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Gluten  Glu ten & MFree ORE Delicious Recipes for Cozy Winter Eating Fresh Ideas for Healthy & Delicious Living

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

PANCAKES!

Best-Tasting GF Mixes Fresh Twists on Homemade

Comfort Foods

ANAPHYLAXIS

Preventing Real-Life Mistakes

page 24

Mac & Cheese Shepherd’s Pie Irish Breads Make-Ahead Winter Smoothies

Breakfast

PERFECT GF COOKIES SWEETHEART GIFTS February/March 2018

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

Celiac Expert Alessio Fasano Display until March 31, 2018

GlutenFreeandMore.com GlutenFreeandMore.com


Gluten & FMree ORE

contents February/March 2018

features 30 Pancakes & Waffles

 pgrade your breakfast with these easy U homemade favorites.

34 Perfect Cookies

Foolproof recipes from America’s Test Kitchen.

38 Comforting Dinners

Just like Mom used to make, only better.

42 Ready, Set, Blend!

Winterize your smoothie routine with our cozy creations.

These good-for-you dinners will bowl you over.

52 Super Treats

 utrient-dense sweets redefine comfort N food.

56 Pancakes in a Box

on the cover Homemade blueberry pancakes, page 31

Gluten Glu ten&MFree ORE Delicious Recipes for Cozy Winter Eating

FEBRUARY/MARCH 2018

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

OUR WINTER COMFORT ISSUE I PANCAKES! I COZY FOODS I IRISH BREADS I PERFECT GF COOKIES I SWEETHEART GIFTS I REAL-LIFE ANAPHYLAXIS MISTAKES

PANCAKES!

Best-Tasting GF Mixes Fresh Twists on Homemade

Comfort Foods

ANAPHYLAXIS

Preventing Real-Life Mistakes page 24

Mac & Cheese Shepherd’s Pie Irish Breads Winter Smoothies

PERFECT GF COOKIES SWEETHEART GIFTS EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW

February/March 2018

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

COVER PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRYSTAL CARVER; MILLET BOWL SALAD BY OKSANA CHARLA

46 Meals in a Bowl

Celiac Expert Alessio Fasano Display until March 31, 2018

GlutenFreeandMore.com

The best gluten-free flapjack mixes you can buy.

66 Irish Breads

Delicious recipes inspired by the Emerald Isle.

in every issue 6 We Hear You 8 Editor’s Note  11 Contributors 28 Ask the Chef 77 Gluten-Free Diet Quick Guide 78 GF Flour Replacements 79 Substitution Solutions 80 Recipe Index & Allergen Guide

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  3


departments lifestyle

10 You Said It

We asked, “If a medication allowed you to eat gluten safely, would you take it?” Here’s what you told us. A fun way to strengthen your bones and muscles.

18 We’ve Got “Issues”

30

Irreverent solutions to your real life food dramas.

must haves

20 Don’t Miss This! New products we know you’ll love.

22  Sweetheart Gifts Unique presents for you and your gluten-free loved ones.

30

how tos

24 Anaphylaxis

34

Real-life mistakes and how to prevent them.

28 Ask the Chef

38

Food editor Beth Hillson answers your baking questions.

66

42

health

14 60

70 Gut Feeling  Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth causes chronic digestive problems.

73 Ask the Doc Our exclusive Q&A with celiac expert Alessio Fasano, MD, director of the Center for Celiac Research and Treatment in Boston.

75  Research Roundup The latest medical updates for people with allergies and food sensitivities. Practical info to make your life easier, pages 77–80.

82  The Heart of Baking

recipe index & Allergen Guide

Appetizers Artichoke and White Bean Dip Beverages Chai Sweet Potato Smoothie Pineapple Salsa Smoothie Raspberry-Lemon Cheesecake Smoothie Taste-Like-Ice-Cream Kale Smoothie Breakfast Acai Granola Bowl Overnight French Toast Casserole Quinola Cereal Whole Grain Matcha Cereal Breads Cinnamon Raisin Bread Coffee Cake Flax Garlic Flatbread Molasses Oat Bread Multigrain Bread Seed ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free Sesame diet. Not allItalian areas Bread of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intendedTeff to Pumpernickel be used as a temporary survival tool until Toaster Pastries these dietary requirements will additional information can be obtained. Understanding Dressing enable the newly diagnosed to read labelsSalad of food products and determine if a product is gluten free. Berry Red Vinaigrette Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting Soups children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates Chilled and Cuke Soup anAvo immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not Watermelon Gazpacho Is The Bomb! allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect thoseEntrees with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the Black BeanofBurgers absence symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of Chicken Molecontained Stew proteins in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. Veggie Quice with Polenta Crust Research indicates that pure, uncontaminated Desserts & Bars in moderation (up to ½ cup dry oats consumed oats daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free Chocolate Squares oats areMacroon currently available in the United States. Consult your physician or dietitian before including Chocolate Maplediet Sunflower Squares oats in your and for regular monitoring. Chocolate Teff Pudding ➥ Grains allowed Classic Apricot Barsnot allowed in ➥ Grains anyBars form Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato, Tapioca, Beans, Granola Pumpkin Bar Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, WheatPie (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, Arrowroot, Amaranth, Teff, Montina, Flax and Personal Care Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale. Nut Flours. Chlorine Hair Care Conditioning Hair Pack ➥ Foods/products that may contain Summer Mask gluten

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Video Instructions Beers, Ales, Lager Marinades Wheat Free Is Not For step-by-step flour blend Breading & Coating Mixes Nutritional Supplements instuctions, go to Gluten Free Brown Rice Syrup Pastas LivingWithout.com/flourblend. Products labeled wheat Communion Wafers Processed Luncheon Meats free are not necessarily Croutons gluten free. They may still Sauces, Gravies contain spelt, rye or barleyButter Dressings Yogurt Self-basting Poultry Buttermilk Milk based ingredients that are (1 stick = 8 tablespoons = ½ cup = 4 ounces) Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Soy Sauce Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup Soy Sauce Solids on the recipe, replace 1 cup Depending 1 cup replaceand Depending on the recipe, not gluten free. Spelt is a Depending on the recipe, replace Energy Bars following: the of 1 with Soup Bases yogurt following: the of 1 with buttermilk form of wheat. cow's milk with 1 of the following: 8 tablespoons butter with 1 of the Flour & Cereal Products Stuffings, Dressings Low Sugar 5g sugar or less per serving 1 cup soy, rice or coconut yogurt 1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon Recipe can be made dairy-free. milk 1 cup rice ✱ Herbal Supplements following: Thickeners (Roux) Low Salt 140mg sodium or less per serving unsweetened 1 cup in Recipe can be made egg-free. lemon juice or 1 tablespoon Keep mindapplesauceQuick 1 cup fruit✱juice & Easy8 30tablespoons minutes or less prep and cooking Imitation Bacon (Non& Mineral Supplements EarthforBalance ✱ Vitamins Recipe can be made soy-free by replacing gluten-free soy sauce or tamari with puree fruit cup 1 Starting the gluten-free until stand (Let vinegar cider milkSecret’s Raw Coconut Aminos. 1 cup coconut Coconut Imitation Seafood Dairy) Buttery Spread or Sticks diet before being tested slightly thickened.) 1 cup goat's milk, if tolerated for celiac disease makes an 8 tablespoons Spectrum Organic ➥ How about alcohol? 1 cup coconut milk 1 cup hemp milk accurate diagnosis difficult. Shortening milk /September 2014 cup rice 10malt www.GlutenFreeandMore.com August Distilled alcoholic beverages and vinegars (except vinegar) are gluten 7⁄8 free. Distilled products 8 tablespoons coconut oil cup fruit juice 7⁄8 are do not contain any harmful gluten peptides. Wine and hard liquor beverages gluten free. vegetable or olive oil tablespoons 8 7⁄8 cup water Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten free. For reduced fat: LIVING WITHOUT’s AugustSeptember2014_working13.indd 10 6 tablespoons unsweetened appleThe magazine with Always read the label & MORE sauce + 2 tablespoons fat of choice Happy Halloween the answers The key to understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. ! Don’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can Thanksgivin -------Gluten Free & More Made Perfect g these recipes You can double or triple combine all ingredients. verify they do not contain or are not derived thoroughly a flour blend, from prohibited Tosmake grains. Labels must GutenFreeandMore.com Gum One-Pot Eggs Meals until used. be read every Star chesare purchased. Manufacturers time foods need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator as you canblend change ingredients as much make to ■ recipes, recipes, recipes Baking Secrets rs time. As of 2006, wheat used in products is identified on Depending on the recipe, replace 1 large at any America’s Test the label. As of Stabilize Kitchen ■ expert advice 2014

