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GLOBE GAZETTE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2021 |

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Legacies of the land

Heritage Century

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 17, 2021

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globegazette.com

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KARIE SWARTS THE GLOBE GAZETTE

SECTION N

HONORING OUR FARMS North Iowa farms recognized as Heritage and Century Farms T

IOWA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

he Iowa Department of Agriculture was back to recognizing Heritage and Century Farm families after the COVID-19 pandemic canceled celebrations in 2020. Included in the celebration of Iowa agriculture was the recognition of four Heritage Farms and 21 Century Farms in the Globe Gazette’s coverage area. To qualify, a family must have owned at least 40 acres for 100 years or more in the case of Century Farms and 150 years or more for a Heritage Farm. The ceremony wasn’t held in 2020 as the fair was canceled due Iowa Departto the pandemic. ment of AgriculIn 2021 in the ture and Iowa state of Iowa, a toFarm Bureau tal of 681 Century celebrated fam(476) and Heritage ilies who have (205) Farms were owned a farm highlighted, and for 100 years or family members 150 years. were honored during a ceremony at the 2021 Iowa State Fair. “The Century and Heritage Farm program is a great way to recognize the strength and resiliency of Iowa’s multi-generation farm families who have overcome challenges, adapted to changing markets and embraced new technologies to be successful,” said Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Mike Naig in a news release. “I always look forward to celebrating along with these families and hearing stories about their incredible journeys.”

Century & Heritage Farms

SHUTTERSTOCK

Century Farm program began in 1976 The Iowa Department of Ag and Land Stewardship has partnered with the Iowa Farm Bureau since 1976 to recognize families who have owned and worked a farm for 100 years or more. The Heritage Farm program was started in 2006 – on the 30th anniver-

sary of the Century Farm program – and more than 1,500 farms have been recognized. “Every family farm receiving this incredible honor should be proud of where they began and where they are now. We’re seeing five, six, even seven generations of farmers being recognized who have paid homage to the legacy their ancestors built while also cultivating

their own way through innovation and sustainability practices,” said Craig Hill, Iowa Farm Bureau president. “This award reinforces what we already know—Iowa’s backbone continues to be in agriculture, and it’s been fortified through the strength of our state’s family farms.” To date, 20,541 Century Farms and 1,566 Heritage Farms have been recognized across the state of Iowa.

2021 HERITAGE AND CENTURY FARMS HERITAGE FARMS Cerro Gordo County  Spotts Family Farm

(Nora Springs-1871)

Mitchell County  Burrington Family Farm

(Osage-1863)  Sullivan Family Farm (Stacyville-1870)  Worth County  Jorde Family Farm (Kensett-1871)

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CENTURY FARMS Cerro Gordo County  Harman Family Farm

(Plymouth-1911)  Pruin Family Farm (Mason City-1920)  Caspersen Family Farm (Rockwell-1920 Floyd County  Carolan Family Farm

(Charles City-1917)

 Greenzweig Family Farm

(Charles City-1920)

 Schmitt Family Farm

(Rockford-1920)

Hancock County  Redenius Family Farm

(Britt-1912)

(Osage-1863)

 Goplerud Family Farm

(St. Ansgar-1920)

 Theobald Family Farms

(Stacyville-1874)

Winnebago County

 Doug Redenius Farms, LLC

 Abbey Family Farm

 Zinn Family Farm

 Aukes Family Farm

(Britt-1920)

(Klemme-1920)

Mitchell County  Burrington Family Farm

(Joice-1920)

(Buffalo Center-1921)  Klukow Family Farm (Buffalo Center-1900)  Tweeten Life Estate (Forest City-1919)

Worth County  Braun Family Farm

(Grafton-1903)  Eilertson Family Farm

(Northwood-1920)  Kinzle Family Farm

(Kensett-1919)  Pleasant Grove Farm

(Kensett-1921) Wright County  Evans Family Farm

(Clarion-1921)

SHUTTERSTOCK


LEGACIES OF THE LAND

N2 | Sunday, October 17, 2021

Globe Gazette

HERITAGE FARMS

PHOTOS BY LISA GROUETTE—GLOBE GAZETTE‌

Marcus and Cathy Spotts stand in front of a shed on their property in rural Nora Springs on Thursday.

