Page 1

Gluten & FMree ORE Gourmet Summer Salads & Meals in Minutes

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

BEST GF BREAD  S    ! 75  varieties reviewed +

Frozen

DESSERTS Lunchbox TREATS

Muffins, Crackers & Snack Cakes

GLUTEN   BUSTER! New Protection for Cross Contamination

Easy STEPS to STRONGER BONES

How Does Your GF Loaf Stack Up? page 36


Gluten & FMree ORE

contents August/September 2017

features 26 Outdoor Eats

Easy summer feasting in your own backyard.

32 Eat Your Veggies

Simple plant-based dishes for weeknight dining.

36 Best GF Breads

on the cover Best GF Breads, page 36.

Gluten&Free MORE Gourmet Summer Salads & Meals in Minutes

BEST GF PACKAGED BREADS I FROZEN DESSERTS I LUNCHBOX TREATS I PLANT-BASED DISHES I BACKYARD DINING I PROTECTION FOR CROSS CONTAMINATION

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA; PASTA SALAD PHOTO BY OKSANA CHARLA

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017

BEST GF BREAD S! 75 varieties reviewed +

Frozen

DESSERTS Lunchbox TREATS

46 Marvelous Muffins

Easy to make. Easy to love.

52 DIY Crackers

These guilt-free snacks are good for you.

56 Frozen Desserts

Ice-cold goodies for sweltering days.

How Does Your GF Loaf Stack Up? page 36

Muffins, Crackers & Snack Cakes

62 Lunchbox Treats

GLUTEN BUSTER! New Protection for Cross Contamination

Easy STEPS to STRONGER BONES Display until September 30, 2017

August/September 2017

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

How do packaged GF loaves stack up? We review every brand on the market.

GlutenFreeandMore.com

in every issue 6 We Hear You 8 Editor’s Note  9 Contributors 24 Ask the Chef 76 Casein-Free Diet Quick Guide 77 Gluten-Free Diet Quick Guide 78 GF Flour Replacements 79 Substitution Solutions 80 Recipe Index & Allergen Guide

We make over classic Hostess-style snack cakes.

66 Beef Bone Broth

This delicious, healing food is easy to make.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  3


26

36

departments lifestyle

10 You Said It

We asked, “If you could eat one meal of any foods in the world, what would it be?” Here’s what you told us.

12 Get Out & Walk!

56

Take steps to stronger bones.

14 We’ve Got “Issues” Irreverent solutions to your real life food dramas.

must haves

16 Don’t Miss This! 18 GF & Vegan

Gluten-free happiness without dairy, eggs and animal derivatives.

how tos

health

20 Considering Colleges

34

68 Resistant Starch

Finding the best fit for your college-bound kid.

 Super food for your digestive system.

24 Ask the Chef

70 Mindful Meditation

Food editor Beth Hillson answers your baking questions.

Calm your mind, your body—and maybe even your chronic pain.

72 Gluten Buster! The AN-PEP enzyme may be great news for those with gluten sensitivity.

74 Research Roundup The latest medical updates for people with allergies and food sensitivities.

food for thought

82  Burrito Blues Practical info to make your life easier, pages 76–80.

GLUTEN-FREE DIET | Quick-Start Guide

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recipe index & Allergen Guide

Don’t eat a food if you are unable to verify the ingredients or if the ingredient list is unavailable. Regardless of the amount eaten, if you have celiac disease, damage to the small intestine occurs every time gluten is consumed, whether symptoms are present or not.

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Appetizers Artichoke and White Bean Dip Beverages Chai Sweet Potato Smoothie Pineapple Salsa Smoothie Raspberry-Lemon Cheesecake Smoothie ➥ Grains allowed ➥ Grains not allowed in Taste-Like-Ice-Cream Kale Smoothie any form Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato, Tapioca, Beans, Breakfast Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, Wheat (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, Acai Granola Bowl Arrowroot, Amaranth, Teff, Montina, Flax and Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale. Overnight French Toast Casserole Nut Flours. Quinola Cereal Whole Grain Matcha Cereal ➥ Foods/products that may contain gluten Breads Video Instructions Cinnamon Raisin Bread Beers, Ales, Lager Marinades Wheat Free Is Not For step-by-step flour blend Breading & Coating Mixes Nutritional Supplements Coffee Cake instuctions, go to Gluten Free Brown Rice Syrup Pastas LivingWithout.com/flourblend. Flax Garlic Flatbread Products labeled wheat Communion Wafers Processed Luncheon Meats free are not necessarily Molasses Oat Bread Croutons gluten free. They may still Sauces, Gravies Multigrain Bread contain spelt, rye or barleyButter Dressings Yogurt Self-basting Poultry Buttermilk Sesame Seed Italian Bread Milk based ingredients that are 1 cup (1 stick = 8 tablespoons = ½ cup = 4 ounces) Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Soy Sauce Depending on the recipe, replace Soy Sauce Solids on the recipe, replace 1 cup Depending 1 cup replaceand Teff Pumpernickel Depending on the recipe, not gluten free. Spelt is a Depending on the recipe, replace Energy Bars 1 of the following: Soup Bases yogurtofwith buttermilk with 1 of the following: form wheat. Toaster Pastries cow's milk with 1 of the following: 8 tablespoons butter with 1 of the Flour & Cereal Products Stuffings, Dressings yogurt coconut or rice soy, cup 1 Salad Dressing 1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon 1 cup rice milk Herbal Supplements following: Thickeners (Roux) unsweetened 1 cup in lemon juice or 1 tablespoon Berry Red Vinaigrette Keep mindapplesauce 1 cup fruit juice Imitation Bacon Vitamins & Mineral Supplements 8 tablespoons Earth Balance (Nonpuree fruitgluten-free 1 cupthe Starting cider vinegar (Let stand until Soups 1 cup coconut milk Imitation Seafood Dairy) Buttery Spread or Sticks diet before being tested slightly thickened.) Chilled Avo and Cuke Soup 1 cup goat's milk, if tolerated for celiac disease makes an 8 tablespoons Spectrum Organic ➥ How about alcohol? 1 cup coconut milk Watermelon Gazpacho Is The Bomb! 1 cup hemp milk accurate diagnosis difficult. Shortening cup rice milk Entrees Distilled alcoholic beverages and vinegars (except malt vinegar) are gluten 7⁄8 free. Distilled products 8 tablespoons coconut oil cup fruit juice 7⁄8 are Black Bean Burgers do not contain any harmful gluten peptides. Wine and hard liquor beverages gluten free. 8 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil 7⁄8 cup water Chicken Mole Stew Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten free. For reduced fat: LIVING WITHOUT’s Veggie Quice with Polenta Crust 6 tablespoons unsweetened appleThe magazine with Desserts Always read the label of choice & Bars & MORE fat tablespoons 2 + sauce Happy Halloween the answers The key to understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. Chocolate Macroon Squares ! Don’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can Chocolate Maple Sunflower Squares Thanksgivin -------Gluten Free & More Made Perfect g these recipes You can double or triple combine all ingredients. verify they do not contain or are not derived thoroughly a flour blend, Chocolate Teff Pudding from prohibited Tosmake grains. Labels must GutenFreeandMore.com Gum One-Pot Eggs Meals until used. be read every Star chesare purchased. Manufacturers time foods need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator as you canblend Classic Apricot Bars change ingredients to make as much ■ recipes, recipes, recipes Baking Secrets rs time. As of 2006, wheat used in products 1 large Depending on the recipe, replace at any from America’s is identified on the label. As of Stabilize Granola Bars Test Kitchen ■ expert advice Heal Your Gut ure 2014, products bearing “gluten free” on the package must contain less egg with 1 of the following: Pumpkin Pie Bar with Fermented August Foods Flour Blend High-Protein Blend (add text latest research High-Fiber■ Flour Flour Blend er All-Purpose e) Powd stur than 20ppm gluten. Agar flax Care MAKES 3 CUPS er Personal ➥ Flax or Chia Gel: 1 tablespoon MAKES 3 CUPS and moi MAKES 3 CUPS Arrowroot Powd + 3 Hair Care nutritious blend works best in baked meal, chia seed or salba seed Chlorine Depending on the recipe, use this blend This high-fiber blend works for breads, pan- This Almond Flour Celiac Disease Foundation such as Celiac Support stand, stir- Hair Pack an Association Gluten Intolerance goods that containFoundation tablespoons hot water. (Let National Conditioning forrequire bars and cookies that Celiacelasticity, Awareness geen cakes, snack Group for most gluten-free baking. 31214 Carra 20350 Ventura Blvd., Ste 240 PO Box 31700 124th Ave. SE Box 544 wraps and pie crusts. minutes or tarch ring occasionally, about 10Summer or other Mask spices, raisinsPO Corns Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Omaha, NE 68131-0700 Auburn, chocolate, warm

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ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free diet. Not all areas of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intended to be used as a temporary survival tool until additional information can be obtained. Understanding these dietary requirements will enable the newly diagnosed to read labels of food products and determine if a product is gluten free. Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect those with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the absence of symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of proteins contained in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. Research indicates that pure, uncontaminated oats consumed in moderation (up to ½ cup dry oats daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free oats are currently available in the United States. Consult your physician or dietitian before including oats in your diet and for regular monitoring.

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until thickened. Use without straining.)

➥ Egg Replacer: Ener-G Foods egg replacer, according to package directions ➥Tofu: 4 tablespoons pureed silken tofu + 1 teaspoon baking powder ➥ Applesauce: 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce (or other fruit puree) ✱ Recipe can be made dairy-free. + 1 teaspoon baking powder ✱ Recipe can be made egg-free.

Low Sugar 5g sugar or less per serving Low Salt 140mg sodium or less per serving Quick & Easy 30 minutes or less for prep and cooking

ZUCCHINI “PASTA” PRIMAVERA PHOTO BY ERIN SCOTT; GRILLED SALMON AND STACKED BREAD PHOTOS BY OKSANA CHARLA; PINEAPPLE DREAM PIE PHOTO BY JULES SHEPARD

Special products for your special diet.


Nice Words

health

BY AMY BURKHAR T, MD, RD

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

BEST PIZZAS ! Secrets from Rome 20-Minute KEBABS

Common Symptoms of POTS Major symptoms of POTS include the following. Symptoms can worsen with heat and after showering. Fatigue Anxiety Exercise intolerance Muscle pains Mottling or discoloration of legs Shortness of breath Dizziness Foot or leg pain Brain fog Digestive problems Cold hands or feet Balance problems Nausea Headaches Abnormal sweating Gynecological issues

Gluten & POTS

SCONES & CAKES

FOOD for the GREAT

A condition that causes fatigue & dizziness could tie into celiac disease & gluten sensitivity

OUTDOORS

GLUTEN: How Sensitive are YOU?

