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BEHIND THE SCENE GLOUCESTERSHIRE The Roving Crows The Tommy Drums Buffo’s Wake

The Drunken Gentlemen Edd Donovan & The Wandering Moles RSD 2014 Gig guide, reviews & opinion

Issue #6 April 2014


BEHIND THE SCENE GLOUCESTERSHIRE April 2014 The usual mad dash to finish this thing is done for another month. My eyes are going blurry from looking at the screen and I’m starting to type any old gibberish that is formed by my fingers bashing the keyboard at random. As usual, thanks go to anybody that has helped the magazine by sharing it, talking about it or contributing to it in any way. Cover I’m now selling a bit of advertising space to help fund photo by a website, flyers etc. So if you’re a music venue, Steve business, festival or promoter and that’s something Dyer. that interests you, just give me an e-mail. I don’t https://ww make a profit but need things to keep ticking over so w.facebook. that people hear about live music in Gloucestershire. com/steve. It’s all very well having a Facebook page for your gig, dyer.100 but where else do you get all of this information Issue #6 collated in one handy magazine format for FREE? April 2014

Contact via e-mail: behindthesceneglos@yahoo.co.uk Follow on twitter: @behindsceneglos Facebook: facebook.com/behindthesceneglos


Hattie Briggs, Emi McDade, James Patrick Williams Frog & Fiddle, Cheltenham 26th March 2014

We entered The Barn as if it were a military operation. Armed with two chairs given to me by the promoter, we waited for the between song applause (as the music had already started), opened the door and stealthily made our way across the room before EMI McDADE’S next song started. Like Andy Mcnab, we managed to enter the secure compound without too much clattering around or blocking anyone’s view - our mission was accomplished. This was the first of Friar’s Folk & Roots Fringe events. Normally located in Gloucester Cathedral or Blackfriars, tonight showcased a different side of folk in Cheltenham’s Frog & Fiddle. Although one half of the pub was a rowdy student night in full flow, behind the closed doors was a platform for young, talented musicians – and none more so than EMI McDADE, a soulful vocalist from Gloucester. Between songs she giggled her thanks for the applause before belting out another powerful ballad, her keyboard shaking as she hammered on the keys. A super start. After a short break, JAMES PATRICK RICHARDS (or JPR as he is possibly known), did a very watchable twentyodd minutes of nu-folk (that actually, isn’t so new anymore). It reminded me of the solo stuff Jim Lockey used to do on this very stage several years ago, but with a little less edginess. I’ve been to a lot of gigs over the years and you quickly get to know what’s good, what’s not and what’s terrible. Tonight, it took approximately 25 seconds, four fingerpicked chords

Photograph by Janet Datchens

and one perfectly delivered vocal line to tell that HATTIE BRIGGS, is good VERY VERY good. The 20 year old from Stroud has a star quality that you just can’t teach. Some people have it and some don’t. With her band accompanying her, she stood on the stage and delivered a seemingly effortless performance that took influences from her heroes (such as James Taylor) but with a style you sense has been developed through an immersion in the rich heritage of folk music. Between songs she talked of her idols, her friends and her experiences at the BBC Young Folk Awards. Her mum was in the audience and led the applause, but in truth, everyone would have clapped just as loudly anyway. Hattie’s tribute to Pete Seeger was a hook-filled hit in the making and when an encore was requested, not even an incorrectly tuned guitar stopped her from beautifully singing ‘Hallelujah’ with a room full of young, old (and somewhere in the middle) folk fans on backing vocals.


RECORD STORE DAY

2014

This is the extent of my record collection: 2 Rage Against The Machine 12 inch’s, a Black Box Recorder 7 inch that barely touched the charts and everything that Symposium have ever done. I once bought Muse’s first single on clear vinyl for 99p from Badlands but sold that for £20 when I was a struggling student. I sometimes wonder what it would be worth now and I’m too afraid to go onto Ebay to check. I think I’ve done this record buying thing the wrong way round as I stopped spending my spare cash on records in about 2001. Since then, there has been a meteoric shift in the spending habits of the average music fan. Song are either listened to digitally on phones and Ipods, or on round bits of plastic with carefully designed cardboard sleeves using retro turntables that are making lots of money for somebody. The only vinyl I have in my house is on the floors of the bathrooms, whist others have theirs stacked tight on shelves in alphabetical order in their bedrooms. So, what better way to celebrate the death of the CD and resurrection of the 7” single than to organise a day to bask in all things vinyl? Once again, on April 19th Record Store Day is upon us…

Like Dale Winton’s Supermarket Sweep, Record Store day is a frenzy of shopping activity (just without the cheesy puns and inflatable bananas on the shelves). For a few years the record shops in Gloucestershire have been taking part in one way or another, often by putting on live music and facilitating queues that snake around their shop fronts from an ungodly hour in the morning. I caught up with several of the stores in the county to get their view on Record Store Day 2014. This year there is plenty going on around Gloucestershire. Here is a sample of what some of the record shops are up to: Mike Ward from Badlands in Cheltenham – “We’ll have live acts throughout the day at the shop, hopefully spilling onto the street if the weather is good, there was quite a street party atmosphere last year with food stalls, cakes etc. In addition, for the 5th year running, we are organising a party in the evening at the Subtone with live acts and a DJ (this year Billy Franks from London , local act Austeros and DJ Mention the Bear). We’ll stock as many of the limited edition releases as possible and this year there is a Bruce Springsteen E.P. which is great for our Springsteen fan club customers.” Martyn Hooper from The Record Shop in Cheltenham – “This year we have bands playing at the Brown Jug pub opposite our shop from 4pm to 9pm. The local release of the Young Kato single is out and we are planning that they do an acoustic set and record signing on the day.”


Steve from Rise Records in Cheltenham – “We have bands on and DJs. Local bands will be playing, we try if possible to get at least 2 local acts in. We try and make the whole day something to remember. That includes live music but also to give an experience in a record shop that is like no other.” Neil Wilson, who is organising entertainment at Trading Post Records in Stroud – “We will be setting up my decks in the shop window of Trading Post and will be Dj’ing from 8am when the shop opens. We’ve invited local DJs down to play a set for 30 minutes each throughout the day and hopefully (fingers crossed) we may well have a celebrity or two along to play a set too.” Phil from Vinyl Vault in Cheltenham – “Although we are not directly involved with Record Store Day there is a definite vinyl buzz around town that the day creates. Over the last couple of years interest in vinyl has increased dramatically with all age groups wanting their vinyl fix - be it collectable or for listening pleasure.”