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6/3/14 2:21 PM

PANCAKE PHOTO BY CHRYSTAL CARVER; MEATBALLS BY JEAN SCHWARZWALDER; IRISH SODA BREAD BY JULES SHEPARD; SMOOTHIE BY MATTHEW KADEY; EXERCISE BANDS BY MICHAEL MULLEN; TRUFFLES BY JENNIFER BEEMAN

14 Body by Bands


ISSN 2379-9323 (print) ISSN 2379-9331 (online)

February/March 2018, Vol. 21, No. 2 EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Alicia Woodward, LCSW

DESIGN DIRECTOR Oksana Charla

MANAGING EDITOR Erica Dermer

FOOD EDITOR Beth Hillson

ASSOCIATE EDITORS Eve Becker Jules Shepard

TEST KITCHEN Madalene Rhyand

CONTRIBUTORS

Katie Brandt Chrystal Carver Nicole Hunn Matthew Kadey, RD April Peveteaux Sueson Vess Jennifer Ward Christine Woods, MSEd Annelies Zijderveld

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jennifer Beeman Chrystal Carver, Cover Photo Oksana Charla Matthew Kadey, RD Michael Mullen Jean Schwarzwalder Jules Shepard Daniel J. van Ackere

ADVERTISING SALES

Susan Tauster National Accounts Manager 630-336-0916 stauster@GlutenFreeAndMore.com

MEDICAL ADVISORS

Amy Burkhart, MD, RD Shelley Case, BSc, RD Christine Doherty, ND Glenn T. Furuta, MD Stefano Guandalini, MD Joseph Murray, MD

YUM.

ADVISORY BOARD Cynthia Kupper, CRD Executive Director Gluten Intolerance Group Marilyn Geller, CEO Celiac Disease Foundation PUBLISHER Philip L. Penny

Gluten Free & More is a lifestyle guide to achieving better health. It is written with your needs in mind but it is not a substitute for consulting with your physician or other health-care providers. The publisher, editor and writers are not responsible for any adverse effects or consequences resulting from the use of suggestions, products or procedures that appear in this magazine. All matters regarding your health should be supervised by a licensed health-care professional. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation. The acceptance of advertising in this publication does not constitute or imply endorsement by Gluten Free & More or Belvoir Media Group LLC of any advertised product or service. Gluten Free & More and Belvoir Media Group LLC accept no responsibility for claims made in advertisements in this publication.

Subscriptions/Customer Service $36 (U.S.) annually to Gluten Free & More, P.O. Box 8535, Big Sandy, TX 757558535. Call toll free 800-474-8614 or subscribe online at GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Reprints Contact Jennifer Jimolka at 203-857-3144, jjimolka@belvoir.com. Minimum order 1,000. Attention Retailers Sell Gluten Free & More in your store. Contact us at shaggett@aidcvt.com for more information. Write to Us We want to hear from you. Send your comments, questions or concerns to Gluten Free & More, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713 or e-mail editor@GlutenFreeAndMore.com. Send product samples to Gluten Free & More, 4351 N 36 Place #2, Phoenix, AZ 85018. All submissions become the property of Belvoir Media Group LLC and cannot be returned to the sender. Submissions chosen ​for publication may be edited for length or clarity. Gluten Free & More (ISSN 2379-9323) is published bi-monthly by Belvoir Media Group LLC, 535 Connecticut Avenue, Norwalk, CT 06854-1713.

Robert Englander Chairman and CEO; Timothy H. Cole Executive Vice President, Editorial Director; Philip L. Penny Chief Operating Officer; Greg King Executive Vice President, Marketing Director; Ron Goldberg Chief Financial Officer; Tom Canfield Vice President, Circulation www.belvoir.com

©2018 Belvoir Media Group, LLC and Gluten Free & More are registered trademarks. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited. Printed in the U.S.A. Revenue Canada GST Account #128044658. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Gluten Free & More P.O. Box 8535, Big Sandy,TX 75755-8535. Periodicals Postage Paid at Norwalk, CT, and at additional mailing offices.

AVAILABLE AT GLUTENFREEANDMORE.COM

www.GlutenFreeandMore.com

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  9


By Chrystal Carver

Pancakes & Waffles Upgrade your breakfast with warm homemade pancakes waffles

PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRYSTAL CARVER

&

Stack them high, butter them up, drizzle them with syrup. These easy-to-make pancakes and waffles are classic morning favorites.

30  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


Did You Know? Grades of maple syrup indicate color and flavor: Grade A Golden (delicate taste), Grade A Amber (rich), Grade A Dark (robust) and Grade A Very Dark (strong).

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S | C O O K : 1 5 M I N U T E S

Blueberry Pancakes PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRYSTAL CARVER

M A K E S 1 0 - 1 2 PA N C A K E S

Blueberry pancakes can be enjoyed any time of the year. If fresh blueberries aren’t available, use frozen blueberries (thawed and drained). These tender, golden pancakes can be whisked up in no time. Serve with pure maple syrup. They can be made egg-free; see instructions. ¾ cup rice flour ¼ cup potato starch (not potato flour) ¼ cup tapioca starch/flour 1 tablespoon sugar 3 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup milk of choice 1 large egg 2 tablespoons melted coconut oil or melted butter 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 cup fresh or frozen blueberries

1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch/flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. 2. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together milk, egg, oil and vanilla. Add to dry ingredients and stir lightly. 3. Spoon batter onto a greased mediumhot griddle and sprinkle blueberries over the batter. Cook until the edges start to brown and bubbles form. Flip pancakes over and cook until brown and cooked through. Serve hot. Each pancake contains 107 calories, 4g total fat, 3g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 20mg cholesterol, 201mg sodium, 17g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 3g sugars, 2g protein, 11Est GL.