10 Tips for Gluten-Free Diet Success

Teresa B. on Facebook

72 www.GlutenFreeandMore.c

om

June/July 2017

Editor’s note: One of the most talked-about topics in our June/July issue wasn’t pizza or breakfast scones. It was POTS—Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome. Our readers took to social media to comment on this story. This condition, which causes fatigue, dizziness, anxiety, shortness of breath and other symptoms, may tie in with celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. For more about POTS, go to GlutenFreeAndMore.com/POTS

GF Medications

Q

you said it ❥ One thing that surprised me was that I

❥ By having to give up gluten and other

continues to surprise me—is what a hassle it is to find gluten-free medicine. There’s nothing more aggravating than ending up in the ER only to have the staff unable to get me a gluten-free medication. When I asked the pharmacy to check the gluten-free status of the medications my doctor ordered, I was informed the company couldn’t tell them whether it was gluten-free. I had to get it filled and take my chances.

If you could eat one meal of any food in the world, what would it be?

you most about going I found your magazine a few gluten-free? years ago—a godsend after years of struggling with my celiac diagnosis. I’m grateful for all the information, recipes BOTH HANDS and support that Gluten Free & REQUIRED. More offers. In June/July’s “You Said It,” a reader wrote about her frustrating experiences with gluten-free medication. I’m certain this issue need antibiotics, corticosteroids or other affects most celiacs. I spend many hours medications for acute conditions, have them each month researching medications; most request it in IV or injectable form. That way, are not a problem. However, with each illness if it takes days for the pharmacy to fill a or new diagnosis, I have to begin the search prescription with gluten-free medications all over again. Adding to the difficulties is (as it often does), they have a head start on the fact that new medications and generics treatment. are approved every month by the FDA. And There was a bill in Congress in 2015 most new production facilities are built in requiring all medications be labeled if they foreign countries that don’t have as exacting contain gluten. The bill never made it out of standards as the United States. The FDA does committee due to pushback citing “onerous not inspect every facility every month and regulations,” among other objections. so most discrepancies, unfortunately, aren’t Another article in Gluten Free & More discovered until a problem occurs. about this topic would be both timely and A note about emergency and urgent helpful. care medications—I’ve found that the majority of medications in injection Mairi-Kathleen M . via email form are gluten-free. So if your readers Anne B. Cottonwood, AZ

❥ I’m 58, a diagnosed celiac for eight years. One thing that surprised me is that people just don’t get it. Or they really don’t care. We were invited to friends for Sunday coffee and entered the house to the yummy aroma of freshly baked scones and quiche, none of which were gluten-free. The host sliced me a piece of cheese. I belong to an art group and we all take turns bringing birthday cake when it’s one of our birthdays. Only one out of 12 women will bake a gluten-free cake. Most of the time, I sit and watch them all eat.

Cindy V. Fort Bragg, CA

❥ When diagnosed with celiac disease

at age 40, I stopped eating gluten suddenly and immediately. Before diagnosis, I couldn’t imagine living without (regular) bread and all the baked goods I’d eaten my whole life. I was pleasantly surprised to find a whole new world of gluten-free baking.

Christina G. Elk Mound, WI

Editor’s note: For information about gluten in your medication, check out glutenfreedrugs. com. For an in-depth article about this topic, visit GlutenFreeAndMore.com/medicine.

Isabelle F. BC, Canada

Let’s pretend you can safely eat one meal of your choice. This meal could include any gluten-filled items your heart desires, anything you crave. What would you choose? Let us know and you could receive a free package of products ($110 value) from Simple Mills. A leader in the clean food movement, Simple Mills manufactures natural baking mixes and crackers, as well as newly introduced frostings and cookies. All products are free of grain, gluten, dairy, soy, GMOs, excessive sugar and artificial flavors and fillers.

Write to editor@GlutenFreeAndMore.com Subject: One Meal

S. Snow Campbell, CA

❥ What surprised me was how much

❥ I was surprised at how uncaring and

people cared about me and went out of their way. I didn’t have to always bring something I could eat. My friends and family either make food for me or buy it already made. Instead of dreading it when we go out for dinner because there’s nothing for me to eat, I feel included. It still surprises me how much my friends and family do for me.

Ellen H. Southfield, MI

sometimes plain rude people can be. A friend has said, “I'm making roast beef. I know you can’t have the cream of mushroom soup I cook it in. Maybe you can rinse it off.” Another friend said, “We're having people over for pizza. You’ll have to bring your own food.” It’s a good thing I always have something I can bring from home but it’s not that easy if I’m visiting people out of town.

Susan C. Georgetown, TX

I was surprised at how my outlook has changed. People will say things to me like, “I would shoot myself if I couldn’t eat bread!” Before my celiac diagnosis, I had similar thoughts—but now that type of thinking gets me miffed. I now understand that you do whatever you have to do in order to survive and be healthy. I also have much more empathy for people with health problems, whatever they are and whatever they need to do to manage their problem.

Joan M. Ann Arbor, MI

Congratulations to Joan M. She was selected to receive a prize package of assorted gourmet oils ($150 value) from Ellyndale Foods (ellyndalefoods.com).

ILLUSTRATION OF SURPRISED WOMAN © MARINA VORONTSOVA/123RF

| New Perspective |

Changing your diet means changing your lifestyle. There are consequences, some unintended and unexpected. So we asked you, “What surprised you most about going gluten-free?” Here’s what you told us.

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6  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

A DEDICATED GLUTEN-FREE BAKERY //

DAIRY, NUT & SOY FREE

Danielle W. Southampton, NJ

Cathie P. via email

| Next Question |

❥ What surprised me most—and

gained weight. The only people I knew on a gluten-free diet had lost weight (they were on the diet for non-medical reasons). Then I read that people with celiac disease often gain weight at first because their bodies are finally getting the nutrients they need.

foods, I’ve been surprised to discover so many new and interesting foods and I’ve added more variety to my diet.

Thank you for this amazing magazine. It’s a spirit booster for sure when I see it in my mailbox.

Since we had to go gluten free, the support from this magazine has been so helpful. Thanks.

you said it

What surprised

I love Gluten Free & More and am so sad it is not a monthly magazine. It’s great to have the recipes and to get a glimpse of the new products available for gluten-free meal prep and snacks. Your magazine is a great resource. Thank you for being there. Margaret C. Minden, LA

Once healthy, vibrant and energetic, Lola, age 28, was now chronically ill. This happily married, Silicon Valley IT consultant had such profound fatigue that she could barely make her bed in the morning. Standing for any prolonged period of time caused her legs to ache and her head to spin. She felt awful. Yet despite multiple doctor visits and numerous medical tests, no one knew why. The cause of Lola’s distress turned out to be Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS), a condition that affects the flow of blood through the body, resulting in fatigue, anxiety and dizziness when standing upright. The symptoms go away after lying down. This disorder remains largely unknown to much of the public. However, I frequently see people in my office with this problem and its prevalence seems to be increasing. Recent research suggests that POTS is autoimmune Display until July 31, 2017 in nature. And according to a study published in the European Journal of GlutenFreeandMore.com Gastroenterology & Hepatology in December 2016, there’s a potential association with POTS and celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. In the study, UK researchers found that people with POTS had a higher rate of celiac disease and self-reported gluten sensitivity. Four percent of study participants with POTS had celiac disease, compared to 1 percent of the general population.

PHOTO © SHUTTERSTOCK/9N ONG

BEST PIZZAS IN ROME I 20-MINUTE KEBABS I SCONES & CAKES I SUMMER SOUPS I BONE BROTH I SUPER-SENSITIVE CELIAC I GF 101

Gluten&MFree ORE

GIRL HOLDING HEAD

JUNE/JULY 2017

This sounds like what I am going through. I have celiac and have been experiencing dizziness. I am going to bring this up at my next doctor’s appointment.

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

Gluten & POTS

49 Easy Recipes for a Healthy, Happy Summer

June/July 2017

we hear you

Just purchased your June/July issue. It is just perfect for me right now. Great variety! Thanks.

Diana W. on Facebook

My mom made me the pizza from the June/July issue. It was soooo good. The crust had a nice crunch to it with a soft inside. Yum.

Micah P. Portland, OR

// LOVE BREAD AGAIN®. //

June/July 2017 GLUTEN FREE & MORE

11

We Want to Hear from You ! Contact us at editor@GlutenFreeAndMore.com or write to us at Gluten Free & More, Belvoir Media Group, LLC, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713. Visit us on Facebook at Gluten Free and More Magazine. Follow us on Twitter at @GlutenFreeMore. Check us out on Instagram @GlutenFreeAndMoreMag #WhatsInOurMailbox. Please include your first and last names, complete address and daytime telephone number. Your correspondence is important to us and we value your input. However, we are unable to print or respond to every letter. All letters become the property of Belvoir Media Group, LLC, and Gluten Free & More magazine. Letters may be edited for length, clarity and style.


editor's note

Gluten-Free Food Allergy Fests

August/September 2017

A Love Affair

Any way you slice it, the world of gluten-free packaged food is better and broader today than ever before, especially when it comes to bread. We confess that we have a love affair with bread and we know that you do, too. Given our intense feelings (too often unrequited!), we wanted to determine exactly how commercial gluten-free breads stack up. So we gathered up every variety of gluten-free sandwich loaf that we could get our hands on and taste-tested each one. This happy project was overseen by our managing editor Erica Dermer, a self-described bread enthusiast, assisted by others on the GF&M team and their families. Our reviewers bit off a lot—tasting, toasting, munching, chewing, savoring and swallowing hundreds of slices. You’ll find our comprehensive review of glutenfree packaged breads—and which ones won us over—starting on page 36. As summer deepens, rely on our food articles to satisfy your hot weather appetite. In these pages, you’ll find recipes for delicious outdoor dining, wonderful salads and main dishes made with harvest-fresh produce and indulgent frozen desserts that will refresh and delight. And don’t miss our great recipes for your back-to-school needs—easy muffins, guilt-free

crackers and classic snack cakes are ideal for lunch boxes. This issue’s health section includes coverage of the latest research reported at Digestive Disease Week, held in Chicago. As part of our coverage, GF&M associate editor Eve Becker dug deep into the exciting new research on the AN-PEP enzyme and its potential to protect gluten-sensitive people from crosscontamination. Eve also conducted a live interview with well-known celiac expert Dr. Peter Green, Director of The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University, which is now posted on GF&M’s Facebook page. Let’s circle back to bread. Honestly, many of us have been a little bread starved over the years. But no more. With over 75 varieties of gluten-free packaged breads on the market and growing availability across the country, a palatable loaf is as close as your supermarket or online store.