Generally, it can be agreed that Record Store Day comes under the category of ‘A good thing.’ What are the positives of the day for the shops? For Trading Post in Stroud it, “Proves to be the busiest day of the year. People start queuing outside from 4-5am.” Mike from Badlands agrees, “It’s evolved into a really busy, fun day where the public are reminded that independent record shops still exist. It’s a good business day for us too plus a lot of our mail order customers from around the country make an effort to visit us on the day so we get to meet our remote customers.” Steve from Rise emphasises the opportunity to give customers a, “Unique experience and getting fully involved in the local music scene.” Martyn from The Record Shop sees the positives on the day as, “Getting up at 3am, getting the shop ready to open at 8am and staying open until 7pm, as well as being able to help customers with cheaper prices than other shops.” Rather you than me. I’m happy to just wander along and check out all of the bands who play through the day.


As with most things that gain some form of popularity, Record Store Day is not without its critics. What are the negatives and what could improve the day for the record shops? Martyn Hooper offers a number of suggestions. “Strangers who turn up at 4am wanting to come into shop early and not come back until next year’s Record Store Day - some operate in teams to get the best releases. We should be able to offer goods as rewards for regular customers not let strangers we see once a year line up early and get items. Having to pay up front for the majority of stock on Record Store Day, and getting stock delivered late - we no long deal with some labels as their admin is just rubbish.”

Mike and Steve agree on the fact that the downsides to the day are outweighed by the positives. Steve says that, “There aren't many negatives about it. At least when you’re buying these items they are for independent record shops only so it's great to see such a big day supporting independent businesses.” However, Mike thinks that, “If there is a downside then perhaps many of the releases are quite expensive and there are a lot of them. So it’s always a gamble to decide what to stock and how much of it to invest in.”

Everyone is eager to stress that Record Store Day is just that…a day. You don’t have to wait until April to buy your records, these shops are open all year round. Mike from Badlands emphasises to, “Remember we are open all year, six days a week and not just on Record Store Day as are all the other independent record shops around the country. So please support your local stores during the rest of the year too.” As does Martyn from The Record Shop, “In our shop it is Record Store Day every weekend!”

Vinyl Vault www.vinyl-vault.co.uk/ Badlands http://shop.badlands.co.uk/

The Records Shop http://www.recordshopcheltenham.co.uk Rise Records www.rise-music.co.uk/ Trading Post https://www.facebook.com/tradingpost.s troud


THE ROVING CROWS

“Keep touring, keep writing, keep going…”

Have you heard the old joke? Three Englishmen, an Englishwoman and an Irishman all walk into the bar, play some energetic traditional music, leave the crowd no option but to clap, sing and dance along, and call themselves The Roving Crows. No? I suppose in hindsight the punchline does need a bit of work. Bad jokes aside, The Roving Crows are now reaping the rewards for their hard graft. Since forming in 2009, they've released 3 albums, a live record and have recently been voted 'Best Live Act' at the 2014 Spiral Earth awards. Despite their Irish influences, their roots are firmly in Gloucestershire. Fiddle player Caitlin takes up the story. "The band was formed in the area and did most of its formative gigging in the county. I was born in Cheltenham as was Greg the trumpet player. Tim (the drummer) and myself both studied at the

University of Gloucestershire. We still gig frequently in the county and consider it our base." The Roving Crows play all original songs written by song-writer, front-man and guitarist Paul O'Neill. Caitlin says that, "Each band member composes their own part to go with Paul's melodies and lyrics. We all have extremely different musical backgrounds and pull together a very unique 'folk fusion' sound. The traditional tunes are taken from my extensive repertoire and re-arranged by the band." It only takes a quick peek at The Roving Crows' gig list on their website to see just how prolific they are as a band. "All members of the Roving Crows work full time with the band. Paul and myself manage the band and are responsible for booking the tour schedule you see today. Some have part-time


paid work recording or in theatre but we all put our heart and soul into the Crows and it comes first. It is a difficult road but we are climbing up the ranks of the music industry having won several prestigious awards." Any favourite venues and musicians in the county? "The Guildhall in Gloucester has got to be at the top of the list followed by Lansdown Hall in Stroud, the Cheltenham Jazz Fest and Nibley Festival. We enjoy listening to Future Set from Tewkesbury, Gaz Brookfield from Bristol and the No Good Nancy's as well." At their annual Christmas 'Bacchanalia' at the Watson Hall in Tewkesbury, the band recorded a live album titled 'Live Distractions' which was released in March. "It is something we have never attempted before, having always opted for the studio sound," says Caitlin. "But we thought we would compile this limited edition album to capture some of the energy and feel of the live gig."

The live album is a perfect way to get your Roving Crows fix on long, dark winter nights. The best way to catch the band in the summer is at one of the many festivals they've become known for playing. "We have had some fantastic experiences performing at festivals up and down the UK. Firm favourites have to be Trowbridge Village Pump, Cambridge Folk Festival and Lakefest. We are looking forward to a repeat performance at Lakefest held in Bredon near Tewkesbury during August." Not to mention Cheltenham Race Week. The Roving Crows are Cheltenham Festival regulars, yet they probably see more of the inside of the town's pubs than they do of the horses. How was this year's experience of Race Week? "It was one of the best yet!" Caitlin says. "There was a fantastic atmosphere in Cheltenham this year - the sun was shining so I guess that helped! Everyone was up for dancing plus we got featured on BBC West Midlands and BBC Glos Radio to boot!" For anyone that saw the band during that mad period of traffic jams, Irishmen and tweed jackets, it's worth remembering that The Roving Crows are for life, not just for Race Week. Finally, what's in store for the band in the next year or so? "Keep touring, keep writing, keep going...onwards and upwards for the Roving Crows."

www.rovingcrows.com


GIG REVIEW

SCOTT JAMES & THE REVOLUTION, STOKELEY Frog & Fiddle, Cheltenham – 28th March 2014 It’s 8.30 and all is quiet in the Barn. A few people mill about at the side of the room, the sound guy comes down from his desk to mingle and I swear I see a tumbleweed roll across the stage. Then, all of a sudden, there begins a mad rush of people streaming through the door. Five pound notes are exchanged for wristbands and before we know it, the room is a busy hive of activity. I guess we didn’t get the memo to turn up fashionably late. It’s Cheltenham Underground’s 99th gig and it’s all a little bit different. Words like ‘electro’ and ‘hip-hop’ are banded about – it means nothing to me (oh, Vienna), but I’m willing to give anything a listen. STOKELY is on first – just himself, an electric guitar and a laptop – truly a one man band for the 21st Century. There are vocal effects and electronica and repetitive rhythms made in a studio or bedroom somewhere. He barely makes eye contact throughout and only addresses the audience once with the customary line, “This is my last song, thanks for having me,” before unplugging his guitar and walking off stage.