For Egg-Free Blueberry Pancakes, omit 1 egg. Combine 1 tablespoon golden flax meal with 3 tablespoons hot water or hot milk of choice; let sit 5 minutes to thicken and cool. Use this mixture to replace 1 egg in step 2. Reserve 1/4 cup of 1 cup milk in the recipe; use reserved milk to thin batter, 1 tablespoon at a time, if needed.

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S | C O O K : 1 5 M I N U T E S

Buttermilk Pancakes M A K E S 1 0 TO 1 2 PA N C A K E S

These golden buttermilk pancakes are fluffy, tender and delicious. They can be made ahead and reheated or frozen for later. They’re slightly sweet and can be topped with pure maple syrup, honey, fresh fruit or whipped cream. This recipe can be made egg-free; see instructions. ¾ cup rice flour ¼ cup potato starch (not potato flour) ¼ cup tapioca starch/flour 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ¼ teaspoon salt 1 large egg 1 cup buttermilk (or 1 cup flax milk or milk of choice + 1 teaspoon white vinegar) ¼ cup avocado oil or cooking oil of choice

1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together rice flour, potato starch, tapioca starch/ flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt. 2. In a small mixing bowl, whisk together egg, buttermilk and oil. Add to dry ingredients and stir just until mixed. 3. Spoon ¼ cup of batter onto a greased medium-hot griddle and cook until edges start to brown and bubbles form. Flip pancakes over and cook until brown and cooked through. Serve hot. Each pancake contains 119 calories, 6g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 19mg cholesterol, 154mg sodium, 15g carbohydrate, 0g fiber, 2g sugars, 2g protein, 10Est GL.

For Egg-Free Buttermilk Pancakes, omit 1 egg. Combine 1 tablespoon golden flax meal with 3 tablespoons hot water or hot milk of choice; let sit 5 minutes to thicken and cool. Use this mixture to replace 1 egg in step 2. Reserve 1/4 cup of 1 cup buttermilk in the recipe; use reserved buttermilk to thin batter, 1 tablespoon at a time, if needed.

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  31


By America’s Test Kitchen

Perfect Cookies

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DANIEL J. VAN ACKERE

Two foolproof recipes from America’s Test Kitchen

34  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


Cookies

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS

I

n the world of baking, cookies might just be the most beloved treat—and the most versatile. Whether they’re an afternoon snack or the sweet ending to a meal, cookies are welcome anywhere and anytime. Here, the chefs at America’s Test Kitchen share their gluten-free versions of two classic cookie recipes, as well as their explanations for baking success.

Gluten-free or not, most peanut butter cookies are either dry and sandy or overly cakey, and they all come up short on peanut butter flavor. The chefs at America’s Test Kitchen wanted a chewy, really peanut-buttery cookie that was also gluten-free. They found they could pack a full cup of peanut butter into their cookies as long as they kept the butter in check to avoid greasiness. To prevent the cookies from being cakey, they used just enough flour to provide structure and volume. Even with less flour, they found they still needed to rest the dough for 30 minutes, as with their other gluten-free recipes. Granulated sugar was necessary for crisp edges and structure, while brown sugar contributed chew and a molasses flavor that complemented the peanut butter.

P R E P: 1 5 M I N U T E S | R E ST: 3 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 2 – 1 4 M I N U T E S

Peanut Butter Cookies MAKES AB OUT 24 CO OKI ES

These cookies will look underdone after baking 12 to 14 minutes but they will set up as they cool. The baking time is very important—2 minutes can be the difference between a soft, chewy cookie and a dry, crisp cookie. Do not shortchange the dough’s 30-minute rest or the cookies will spread too much and taste gritty. 1¾ cups (8 ounces) ATK Gluten-Free All- Purpose Flour Blend (page 36) 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon xanthan gum 1 cup packed light brown sugar ¾ cup granulated sugar 1 cup creamy peanut butter ½ cup unsalted butter, melted and still warm 2 large eggs 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/3 cup dry-roasted peanuts, chopped fine

Using bottom of greased dry measuring cup, press each ball to ¾-inch thickness. Sprinkle tops evenly with peanuts. 5. Bake cookies, 1 sheet at a time, until puffed and edges have begun to set but centers are still soft (cookies will look underdone), 12 to 14 minutes, rotating sheet halfway through baking. Let cookies cool on sheet for 5 minutes. Then transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature. Each cookie contains 207 calories, 11g total fat, 4g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 28mg cholesterol, 112mg sodium, 25g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 16g sugars, 4g protein, 16Est GL.

1. Whisk flour blend, baking soda, salt and xanthan gum together in medium bowl. Set aside. 2. Combine brown sugar, granulated sugar and peanut butter in large bowl. Pour warm butter over sugar mixture and whisk to combine. Whisk in eggs and vanilla and continue to whisk until smooth. Stir in flour mixture with rubber spatula and mix until soft, homogeneous dough forms. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let dough rest for 30 minutes. (Dough will be slightly shiny and soft.) 3. Place oven rack in middle position and preheat oven to 325°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. 4. Working with 2 generous tablespoons of dough at a time, roll dough into balls and space 2 inches apart on prepared sheets.

Notes from GF&M Test Kitchen

If you use your favorite gluten-free all-purpose blend in this recipe, your results may vary. These cookies can be made dairy-free, egg-free or peanut-free by following these instructions: For Dairy-Free Peanut Butter Cookies, use dairy-free white chocolate chips and dairy-free semisweet chocolate chips. (See Shopping List, page 37.) Replace the butter with an equal amount of Earth Balance buttery sticks. Replace the dry milk powder in ATK Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Blend with an equal amount of dry soy milk or powdered coconut milk. For Egg-Free Peanut Butter Cookies, omit 2 eggs. Reduce butter or margarine to 6 tablespoons. Combine 1 tablespoon golden flax meal with 3 tablespoons hot water; let

sit 5 minutes to thicken and cool. Mix 2 tablespoons VeganEgg egg replacer (Follow Your Heart) with 8 tablespoons very cold water. Add cooled flax meal mixture to recipe in step 2, whisking until smooth. Add VeganEgg mixture and combine until smooth. Tip: Do not use peanut butter with visible oil in the jar; cookies will be greasy. For Peanut-Free Cookies, replace 1 cup smooth peanut butter with 1 cup sunflower seed butter. Replace 1/3 cup roasted peanuts with 1/3 cup roasted sunflower seeds, chopped fine.