Alicia Woodward Editor-in-Chief

P.S. Stay tuned for our next big product review. Next issue, we tackle GF pasta!

What You Love About Bread Take a look at readers’ criteria for bread. No surprise–taste and texture rank tops.

1600

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1400

Despite heavy rain, Minneapolis #GFFAFest attendees came, ate and conquered. A gluten-free allergy-friendly donut truck shared fresh-baked donuts with very appreciative Fest-goers. Educational presentations and food demos were well attended, many with standing room only. Thank you, Minneapolis! Next stops: ➥ Richmond, VA August 26-27 ➥ Indianapolis, IN September 23-24 ➥ Portland, OR October 21-22 Visit GFFAFest.com for more information.

Our Recipe Pledge Gluten Free & More strives to be your leading resource for a delicious life, lived well. Our recipes, created by chefs who are special-diet experts, are 100 percent gluten-free. Ingredient substitutions are provided (recipe permitting) for common food allergens like dairy, egg, peanut, soy and tree nuts. Our readership includes those with mild to severe non-celiac gluten sensitivity, people with celiac disease and individuals with mild to severe food allergies and intolerances. Products advertised and/or reviewed in these pages will not fit every reader’s individual dietary needs. Use advertised and reviewed products with full awareness of your specific dietary issues. Always read ingredient labels. When in doubt, contact the company directly.

Follow GlutenFreeAndMore

1200 Number of votes

1000 800

Twitter: @GlutenFreeMore

600

Facebook /GlutenFreeandMore

400 200 0

Results based on 2017 GF&M survey with over 2,000 readers responding.

8  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

Instagram @GlutenFreeAndMoreMag Pinterest /GlutenFreeMore


contributors Whenever her 13-yearold daughter with celiac

ISSN 2379-9323 (print) ISSN 2379-9331 (online)

August/September 2017, Vol. 20, No. 5

disease eats out, associate editor Eve Becker (“Gluten

Buster!” page 72) worries

about cross-contamination. But new research about

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alicia Woodward, LCSW DESIGN DIRECTOR Oksana Charla

MANAGING EDITOR Erica Dermer

FOOD EDITOR Beth Hillson

the AN-PEP enzyme gives

ASSOCIATE EDITORS Eve Becker Jules Shepard

her hope. “Digging into the studies and talking to the

researchers about how AN-PEP breaks down gluten has

CONTRIBUTORS

Katie Scarlett Brandt Mary Capone Megan Gilmore April Peveteaux Rebecca Reilly Victoria Shanta Retelny, RDN Sueson Vess Christine Woods, MSEd Annelies Zijderveld

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Portia Bayer Tim Benko Oksana Charla Cory Derusseau Michael Mullen Erin Scott Jules Shepard

ADVERTISING SALES

Susan Tauster National Accounts Manager 630-858-1558 stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com

MEDICAL ADVISORS

Amy Burkhart, MD, RD Shelley Case, BSc, RD Christine Doherty, ND Glenn T. Furuta, MD Stefano Guandalini, MD Joseph Murray, MD

been enlightening. On a recent overnight school trip, I gave my daughter a supplement of this enzyme before she ate the gluten-free meal provided. It added an extra layer of protection to her gluten-free diet.”

“I love bread—sandwiches, French toast, croutons, stuffing. You name it, I love it,” says managing editor Erica Dermer, who headed up GF&M’s comprehensive review of gluten-free packaged breads (“Best GF Breads,” page 36). “I never thought I’d ever get enough bread to be satisfied—until I sampled over 75 different loaves in a short timespan. I probably won’t be making toast for breakfast for a while!”

“It’s difficult to feel sorry for

TEST KITCHEN Madalene Rhyand

ADVISORY BOARD Cynthia Kupper, CRD Executive Director Gluten Intolerance Group Marilyn Geller, CEO Celiac Disease Foundation PUBLISHER Philip L. Penny

my gluten-free self when I’m surrounded by so many safe, wonderful foods,” says food editor Beth Hillson. In this issue, she shares recipes in “Outdoor Eats” (page 26) and “Lunchbox Treats” (page 62) and advice in “Ask the Chef” (page 24). “I’ve been doing this diet long enough to remember when our choices weren’t so vast or delicious. These days, I’m dining on a big helping of gratitude.”

Food poet Annelies Zijderveld (“Burrito Blues,” page 82) has seen the negative impact that certain menu items can have on her loved

Gluten Free & More is a lifestyle guide to achieving better health. It is written with your needs in mind but it is not a substitute for consulting with your physician or other health-care providers. The publisher, editor and writers are not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences resulting from the use of suggestions, products or procedures that appear in this magazine. All matters regarding your health should be supervised by a licensed health-care professional. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation. The acceptance of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement by Gluten Free & More or Belvoir Media Group LLC of any advertised product or service. Gluten Free & More and Belvoir Media Group LLC accept no responsibility for claims made in advertisements in this publication.

ones. “When you care about someone

Kryptonite…but it is still their choice when it comes to eating,” she says. “It’s confounding to watch the cycle of people deliberately ingesting disruptive food.”

Gluten Free & More (ISSN 2379-9323) is published bi-monthly by Belvoir Media Group LLC, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713.

Robert Englander Chairman and CEO; Timothy H. Cole Executive Vice President, Editorial Director; Philip L. Penny Chief Operating Officer; Greg King Executive Vice President, Marketing Director; Ron Goldberg Chief Financial Officer; Tom Canfield Vice President, Circulation

with a food sensitivity or allergy, you know which food acts as their

Subscriptions $36 (U.S.) annually to Gluten Free & More, P.O. Box 8535, Big Sandy, TX 75755-8535. Call toll free 800-4748614 or subscribe online at GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Reprints Contact Jennifer Jimolka at 203-857-3143, jjimolka@belvoir.com. Minimum order 1,000. Attention Retailers Sell Gluten Free & More in your store. Contact us at retail@Belvoir.com for more information. Write to Us We want to hear from you. Send your comments, questions or concerns to Gluten Free & More, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713 or e-mail editor@GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Send product samples to Gluten Free & More, 4351 N 36 Place #2, Phoenix, AZ 85018. All submissions become the property of Belvoir Media Group LLC and cannot be returned to the sender. Submissions chosen ​for publication may be edited for length or clarity.

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August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  9


By Beth Hillson

Easy summer feasting in your own backyard

26  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

Outdoor Eats


W

arm weather is a perfect time for outdoor meals. Now is the time of year to savor just-picked veggies and take full advantage of your grill. Add sunshine and a mellow attitude and you’re set! Grilling calls for smaller cuts of lean meat (think: quick cooking) and light, flavorful marinades. Don’t scrimp on fresh, vibrant ingredients from local farms—corn, tomatoes, zucchini, cucumbers, herbs—to enhance your meals. You don’t need much to bring out the amazing flavor of freshly picked produce. For these recipes, consider fresh fruit for dessert. Naturally sweet strawberries, blueberries, peaches and pears call for nothing more than a spritz of whipped cream and a sprig of mint to top off your meal.

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S | M A R I N AT E : 2 H O U R S | C O O K : 1 0 - 1 2 M I N U T E S

Korean Pork & Lettuce Wraps M A K E S 4 TO 6

Fun finger food and hearty gluten-free beer or a crisp white wine are synonymous with delicious summer dining. Assemble these wraps for an outdoor dinner party or serve the ingredients in bowls and let guests make their own. This flavorful dish can be doubled or tripled for large gatherings.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

2 tablespoons white or red miso (see Shopping List, page 31) 2 tablespoons gluten-free soy sauce 2 tablespoons Sriracha, more for serving 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons dry sherry 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 2 cloves garlic, crushed 1/8 teaspoon pepper 2 pounds boneless pork loin chops 6 bibb lettuce leaves, for serving 1 cup thinly sliced cucumber, for serving 1 cup pea shoots or pea pods, cut into matchsticks to measure ½ cup 3 green onions, thinly sliced, for serving ❧ Dipping Sauce

instant-read thermometer inserted into the center reads 145°F. Remove from grill and let cool. Cut pork into thin strips. 4. Set lettuce leaves on a serving tray. Spoon equal amounts of pork, cucumber, pea shoots or pea pods and green onion into each lettuce leaf. Top with Dipping Sauce. Each serving without sauce contains 246 calories, 6g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 72mg cholesterol, 825mg sodium, 14g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 8g sugars, 34g protein, 7Est GL. Each serving with sauce contains 264 calories, 6g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 72mg cholesterol, 1024mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 11g sugars, 34g protein, 11Est GL.

Dipping Sauce MAKES ¼ CUP

This tangy Asian sauce is the perfect topping for Korean Pork & Lettuce Wraps. 1½ tablespoons gluten- free soy sauce or coco- nut aminos 3 teaspoons honey 3 teaspoons rice vinegar 1 teaspoon sherry 1 teaspoon Sriracha sauce 1 clove garlic, crushed

1. Whisk together all the ingredients in a small bowl. Each tablespoon contains 27 calories, 0g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 299mg sodium, 5g carbohydrate, 0g fiber, 5g sugars, 1g protein, 3Est GL.