Before the gig my girlfriend put SCOTT JAMES & THE REVOLUTION’s CD on in the car stereo and broke one of my three golden gig rules: 1) Never wear the t-shirt of the band you are going to see. 2) Never talk over the musicians and 3) Never listen to the band on the way to the gig. She wasn’t to know and besides, I let her buy me a pint of Butcombe as way of an apology. SCOTT JAMES & THE REVOLUTION are a tight hip-hop outfit fronted by Scott James and Sophie Cotterell who trade off each other superbly. They make you stop, listen and (if you are that way inclined) wave your hands in the air like you just don’t care. Mostly original material is mixed with a couple of note-for-note perfect Fugees and Tupac covers and I can assure you that it won’t be long before they are the headline act. I know absolutely nothing about rap and hip-hop (however, I have watched every single episode of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air several times) but I can tell a good band when I see one. And with that, we have to shoot off and miss the headline band HUGH. Places to go, people to see. Sorry!


BLACK DOG FUNDRAISING is a group of friends and business contacts in Gloucestershire seeking to raise money for mental health charities. Their first event is at THE GUILDHALL in GLOUCESTER on SATURDAY 19TH APRIL. It features music from THE CHIP SHOP BOYS, FOLKLAW and a ROBBIE WILLIAMS TRIBUTE BAND. A more varied line-up you are not likely to see! Tickets are available from the following link: http://www.ticketsource.co.uk/blackdogfundrais ing You can also keep up to speed with the event by visiting their Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/BlackDogFundraising


…IN GLOUCESTERSHIRE WITH GAF FRANKS-BAYNTUN ONE THING YOU ABOUT MUSIC…

FAVOURITE BAND/MUSICIAN… I see an amazing array of talent at my open mic alone. I think I'd come down on the side of Jonny ‘Fingers' Holmes, or Chris Mitchell (guitarist from a number of local bands including 'Galloping Cows). BEST GIG YOU’VE EVER BEEN TO…

WOULD

CHANGE

If I'm honest there's a few things, but at the risk of sounding like a moaning Minnie, I'll stick to one. I'd say venues and promoters needing to be more open to the types of acts they are prepared to book and they could, in some cases, perhaps be more responsive and considerate to the artists. BEST KEPT SECRET… Easy, St Paul's Tavern! Such a fantastic, friendly place to play, hang out and drink. They really know how to run a small venue.

Hmm, tricky. Probably any gig by the 'Wizards of Oz'. An amazing Ozzy tribute band, I'm not a fan of Ozzy as such, but they are always such a great band to see live.

FAVOURITE VENUE/PUB...

LAST GIG YOU WENT TO…

GIVE YOURSELF A PLUG…

Was Placebo, but not in Gloucestershire, for that it'd have to be either race week at the Cotswold (Dan and Polly) or, um, nope, not sure so let's go with that!

I'm Gaf and I'm the singer/guitarist for www.facebook.com/mydesignmusic. We rock up pop classics (imagine Green Day playing Bonnie Tyler and you're close!).

BEST THING ABOUT MUSIC… That's easy, the appreciation that people show for a wide range of styles AND abilities. Audiences here are very accepting here compared to other places I've experienced.

There's a few with equal standing, the Cotswold and St Paul's Tavern in Cheltenham both win for me.

I also play bass for Funkbomb, perform solo acoustic gigs and host the open mic at the Cotswold Inn once a fortnight. I've been gigging for around 22 years as a bassist and have had some amazing experiences and a lot of fun along the way.


I saw them before they were big… I read an interesting comment on a Facebook event page for a local gig a while back that said this:

Now, obviously this is an appalling attitude (and shocking use of an apostrophe when it really wasn’t needed at all) and if everyone took this viewpoint then pretty soon bands would be playing to even sparser audiences. Some of the best gigs I’ve ever been to have been in mostly empty rooms. I’ve watched many of my favourite musicians such as Ben Marwood, Jim Lockey, Gaz Brookfield, Frank Turner, The Wave Pictures and The Get Up Kids with only one man and his dog (plus the support bands and guy selling merchandise) next to me. Then a few months later they’ve been playing to thousands of people at festivals or millions on the TV. That’s just how it goes. Sometimes it’s not the venue’s fault. Sometimes it’s down to the weather or lazy promotion or the fact that the band are just not well known enough to be playing that size venue in that particular town (yet). This initial Facebook comment got me thinking about something I read many years ago by a fairly poor metal band. They said that even if there’s only a couple of people at their gig, they’ll still play their full set and they’ll still play as if it’s a sold out show. You wouldn’t go to the cinema, see only a scattering of people in the audience and then expect to have the film cut by 20 minutes or the picture slightly blurred.

If I go to the toilet will I lose my spot?

Why should a gig be any different for the audience? Are you going to the gig to watch the band or for the atmosphere in the room? If you are going for both, then great. But if your enjoyment only comes when the venue is full of people then I’m sorry, you’ll be missing out on some fantastic bands. Nobody starts out playing at Brixton Academy. Nobody sells hundreds of tickets to their first gig. And nobody deliberately tries to play a show to an empty room – sometimes it just happens. And the next time it does happen, buy a drink anyway, applaud at the end of each song and maybe in a year or two’s time you’ll be able to say that you saw that multi-million selling band when nobody else was interested (and then write a smug article about it in a local online music magazine).


GIG REVIEW 20.03.14 2000 Trees Festival University of Gloucestershire Showcase No Atlas, Nathalie Mac, Crossing Adam, Born At The River The Frog & Fiddle is busy. There are probably about a hundred people here. Some come and go. Some stick around. Some are in bands and some are there to just support their mates and clap and holler at the right moments. I don't remember it ever being like this when I was a student. Thursday nights were spent sinking 99p pints in Wetherspoons, then queuing outside the Fez club in the rain. There certainly weren't local music festival showcase gigs to go to. In fact, I don't remember any local music festivals at all.

We take our usual spots to the back and to the left of the room. In front of us are girls. Lots and lots of girls. It's probably because the singer of BORN AT THE RIVER has a cracking voice and nicely quaffed hair. And the band are good too. This is indie rock as we know it in 2014. Born At The River finish, step off stage and the girls disappear too. CROSSING ADAM (who is not a band but a guy with a guitar named Adam) plays next. Second song in, he takes the unprecedented step of attempting to incite a sing-along with an audience that are barely warmed up and don't actually know the song. Brave stuff.

We're on a roll now and after a quick keyboard set-up, NATHALIE MAC joins us on stage and makes a big mistake she tells us that we won't like her. "My set might be kind of boring," she says. Hold on, aren't we supposed to be the judge of that? There are 3 things that I've learnt in life: 1) Don't talk about yourself all of the time. 2) If you order a small pack of mushrooms with Asda online shopping, 9 times out of 10 they'll substitute them for a large pack for the same price. And most importantly 3) Don't put yourself down. Nathalie Mac won a contest and was on Radio 1 - she has the most out of everyone to brag about. Her voice is strong - if Emile Sande has managed to make herself into a household name, then surely there's a place for Nathalie Mac too. Quite the opposite, next band NO ATLAS are so sure of themselves. They have their name up on a projector and merchandise being sold at the back of the room. It's all about the little touches. Compared to Born At The River, their brand of indie is more brooding and the band have a nice dynamic. When No Atlas finish, we get up to go. As we make our way across the room several people stop us and ask us questions like, "Is this the interval?" and "Are there any more bands on?" It's a bit strange but we give them the answers they need* and check to see if we are accidentally wearing badges that say, 'Happy to Help’. We’re not.