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  35


By Nicole Hunn

Comforting Dinners

raditional staples, easy dinners and comfort foods are things we all crave these days. That’s why I devoted an entire chapter to the subject in my latest cookbook, GlutenFree on a Shoestring: 125 Easy Recipes for Eating Well on the Cheap (2nd edition). These recipes are three of the comfort foods my family and I love. Simple to prepare, they’ll warm your home and your heart with a feeling of pride, give you a well-earned sense of accomplishment and leave you with more money in your pocket at the end of the day because they’re made from scratch.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEAN SCHWARZWALDER

Just like Mom used to make

T

38  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


P R E P: 2 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 3 0 M I N U T E S

Macaroni & Cheese MAKES 8 SERVI NGS

This recipe for macaroni and cheese is casserole-style with eggs, poured into a 9x13-inch baking dish, covered and baked until firm. This is also a great make-ahead dish. Just prepare the pasta and cheese mixture, pour it into a prepared baking dish, cover it tightly with foil and plastic wrap, and freeze it. When you’re ready to serve it, there’s no need to defrost it first. Just remove the plastic wrap but retain the foil, pop it in a preheated oven and bake until it’s bubbling and the eggs are set. This recipe can be made dairy-free and egg-free; see instructions. 1 (16-ounce) package uncooked gluten-free short pasta (elbows, penne, small shells, etc.) ½ cup unsalted butter, room temperature 4 large eggs, room temperature 1 (12-ounce) can evaporated milk 1 teaspoon kosher salt ❧ Freshly ground black pepper, to taste 12 ounces cheddar cheese

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9x13-inch baking dish.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEAN SCHWARZWALDER

2. In a large pot of boiling water, cook pasta al dente (shave a couple of minutes off the package directions). Drain pasta and return it to the hot pot, off the stovetop. 3. Add butter to the pot of hot pasta and toss gently until butter is entirely melted. This should take 2 minutes or less. 4. Beat eggs in a separate medium bowl. Add milk, salt and pepper and whisk to combine. Add a few tablespoons of hot pasta to egg mixture. This will temper the eggs by slowly coaxing them up to a warmer temperature. 5. Add egg mixture to pasta pot. Then add grated cheese and stir gently to combine without breaking the pasta. 6. Spread entire mixture evenly into prepared baking dish and cover with foil. 7. Place in preheated oven and bake 25 minutes or until it’s bubbling around the edges and the eggs are set. Uncover and

bake another 5 minutes until browned on top. 8. Remove from oven and let cool 10 minutes. Slice into squares and serve. Each serving contains 575 calories, 33g total fat, 19g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 193mg cholesterol, 633mg sodium, 46g carbohydrate, 5g fiber, 6g sugars, 24g protein, 27Est GL.

For Dairy-Free Macaroni & Cheese, replace the butter with an equal amount of buttery sticks (Earth Balance). Replace the evaporated milk with an equal amount of full-fat canned coconut milk. Use a dairy-free shredded cheddar cheese alternative (Daiya) in place of the grated cheddar cheese. For Egg-Free Macaroni & Cheese, omit the eggs. Reduce the butter by 3 to 4 tablespoons.

P R E P: 3 0 M I N UTE S | BA K E : 2 0 – 2 5 M I N UTE S

Szechuan Meatballs M A K E S A B O U T 1 8 M E AT B A L L S

The secret to flavorful Szechuan meatballs is to allow the ground beef to marinate so it absorbs the flavors of the gluten-free soy sauce, honey, vinegar and ginger. Be sure to use ground beef that’s at least 90 percent lean. If you use beef that’s less lean, the fat drains onto the pan when the meatballs are baked and much of the flavor drains right along with it. The sesame oil in the marinade is much tastier and less greasy than the fat in the ground beef. This recipe can be made egg-free; see instructions. ¼ cup gluten-free soy sauce or tamari ¼ cup gluten-free rice vinegar ¼ cup toasted sesame oil 2 large eggs, room temperature, beaten

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  39


Winterize your smoothie routine with these comforting creations 42  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018

BLENDER PHOTO © SHUTTERSTOCK/MALA_KOZA

Ready, Set, Blend!


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BY MATTHEW KADEY, RD

Summer might be a distant memory but that doesn’t mean now can’t be prime smoothie season. Crafted for wellness, these blended drinks will make you feel all cozy inside even in the grips of winter. Blitzing together the right ingredients can warm the body with a cornucopia of musthave nutrients for better health. Apples, avocado, sweet potatoes and warming spices provide plenty of flavor and comfort. So don’t give your blender the season off. Fight the winter blues with these feel-good smoothies.

P R E P: 1 5 M I N U T E S

P R E P: 1 0 M I N U T E S

Apple Crisp Smoothie

PB&J Smoothie

MAKES 1 SERVI NG

MAKES 1 SERVI NG

This drink goes down easy whether it’s served for breakfast, snack or dessert. If desired, swap out the oats for quinoa flakes and the apple for chopped frozen pear. To make ahead, freeze a few chopped apples so you have them on hand when you need them. If using large, soft medjool dates, omit the soaking step and use just 1 date.

High on nostalgia, this smoothie tastes like everyone’s favorite schoolyard sandwich. Navy beans give it creamy texture and mellow flavor, not to mention a nutritional boost of extra fiber and protein. If needed, sunflower butter or almond butter can replace the peanut butter, while frozen raspberries can be used in lieu of strawberries. Top with granola for a pleasant crunch.

1 small apple 3 pitted dates 3/4 cup low-fat plain milk of choice 1/2 cup plain or vanilla Greek-style yogurt of choice 1 tablespoon gluten-free rolled oats 1 tablespoon flax meal 1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract (omit if using vanilla yogurt) 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW KADEY

1. Slice apple into 1-inch chunks. Spread out on a baking sheet and freeze until solid, about 2 hours. 2. Place dates in a small bowl, cover with warm water and let sit until softened, about 10 minutes. Drain. 3. Place milk, yogurt, drained dates, oats, flax meal, vanilla, cinnamon and frozen apple in a blender container and blend until smooth. Each serving contains 350 calories, 6g total fat, 2g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 13mg cholesterol, 117mg sodium, 57g carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 33g sugars, 22g protein, 25Est GL.

1 cup low-fat plain milk of choice 1 tablespoon peanut butter, sunflower seed butter or almond butter 1/4 cup canned navy beans, drained and rinsed 2 teaspoons honey, optional 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1/2 cup frozen cherries 1/2 cup frozen strawberries Gluten-free granola, ❧ optional

1. Place milk, peanut butter, navy beans, honey (if using), vanilla, frozen cherries and frozen strawberries in a blender container. 2. Process until smooth. 3. Pour drink into a glass and top with granola, if using. Each serving contains 446 calories, 12g total fat, 4g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 10mg cholesterol, 443mg sodium, 69g carbohydrate, 9g fiber, 33g sugars, 21g protein, 28Est GL.

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  43


BY BETH HILLSON

Meals in a Bowl These good-for-you dinners will bowl you over Grain bowls are a yummy way to create easy, texture-pleasing, mouth-watering meals. Start with a gluten-free whole grain. Add veggies and beans. Top with cubed or sliced chicken, salmon, tofu, eggs or cheese. Generously drizzle with a flavorful sauce and throw on some crunch. Toss everything together like a salad or layer ingredients in a glass bowl for extra eye appeal. You can use all fresh ingredients or take advantage of leftovers. I save time by cooking extras on the weekend. Then I use these leftovers to quickly assemble healthy grain bowls during the week. These easy recipes (they’re menu standards at my house) guarantee filling, healthy, appetizing meals every time.