1. Whisk together miso, soy sauce, Sriracha, honey, sherry, rice vinegar, garlic and pepper in a medium bowl. Add pork and toss to coat. Marinate in refrigerator 2 to 4 hours. 2. Lightly oil the grate of a grill. Heat grill to medium-high (about 375°F). 3. Grill pork chops 5 to 6 minutes per side or until no longer pink in the center and an

For gluten-free wine and beer that pair well with this recipe, see Shopping List on page 31.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  27


Eat Your Veggies

Gi

lm

ore

Simple plant-based dishes for weeknight dining

ega

I

n this busy world, it’s not always easy to eat healthy. Even though healthy foods are more abundant and more accessible than ever before, life can often get in the way when it comes to making good food choices. While I do enjoy cooking, I’m also a busy working mom and don’t have all day to spend in the kitchen— and I know you don’t either. My family members will only eat meals that taste really good (in other words,

32  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

they can’t taste too “healthy”), and like most families, we also need to stick to a budget. I developed these vegetable-based recipes (featured in my book, No Excuses Detox) with speed, convenience and cost in mind to make healthy eating as easy as possible. Rest assured that eating real food in real-life situations is totally doable, even when you have a crazy schedule.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIN SCOTT

n

B

yM


P R E P: 3 0 M I N U T E S

P R E P: 3 0 M I N U T E S | C H I L L : 1 H O U R

Zucchini “Pasta” Primavera

Mediterranean Quinoa Salad

MAKES 2 SERVI NGS

MAKES 6 SERVI NGS

Pasta primavera is a popular dish featuring lightly sautéed vegetables. This recipe takes it a step further by making it entirely vegetablebased using zucchini “noodles” as the pasta. Zucchini is surprisingly satisfying as a pasta alternative. When it’s tossed with other flavorful vegetables, herbs and a touch of cheese, no one will miss the traditional version. Store leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 3 days.

Despite its reputation as a super grain, quinoa is not technically a grain. It’s a seed that happens to be a complete protein, containing all 9 essential amino acids, as well as iron, magnesium, vitamin B2 and manganese—all necessary for healthy brain function. Combined with an assortment of fresh herbs, olive oil and crunchy chopped vegetables, this salad is bursting with flavor. Serve it cold or at room temperature. Store leftovers in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 4 days. Leftovers make an easy-pack lunch.

2 large zucchini 1 tablespoon coconut oil or butter 1 red onion, thinly sliced 1 carrot, julienned 1 red bell pepper, chopped 1 pound asparagus, tough stems re- moved, chopped, or chopped broccoli 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 pint cherry tomatoes, sliced in half ½ teaspoon fine sea salt 1 teaspoon dried basil 1 teaspoon dried oregano ❧ Pinch of red pepper flakes, optional 6 tablespoons grated Pecorino Romano cheese or dairy-free alternative

2 cups uncooked quinoa, rinsed and drained 4 cups water ½ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 teaspoons fine sea salt ❧ Freshly ground black pepper 1 cup minced green onions, white and green parts

½ red onion, chopped 1 cup loosely packed chopped fresh dill 1 cup loosely packed chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1 cucumber, chopped 1 large red bell pepper, chopped 10–15 olives, chopped (such as Castel- vetrano)

1. In a saucepan, combine quinoa and water and bring to a boil. Cover and lower heat, cooking quinoa until it has absorbed all the water, about 15 minutes. Fluff with a fork and let cool. 2. In a large bowl, whisk together lemon juice, olive oil, salt and a few grinds of pepper to make a dressing. 3. Add cooked quinoa and toss it in the dressing to coat well. 4. Add green onions, red onion, dill, parsley, cucumber, bell pepper and olives and toss well to combine. Let mixture marinate in the refrigerator 1 hour before serving. Each serving contains 333 calories, 14g total fat, 3g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 869mg sodium, 45g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 3g sugars, 10g protein, 23Est GL.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIN SCOTT

1. Turn zucchini into spaghetti-like noodles using a spiralizer or use a vegetable peeler to create long, thin zucchini ribbons. Then set them aside. 2. In a large pot, melt coconut oil over medium heat. Add onion and carrot and sauté 5 minutes. Add bell pepper and asparagus and sauté until all veggies are tender, about 8 minutes. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. 3. Add zucchini noodles, tomatoes, salt, basil, oregano and red pepper flakes (if using) and sauté until zucchini is tender, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove pot from the heat. 4. Sprinkle cheese over the top and adjust seasoning, if needed. Serve warm. Each serving contains 290 calories, 11g total fat, 9g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 15mg cholesterol, 832mg sodium, 40g carbohydrate, 13g fiber, 21g sugars, 17g protein, 16Est GL.

Miss the Meat in Zucchini “Pasta” Primavera? Add your favorite high-quality chopped or cubed meat to the pan while cooking the peppers and asparagus in step 2; drain off any juices.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  33


Best

BY ERICA DERMER

GF BREADS We all love bread & now most of us buy it readymade. Here’s how gluten-free packaged brands stack up.

36  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

I

n a recent Gluten Free & More survey, we found that over 80 percent of our readers purchase packaged bread at least once a month. Almost 50 percent purchase it once a week or more. About half of those surveyed said they’ve tried to make a loaf at home—but only half liked the outcome. Let’s face it. Buying packaged bread is just easier. But how does it stack up? We tasted almost every gluten-free packaged brand in the United States to find out.


The Market Overview Don’t let anyone tell you there aren’t enough glutenfree breads on the market. While you may see only a few on grocery shelves or in freezers, there’s a good amount of gluten-free bread being sold throughout the United States. We found and tested over 75 varieties of bread, encompassing over 30 brands! (Some are only available regionally or online.)

Taste & Texture Taste and texture are our supreme criteria. For a long time, gluten-free bread was known for its lack of flavor and its crumbly, dense texture. The good news is that all that has changed. We all want bread that we can eat right out of the bag— slices that don’t have to be toasted first. Some breads now reach that lofty goal. We were surprised by their soft texture and flexible slices. You can love your bread again. Although the overall quality of gluten-free bread has definitely improved, a few brands still have a way to go. In our taste tests, there were some slices we just couldn’t swallow, literally. Some slices crumbled when handled, even before toasting.

HAPPY BREAD © THINKSTOCK/ISTOCK/THOMAN

Safety & Certification Almost 50 percent of survey respondents said they look for certified gluten-free bread. When gluten-free bread is certified by a third-party organization, consumers can rest easy, knowing that the product has been tested and falls under 10 or 20 ppm of gluten (depending on the individual certification). Currently, there are four gluten-free certifications: CSA Gluten Free Certification by the Celiac Support Association, GFCO (Gluten-Free Certification Organization) by the Gluten Intolerance Group, GFCP (Gluten-Free Certification Program) by Beyond Celiac, and NSF Gluten-Free Certification by NSF International. Many brands don’t offer certification but they produce their breads in a dedicated gluten-free facility and conduct in-house testing to verify safety. When buying gluten-free bread, look for certification and information on how the manufacturer ensures its product is celiac safe.

Reader Favorites

We asked readers about their favorite brands of packaged bread. With over 2,000 responses, these are our readers’ top 10. 1. Udi’s ~20% 2. Canyon Bakehouse ~20% 3. Schar ~14% 4. Glutino ~5% 5. Trader Joe’s ~4% 6. Three Bakers ~4% 7. Franz Gluten Free ~3% 8. Aldi’s liveGfree ~3% 9. Kinnikinnick ~3% 10. Rudi’s ~2% Editor’s note: Availability plays a factor. The top brands shown are the most widely distributed.

What’s in It? While nutrition is a critical aspect of food, our readers ranked it below price, loaf size and product availability in importance. Glutenfree food is often more caloriedense than its glutenfull counterparts. Check our charts to compare calories, fat, sodium, protein and sugar content per serving among brands. Bread made primarily with whole grains or ancient grains (such as sorghum, millet, buckwheat or amaranth) is a healthy choice. These nutrient-dense ingredients offer more protein, fiber and other benefits than loaves made with white rice flour and starches.

Editor Favorites How did we come up with our favorites? We tasted every loaf of gluten-free shelf-stable and frozen bread we could find, over 75 in all. Slices were judged on texture (toasted and untoasted) and overall taste. We asked ourselves: “Would we buy this loaf with our next paycheck?” and “Would we buy it for our family at full retail price?” We’ve watched the gluten-free bread market blossom over the years. Gluten-free brands have stepped up their quality, improving taste and texture. We’re excited to see how the market will expand in the years to come.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  37


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August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  45


Marvelous Muffins

Zucchini Muffin with Cardamom Streusel

Easy to make. Easy to love.

M

Chocolate Raspberry Dessert Muffin

Apple Carrot with Coconut & Walnut Topping

46  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

By Rebecca Reilly

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PORTIA BAYER

uffins are a delicious way to showcase summertime bounty. Any time you can slip fresh fruit or vegetables into a favorite food without the kids noticing, it’s a definite plus. So we created a basic muffin recipe and tweaked it in four different ways to highlight the season’s produce. And then, as a bonus, we created an indulgent Chocolate Raspberry Dessert Muffin for a special treat.


P R E P: 2 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 5 – 1 8 M I N U T E S

Zucchini Muffins MAKES 12 MUFFINS

Here’s a delicious way to enjoy summer’s abundant zucchini harvest. For a healthier muffin, skip the topping. This recipe can be made eggfree; see instructions. 2 cups Rebecca’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend (page 49) or all-purpose flour blend of choice 1 tablespoon double-acting baking powder ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if xanthan is in your flour blend) ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon ground ginger ¼ teaspoon salt 1 large egg, room temperature 1/3 cup sugar or finely ground coconut sugar 1 cup + 2 tablespoons milk of choice 1 cup grated zucchini 1/4 cup neutral vegetable oil ❧ Cardamom Streusel Topping, optional (page 50)

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease each cup of a 12-cup muffin tin or line cups with paper liners.

2. In a large bowl, place flour blend, baking powder, xanthan gum, baking soda, ginger and salt. Whisk until combined. 3. In a small bowl, place egg and sugar and whisk until combined. Add milk, zucchini and oil and blend well. 4. Make a well in the dry ingredients and pour in the liquid mixture. Stir to combine. Let batter sit 5 minutes. 5. Scoop batter into prepared muffin cups. Sprinkle with Cardamom Streusel Topping, if desired. 6. Place muffins in preheated oven on the middle rack. Bake 15 to 18 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean or with just a few dry crumbs.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PORTIA BAYER

Each muffin without topping contains 163 calories, 6g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 20mg cholesterol, 205mg sodium, 25g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 7g sugars, 3g protein, 16Est GL.

For Egg-Free Zucchini Muffins, omit 1 egg. Reduce oil to 3 tablespoons. Combine 1 tablespoon of flax meal with 3 tablespoons of hot unsweetened applesauce. Let sit 5 minutes to cool. Use this mixture to replace the egg in step 3. Bake 2 to 5 more minutes than recipe instructs until done.