*1) No, there’s no interval as we're not at the theatre and 2) yes, two more but we have to leave because we are old and have work tomorrow.


EDD DONOVAN & THE WANDERING MOLES Something To Take The Edge Off album (Paper Label Records) Edd Donovan released his first album in 2006 so you’d be excused if you were wondering just exactly what he’s been up to between that and the release of album number two, ‘Something To Take The Edge Off.’ Well, it seems that he’s been doing some deep thinking, some highly crafted song writing and forging a career in social work. The ten tracks on this album are contemporary folk at its very best. Musically, it takes the best bits of Bob Dylan and Simon & Garfunkel, but lyrically it’s unique for the fact that it tackles the issues of domestic violence (on stand out track ‘House on Fire’) and mental health (‘The Social Worker,’ with a sparse guitar and vocal sound). Edd sings of being, “Damned if I do, damned if I don’t,” and we can all empathise with that in some way. But if this makes it sounds like the album is heavy going then trust me, it’s not. Originally from the North of England, Edd relocated to Cheltenham several years ago and you can still hear his accent come through in songs such as ‘Stone,’ with it’s “La, la, la” refrain. It’s reminiscent of early Herman Dune in places, as female vocal harmonies nestle nicely beside Edd’s unique delivery and thoughtful observations of every day life.

www.edddonovan.co.uk www.paperlabelrecords.co.uk To win a signed pre-release copy of ‘Something To Take The Edge Off,’ just email your name to: behindthesceneglos@yahoo.co.uk We will pick one lucky winner at random by the end of the month to receive the CD in the post!

‘Something To Take The Edge Off’ is a heart-warming piece of work by a man who wears his influences on his sleeve – just don’t leave it another 8 years before the next one, eh Edd? THE BAND WILL BE APPEARING LIVE AT THE ALBUM RELEASE PARTY ON 11TH APRIL AT BOOGIE LOUNGE, CHELTENHAM.


GIG REVIEW Two Rivers Studios has something of the Tardis about it. From the outside it looks like any other industrial unit on any other industrial park, so much so that we spent several minutes driving around rows of closed lock ups looking for the studio (which could easily have been a diversion tactic in a hammer horror film). But when we stepped inside we were pleasantly surprised to find a spacious set up which by day is a recording and rehearsal studio, but by night transforms into a cosy venue for gigs.* Buzzing with activity, a large group of teenagers nattered to their mates about Tamagotchis, the Blur vs Oasis rivalry and how annoying it is when you lose the floppy disk with all of your school work on. ** A few older people sat around on the sofas and drank reasonably priced lager from the bar. There’s something to be said for watching live music whilst lounging on a 3-piece suite.

Strange Things Frighten Us, Polary Bear at Two Rivers Studios, Cheltenham (08.03.14) In front of us the youngsters lapped up every moment of local band, POLARY BEAR. There was strobe lighting, the sound was excellent and a smoke machine made us feel like we were on Top of the Pops. Although the music was nothing new, the vocalist was spot on in his delivery of some catchy slices of pop-punk for the Facebook generation. Shortly afterwards, another local band, STRANGE THINGS FRIGHTEN US, took to the stage and suffered a little from what is commonly known as ‘mate’s band syndrome’ (you know, when everyone’s watched their mate’s band play and then just kind of hang around outside for the rest of the evening ignoring the other acts on). By their own admission, their performance was a bit sloppy (the singer described it as a train-wreck, but I wouldn’t go that far) and comparisons to early Paramore would be made by lazy journalists.*** Two Rivers Studios have a great little set up and with more Saturday night gigs on the horizon from bands across all genres, I’m sure we’ll be returning there soon. *So, more like Anne Frank’s secret hideout in fact. ** Well, that’s what I talked about when I was a teenager. I assume that it’s still the same. *** I am a lazy journalist.

http://www.tworiversproduction.co.uk/


GLOUCESTERSHIRE GIG GUIDE FOR APRIL When?

Who?

Where?

Where?

2nd

Thomas Ford

Café Rene

Gloucester

3rd

Gaz Brookfield

Prince Albert

Stroud

3rd

Binomial

Marlborough Arms

Cirencester

3rd

Captain Accident & The Disasters, Fight The Bear, Sam Green & The Midnight Heist Russ Poole

Frog & Fiddle

Cheltenham

New Inn

Gloucester

Frog & Fiddle

Cheltenham

4th

Brown Torpedo presents: Violent Gas Open Mic with Bob Smith

Miners Arms

Whitecroft

4th

11th Hour (Lamb Of God Tribute)

The Brunswick

Gloucester

4th

Jessica Rhodes

Exmouth Arms

Cheltenham

4th

Tim Manning (6pm)

Peppers Cafe

Gloucester

4th

The Swan

Cheltenham

4th

The Collective Arts Showcase feat: Abel Gray, Scarlett Shocks, Nathalie Mac, Chain Heavy. Gig with a Guest: Alex Petrie

Bell Inn

Cheltenham

4th

King Solomon’s Reggae Jam

Grumpy Whiskers

Cheltenham

5th

Ruby Turner, Rick Payne

Bacon Theatre

Cheltenham

5th

Ma Polaine’s Great Decline

Prince Albert

Stroud

5th

Otis Mack & The Tubby Bluesters

Café Rene

Gloucester

5th

Nathan Salsburg

Village Hall

5th

Joliet Blues Band

Sound Music Venue

Stretton On Fosse Cheltenham

5th

Buckfest: Skreamer, Venus Mountains, The Texas Flood, Defy All Reason. Graveyard Johnnys, Radio Nasties, Red Light Rebels

The Brunswick

Gloucester

Frog & Fiddle

Cheltenham

4th 4th

5th

The Red Light Rebels are highlighted at the request of Gemma Saunders – see how kind we are to our readers?


GLOUCESTERSHIRE GIG GUIDE FOR APRIL When?

Who?

Where?

Where?