Protein

Veggies

46  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


Grain

Putting It Together Whole gluten-free grains, fresh veggies, lean protein, a flavorful sauce that trickles down through the layers of ingredients, a crunchy topping and a garnish of fresh herbs combine to make a delicious grain bowl.

Crunch

GREAT FOUNDATION Start with a gluten-free whole grain like quinoa, sorghum or millet. Loaded with nutrients and fiber, the grain is the wholesome foundation of this dish.

Sauce

Veggies

PERFECT PRODUCE Crunchy raw veggies, like shredded purple cabbage and carrots, and roasted vegetables, like sweet potato, butternut squash, cauliflower and broccoli, are perfect for bowls. Don’t forget raw baby spinach, arugula or kale and avocado, too. Aim for 1 to 2 cups of veggies for each cup of uncooked grain. PROTEIN BOOST Add low-fat protein like salmon, chicken or hard-boiled eggs. For a flavor twist, try smoked turkey bacon, spicy flavored chicken, fried eggs or grilled tofu. Legumes like kidney beans and chickpeas add protein, too; they’re ideal for vegetarians. Add 1 cup (or more) per cup of uncooked grain. SAY CHEESE Dairy eaters may want to add cubed, crumbled or grated cheese for another level of flavor. Dairyfree folks can substitute a favorite dairy-free cheese or omit the cheese altogether.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

SAUCE IT A flavorful sauce brings it all together. Make it rich and creamy by pureeing lightly sautéed ingredients and adding a hint of plain yogurt, cream of choice or coconut milk.

Butternut Squash, Chipotle Chicken & Creamy Apple Quinoa Bowl, page 51.

THE CRUNCH Nuts and seeds add a contrast of textures. Roasted pistachios, sunflower seeds or pumpkin seeds are delicious toppers. Coarsely crushed corn chips are another way to add crunch. THE GARNISH Top with fresh herbs for color and taste. Parsley or basil are good choices.

GLUTEN FREE & MORE  47


By Sueson Vess

Super Treats

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER BEEMAN

Easy, nutrient-dense functional sweets redefine comfort food

C

omforting someone in need takes many forms. Sometimes the need isn’t clearly apparent and typical communication isn’t an option. This is often the case when a child is on the autism spectrum. I work closely with families on the spectrum and have presented cooking classes at the annual Autism One Conference for years. Over the past decade, the conference’s dietary focus has expanded from simple gluten-free, casein-free foods (GFCF) and the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) to striving to understand and meet the complicated needs of each specific child. The parents’ tireless efforts to help their children never cease to impress and inspire me. After a long, exhausting day of cook-

52  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


P R E P: 2 0 – 2 5 M I N U T E S

Cardamom Apricot Truffles M A K E S 3 6 TO 4 0 T R U F F L E S

PHOTO BY PHILIP ROSS

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JENNIFER BEEMAN

This super-healthy treat contains plenty of fiber and protein. Healing spices aid digestion and help ease constipation and gas. Orange oil helps digest fats. Adapt this recipe to fit your dietary needs. If you don’t eat coconut, enjoy these truffles plain or roll them in ground sunflower seeds or a cinnamon/cardamom blend. 1 cup almond meal/flour, ground sunflower seeds or other nut or seed flour 1/2 cup pitted prunes 11/2 cups dried apricots 1 teaspoon orange zest (from a fresh, organic orange) 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/2 teaspoon sea salt ¼ teaspoon ground nutmeg 2-3 drops orange essential oil ❧ Unsweetened dried coconut flakes, to roll, optional

1. In food processor bowl fitted with a knife blade, combine almond meal, prunes, apricots, orange zest, cinnamon, cardamom, salt, nutmeg and orange oil. Process until thoroughly combined.

ing and presenting at last year’s Autism One Conference, I ran into a mom and her son in a hallway. I had watched this boy grow up over the years. Now in an adult body, he was still unable to communicate in a traditional manner. Travel and the unfamiliar surroundings were taking a toll and he was agitated and hungry. His diet was restricted to soft GFCF foods as he was healing from a difficult seizure during which he had bitten his tongue. My fatigue did not compare to what this family was experiencing. Returning to the family’s hotel room with food, I prayed that it would be comforting, nourishing and welcomed by the young man. Tiny steps, one bite at a time—and comfort was restored. The next day, he was peaceful. He kissed my cheek, the ultimate

2. Form mixture into walnut-size balls (about 2 heaping teaspoons of batter). 3. Spread coconut flakes, if using, on a plate or piece of waxed paper. 4. Drop truffles into coconut to coat and roll between hands into balls. Store in the refrigerator. Each truffle contains 33 calories, 1g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 31mg sodium, 5g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 4g sugars, 1g protein, 2Est GL.

P R E P: 2 0 – 2 5 M I N U T E S

Cacao Peppermint Truffles M A K E S 3 6 TO 4 0 T R U F F L E S

This guilt-free treat takes truffles to a healthier place using pumpkin seeds. hemp seeds and figs for additional protein and fiber. Raw cacao is a good source of magnesium. Peppermint oil is healing and soothing to digestion. 2 cups pitted dates 6 dried figs, stems removed 1/2 cup ground pumpkin seeds* 1/2 cup hemp seeds 1 pinch sea salt 1/4 cup unsweetened raw cacao or cocoa powder 1 tablespoon coconut oil 1-2 tablespoons hot water, as needed

3-4 drops pure peppermint essential oil or ½ teaspoon peppermint extract 1 cup finely shredded unsweetened coconut flakes, for rolling, optional 2 tablespoons cacao, for rolling, optional

1. Place dates, figs, ground pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, salt, cacao, coconut oil, 1 tablespoon hot water and peppermint oil into a food processor bowl fitted with knife blade. Pulse until mixture is well combined and comes together in a ball. (If needed, add an additional tablespoon of water, 1 teaspoon at a time.) 2. Form mixture into walnut-size balls (about 2 heaping teaspoons of batter). 3. In a small bowl, combine coconut flakes with 2 tablespoons cacao, if using. Spread mixture on a plate or a piece of waxed paper. 4. Drop truffles into coconut-cacao mixture to coat and roll between hands into balls. For firmer texture, chill truffles in the refrigerator. Each truffle contains 60 calories, 3g total fat, 1g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 4mg sodium, 8g carbohydrate, 1g fiber, 5g sugars, 2g protein, 3Est GL.

*TIP For ground pumpkin seeds, process shelled raw pumpkin seeds (also called pepitas) in a clean coffee grinder, a food processor or a blender until finely ground.

gift from a young person grateful for true comfort food. These treats are naturally sweet without refined sugar. Nutrient-dense, they promote wellness and they help bring comfort.

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  53


By Erica Dermer

We tasted over 70 packaged gluten-free pancake mixes to find the very best you can buy

Part 4 in Gluten Free & More’s in-depth series on the best glutenfree packaged foods. Prior stories include Best Breads (Aug/Sept 2017), Best Pasta (Oct/Nov 2017) and Best Pies (Dec/Jan 2018).