P R E P: 1 5 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 5 – 1 8 M I N U T E S

Chocolate Raspberry Dessert Muffins MAKES 12 MUFFINS

Chocolate and raspberries make these muffins pure indulgence. Let them cool before eating to avoid burning your mouth on the molten filling. This recipe can be made egg-free; see instructions. To reduce the calories a bit, enjoy them without the topping. 1¾ cups Rebecca’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend (page 49) or all- purpose flour blend of choice ¼ cup cocoa, sifted 1 tablespoon double-acting baking powder ¾ teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if xanthan is in your flour blend) ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon salt

1 large egg 1/3 cup sugar or finely ground coconut sugar ¼ cup neutral vegetable oil 1¼ cups milk of choice 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract ½ cup cherry, raspberry or apricot preserves ½ cup mini chocolate chips or topping of choice, optional (page 50)

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 12-cup muffin tin or line cups with paper liners.

2. In a large bowl, place flour blend, cocoa, baking powder, xanthan gum, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Whisk to combine. 3. In a separate bowl, place egg and sugar. Whisk to combine. Add oil, milk and vanilla and blend well. 4. Make a well in the dry ingredients. Pour in the liquid mixture and whisk to combine. 5. Scoop batter into prepared muffin tin, filling each cup about half full. Make an indentation in the middle of each cup of batter and drop in a generous teaspoon of preserves. Top each with more batter. 6. Sprinkle with chocolate chips or other topping of choice, if desired. Place muffins on middle rack in preheated oven and bake 15 to 18 minutes or until done. Each muffin without topping contains 182 calories, 6g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 20mg cholesterol, 208mg sodium, 30g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 11g sugars, 3g protein, 18Est GL.

For Egg-Free Chocolate Raspberry Dessert Muffins, omit 1 egg. Reduce oil to 3 tablespoons. Reduce milk to 1 cup + 2 tablespoons. Combine 1 tablespoon of flax meal with 3 tablespoons of hot unsweetened applesauce. Let sit 5 minutes to cool. Use this mixture to replace the egg in step 3.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  47


BY MARY CAPONE

Fig & Rosemary Artisan Crackers

Crackers The perfect guilt-free, gluten-free snack

C

 rackers are a favorite American snack food— and for good reason. They’re full of flavor, are great bases for toppings and have more nutrition than chips. It’s surprisingly easy to make homemade crackers. Preparing the dough is a snap. Mix the dry ingredients with the liquid ingredients, roll out the dough between two sheets of parchment paper and pop the crackers in the oven. A few simple steps and you’re done. Homemade crackers can be amazingly delicious and super-nutritious. They’re excellent vehicles for wholesome, nutrient-dense ingredients. Packed with nourishment, they make the perfect guilt-free, glutenfree snack.

52  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

P R E P: 2 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 0 – 1 2 M I N U T E S

Fig & Rosemary Artisan Crackers MAKES 28 CRACKERS

These paleo-friendly crackers are slightly sweet and a bit savory. Serve them with your favorite dips or cheese or enjoy them plain. If nuts are an issue, substitute homemade sunflower seed meal (see TIP, page 53) for equally delicious results. This recipe can be made egg-free; see instructions. -3 fresh or dried figs, finely chopped 2 3 sprigs rosemary, stemmed and minced 1½ cups almond meal or sunflower seed meal* ½ teaspoon salt, more for sprinkling on top 1 large egg, beaten

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Lightly grease a baking sheet or line it with parchment paper.

2. In a food processor with the blade attachment, finely chop the figs and rosemary leaves. Add almond flour and salt and process to blend. Add beaten egg and process until a soft dough forms. Dough will be sticky. 3. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough between 2 pieces of parchment paper into a 12-inch square about ¼ to 1/8-inch thick. (Don’t worry if the edges are rough.) Remove the top piece of parchment paper and transfer the dough to prepared baking sheet. With a knife or pizza cutter, cut dough into 2x2-inch crackers and pierce the tops of cracker with a fork to let moisture escape. Sprinkle tops with salt, if desired. 4. Place in preheated oven and bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown. Let crackers dry on baking sheet for 10 minutes before serving.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TIM BENKO; BENKO PHOTOGRAPHICS

DIY

Classic Buttery Rounds


Seedy Date Crackers

Each cracker contains 38 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 8mg cholesterol, 46mg sodium, 2g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 1g sugars, 2g protein, 0Est GL.

For Egg-Free Fig & Rosemary Artisan Crackers, omit 1 egg. Combine 1 tablespoon golden flax meal with 3 tablespoons unsweetened hot applesauce. Let cool. Add to recipe in step 2 to replace 1 egg. For crisp crackers, roll dough really thin (1/8 inch). For Savory Tomato Crackers, omit the figs and rosemary in step 2. Place 3 sundried tomatoes and 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh basil in a food processor and process.

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 2 – 1 5 M I N U T E S

Classic Buttery Rounds MAKES 24 CRACKERS

These rich, buttery crackers are slightly sweet. Although they’re called buttery, your favorite vegetable oil works just as well as butter in this recipe. Sesame seeds and Parmesan cheese add a nice nutty note but if either sesame or dairy isn’t in your diet, just omit it. 1 cup Mary’s Baking Blend (page 55) or gluten-free all-purpose flour blend of choice 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese, optional 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, more for sprinkling on top, optional 1 teaspoon baking powder

Caraway Flatbread Crisps

½ teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if xanthan is in your flour blend) ¼ teaspoon salt, more for sprinkling on top 2 teaspoons honey or agave 2 tablespoons melted butter or vegetable oil 2 tablespoons sunflower oil or olive oil 4-6 tablespoons warm water, more if needed

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour blend, Parmesan cheese (if using), sesame seeds (if using), baking powder, xanthan gum and salt. Add honey, melted butter and oil and stir to combine. 3. Add 4 tablespoons warm water and mix together. Add remaining 2 tablespoons water, a little at a time, until dough is just moist enough to hold together and forms a soft ball when patted together with hands. If dough is too crumbly, add more water, 1 teaspoon at a time, just until it holds together. The more water added, the less crispy the crackers. 4. Roll out dough between 2 pieces of parchment paper to about ¼-inch thickness. Remove top sheet of parchment paper and cut dough into rounds with a 2-inch biscuit cutter or into 2x2-inch squares. 5. Transfer dough to prepared baking sheet. Brush crackers with a little water and top with salt and sesame seeds, if desired. 6. Place in preheated oven and bake 12 to 15 minutes or until golden brown. 7. Remove from oven and let cool on baking sheet. (Crackers will continue to cook as they cool.) Each cracker contains 44 calories, 2g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 3mg cholesterol, 39mg sodium, 6g carbohydrate, 0g fiber, 1g sugars, 0g protein, 4Est GL.

*TIP To make sunflower seed meal, process 1½ cups roasted sunflower seeds and 1 teaspoon sugar in a food processor into a coarse meal, about 1 minute. To make almond meal, process 1½ cups raw almonds and 1 teaspoon sugar into a coarse meal, about 1 minute. (Adding a little sugar keeps processed sunflower seeds or almonds from turning into “butter.”)

The key to making perfectly crisp crackers is using the right amount of water. Add just enough water to hold the dough together when you shape it with your hands.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  53


Frozen

Desserts

BY JULES SHEPARD

P R E P: 4 5 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 0 M I N U T E S | FREEZE: 4+ HOURS

Chocolate Snickers Treats M A K E S 1 2 TO 1 4 T R E AT S

Layers of chocolaty nut-butter goodness make this treat hard to resist. If you’re avoiding peanuts, nuts or dairy, use seed butter instead of peanut butter and a peanut-free, dairy-free chocolate bar like No Whey! candy bars in place of Snickers.

Crust 1 cup finely chopped gluten-free graham crackers ¼ cup sugar 4 tablespoons butter or dairy-free alternative, melted, more as needed

Filling 1 cup confectioners’ sugar, more as needed ¾ cup cream cheese or dairy-free cream cheese, room temperature 1 cup smooth peanut butter, seed butter or nut butter of choice ½ cup half & half or creamer of choice (soy, almond or coconut) 9 ounces whipped topping of choice ½ cup chopped Snickers or choco- late-caramel candy bar of choice

Chocolate Ganache ½ cup semisweet chocolate chips ½ cup half & half or creamer of choice (soy, almond or coconut)

56  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

2 tablespoons smooth peanut butter, seed butter or nut butter of choice ¼-½ cup chopped Snickers or chocolate-caramel candy bar of choice 1/8 cup mini semisweet chocolate chips

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULES SHEPARD

T

he hot days of summer call for refreshing chilled treats. We created these delicious frozen recipes so you can cool off and indulge while enjoying the warm weather.

Topping


P R E P: 2 5 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 3 5 – 4 5 M I N U T E S | F R E E Z E : 3 + H O U R S

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULES SHEPARD

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line a 12-cup muffin tin with paper liners. 2. To make crust, combine graham cracker crumbs, sugar and butter in a small bowl, stirring with a fork until combined. Squeeze some mixture between your fingers to see if it holds together; if it’s too crumbly, add more melted butter until mixture holds together. Portion mixture evenly among 12 muffin cups (about 1 rounded tablespoon each), pressing to cover the bottom of each liner. Place in preheated oven and bake 10 minutes. Remove from oven and let cool. 3. To make filling, place 1 cup confectioners’ sugar and cream cheese in a large mixing bowl and beat until light and smooth. Stir in peanut butter. (If using a thin “natural” peanut butter, you may need an extra ¼ cup confectioners’ sugar to make the filling thicker.) Add half & half. Fold in whipped topping and chopped candy until ingredients are uniformly mixed. Spoon filling into muffin cups up to the top. Freeze until firm, at least 1 hour. 4. To make ganache, combine chocolate chips and half & half in a double boiler over medium-high heat, stirring just until chocolate is melted and mixture is smooth. Remove from heat and let cool slightly. Spoon over each frozen nut butter treat. Return to freezer until ganache is cold and set. 5. To make topping, gently melt peanut butter in a small pot over low heat. Transfer to a small plastic bag with a tiny corner cut out. Squeeze bag to drizzle melted nut butter over frozen treats. Sprinkle with chopped candy and chocolate chips. Freeze at least 4 hours before serving. Each treat contains 428 calories, 32g total fat, 15g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 57mg cholesterol, 95mg sodium, 32g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 23g sugars, 8g protein, 17Est GL.