6th

Neil Morris

Prince Albert

Stroud

6th

The Earl Band (6pm)

Railway Inn

Newnham

6th

Kim Cypher (2pm)

Exmouth Arms

Cheltenham

9th

Emily & The Woods

Prince Albert

Stroud

9th

Bob ‘Miff’ Smith

Railway Inn

Newnham

9th

Bayshill

Cheltenham

9th

Drawing Of The Three, Feral Waves, Alex Petrie Rhys Matthews

Parabola Arts Centre

Cheltenham

9th

Hannah Faulkner, Will Rogers

Café Rene

Gloucester

10th

Lloyd Cole + Support

Subscription Rooms

Stroud

10th

Open Mic

Prince Albert

Stroud

11th

Over The Hill

Exmouth Arms

Cheltenham

11th

Alex Petrie, Ells Ponting, Luke Philbrick, Harper’s Ferry

Cheltenham

11th

Gig with a Guest: Gaf FranksBayntun Toadstool (10th Birthday)

Unplugged Underground @ Cotswold Inn Bell Inn The Brunswick

Gloucester

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

Davefest @ Lower Lode Inn Miners Arms

Forthampton

11th 11th

Cheltenham

11th

Emorragia, We Define A Martyr, We May Be Strangers, Splints The Last Exit

11th

B.U.S.K, Neo Deals

11th

Johnny Kowalski & The Sexy Weirdos The Charlton Blues Kings, The Newbolds, Steve Ferbrache, Sinead Claire Blackbeard’s Tea Party

Café Rene

Gloucester

New Brewery Arts

Cirencester

Prince Albert

Stroud

Ed Donovan & The Wandering Moles album release

Boogie Lounge

Cheltenham

11th

11th 11th

You are spoilt for choice on Friday 11th.

Whitecroft


GLOUCESTERSHIRE GIG GUIDE FOR APRIL When?

Who?

Where?

Where?

12th

Andrew Ferris

Miners Arms

Whitecroft

12th

Grumpy Whiskers

Cheltenham

12th

Hook-Line Riot, Enziguri, Red Light Rebels U is for Ukulele

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

12th

Vince Freeman

Monty’s Brasserie

Cheltenham

12th

Subduction

Prince Albert

Stroud

13th

Open Mic (6pm)

Railway Inn

Newnham

13th

Winter Mountain

Prince Albert

Stroud

16th

Four Mile House

Prince Albert

Stroud

16th

Live @ Gloucester Acoustic Showcase

Café Rene

Gloucester

17th

Matt Woosey

Prince Albert

Stroud

17th

Suggs: My Life Story

Subscription Rooms

Stroud

17th

Bruce & Dave, Gordon Wood

Peppers Café

Gloucester

18th

Guildhall

Gloucester

18th

Hired Guns, Check Da Cone, New Lake, The Feddens, Joe Banyard Sexperience Binomial

The Hawbridge Inn

Tirley

18th

Thee Ones

Café Rene

Gloucester

18th

Open Mic with Bob Smith

Miners Arms

Whitecroft

18th

Frog & Fiddle

Cheltenham

Marlborough Arms

Cirencester

18th

Chewing On Tinfoil, Failures Union, Austeros, Bedford Falls Marlborough Arms Mini Festival: Bad Obsession, Useless Eaters, Danger Mouse, Last Exit Saints, Familiars, Charlie Baxter + more (from 12.30) Gig with a Guest: TBC

Bell Inn

Cheltenham

18th

Reckless Element

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

18th

WHEN YOU ARRIVE, TELL THE VENUE THAT ‘BEHIND THE SCENE GLOUCESTERSHIRE’ SENT YOU!


GLOUCESTERSHIRE GIG GUIDE FOR APRIL When?

Who?

Where?

Where?

19th

DJ Trashed

The Brunswick

Gloucester

19th

Black Dog Charity Fundraiser: Chip Shop Boys, Folklaw, Robbie Williams Tribute Arthur Rigby & The Baskervilles

Guildhall

Gloucester

Prince Albert

Stroud

Subtone

Cheltenham

19th

Billy Franks, Austeros, Mention The Bear DJ Cash Live (Johnny Cash Tribute)

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

19th

Vince Freeman

Lakeside Bar

20th

Suburbia Feat. Andrew Meek (6pm)

Railway Inn

South Cerney Newnham

20th

Ed Donovan & The Wandering Moles

Prince Albert

Stroud

21st

Random Book Club

Prince Albert

Stroud

23rd

Café Rene

Gloucester

24th

Lassington Oak & Stroud Morris Men, Two Anchors Vince Freeman

Soho Bar

Cheltenham

24th

Open Mic

Prince Albert

Stroud

25th

The ZZ Tops

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

25th

Cabstars, DJ Skinny Ed

Café Rene

Gloucester

25th

Bell Inn

Cheltenham

Miners Arms

Whitecroft

25th

Gig with a Guest: Jay Arthur Hartley Red River Blues, Ed Hanfrey Et Al, Platform 1 5 Undercover

Exmouth Arms

Cheltenham

25th

Panic Room

Guildhall

Gloucester

25th

Friday Night Live

Subscription Rooms

Stroud

26th

Desert Monkeys (Arctic Monkeys Tribute) Sq Bomb

Sound Music Venue

Cheltenham

Prince Albert

Stroud

19th 19th

25th

26th

PLEASE CHECK TIMES, PRICES ETC WITH THE VENUE


GLOUCESTERSHIRE GIG GUIDE FOR APRIL When?

Who?

Where?

Where?

26th

Sq Bomb

Prince Albert

Stroud

26th

Soul Town with Andy Edwards

Subscription Rooms

Stroud

26th

Solid Gone

Miners Arms

Whitecroft

26th

Luke Jackson

Frog & Fiddle

Cheltenham

26th

The Brunswick

Gloucester

26th

Cambion, Metaprism, Within These Walls Straight Torque, Binomial

Wheatsheaf

Cheltenham

26th

Tripwire

Railway Inn

Newnham

27th

Jessica Vincent, Tim Smith (2pm)

Black Book Café

Stroud

27th

From The Jam with Bruce Foxton, The Q Gaz Brookfield

Subscription Rooms

Stroud

Café Rene

Gloucester

Sam Green, Philip Henry & Hannah Martin

Prince Albert

Stroud

30th 30th

IF YOUR GIG ISN’T LISTED IT’S BECAUSE YOU DIDN’T SEND IT TO ME. YOU KNOW WHAT TO DO NEXT MONTH… PLEASE keep sending me your gigs for the gig guide. PLEASE keep sending me photos for the gig gallery. PLEASE let me know if have a gig in April you’d like me to review or a gig in May you’d like me to preview.

E-mail: behindthesceneglos@yahoo.co.uk


ALBUM REVIEW The Drunken Gentlemen – The Dutch Angle The Drunken Gentlemen formed in London but now reside in Cheltenham (via Naples, apparently). The band go by the names of Jacques Miami, Nick Roubles and Andy Mambeau. Following a spaghetti western concept EP, they have followed up with a uniquesounding debut album called ‘The Dutch Angle.’ You couldn’t make it up if you tried. The Drunken Gentlemen have created an album of nostalgic lounge pop that fits comfortably next to bands such as The Divine Comedy.