R

egardless of how you make them or top them, everyone seems to love pancakes and waffles. With a variety of gluten-free mixes on the market, it’s easy to make these favorite breakfast foods allergy-friendly. We set out to find the best gluten-free pancake and waffle mixes on the market—the ones with the best taste and the perfect rise and texture. We also wanted to find the top picks for those who eat vegan or grain-free and those who must avoid other common allergens, such as dairy or eggs. After weeks of tasting, what’s our conclusion? There’s a perfect pancake mix for just about everybody!

56  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018

ILLUSTRATION OF HAPPY PANCAKE © THINKSTOCK/ISTOCK/N GVOZDEVA

Who Makes THE BEST GF Pancake Mix?


How We Found the Best

Many mixes feature directions to make both pancakes and waffles. Sometimes the mix preparation is the same, though typically waffles require more oil or butter to keep them crispy. We especially appreciate mixes that have instructions for making smaller servings and don’t require you to use the whole box. Sometimes you just want a few pancakes—not a whole platter!

We tested 71 gluten-free pancake and waffle mixes to find the best for our readers. Many of them were also dairy-free, egg-free or grain-free and ready to fit most specialty diets. Our chart (page 58) is not a comprehensive list of all pancake mixes on the market but it contains as many as we could find that are readily available in grocery stores or online. We were amazed by the number of companies that offer gluten-free pancake and waffle mixes. Some companies, like Pamela’s, have up to eight varieties—from grainfree and buttermilk to non-dairy and buckwheat! We tasted buttermilk, multigrain, sprouted grain, grainfree and high-protein pancakes. Some require very few additions to make the mix—just a little oil and water—while some require everything but the kitchen sink. Some mixes are made mostly with white and brown rice flour, while others are made with more complex flours like sorghum, buckwheat, millet or almond. These alternative flours add extra flavor and nutrition. Some mixes contain flavorings such as cinnamon or vanilla (or the instructions ask you to mix in vanilla extract). Unless you love the taste, be careful when buying mixes that include strong flavors like cinnamon or pumpkin; some can be overpowering.

Reader Favorite Mixes We polled Gluten Free & More readers about pancakes and waffles, and over 1,400 of you wrote in about your favorites. If we learned one thing in our reader survey and our editors’ taste testing, it’s that we love pancakes and waffles! If you had to choose one, you’re definitely pancake fans. Fortunately, no one is asking you to choose. Gluten-free pancake and waffle mixes are readily available at most traditional grocery stores and more than 50% of our readers shop for mixes there. However, shelf space often limits varieties and brands. You might need to visit a natural grocery store (like 40% of you do) or order your favorite mixes online (like 20% of you do). Our reader favorites were pretty clear. (See our graph below.) Note that mixes that are readily available scored higher than those that are less widely distributed.

Reader Favorites

Here are your top 10 mixes based on GF&M’s reader survey.

King Arthur Flour Gluten Free Pancake Mix

PHOTOGRAPHY BY OKSANA CHARLA

Trader Joe’s Gluten Free Pumpkin Pancake Mix Krusteaz Gluten Free Buttermilk Pancake Mix Pamela’s Pancake & Waffle Mix Non-Dairy

Namaste Waffle & Pancake Mix Trader Joe’s Gluten Free Buttermilk Pancake & Waffle Mix Hungry Jack Gluten Free Funfetti Buttermilk Pancake & Waffle Mix

4%

5%

12%

14%

4% 2% 2% 2% 2%

Kinnikinnick Pancake & Waffle Mix

Pamela’s Baking & Pancake Mix

13%

Bisquick Gluten Free Pancake & Baking Mix

40% Others (each less than 2%)

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  57


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February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  65


By Jules Shepard

Irish Breads

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULES SHEPARD

Delicious recipes inspired by the Emerald Isle

66  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018


S

t. Patrick’s Day commemorates the patron saint of Ireland and is a celebration of all things Irish, including bread. Bring the celebration to your family’s table with these traditional Irish breads, made deliciously gluten-free.

P R E P: 2 0 M I N U T E S | B A K E : 1 5 M I N U T E S

Buttery Scones

❧ Demerara sugar or flaky sea salt, for sprinkling, optional

PHOTOGRAPHY BY JULES SHEPARD

MAKES 8 SCON ES

Scones are a tradition on nearly every Irish breakfast table. The secret to making a good scone is to use cold fats and work them into the flour before melting; the added step of “laminating” the dough adds more lovely layers. The technique is quite simple. With a few ordinary ingredients and a light gluten-free flour blend, this recipe produces tender, flaky pastry. Enjoy these scones with Irish butter, your favorite jam or a dollop of yogurt. 12 tablespoons cold unsalted butter or dairy-free alternative, divided 3 cups Jules’ Homemade All-Purpose Flour Blend, more for dusting, page 68 1/4 cup sugar 21/2 teaspoons baking powder 1 teaspoon salt 1 cup + 1 tablespoon cold milk of choice (not skim), more as needed 1 tablespoon honey, agave syrup or coconut nectar 1/2 cup raisins or dried currants

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Cut 10 tablespoons butter into small cubes, about 1/4 inch in size. Place them in a bowl in the freezer while you prepare dry ingredients. 3. In a large bowl, whisk together flour blend, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add 10 tablespoons cold butter by cutting it in with a pastry cutter or 2 butter knives until pea-size pieces of butter are scattered evenly throughout flour mixture. 4. In a separate bowl, combine milk and honey. Slowly add to flour mixture, stirring with a fork until a ragged dough forms. Dough should hold together when squeezed lightly. If it doesn’t, stir in an additional 1 to 2 tablespoons milk with a fork. Do not overwork the dough. 5. Transfer dough to a clean counter or pastry mat dusted with gluten-free flour. Pat to flatten. Then gently roll dough into a rectangle about 8x12 inches, with the long side facing you.

6. Heat 2 tablespoons butter in a small pan or in the microwave until softened (not melted). Spread evenly over dough with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle raisins evenly on top and press gently into dough. 7. Fold bottom third of dough up over the center line. Fold the top third down to meet the bottom edge, as if folding a letter. Then fold in half crosswise. Using a rolling pin, gently flatten into a 4x8-inch rectangle. Cut dough into 8 equal rectangles, squares or triangles. 8. Arrange on prepared pan, leaving 2 inches between each piece. Sprinkle tops generously with demerara sugar, if using, or sprinkle lightly with flaky sea salt, if using. 9. Place scones in preheated oven and bake until golden brown, about 15 minutes. 10. When done, remove from oven and cool on a wire rack. Each scone contains 430 calories, 19g total fat, 11g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 48mg cholesterol, 311mg sodium, 65g carbohydrate, 2g fiber, 16g sugars, 3g protein, 43Est GL.

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  67


GLUTEN-FREE DIET | Quick-Start Guide

H

ere is a simple overview of the gluten-free diet. Not all areas of the diet are as clear-cut as portrayed by this guide. This is intended to be used as a temporary survival tool until additional information can be obtained. Understanding these dietary requirements will enable the newly diagnosed to read labels of food products and determine if a product is gluten-free. Celiac disease is a life-long genetic disorder affecting children and adults. When people with celiac disease eat foods that contain gluten, it creates an immune-mediated toxic reaction that causes damage to the small intestine. This does not allow food to be properly absorbed. Even small amounts of gluten in foods may affect those with celiac disease and cause health problems. Damage can occur to the small bowel even in the absence of symptoms. Gluten is the generic name for certain types of proteins contained in wheat, barley, rye and their derivatives. Research indicates that pure, uncontaminated oats consumed in moderation (up to 1/2 cup dry oats daily) are tolerated by most celiacs. Gluten-free oats (purity protocol) are currently available in the United States. Consult your physician or dietitian before including oats in your diet and for regular monitoring.