Cookies & Cream Sundae Bars MAKES 16 BARS

You’ll love this self-contained brownie sundae. Line the pan with foil or parchment paper to make the brownies easier to remove and for quicker cleanup. For best results, do not replace the eggs in this recipe. 2 ounces unsweetened chocolate or 2 100% cacao baking squares 1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips 8 tablespoons butter or dairy-free alternative 1 cup sugar 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract 2 large eggs 1/4 cup cold prepared black coffee or orange juice 2/3 cup Jules’ Homemade All-Purpose Flour Blend (page 58) or all-purpose flour blend of choice 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 32 ounces vanilla ice cream or dairy-free frozen dessert 1 (8–10.5 ounce) package gluten-free chocolate sandwich cookies ¼ cup chocolate syrup

1. Preheat oven to 325°F. Line an 8x8-inch baking pan with parchment paper or foil, pressing to cover the bottom and up the sides. Lightly spray foil with cooking oil. 2. Place chocolate, chocolate chips and butter in a double boiler over medium heat to gently melt. Stir until ingredients are combined and remove from heat. 3. In a large bowl, whisk together sugar and vanilla. Stir in eggs, one at a time. Add coffee and continue to whisk until mixture is completely smooth. Add melted chocolate mixture and combine. 4. In a separate bowl, whisk to combine flour blend, baking powder and salt. Stir into melted chocolate-sugar

mixture until combined. Pour batter into prepared pan. 5. Place in preheated oven and bake 35 to 45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out with only a few wet crumbs (not totally clean or brownies are overcooked). 6. Remove from oven and cool in pan on a wire rack 5 minutes. Lift brownies from pan by pulling up on foil or parchment and let cool completely on a wire rack. 7. While brownies cool, set out ice cream to soften. Crush all but 16 cookies from the package into crumbs. Stir crumbs into softened ice cream, reserving 1/8–¼ cup of crumbs for topping. 8. Drizzle brownies with chocolate syrup and arrange reserved 16 cookies in a grid pattern on top of brownies. Spread softened ice cream evenly over cookies, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle remaining cookie crumbs over ice cream. Return to freezer until completely frozen, at least 3 hours. Each bar contains 315 calories, 15g total fat, 8g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 54mg cholesterol, 177mg sodium, 45g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 26g sugars, 5g protein, 27Est GL.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  57


Lunchbox Treats

Classic snack cakes get a gluten-free makeover

I

By Beth Hillson

62  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

f you wistfully recall the days when your lunchbox contained a classic Hostess snack cake, you’re not alone. For many of us, it’s a gluten-filled lifetime ago since we tasted that iconic combination of tender cake and luscious cream filling. Here are gluten-free versions (they can be made dairy-free, too) of two favorite treats from childhood. Guaranteed to bring back delicious memories, you’ll be delighted by how much they look and taste like the real deal. Make one recipe or both—and let your inner child indulge!


P R E P: 6 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 8 – 2 0 M I N U T E S

Hostess-Style Cupcakes MAKES 24 CUPCAKES

These tasty delights are filled with rich marshmallow creme and topped with luscious chocolate ganache. These cupcakes freeze well. For egg-free cupcakes, see instructions. 21/3 cups + 1 tablespoon Beth’s Gluten- Free Flour Blend 1/3 cup + 1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder 1 tablespoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ¾ cup (1½ sticks) unsalted butter or dairy-free buttery spread, softened 12/3 cups sugar 3 large eggs, room temperature 1½ teaspoons pure vanilla extract 1 cup low-fat buttermilk, soy milk or rice milk 2 cups Creme Filling (page 65) ❧ Chocolate Ganache

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray 24 muffin cups with vegetable oil. 2. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour blend, cocoa powder, baking powder and baking soda. Set aside. 3. In a separate medium bowl, beat softened butter on medium-high speed until fluffy. Add sugar and beat 1 minute. Add eggs and vanilla and beat until blended. Add flour mixture and beat until smooth and incorporated. Add buttermilk and beat to combine. 4. Fill prepared muffin cups halfway with batter. 5. Place in preheated oven and bake 18 to 20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. 6. Remove from oven and let cupcakes cool in pans 10 minutes. Then remove from pans and let cool completely on a wire rack before filling. 7. Scrape Creme Filling (reserve ½ cup for curlicue decoration) into a pastry bag fitted with a ¼-inch round tip. Gently insert the tip of the pastry bag about ½ inch into the top of each cupcake and lightly squeeze some filling into each cupcake. Alternatively, hollow out the center of each cupcake with a cupcake corer and fill. 8. Frost cupcakes by dipping the top of each into warm Chocolate Ganache. Place frosted cupcakes on a baking sheet and refrigerate 5 to 10 minutes to set. 9. To decorate with curlicues, combine reserved

Creme Filling with ¼ to ½ cup additional confectioners’ sugar. Test for consistency by swirling a small amount on a sheet of wax paper to see if it retains its shape. Spoon into a pastry bag fitted with a #2 or #3 round tip or a plastic zip-top bag with a small corner snipped off. Pipe curlicues across the top of each cupcake. Each cupcake contains 217 calories, 10g total fat, 6g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 48mg cholesterol, 150mg sodium, 31g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 18g sugars, 3g protein, 20Est GL

Egg-Free

For Egg-Free Hostess-Style Cupcakes, omit 3 eggs. Add 1 tablespoon arrowroot powder or cornstarch to flour blend in step 2. Reduce butter to 10 tablespoons in step 3. Combine 2 tablespoons flax meal with 6 tablespoons hot unsweetened applesauce; let sit 5 minutes to thicken. When cool, use this mixture in step 3 to replace 3 eggs.

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S

Beth’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend MAKES ABOUT 41/3 CU PS

This recipe makes enough for Hostess-Style Cupcakes and Twinkies. Store in the refrigerator in a zip-top bag and bring to room temperature before using. ¼ cups rice flour 1 1½ cups sorghum flour 1¼ cups cornstarch or potato starch (not potato flour) 1/3 cup tapioca flour/starch 3 teaspoons xanthan gum 1 teaspoon salt

1. Mix all ingredients until well blended. Each cup contains 510 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 600mg sodium, 114g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, 0g sugars, 9g protein, 76Est GL

Chocolate Ganache MAKES ½ CUP

Use this frosting to top Hostess-Style Cupcakes. Let it harden on the cupcakes before decorating them with curlicues. ¼ cup heavy cream, coconut milk or soy milk 4 ounces semisweet or bittersweet chocolate, chopped, or mini choco late chips 1 tablespoon unsalted butter or dairy-free buttery spread, softened

Marshmallow creme makes this filling light and fluffy.

1. In a small pan over low heat, heat cream until it begins to steam, stirring constantly to keep it from scorching. Remove from heat and stir in chocolate until melted and mixture is smooth. Add butter and stir until smooth. 2. Dip the top of each cupcake into ganache. Place frosted cupcakes on a baking sheet and refrigerate 5 to 10 minutes to cool. Each tablespoon contains 94 calories, 7g total fat, 5g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 4mg cholesterol, 3mg sodium, 10g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 8g sugars, 1g protein, 6Est GL.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  63


Beef Bone Broth This delicious, healing food is easy to make

W

hether it’s made with beef, poultry, lamb or fish, homemade bone broth is a delicious, healing food to include in your daily diet. It is rich in nutrients and minerals that help strengthen bones, reduce inflammation and heal digestive issues. Making your own beef bone broth is not difficult. The key is to use high-quality ingredients (grass-fed beef and fresh, organic vegetables) and to have the proper cooking equipment (a large stainless steel or ceramic-lined cast iron stockpot, a strainer, a ladle and storage containers) on hand. Consider making a large batch and freezing it in 1- to 2-quart glass containers and BPA-free ice cube trays for easy access when you need it. Freezing in glass containers means there’s no leaching of plastic chemicals. Fill just to the shoulder of the jar, leaving ample space (at least 1½ inches for a quart jar) at the top for expansion. Freeze

66  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

only cold broth. Refrigerate the broth overnight before freezing to assure best success. To boost nutrition, use bone broth as a base for soups, sauces, gravy and anywhere a savory liquid is suggested. Enjoy a steaming cup of bone broth every morning to get your day started out right.

Beef Bone Broth M A K E S A B O U T 3 Q UA RT S

This recipe can be doubled or tripled, depending on your pot size. Always use quality ingredients, organic vegetables and beef bones from cows that have been grass-fed and humanely raised in pastures. 6-7 pounds beef bones, including some knuckle, marrow and meaty bones and calves feet, if available

BONE BROTH PHOTO BY CORY DERUSSEAU

By Sueson Vess


4 quarts cold purified water 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar or fresh lemon juice 6 carrots, cut into large chunks 6 celery stalks, cut into large chunks 3 unpeeled onions, quartered 2 leeks with green tops 6 cloves garlic 2 bay leaves ❧ Handful of fresh parsley stems and/or thyme sprigs 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 1/2 teaspoon juniper berries 1 kombu stick (a sea vegetable that adds beneficial micronutrients) ❧ Sea salt, to taste (add after cooking)

BONE BROTH PHOTO BY CORY DERUSSEAU

1. Preheat oven to 400°F. Place meaty bones in a roasting pan and roast them in preheated oven, turning after 20 minutes, until brown on both sides, about 40 to 60 minutes. 2. While meaty bones are roasting, place remaining bones in a large stockpot and cover them with cold water. Add vinegar and let sit (off heat) until meaty bones are ready. 3. Add roasted meaty bones, vegetables and remaining ingredients (except salt) to the stockpot and place over medium heat. Slowly bring to a low boil. 4. Deglaze the roasting pan by adding water to the pan and scraping up any bits remaining in the pan. Add this liquid to the stockpot. 5. Reduce heat to low and gently simmer (partially covered) at least 10 hours or up to 24 hours. To keep broth from boiling (boiling gives broth a cloudy finish), keep the lid slightly ajar. As the broth simmers, occasionally skim and discard any scum and impurities that rise to the surface. Monitor simmering broth by adjusting heat and lid. 6. Remove bones and discard. If using marrow bones, scoop out the marrow and reserve for other use. Strain the broth through a fine sieve into another container and discard vegetable solids. If not using the broth immediately, place the pot in a sink full of ice water and stir to cool. (Refrigerating

In a Hurry? When you don’t have time for homemade, these companies offer ready-made gluten-free bone broth.

Calling All Doctors!

Ancient Nutrition ancientnutrition.com Bonafide Provisions bonafideprovisions.com Epic epicbar.com Pacific Foods pacificfoods.com Not every product sold by every company listed is glutenfree or allergy-friendly. Read labels carefully. When in doubt, confirm ingredients directly with the manufacturer.