The baritone vocals are a real highlight and the arrangements are more clever than the band would like you to think. Their press release states that the songs were created by ‘anything they, and their extended collective of musicians, could lay their hands on.’ But drunken gentlemen they clearly are not. ‘Besame Mucho,’ a cover of a Mexican bolero is exotic and sultry, whilst the nine other tracks firmly fall into the category of ‘kitsch’ and ‘art pop.’ Eddie Argos from Art Brut once sung of ‘clever, clever jazz, man’ and this could be it. As it says on the back of the CD, this is music ‘best consumed with a bottle of red wine.’ Chansons d’ivresse indeed.

https://www.facebook.com/ drunkengents

http://drunkengentlemen.bandcamp.com


BUFFO’S WAKE & RATBAG Two former Stroud residents, Jack Ellis and Mike Milner, are about to embark on a European tour with their band Buffo’s Wake. Jack is also in RatBag, a Brighton based ska-punk band as well as Mange Domesticov, a busking gypsy folk band that he formed with his brother. How he finds the time to eat, go to the toilet or watch Homes Under The Hammer I’ll never know. So where did it all start and why aren’t they based in Stroud anymore? “I lived in Stroud my whole life until leaving to do a music degree in Brighton and my family have lived in Gloucestershire for three generations, perhaps more,” says Jack. “Our first band in Stroud was called 17 Ways To Infiltrate Your Mother.”

Three years ago Buffo’s Wake formed and the band, who describe themselves as ‘gypsy punk horror folk madness,’ are shortly due to leave for a thirty day tour through Belgium, Germany, Holland, Denmark, Norway and The Czech Republic. “We have toured twice in Europe and twice in the UK. We have played a range of summer festivals and we are now regulars at Boomtown, Secret Garden Party, Bestival, Over the Moon and Small World,” says Jack. It’s not difficult to see why – their music is made for a party atmosphere. Dark in places, it’s what a League Of Gentleman musical would sound like. Their debut album 'Carniphobia‘ is in its final stages of production and is set to be released ready for the summer.

I’m surprised no one has ever used that name before – let’s put it down to the inexperience of youth. Between 2004 and 2007 they recorded a demo and played shows at various house parties and village halls in Cam, Dursley and Minchinhampton alongside other local bands such as Happy Hour, Cardboard Cutouts, Sub Justice, Elysium and Caught You Smiling. After the band finished and a few other projects fell by the wayside, Jack moved to Brighton to begin the aforementioned music degree.

Buffo’s Wake (pictured right) https://www.facebook.com/BuffosWake?fref=ts https://www.facebook.com/pages/RatBag/383986561628374?fref=ts


Band number two, RatBag, are a high energy female fronted ska punk outfit. They remind me of little known ska band Muttley’s Dastardly Skam who you’re probably either too old or too young to remember. According to Jack, “The band support numerous causes such as anti-Fascist, marine conservation, women's rights, water aid, squatters’ benefits and are often playing benefit shows to do our bit to help.” RatBag’s debut album ‘Funny Way To Make Ends Meet’ was released at the end of March with a launch party in Brighton.

If you find yourself on holiday in Berlin or Amsterdam this Easter and get fed up of looking at a collapsed wall or rows and rows of tulips, then check out the dates below and catch Buffo’s Wake and Ratbag for some home-from-home musical entertainment.

RatBag (pictured above) Buffo's Wake tour dates: Rumpus Party - London - 4/04 The Gladstone - Brighton - 5/04 ADM - Amsterdam - 11/04 Zwarte Ruiter - Amsterdam - 12/04 Das Gaengeviertel - Hamburg - 13/04 Sound of Mu - Oslo - 17/04 Maksi Taksi - Oslo - 19/04 Mein Haus Am See - Berlin - 23/04 Duncker Club - Berlin - 24/04 Supermolly - Berlin - 25/04 Subway To Peter - Chemnitz - 26/04 Propoganda - Prague - 28/04 XT3 - Prague - 29/04 Open Air Fest - Prague - 30/04 The Cellar Bar - Bournemouth - 09/05 The Global Cafe - Reading - 10/05 Hobbit - Southampton - 16/05

Old Firehouse - Exeter - 17/05 Small World Fest - Headcorn – 2225/05 Scrumpfest - Exeter – 22/05 The Hawbridge - Gloucester – 23/05 The Lamb - Lewes - 06/06 The Fox & Firkin - London - 20/06 The Magic Garden - London - 21/06 Secret Garden Party - 25-27/07 Boomtown - Winchester - 7-10/08 RatBag tour dates: ADM - Amsterdam - 11/04 Small World fest - Headcorn - 2225/05 Strawberry Fair - Cambridge - 7/06 Boomtown Fair - Winchester - 7-10/08

Twitter: @behindsceneglos


THE TOMMY DRUMS By day the Tommy Drums are four young lads studying for their ALevels, but by night they are a Libertines-esque quartet who have so far played two sold out shows at The 2 Pigs in Cheltenham. Is it me, or are bands getting younger these days? I asked their singer Sam Jones, who has a touch of the Jamie T's about him, how they managed to build such a following with only a demo behind them. "We developed our fan base first off through students at our schools and then as we played more gigs to different audiences we gradually saw less and less of our friends turning up and random people took their place," says Sam. "The songs that are the fan favourites are 'Savages' and 'Morning After'." Both songs appear on the demo E.P. 'Savages,' which was recorded at PGC studios in Cheltenham. "We would recommend [PGC studios] to new bands. It took us quite a while to adjust to recording to a metronome

but we got there in the end!“ Where are the lads’ favourite places to play in Gloucestershire? At this rate, it won't be long before they are selling out the Town Hall. "The Guildhall is our favourite place to play in Gloucestershire," Sam says. "2 Pigs is also great, more so for upcoming local bands as they get you playing there once every 2 months or so. Our favourite local musicians are probably our pals New Lake, Polary Bear, Delicate Holly and The Purple Urks who are all around our age." What's in the pipeline for The Tommy Drums in the next few months? Knuckling down at school? Studying hard? Coursework? (I sound like their mothers). "Our plan is to book some festival slots, get gigs outside of Gloucestershire to widen the audience and save up to make a solid professional recording of some of our tracks." Best get an extra paper round then. On second thoughts, scrap that just play some more sold out shows to a load of your mates - isn't that what we all want to do secretly?