Rice, Corn (Maize), Soy, Potato, Tapioca, Beans, Garfava, Sorghum, Quinoa, Millet, Buckwheat, Arrowroot, Amaranth, Teff, Montina, Flax and Nut Flours.

➥ Grains not allowed in any form Wheat (Einkorn, Durum, Faro, Graham, Kamut, Semolina, Spelt), Rye, Barley and Triticale.

➥ Foods/products that may contain gluten Marinades Beers, Ales, Lager Nutritional Supplements Breading & Coating Mixes Pastas Brown Rice Syrup Processed Luncheon Meats Communion Wafers Croutons Sauces, Gravies Dressings Drugs & Over-the-Counter Medications Energy Bars Flour & Cereal Products Herbal Supplements Imitation Bacon Imitation Seafood

Self-basting Poultry Soup Bases Soy Sauce and Soy Sauce Solids Stuffings, Dressings Thickeners (Roux) Vitamins & Mineral Supplements

Call First You can verify ingredients by calling or e-mailing a food manufacturer and specifying the ingredient and the lot number of the food in question. State your needs clearly—be patient, persistent and polite.

If In Doubt, Go Without Don’t eat a food if you are unable to verify the ingredients or if the ingredient list is unavailable. Regardless of the amount eaten, if you have celiac disease, damage to the small intestine occurs every time gluten is consumed, whether symptoms are present or not.

Wheat Free Is Not Gluten Free Products labeled wheat free are not necessarily gluten free. They may still contain spelt, rye or barleybased ingredients that are not gluten free. Spelt is a form of wheat.

Keep in mind

➥ What about alcohol? Distilled alcoholic beverages and vinegars (except malt vinegar) are usually gluten-free. Distilled products do not contain any harmful gluten peptides unless a gluten-containing flavoring is added after distillation. Wine is gluten-free. Unless labeled otherwise, beers, ales and lagers are NOT gluten-free.

■ recipes,

recipes, recipes advice ■ latest research ■ expert

DELICIOUS SPRING | CREAMY CHEESECAKE, QUICK BREADS, CAKE POPS, EASTER DINNER, SOFT PRETZELS I GF TAX BREAKS I GOT GLUTENED? I BRAIN HEALTH

Gluten Free & More GutenFreeandMore.com

APRIL/MAY 2016

The key to understanding the gluten-free diet is to become a good label reader. Don’t eat foods with labels that list questionable ingredients unless you can verify they do not contain or are not derived from prohibited grains. Labels must be read every time foods are purchased. Manufacturers can change ingredients at any time. Wheat used in products is identified on the label. Products bearing “gluten free” on the package must contain less than 20ppm gluten.

The magazine with the answers

GLUTEN FREE & MORE

Always read the label

Starting the gluten-free diet before being tested for celiac disease makes an accurate diagnosis difficult.

Gluten&Free MORE Eat Great, Feel Better, Live Well

45+ RECIPES

#1 magazine for people with food allergies & sensitivities

Delicious Spring!

Cheesecake, Quick Breads Cake Pops, Easter Dinner

Pilates for

DIGESTIVE HEALTH

Got Glutened?

9 Quick Fixes

Creamy Cheesecake & Easy Fruit Toppings, page 42

SOFT PRETZELS

Secrets to a

Healthier Brain Gluten-Free Tax Breaks

April/May 2016

➥ Grains allowed

Be a food detective

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Display until May 2, 2016

GlutenFreeandMore.com

Beyond Celiac PO Box 544 Ambler, PA 19002-0544 215-325-1306 beyondceliac.org

Celiac Disease Foundation 20350 Ventura Blvd., Ste 240 Woodland Hills, CA 91364 818-716-1513 celiac.org

Celiac Support Association PO Box 31700 Omaha, NE 68131-0700 877-272-4272 csaceliacs.info

Gluten Intolerance Group 31214 124th Ave. SE Auburn, WA 98092 253-833-6655 gluten.net

2018 Note: This guide is not meant to be an exhaustive resource.

©

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  77

in your

Slow Cooker


substitutions

GF Flour Replacements (light) Flours

Neutral

High-Protein Flours

High-Fiber Flours

Brown Rice Flour

Amaranth Flour

Amaranth Flour

Corn Flour

Buckwheat Flour

Sorghum Flour Sweet Rice Flour White Rice Flour

Stabilizers

Starches

Gums

Flax Seed Meal

Arrowroot Powder

Agar Powder

Buckwheat Flour

Ground Chia Seed

Cornstarch

Carrageenan

Chickpea Flour

Chickpea Flour

Potato Flour (not Potato Starch)

Kudzu Root Starch or Kuzu

Gelatin Powder

Millet Flour

Corn Flour

Potato Starch (not Potato Flour)

Guar Gum

Oat Flour

Mesquite Flour

Sweet Potato Flour

Locust Bean Gum

Quinoa Flour

Oat Flour

Tapioca Starch or Tapioca Flour

Psyllium Husk

Sorghum Flour

Quinoa Flour

Teff Flour

Teff Flour

(add texture and moisture)

Xanthan Gum

Adapted from Gluten-Free Makeovers by Beth Hillson. Available from Da Capo Press, a member of The Perseus Books Group. Copyright © 2011. Used with permission.

78  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018

GLUTEN-FREE FLOUR PHOTO © SIRYNA MELNYK/ISTOCK/THINKSTOCK

Use this chart as a guide to help select replacement gluten-free flours for all your baking. While not identical, the flours in each column have comparable baking characteristics and serve a similar function in building structure in recipes. If you can’t tolerate a certain flour or you’ve run out, find another flour in the same column (not row) and use it as a substitute.


Substitution Solutions

Gluten Free & More Pantry F or step-by-step flour blend instuctions, go to GlutenFreeandMore.com/flourblend

Milk

Buttermilk

Yogurt

Butter

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup cow's milk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup buttermilk with 1 of the following:

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 cup yogurt with 1 of the following:

(1 stick = 8 tablespoons = ½ cup = 4 ounces)

1 cup soy milk + 1 tablespoon

1 cup soy, rice or coconut yogurt

1 7/8 7/8 7/8

1 cup unsweetened applesauce 1 cup fruit puree

1 1 1 1 1

cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup coconut milk cup goat's milk, if tolerated cup hemp milk

lemon juice or 1 tablespoon cider vinegar (Let stand until slightly thickened.) cup coconut milk cup rice milk cup fruit juice cup water

Gluten-Free Flour Substitutions

To make a flour blend, thoroughly combine all ingredients. You can double or triple these recipes to make as much blend as you need. Store in a covered container in the refrigerator until used. All-Purpose Flour Blend MAKES 3 CUPS

Depending on the recipe, use this blend for most gluten-free baking. 1½ cups white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup tapioca starch/flour 3/4 cup cornstarch or potato starch (not potato flour) Each cup contains 510 calories, 2g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 6mg sodium, 117g carbohydrate, 3g fiber, 0g sugars, 5g protein, 83Est GL.

