

This nutritious blend works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps and pie crusts.

1 cup brown rice flour or sorghum flour ½ cup teff flour (preferably light) ½ cup millet flour or amaranth flour 2⁄3 cup tapioca starch/flour 1⁄3 cup cornstarch or potato starch Each cup contains 428 calories, 2g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 92g carbohydrate, 19mg sodium, 5g fiber, 8g protein.

1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) ¾ cup bean flour or chickpea flour ¾ cup arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch ½ cup tapioca starch/flour Each cup contains 588 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 128g carbohydrate, 24mg sodium, 6g fiber, 11g protein.

General Guidelines for Using Xanthan or Guar Gum Gum (xanthan or guar) is the key to successful gluten-free baking. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, keeping it from crumbling. ■ Add ½ teaspoon xanthan or guar gum per cup of flour blend to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. ■ Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread or other baked items that call for yeast. ■ Add 1½ teaspoons per cup of flour blend to make pizza dough or pie crust. Note: If you purchase a commercial flour blend, read the ingredient list carefully. Some blends contain salt and xanthan or guar gum. If so, there is no need to add more. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation.

➥ Flax or Chia Gel: 1 tablespoon flax meal, chia seed or salba seed + 3 tablespoons hot water. (Let stand, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes or until thickened. Use without straining.) ➥ Egg Replacer: Ener-G Foods egg replacer, according to package directions ➥Tofu: 4 tablespoons pureed silken tofu + 1 teaspoon baking powder ➥ Applesauce: 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce (or other fruit puree) + 1 teaspoon baking powder IMPORTANT! Replacing more than two eggs can change the integrity of a recipe. For recipes that call for a lot of eggs, like a quiche, use pureed silken tofu, if soy is tolerated. Because egg substitutions add moisture, you may have to increase baking times slightly.

Nuts

--------

Depending on the recipe, replace tree nuts or peanuts with an equal amount of 1 of the following: Toasted coconut flakes, Sunflower seeds, Toasted sesame seeds (use only 2 to 3 tablespoons), Crushed cornflakes, Crushed crispy rice cereal, Crushed potato chips OR Pumpkin seeds

February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

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Gl ut en -F re Da e iry -F re e Eg gFr ee No Pe an ut So s, yNo Fr ee Nu ts Lo w Su ga r Lo w So di um

recipe index & Allergen Guide

Bread Gingery Orange Hot Cross Buns, page 47 Hot Cross Buns, page 47 Potato Rosemary Bread, page 48 Appetizers Beet Caviar, page 66 Egg Rolls, page 58 Marinated Chickpeas, page 66 Potstickers, page 57 Quinoa Pizza Cakes, page 31 Wonton Cups, page 60 Wonton Wrappers, page 62 Dressings & Dips Guacamole, page 58 Red Pepper Mayonnaise, page 31 Red Wine-Orange Vinaigrette, page 66 Tarragon Dressing, page 29 Soup & Sides Quick Pickled Beets, page 65 Sweet Potato Rounds, page 54 Tomato Red Pepper Soup, page 52 Salads Red Slaw with Beets & Fennel, page 65 Roasted Beet Spinach Salad, page 66 Sorghum Salad with Corn, Tomatoes & Tarragon, page 29 Entrees Beef Burgers with Sweet Potato Rounds, page 54 Braised Pork Shoulder, page 70 Chickpea & Quinoa Patties, page 30 Chili-Orange Chicken with Masala Carrots, page 51 Mediterranean Braised Lamb, page 71 Thai Beef Stew, page 70 Thai Pork & Rice Bowl, page 53

88 www.GlutenFreeandMore.com February/March 2016

■ ■

■ ■

No Peanuts, No Nuts Nuts can be omitted or substitutions provided.

Soy-Free Soy-Free substitutions provided.

Low Sugar Recipe contains 5g of sugar or less per serving.

Low Sodium Recipe contains 140mg of sodium or less per serving.

Egg-Free Egg-Free substitution instructions provided.

Dairy-Free Dairy-Free substitutions provided.

Guten-Free All recipes in this magazine are gluten-free.

Icons (or colors) identify recipes that are most appropriate for certain eating goals.

Key

IMPORTANT: Read the labels of all processed foods that go into your recipe, such as broths, condiments, sausages, chocolate chips, etc., to make sure they do not contain any allergen you need to avoid. Manufacturers can change their ingredients without warning. When in doubt, contact the manufacturer directly. For a list of companies that offer glutenfree, allergy-friendly ingredients used in these recipes, refer to the Shopping List included in the article.

REZ ART/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Breakfast Baked Oatmeal, page 32


resources Advertise in our April/May Issue. Advertising Space Deadline: January 19, 2016

Gl ut en -F re Da e iry -F re e Eg gFr ee No Pe an ut So s, yNo Fr ee Nu ts Lo w Su ga r Lo w So di um

For information, contact Susan Tauster at stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com or call 630-858-1558.

Macaroni & Cheese Cauliflower Mac & Cheese, page 38 Mac & Cheese with Roasted Peppers, Jalapeños & Bacon, page 36 Stovetop Mac & Goat Cheese, page 37 Vegan Mac & Cheese, page 35

CUPCAKE AND CHOCOLATE MOUSSE PHOTOS BY RICKI HELLER

Topping Crumb Topping for Mac & Cheese, page 37 Desserts Buttercream Frosting, page 42 Chocolate Beet Cheesecake, page 68 Chocolate Chestnut Mousse, page 44 Chocolate Yogurt Sauce, page 55 Icing, page 47 Maple Pears, page 55 No-Bake Butterscotch Layer Bars, page 45 Orange Crème Truffles, page 42 Pink Velvet Cupcakes, page 41 Yankee Ginger Snaps, page 49 Gluten-Free Flour Blends GF&M All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 87 GF&M High-Fiber Blend, page 87 GF&M High-Protein Blend, page 87 GF&M Self-Rising Flour Blend, page 87 Jules’ Homemade All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 62 Ricki’s All-Purpose Gluten-Free Flour Mix, page 44

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February/March 2016 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

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Gluten Free & More February-March 2016  

Classic Gooey Gluten-Free Mac & Cheese Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread & Hot Cross Buns Smart Gluten-Free Savings at Club Stores No-Guilt Gluten-...

Gluten Free & More February-March 2016  

Classic Gooey Gluten-Free Mac & Cheese Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread & Hot Cross Buns Smart Gluten-Free Savings at Club Stores No-Guilt Gluten-...