https://www.facebook.com/wearethetommydrums


GIG PREVIEW BINOMIAL at The Marlborough Arms, Cirencester, 3rd April 2014

BINOMIAL, a synth-pop covers band, play THE MARLBOROUGH ARMS in CIRENCESTER on Thursday 3rd April. Formed in 2011 by Andy Randle (keyboards and programming) and Paul Dodson (vocals), the duo recreate hits from bands such as The Human League, Kraftwerk and Yazoo.* The band themselves say, “Imagine if you could have the Human League, Soft Cell, Depeche Mode, Yazoo, Pet Shop Boys, Kraftwerk, Gary Numan and Erasure on one bill - this is what we bring to our audience. Binomial's unique selling point is its original song arrangements which see classic electro-dance hits re-energised for the 21st century.” JUST ADDED: Binomial join covers band Straight Torque at a charity event at The Wheatsheaf Inn, Cheltenham on Saturday 26th April in support of the Gloucestershire NHS Paediatric Oncology Trust. The trust does great work with young people at the Cheltenham General and the Gloucester Royal Hospitals. Advance tickets: Early bird tickets £4 rising to £5 after 20th April. https://www.ticketsource.co.uk/bo xoffice/select/fbTfWIIOqEJO As well as making a name for themselves at venues in Cirencester, BINOMIAL have made a number of successful appearances in and around Gloucestershire - including The Phoenix Festival, The Cotswold Show and Swindon Pride. Admission to the gig at The Marlborough Arms on 3rd April is free. If you spent the 80s borrowing your mum’s eyeliner and covering your walls in posters of Marc Almond and the like, then what better way to spend your evening? Or if, like me, you spent the first half of the eighties as a twinkle in your mother’s eye (and the second half in Terry’s nappies), then pop along and find out that there was more to the 80s than that bloke from Eastenders’ brother shouting “Gold,” on Top Of The Pops. * No, not the milkshake.

The Marlborough Arms, Sheep Street, Cirencester. GL7 1QW www.facebook.com/binomialband


GIG PREVIEWS NATHAN SALSBURG at The Village Hall, Stretton-OnFosse. Friday 5th April. On Friday April 5th from 8pm at Stretton on Fosse Village Hall, Grammy nominated guitarist and curator of the Alan Lomax Collection, NATHAN SALSBURG, will be performing his latest LP. In addition to this, he will be showing the acclaimed film on the collection he curates. Find ‘Folking Marvellous’ on Facebook for ticket details. https://www.facebook.com/folkingmarvell os (note that this is not my typo – their Facebook page is spelt like that!).

Entry costs £8 and you can be assured of a relaxed, friendly atmosphere with quality ales from the North Cotswold Brewery just a mile from the venue.

LUKE JACKSON at The Frog & Fiddle, Cheltenham. Saturday April 26th. After the success of their Hattie Briggs gig at The Frog & Fiddle (which is reviewed elsewhere in this issue), Friars Folk & Roots bring LUKE JACKSON to the Barn on TH SATURDAY 26 APRIL. Luke Jackson is a former BBC2 Folk Awards Nominee and is playing in Cheltenham as part of his ‘Fumes And Faith’ album tour. An exciting singer-songwriter from Kent, Luke was last seen in Gloucestershire supporting Martyn Joseph at Gloucester Blackfriars last April. Tickets are available from http://www.friarsfolkandroots.co.uk/ For more on Luke Jackson visit http://lukepauljackson.com/


Gig Preview - Violent Gas at The Frog & Fiddle, Cheltenham (04.04.14) As part Festival…

of

The

Cheltenham

Poetry

Brown Torpedo presents VIOLENT GAS An evening of spoken word poetry, short film and live electronic music. Hosted by Dan Cooper & Danny Ash. Short Films from: Tony Gage Danny Ash Dan Cooper Callie Middlemiss Tom Cassidy Live Music from: The Bluff Chill Account Brown Torpedo (providing soundtrack to film) Spoken from:

Word

a

live

Performances

Michael Scott Nick Short Danny Ash Dan Cooper

http://www.violentgas.tumblr.com/

Friday 4th April 2014 The Frog & Fiddle, Cheltenham. Doors 7.30. Admission £4. 18+. Tickets in advance available from Cheltenham Town Hall: http://www.cheltenhamtownha ll.org.uk/event/violent-gas28342/


VAGRANT TROUBADOR – a book by Evan Burgess I’ve wanted to write an article about busking for a while now. I planned to walk around Cheltenham on a Saturday afternoon and listen to all of the buskers throughout the day. But then the idea slipped by the wayside as the weather got colder and I remembered that I actually hate walking around town on a Saturday because it’s full of people who walk too slowly or parents shouting at their children. Then, as a stroke of luck, I saw that long-time local busker Evan Burgess had written a book all about his experience of busking in Scandinavia. A few Facebook messages later were exchanged and voila! I had my article and I didn’t even have to leave the house) Vagrant Troubadour is a book about Evan’s travels through Europe as a street musician - from playing the 100,000 strong Roskilde Festival in Denmark to the Swedish Tennis Open in Båstad. Characters he meets through street music are brought to life with no holds barred retellings of bizarre yet amusing incidents. The book attempts to give an insight into the tradition that is street music. I ask him how he compares busking in the UK to overseas? “Music is such a larger part of society in Sweden than it is in England,” Evan says. “It is almost a philosophical subject to Swedes who consume music in an academic as well as purely visceral way. I love that aspect of it and tunes are almost like a fine wine to them. The Scandinavian system means that everyone has at least a

little bit of money, whereas in England there are some people who have almost nothing and public places are the only area they can habituate.” Surely it gets a bit cold on the fingers during the winter months? “It was incredibly painful on my fingertips, I played in minus 20 and my body felt fine but I couldn't get around the fact my fingers had to be exposed to play the guitar. The only thing I felt similar to that was when I walked into a freezer at a supermarket and was hit by the cold like an ice sheet.” Rather you than me. I wear thermal vests and long johns from November to March in the UK and I work in a room where the thermostat goes up to 30 degrees. In the book Evan describes a few ‘hairy’ incidents, such as people trying to pull on his strings and urinate in his guitar

https://www.facebook.com/StreetMusic20082012


VAGRANT TROUBADOR – a book by Evan Burgess case. Did he ever want to give up? “I never did because I didn't feel I was in the wrong. Only once did an incident make me question my ‘right’ to be on the street and that was in Denmark where a man muted my guitar and told me to stop because in Denmark street music is deemed as similar to begging (and begging is outlawed). I always found it strange that considering prostitution is legal in Denmark, street music fell into an unlawful category.” How did it feel to go out busking every day as your only means of making money? “It was great as long as I had access to weights to train my knees,” says Evan. “The only fear I had was procrastination and staying in bed. No one expected me to turn up and clock on. I was working 20 hour weeks and getting paid as much as a full time job in a fast food place or cafe, but still I sometimes couldn't fight my own desire to hibernate.”