Are you a doctor, dietitian, nutritionist or support group leader who helps people newly diagnosed with allergies or food sensitivities? Are you interested in supplying complimentary copies of Gluten Free & More magazine to your patients?

We’d like to hear from you! hot stock will cause it to become cloudy.) When cool, cover and refrigerate broth or freeze in portion-sized containers or ice cube trays. Each cup contains 132 calories, 8g total fat, 4g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 36mg cholesterol, 164 mg sodium, 0g carbohydrate, 0g fiber, 0g sugars, 12g protein, 0Est GL.

Contributing chef Sueson Vess (specialeats.com) is a food coach, cooking instructor and author of Special Eats, available at GlutenFreeAndMore.com.

Please send an e-mail to magazine@GlutenFreeAnd More.com with the name of your practice/support group, full address* and phone number. We will contact you with more details about this exciting program. *This program ships to U.S. addresses only.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  67


Quick-Start Guide | CASEIN-FREE DIET

➥ Casein-free alternatives

Milk, Cream, Half & Half Yogurt Sour Cream Cheese Butter Sherbet White Chocolate and Milk Chocolate Ice Cream Ice Milk Creamed Soups and Vegetables Soup Bases Puddings, Custard Whey

Rice, Soy, Hemp, Coconut and Potato-Based Milks Pareve Creams and Creamers Sorbet Italian Ices Ghee (if guaranteed casein free) Coconut Butter Coconut Milk

➥ Bovines and you All bovine milk and milk products contain casein. ➥ Foods that may contain casein Margarine Tuna Fish Cosmetics, Medicines Lactic Acid Artificial Flavorings Semisweet Chocolate Hot Dogs Lunch Meats Sausage Ghee

Kosher is good Kosher pareve foods are casein free. Foods certified as kosher non-dairy or pareve are free of dairy proteins.

The magazine with the answers Gluten Free & More GlutenFreeandMore.com ■ recipes,

recipes, recipes advice ■ latest research ■ expert

DELICIOUS SPRING | CREAMY CHEESECAK E, QUICK BREADS, CAKE

Many non-dairy foods contain casein proteins. Avoid foods that contain any ingredient with casein or caseinate.

PRETZELS I GF TAX BREAKS I GOT GLUTENED? I BRAIN HEALTH

➥ Dairy free may contain casein

POPS, EASTER DINNER, SOFT

examined quality-of-life indicators for those with celiac disease on the glutenfree diet. Research presented by the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University revealed that the cost of gluten-free products is 183 percent more expensive than their wheat-based counterparts. Researchers reported that availability of gluten-free products in traditional grocery stores has increased, while online availability has dropped. >>p 81

➥ Foods that contain casein

APRIL/MAY 2016

Quality of Life  Various studies at DDW

Currently, there are no double-blind studies proving the efficacy of the GF/CF diet in autism spectrum disorders. Several open studies conducted in Europe and the United States do provide strong positive data. There is also voluminous anecdotal evidence on the efficacy of the dietary approach. When removing dairy from the diet, it is vital that adequate calcium and vitamin D be added in the form of fortified milk substitutes or acceptable vitamin and mineral supplements. Guidance from a qualified physician or nutritionist is strongly advised.

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

ATIs in Wheat  Many people with nonceliac gluten sensitivity may actually be reacting to other components in wheat, not to gluten. A multi-site study examined amylase trypsin inhibitors (ATIs, pest-resistant molecules that play a role in grain maturation) and found that ATIs in wheat can initiate innate immunity in celiac disease and promote symptoms in those with non-celiac wheat sensitivity. In a separate study, some of these researchers identified and tested bacterial strains with a capacity to degrade ATIs and reduce their immune stimulatory activity. They found that certain Lactobacillus strains have the capacity to change the inflammatory effects of ATIs. Supplementation with these Lactobacillus strains may help gluten- and wheatrelated disorders, they concluded. More research is needed.

A

casein-free diet has been found to be beneficial for a number of people for a variety of reasons. A gluten-free and casein-free (GF/CF) diet has provided positive results for many people diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, such as autism, Asperger’s syndrome, atypical autism and pervasive developmental disorder.

GlutenFre e Eat Great, Fee

#1 magazine for

l Better, Liv e Well

people with food

allergies & sensitiv

45 + RECIPES

& MORE

ities

Delicious Spring!

Cheesecake, Quick Breads Cake Pops, Eas ter Dinner

Pilates for

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Creamy Cheesecake & Easy Fruit Toppings,

Got Glutened?

9 Quick Fixes

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concluded that the majority of symptomatic celiacs in the study did not have active disease. They recommended further study on the impact of PPIs, NSAIDs and SSRIs on mucosal healing in celiac disease. In separate presentations at DDW, various researchers pointed to other factors that can contribute to ongoing villous atrophy, including rotavirus, HIV infection, cow’s milk protein enteropathy, certain medications (such as olmesartan, a blood pressure medicine), giardiasis (a parasitic infection), Crohn’s disease, H. pylori infection and bacterial overgrowth.

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• Be a food detective • Always read labels • If in doubt, go without • Call food companies if ingredients are suspect. 2017 Note: This guide is not meant to be an exhaustive resource.

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in yo

Slow Cooke


GLUTEN-FREE DIET | Quick-Start Guide

H

ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free diet. Not all areas of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intended to be used as a temporary survival tool until additional information

can be obtained. Understanding these dietary requirements will enable the newly diagnosed to read labels of food products and determine if a product is gluten free. Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage

to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect those with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the absence of symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of proteins contained in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives.

Call First You can verify ingredients by calling or e-mailing a food manufacturer and specifying the ingredient and the lot number of the food in question. State your needs clearly—be patient, persistent and polite.

Research indicates that pure, uncontaminated oats consumed in moderation (up to 1/2 cup dry oats

daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free oats are currently available in the United States. Consult your physician or dietitian before including oats in your diet and for regular monitoring.

➥ Grains allowed Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato, Tapioca, Beans, Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, Arrowroot, Amaranth, Teff, Montina, Flax and Nut Flours.

➥ Grains not allowed in any form Wheat (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale.

➥ Foods/products that may contain gluten Marinades Beers, Ales, Lager Nutritional Supplements Breading & Coating Mixes Pastas Brown Rice Syrup Processed Luncheon Meats Communion Wafers Croutons Sauces, Gravies Dressings Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Energy Bars Flour & Cereal Products Herbal Supplements Imitation Bacon Imitation Seafood

Self-basting Poultry Soup Bases Soy Sauce and Soy Sauce Solids Stuffings, Dressings Thickeners (Roux) Vitamins & Mineral Supplements

Distilled alcoholic beverages and vinegars (except malt vinegar) are gluten free. Distilled products do not contain any harmful gluten peptides. Wine and hard liquor beverages are gluten free. Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten free.

Wheat Free Is Not Gluten Free Products labeled wheat free are not necessarily gluten free. They may still contain spelt, rye or barleybased ingredients that are not gluten free. Spelt is a form of wheat.

■ recipes,

recipes, recipes advice ■ latest research ■ expert

DELICIOUS SPRING | CREAMY CHEESECAKE, QUICK BREADS, CAKE POPS, EASTER DINNER, SOFT PRETZELS I GF TAX BREAKS I GOT GLUTENED? I BRAIN HEALTH

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APRIL/MAY 2016

The magazine with the answers

Starting the gluten-free diet before being tested for celiac disease makes an accurate diagnosis difficult.

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

The key to understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. Don’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can verify they do not contain or are not derived from prohibited grains. Labels must be read every time foods are purchased. Manufacturers can change ingredients at any time. Wheat used in products is identified on the label. Products bearing “gluten free” on the package must contain less than 20ppm gluten.

Don’t eat a food if you are unable to verify the ingredients or if the ingredient list is unavailable. Regardless of the amount eaten, if you have celiac disease, damage to the small intestine occurs every time gluten is consumed, whether symptoms are present or not.

Keep in mind

➥ What about alcohol?

Always read the label

If In Doubt, Go Without

Gluten&Free MORE Eat Great, Feel Better, Live Well

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Delicious Spring!

Cheesecake, Quick Breads Cake Pops, Easter Dinner

Pilates for

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Got Glutened?

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Creamy Cheesecake & Easy Fruit Toppings, page 42

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Secrets to a

Healthier Brain Gluten-Free Tax Breaks

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Be a food detective

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Beyond Celiac PO Box 544 Ambler, PA 19002-0544 215-325-1306 beyondceliac.org

Celiac Disease Foundation 20350 Ventura Blvd., Ste 240 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 818-716-1513 celiac.org

Celiac Support Association PO Box 31700 Omaha, NE 68131-0700 877-272-4272 csaceliacs.info

Gluten Intolerance Group 31214 124th Ave. SE Auburn, WA 98092 253-833-6655 gluten.net

2017 Note: This guide is not meant to be an exhaustive resource.

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in your

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gluten-free flours

GF Flour Replacements

(light) Flours

Neutral

High-Protein Flours

High-Fiber Flours

Stabilizers

Starches

Gums

Brown Rice Flour

Amaranth Flour

Amaranth Flour

Flax Seed Meal

Arrowroot Powder

Agar Powder

Corn Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Ground Chia Seed

Cornstarch

Carrageenan

Sorghum Flour

Chickpea Flour

Chickpea Flour

Potato Flour (not Potato Starch)

Kudzu Root Starch or Kuzu

Gelatin Powder

Sweet Rice Flour

Millet Flour

Corn Flour

Potato Starch (not Potato Flour)

Guar Gum

White Rice Flour

Oat Flour

Mesquite Flour

Sweet Potato Flour

Locust Bean Gum

Quinoa Flour

Oat Flour

Tapioca Starch or Tapioca Flour

Psyllium Husk

Sorghum Flour

Quinoa Flour

Teff Flour

Teff Flour

(add texture and moisture)

Xanthan Gum

Adapted from Gluten-Free Makeovers by Beth Hillson. Available from Da Capo Press, a member of The Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2011. Used with permission.

78  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

GLUTEN-FREE FLOUR PHOTO © SIRYNA MELNYK/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Use this chart as a guide to help select replacement gluten-free flours for all your baking. While not identical, the flours in each column have comparable baking characteristics and serve a similar function in building structure in recipes. If you can’t tolerate a certain flour or you’ve run out, find another flour in the same column (not row) and use it as a substitute.