--------

Self-Rising Flour Blend MAKES 3 CUPS

Use this blend for muffins, scones, cakes, cupcakes or any recipe that uses baking powder for leavening. 1 ¼ cups sorghum flour 1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup tapioca starch/flour 4 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon salt Each cup contains 495 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 863mg sodium, 110g carbohydrate, 7g fiber, 0g sugars, 10g protein, 71Est GL.

High-Fiber Flour Blend

High-Protein Flour Blend

MAKES 3 CUPS

MAKES 3 CUPS

This high-fiber blend works for breads, pancakes, snack bars and cookies that contain chocolate, warm spices, raisins or other fruits. It is not suited to delicately flavored recipes, such as sugar cookies, crepes, cream puffs, birthday cakes or cupcakes.

This nutritious blend works best in baked goods that require elasticity, such as wraps and pie crusts.

1 cup brown rice flour or sorghum flour ½ cup teff flour (preferably light) ½ cup millet flour or amaranth flour 2/3 cup tapioca starch/flour 1/3 cup cornstarch or potato starch Each cup contains 481 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 10mg sodium, 105g carbohydrate, 8g fiber, 0g sugars, 9g protein, 68Est GL.

1 cup white or brown rice flour (or combination) 3/4 cup bean flour or chickpea flour 3/4 cup arrowroot starch, cornstarch or potato starch ½ cup tapioca starch/flour Each cup contains 462 calories, 3g total fat, 0g saturated fat, 0g trans fat, 0mg cholesterol, 17mg sodium, 100g carbohydrate, 5g fiber, 3g sugars, 9g protein, 66Est GL.

General Guidelines for Using Xanthan or Guar Gum Gum (xanthan or guar) is the key to successful gluten-free baking. It provides the binding needed to give the baked product proper elasticity, keeping it from crumbling. ■ Add ½ teaspoon xanthan or guar gum per cup of flour blend to make cakes, cookies, bars, muffins and other quick breads. ■ Add 1 teaspoon per cup of flour blend to make yeast bread or other baked items that call for yeast. ■ Add 1½ teaspoons per cup of flour blend to make pizza dough or pie crust. Note: If you purchase a commercial flour blend, read the ingredient list carefully. Some blends contain salt and xanthan or guar gum. If so, there is no need to add more. Nutritional analyses of recipes are based on data supplied by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and certain food companies. Nutrient amounts are approximate due to variances in product brands, manufacturing and actual preparation.

Depending on the recipe, replace 8 tablespoons butter with 1 of the following: 8 tablespoons Earth Balance (Non- Dairy) Buttery Spread or Sticks 8 tablespoons Spectrum Organic Shortening 8 tablespoons coconut oil 8 tablespoons vegetable or olive oil For reduced fat: 6 tablespoons unsweetened apple- sauce + 2 tablespoons fat of choice

Egg

--------

Depending on the recipe, replace 1 large egg with 1 of the following: ➥ Flax or Chia Gel: 1 tablespoon flax meal, ground chia seed or salba seed + 3 tablespoons hot water. (Let stand, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes or until thickened. Use without straining.) ➥ Egg Replacer: Ener-G Foods egg replacer, according to package directions ➥Tofu: 4 tablespoons pureed silken tofu + 1 teaspoon baking powder ➥ Applesauce: 4 tablespoons unsweetened applesauce (or other fruit puree) + 1 teaspoon baking powder IMPORTANT! Replacing more than two eggs can change the integrity of a recipe. For recipes that call for a lot of eggs, like a quiche, use pureed silken tofu, if soy is tolerated. Because egg substitutions add moisture, you may have to increase baking times slightly.

Nuts

--------

Depending on the recipe, replace tree nuts or peanuts with an equal amount of 1 of the following: Toasted coconut flakes, Sunflower seeds, Toasted sesame seeds (use only 2 to 3 tablespoons), Crushed cornflakes, Crushed crispy rice cereal, Crushed potato chips OR Pumpkin seeds

February/March 2018  GLUTEN FREE & MORE  79


Gl ut en -F re Da e iry -F re e Eg gFr ee No Pe an ut So s, yNo Fr ee Nu ts Lo w Su ga r Lo w So di um

Breakfast

Apricot Prune Compote, page 54

Blueberry Pancakes, page 31

Buttermilk Pancakes, page 31

Favorite Waffles, page 32

Grain-Free Pancakes, page 33

Apple Crisp Smoothie, page 43

Mocha Smoothie, page 44

PB&J Smoothie, page 43

Sweet Potato Pie Smoothie, page 44

Tropical Green Smoothie, page 44

Icons (or colors) identify recipes that are most appropriate for certain eating goals. ■ Gluten-Free All recipes in this magazine are gluten-free. ■ Dairy-Free ✱ Dairy-free substitutions provided.

■ Egg-Free ✱ Egg-free substitution instructions provided.

Smoothies ■

■ No Peanuts, No Nuts ✱ Nuts can be omitted or substitutions provided. ■ Soy-Free ✱ Soy-free substitutions provided. ■ Low Sugar Recipe contains 5g of sugar or less per serving.

Bread

■ Low Sodium Recipe contains 140mg of sodium or less per serving.

Buttery Scones, page 67

Irish Brown Bread, page 68

Irish Soda Bread, page 68

Entrees Butternut Squash, Chipotle Chicken & Creamy Apple Quinoa Bowl, page 51 Macaroni & Cheese, page 39

Maple Roasted Carrots & Smoked Turkey Millet Bowl, page 48

Shepherd’s Pie, page 40

Szechuan Meatballs, page 39

Tahini Chickpea & Roasted Veggie Sorghum Bowl, page 50

Dressings Creamy Apple Vinaigrette, page 51

Shallot Vinaigrette Crème, page 48

Tahini Cream, page 50

Blondies, page 36

Cacao Peppermint Truffles, page 53

Cardamom Apricot Truffles, page 53

Cherry-Berry Dessert, page 54

Peanut Butter Cookies, page 35

ATK Gluten-Free All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 36

Basic Gum-Free Gluten-Free Flour, page 41

GF&M All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 79

GF&M High-Fiber Flour Blend, page 79

GF&M High-Protein Flour Blend, page 79

GF&M Self-Rising Flour Blend, page 79

Jules’ Homemade All-Purpose Flour Blend, page 68

Desserts ■

Gluten-Free Flour Blends

80  www.GlutenFreeandMore.com  February/March 2018

Key

IMPORTANT: Read the labels of all processed foods that go into your recipe, such as broths, condiments, sausages, chocolate chips, etc., to make sure they do not contain any allergen you need to avoid. Manufacturers can change their ingredients without warning. When in doubt, contact the manufacturer directly. For a list of companies that offer gluten-free, allergyfriendly ingredients used in these recipes, refer to the Shopping List included in the article.

PANCAKES PHOTO BY CHRYSTAL CARVER

recipe index & Allergen Guide

Gluten Free & More February/March 2018  
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