We’ve all heard some bloke with an acoustic guitar belting out a dodgy version of Wonderwall outside Marks & Spencer, so does Evan have any tips for inexperienced buskers? “Don't make the street performance the goal. Use it as a place to advertise something else you are doing.” He points to Stroud and Cirencester as his favourite places in Gloucestershire to busk. “The bigger cities are a bit more hit or miss as the streets are so wide. People are on their guard against chuggers and mobile phone salesmen. In many cases it is better than having a mobile phone as if you stay long enough you will see someone you wanted to chat to.” Vagrant Troubadour is on sale for £10 at the Swedish restaurant Svea Cafe, which is at 24 Rodney Road - just off the High Street in Cheltenham.

https://www.facebook.com/StreetMusic20082012


VAGRANT TROUBADOR – an *exclusive” chapter CHAPTER 3 – WHAT PEOPLE GIVE When you are a street artist and you’re hoping to gain money, you obviously have to collect money in some way. Recently it’s finally possible to collect it with a mobile phone or a bank card if you have a little add on for your Iphone, but for a long time still cash will be the preferred option. In America you start with notes straight away, but in other countries where the currency is worth something (UK, Scandinavia, the euro zone) you usually don’t see notes so often, apart from in Sweden which has the 20kr note. But sometimes people don’t have the cash to drop in, and sometimes, some people just want to insult you, on other occasions, people are really weird. I’m vegetarian and one day a man had come from the supermarket having bought some meat. I have no idea what kind of meat, but it looked wet through the bag, so probably had some blood inside it. He dropped it into my guitar case, it was actually probably quite expensive too. But I had no use for it, and as a rule, I don’t want people getting ideas to put in trash into my guitar case, so I stopped playing and explained I didn’t want it. The guy looked surprised, but he was obviously not the brightest match in the matchbox. “I don’t eat meat.” I explained, “But it’s good, it cost a lot.” “Ok, but I don’t eat it.” “Maybe you can give it to a friend?” I really was at a loss for why this guy bought the meat in the first place, I pushed it into his hands and he reluctantly made his way. Some people give apples, bananas and the like, but I personally don’t see the charm in an apple that has been sat down next to coins. But there are odder things, below is a list of some notable items and services I’ve received when I’ve played street music. 1. The headrest from an SJ train: This item was more bizarre than anything else, and must have been the proceeds of vandalism. I can’t say I had much use for it and left it when I went home. 2. Countless condoms: I am never sure what the implication behind this is. If you are positive, perhaps they are saying “Wow, your music is so good, you’ll need this!”, on the negative side they could be making a subtle protest against me breeding. 3. Lubricant: Again, this could be seen as a compliment, or perhaps as an insult. What has stunned me about the two above mentioned items, is that people will come to buy them off me when in need.


VAGRANT TROUBADOR – an *exclusive” chapter 4. Lighters: Lighters are quite useful, and after a while they add up and can be traded at a later date whilst out on the tiles. 5. Cigarettes: People would give them in almost full packets, one or a multiple at a time, and after I had cigarettes, though rarely smoking, I could easily make friends by handing them out to passers-by who wanted to partake. I’ve actually made a few friends this way so perhaps cigarettes aren’t all bad. 6. Notes: Sometimes people will leave notes. The first time someone left a note, I was new in Sweden and it read “Du är skitbra” which lead me to believe I was being insulted at first. Some contained phone numbers and some had compliments on. 7. Teddy Bears: One year I got three teddys whilst playing in Kristianstad as they were prizes for games at a fare. 8. Bank cards: I got two bank cards, one went into the possession of the guy I was playing with who said he knew places where they’d take a signature, and the other was from a girl the same year I got the bears. Having a girls name on a card is not the best start in a career of card fraud. I looked her name up online and asked if she wanted the card back, but she got a new one instead. 9. A massive attack CD: As it happened I already had this record and didn’t think it was that good. It was a bit of a disappointment to see it going into my case. 10. A Lucia Katt: This is a traditional Swedish bakery good that has saffron in it, but in fact it tastes of nothing and has no chocolate on it, so in my opinion was worthless, especially as all the taste leaves when it isn’t hot or dunked in coffee. 11. Café Latte: A girl in Västra Hamn liked the music but didn’t have any cash so bought me coffee a few times instead. 12. Hugs: Quite a lot of time, people will just ask to hug me. Depending on their state of mental health and sobriety I will consider it. 13.

Advice: Lots of people are quite willing to offer advice, which I always value.

14. Kisses: It can be good or bad, for the same reasons as the hugs. One girl who did kiss me didn’t remember who I was when I met her again a few years later, and didn’t believe me until I remembered her name and her friends recognised me. Her name was Tiger and I had thought she’d made it up to mock me, but actually she had been honest. I suppose it’s personal taste, but when the creepy guys and old ladies start trying it on I’m not so happy.


VAGRANT TROUBADOR – an *exclusive” chapter 15.

Alcohol of all sorts: It can have its ups and downs.

16. Hot chocolate: A lady bought me hot chocolate despite having cash, it was as if she really thought I was a drug addict. I explained to her that she could just give me the money as I wouldn’t buy drugs, but she insisted, so she obviously didn’t want to see it wasted on alcohol either.

17. Business card: Most of the time I have no idea why as they don’t respond when I ask what they wanted. 18. Trash: A little girl was walking with her mother and dropped a bag into my guitar case from 7/11 which I assumed must have a bun in it. In fact it was just her left overs and wrapping paper. The little bitch was laughing as she walked away. 19. Sweets and chocolate: I don’t like sweets, if the chocolate is wrapped maybe, otherwise I can give it to a friend and tell them it’s a present. 20. A bible: Well thanks. 21.

Toys: Mainly something you’d find in a kinder egg.

22. Pictures: Sometimes people will take a picture and get in touch with me later to send it to me. 23. A laptop bag: In Denmark a man walked past, dropped it into my case and told me he’d robbed a bank and that had all the money in it. He must have robbed the bank of Roskilde because the bag was empty (it went bust in the credit crunch). 24.

Chewing gum: So far always been in the packet.

25. Train cards: They were active for another few days, so that was quite useful to give to my friends. 26. Stink Bomb: A little townie kid in England put a stink bomb in my case, when I tried to move it, it exploded. Thus he and his crew informed me I smelled of shit. "Why do you want to smell of shit?" they asked. Sometimes nowadays I see a few of this group working for minimum wage in supermarkets and it’s quite possibly the pinnacle of their careers. I can't say I don't enjoy it.


BEHIND THE SCENE GLOUCESTERSHIRE ISSUE #6 APRIL 2014

Content created by BEHIND THE SCENE GLOUCESTERSHIRE.

E-mail: behindthesceneglos@yahoo.co.uk Twitter: @behindsceneglos Facebook: facebook.com/behindthesceneglos Tumblr: behindthesceneglos.tumblr.com/

Behind The Scene Gloucestershire Issue 6 April 2014  
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