Substitution Solutions

Gluten Free & More Pantry F or step-by-step flour blend instuctions, go to GlutenFreeandMore.com/flourblend

Milk

Buttermilk

Yogurt

Butter

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup cow's milk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup buttermilk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup yogurt with 1 of the following:

(1 stick = 8 tablespoons = ½ cup = 4 ounces)

1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon

1 cup soy, rice or coconut yogurt

1 7/8 7/8 7/8

1 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 cup fruit puree

1 1 1 1 1

cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup coconut milk cup goat's milk, if tolerated cup hemp milk

lemon juice or 1 tablespoon cider vinegar (Let stand until slightly thickened.) cup coconut milk cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup water

Gluten-Free Flour Substitutions

To make a flour blend, thoroughly combine all ingredients. You can double or triple these recipes to make as much blend as you need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator until used. All-Purpose Flour Blend MAKES 3 CUPS

Depending on the recipe, use this blend for most gluten-free baking. 1½ cups white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup tapioca starch/flour 3/4 cup cornstarch or potato starch (not potato flour) Each cup contains 510 calories, 2g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 6mg sodium, 117g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 0g sugars, 5g protein, 83Est GL.

--------

Self-Rising Flour Blend MAKES 3 CUPS

Use this blend for muffins, scones, cakes, cupcakes or any recipe that uses baking powder for leavening. 1 ¼ cups sorghum flour 1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup tapioca starch/flour 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt Each cup contains 495 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 863mg sodium, 110g carbohydrate, 7g fiber, 0g sugars, 10g protein, 71Est GL.

High-Fiber Flour Blend

High-Protein Flour Blend

MAKES 3 CUPS

MAKES 3 CUPS

This high-fiber blend works for breads, pancakes, snack bars and cookies that contain chocolate, warm spices, raisins or other fruits. It is not suited to delicately flavored recipes, such as sugar cookies, crepes, cream puffs, birthday cakes or cupcakes.

This nutritious blend works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps and pie crusts.

1 cup brown rice flour or sorghum flour ½ cup teff flour (preferably light) ½ cup millet flour or amaranth flour 2/3 cup tapioca starch/flour 1/3 cup cornstarch or potato starch Each cup contains 481 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 10mg sodium, 105g carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 0g sugars, 9g protein, 68Est GL.

1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup bean flour or chickpea flour 3/4 cup arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch ½ cup tapioca starch/flour Each cup contains 462 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 17mg sodium, 100g carbohydrate, 5g fiber, 3g sugars, 9g protein, 66Est GL.

General Guidelines for Using Xanthan or Guar Gum Gum (xanthan or guar) is the key to successful gluten-free baking. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, keeping it from crumbling. ■ Add ½ teaspoon xanthan or guar gum per cup of flour blend to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. ■ Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread or other baked items that call for yeast. ■ Add 1½ teaspoons per cup of flour blend to make pizza dough or pie crust. Note: If you purchase a commercial flour blend, read the ingredient list carefully. Some blends contain salt and xanthan or guar gum. If so, there is no need to add more. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation.

Depending on the recipe, replace 8 tablespoons butter with 1 of the following: 8 tablespoons Earth Balance (Non- Dairy) Buttery Spread or Sticks 8 tablespoons Spectrum Organic Shortening 8 tablespoons coconut oil 8 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil For reduced fat: 6 tablespoons unsweetened apple- sauce + 2 tablespoons fat of choice

Eggs

--------

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 large egg with 1 of the following: ➥ Flax or Chia Gel: 1 tablespoon flax meal, ground chia seed or salba seed + 3 tablespoons hot water. (Let stand, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes or until thickened. Use without straining.) ➥ Egg Replacer: Ener-G Foods egg replacer, according to package directions ➥Tofu: 4 tablespoons pureed silken tofu + 1 teaspoon baking powder ➥ Applesauce: 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce (or other fruit puree) + 1 teaspoon baking powder IMPORTANT! Replacing more than two eggs can change the integrity of a recipe. For recipes that call for a lot of eggs, like a quiche, use pureed silken tofu, if soy is tolerated. Because egg substitutions add moisture, you may have to increase baking times slightly.

Nuts

--------

Depending on the recipe, replace tree nuts or peanuts with an equal amount of 1 of the following: Toasted coconut flakes, Sunflower seeds, Toasted sesame seeds (use only 2 to 3 tablespoons), Crushed cornflakes, Crushed crispy rice cereal, Crushed potato chips OR Pumpkin seeds

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  79


80  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  August/September 2017

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■ Low Sugar Recipe contains 5g of sugar or less per serving. ■ Low Sodium Recipe contains 140mg of sodium or less per serving.

■ Dairy-Free ✱ Dairy-free substitutions provided.

■ Soy-Free ✱ Soy-free substitutions provided.

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■ Gluten-Free All recipes in this magazine are gluten-free.

■ No Peanuts, No Nuts ✱ Nuts can be omitted or substitutions provided.

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Icons (or colors) identify recipes that are most appropriate for certain eating goals.

■ Egg-Free ✱ Egg-free substitution instructions provided.

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Key

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IMPORTANT: Read the labels of all processed foods that go into your recipe, such as broths, condiments, sausages, chocolate chips, etc., to make sure they do not contain any allergen you need to avoid. Manufacturers can change their ingredients without warning. When in doubt, contact the manufacturer directly. For a list of companies that offer gluten-free, allergyfriendly ingredients used in these recipes, refer to the Shopping List included in the article.

ZUCCHINI “PASTA” PRIMAVERA PHOTO BY ERIN SCOTT; CONFETTI QUINOA TOMATO BOWLS PHOTO BY OKSANA CHARLA

Crackers Caraway Flatbread Crisps, page 54 Classic Buttery Rounds, page 53 Fig & Rosemary Artisan Crackers, page 52 Savory Seed & Oat Crackers, page 54 Seedy Date Crackers, page 54 Muffins Apple Carrot Muffins, page 48 Banana Blueberry Muffins, page 48 Chocolate Raspberry Dessert Muffins, page 47 Lemon Blueberry Muffins, page 49 Zucchini Muffins, page 47 Soup Beef Bone Broth, page 66 Salads Confetti Quinoa Tomato Bowls, page 29 Greek Pasta Salad, page 30 Mediterranean Quinoa Salad, page 33 Sauces & Dressings Dipping Sauce, page 27 Greek Dressing, page 30 Entrees Grilled Greek Chicken, page 28 Korean Pork & Lettuce Wraps, page 27 Lime & Chili Salmon Fillets, page 28 Rainbow Lo Mein, page 34 Zucchini “Pasta” Primavera, page 33 Desserts Chocolate Snicker Treats, page 56 Cookies & Cream Sundae Bars, page 57 Creme Filling, page 65 Hostess-Style Cupcakes, page 63 Hostess-Style Twinkies, page 64 Ice Cream Sandwich Cake, page 58 Ice Crispy Treat Pie, page 59 Pineapple Dream Pie, page 60 Toppings & Glazes Cinnamon-Sugar Topping, page 50 Chocolate Ganache, page 63 Lemon Glaze, page 50 Streusel Topping, page 50 Gluten-Free Flour Blends & Baking Ingredients Beth’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend, page 63 Dairy-Free Sweetened Condensed Milk, page 59 GF&M All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 79 GF&M High-Fiber Flour Blend, page 79 GF&M High-Protein Flour Blend, page 79 GF&M Self-Rising Flour Blend, page 79 Jules’ Homemade All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 58 Mary’s Baking Blend, page 55 Rebecca’s Gluten-Free Flour Blend, page 49

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recipe index & Allergen Guide


Ad Index

resources Be a food safety hero! August/September 2017

AllergyHome.org..............................................................................................65 Best Gluten Free Cookbook......................................................................59 Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano.........................................................................81 Canyon Bakehouse.................................................................................11, 44 Carlson.......................................................................................................................7 Celiac Disease Foundation........................................................................65 Coconut Bliss......................................................................................................61 ELISA Technologies.........................................................................................81 Enjoy Life...............................................................................................................84 Frey Vineyards....................................................................................................55 Gluten-Free Food Allergy FEST...............................................................45 Gluten Free & More Doctors’ Program.................................................67 Gluten Free & More Subscribe...................................................................15 Hatch Chile.............................................................................................................2 NoGii........................................................................................................................83 NOW Foods/Ellyndale/Q Cups...............................................................23 San-J.........................................................................................................................35 Schar....................................................................................................................5, 44 Simple Mills.........................................................................................................75 Stabilyze.................................................................................................................19 The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center......................51 Three Bakers................................................................................................30, 44 Uncle Wally’s/Pillsbury..................................................................................51

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Advertise in our October/November issue. Advertising Space Deadline: July 18, 2017 For information, contact Susan Tauster at stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com or call 630-858-1558.

RESEARCH ROUNDUP CONTINUED FROM PAGE 76

Another study from Columbia University showed that almost half (46 percent) of patients with biopsy-diagnosed celiac disease have a positive depression screen. Researchers found a moderate correlation between more severe celiac disease symptoms and depression. They recommended that physicians consider depression screening for their patients with persistent celiac symptoms.

Researchers from Columbia University also found that celiac teens and adults with the highest adherence to the gluten-free diet had significantly lower quality-of-life scores than those with the lowest adherence. Roughly a third of individuals with celiac disease had dysphoria (unhappiness, dissatisfaction) stemming from worry about cross-contamination (adults 28 percent, teens 37 percent), dislike of being so vigilant and asking constant questions about their food (adults 28 percent, teens 27 percent), distrust of

restaurant menus leading to extensive planning (adults 36 percent, teens 30 percent), and constant educating of uninformed or dismissive waiters (adults 26 percent, teens 20 percent). Researchers concluded that hypervigilance can have an adverse effect on quality of life. “Research is needed to determine the best level of dietary adherence that can both avoid intestinal damage and long-term complications, yet maximize quality of life and energy levels,” they wrote.

August/September 2017  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  81

Gluten Free & More August/September 2017  

The Best Gluten-Free Sliced Breads: 2017 Frozen Gluten Free Desserts Gluten Free Lunchbox Treats Gourmet Summer Salads

Gluten Free & More August/September 2017  

The Best Gluten-Free Sliced Breads: 2017 Frozen Gluten Free Desserts Gluten Free Lunchbox Treats Gourmet Summer Salads