Spotts family perseveres through hard work Nora Springs family celebrates 150 years on the same farm JARED MCNETT

Globe Gazette ‌

A

bout four years before the town of Nora Springs was incorporated (in 1875), Samuel Spotts and his wife, Margaret, bought land along what is now Warbler Avenue for $30 an acre. This past month, Marcus Spotts and his wife, Cathy, paid $15 a piece for commemorative t-shirts to mark 150 years and five generations of farming that very same land. During the Iowa State Fair this year, the Spotts family was honored by the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship for having a Heritage Farm which is farmland of at least 40 acres that’s been owned and operated by the same family for 150 years or more. When asked about the recognition, which includes a plaque and an honorary stump, Marcus said that what he’s proudest of is how the award speaks to the character of those before him. “(It’s the) perseverance that everyone had, even through the tough times. They just keep going, like a bad habit,” he said. With the Spotts family, the land went from Samuel and Margaret to Abraham and Emma Spotts in 1895. Then it was passed to Paul and Alma Spotts in 1944. Lester and Lorraine Spotts assumed control in 1973, before Marcus and Cathy took charge in 2016. Marcus kind of always knew he’d farm the land, Cathy wasn’t as certain though there were some signs. “No, I didn’t think I would but my grandma farmed and my mom was his (Marcus’) second grade teacher here in Nora Springs,” she said. Through 2021, there are 1,566 Heritage Farms in the state of Iowa (according to the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship). Dubuque County has the most Heritage Farms, at 57, while four counties (Adams, Cherokee, O’Brien and Osceola) don’t have any. There are a total of two heritage farms in Cerro Gordo County, the one

“They just keep going, like a bad habit.” Marcus Spotts, Farmer owned by the Spotts family and one owned by Randall T. Law. In Floyd County, there are 10 such farms. The program itself began in 1976 with awards for Heritage Farms as well as Century Farms which have made it at least 100 years within the same family. In Iowa, through 2021, there are 20,537 Century Farms including 122 in Cerro Gordo and 178 in Floyd. Along with consistent ownership of the 160-plus acres in Nora Springs, Marcus said that what’s been grown on his family’s land hasn’t changed a whole lot since Samuel started. “Corn and soybeans,” he said. Per Marcus, the family works about 110 acres of corn and 52 acres of beans. What’s also kept up over time is the way the family has reckoned with hardships such as inheritance tax matters in the 1970s or price problems in the 1980s. “Part of the reason we’re this far is that we have a short memory,” Marcus said. “We always prepare for the worst and hope for the best.” For decades now, part of that preparation has involved working with agronomists, salesmen and even fellow neighbors Bruce, Sandy and Jordan Davison who Marcus is quick to thank. “I think we’ve always had good people helping us,” Marcus said. A somewhat more recent trend in the Spotts clan has been a fondness for aviation. In 1946, Paul Spotts, Marcus’ grandpa, built a hangar out near several fields of crops. To accompany the hangar, there’s a runaway

that stretches about three acres through the property. Marcus said that Paul had at least one plane out at the hangar but there would be events for the “Flying Farmers” where folks would park their planes in the area around the runway. Paul passed that love of flight down to his son, Lester, who then passed it down to Marcus who got his license in 1983. Marcus’ son, who goes by Blake, has his license as well. Of all the places on the Spotts farmland, Marcus said that the hangar and runway area is his absolute favorite. “It’ll take you anywhere you want to go,” he said. For him and Cathy, that’s meant taking vacations in Florida, going to a wedding in Atlanta and even flying over the “Field of Dreams” movie site in Dyersville during the MLB event earlier this summer. “The key is not having to go to the airport,” Cathy joked. There have been more utilitarian functions too. Cathy said that the family’s

previously used its Cirrus SR22 to hunt down people’s cattle that got out and Marcus shared that having a plane is helpful to check out the fields. He then added that his grandpa and dad would actually hunt fox out of the plane. The Spotts don’t have any plans to turn over those wings anytime soon and they certainly don’t have any intent to stop farming their land either. The way Marcus sees it, it’s more of a motivator to work in a place that’s been a part of a family for so long. “You’re going to work a little bit harder to keep it going,” he said. Cathy sees it as a way of belonging and a way of tapping back into the present but also looking toward the future. “Everybody wants to be a part of something and I think it’s quite a legacy for our kids to see that and to see that you’re working together even when you might not always get along.”

Jared McNett covers local government for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at Jared.McNett@globegazette.

com or by phone at 641-421-0527. Follow Jared on Twitter @TwoHeadedBoy98.

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

Sunday, October 17, 2021 | N3

CENTURY FARMS CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

Caspersen family celebrates 100 years on the farm Caspersen Plymouth farmers Family hold party for ‘Century Farm, 1920 Farm’ designation JERRY SMITH

GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Globe Gazette‌

Caspersen Family Farm, 1920‌ Owners: Leon and Irene Caspersen‌

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he Caspersens have been working the family land in Plymouth for 100 years now, and hope to carry on the tradition for many more generations. The family celebrated becoming an Iowa Century Farm with a party, held at the farm on the Saturday of Labor Day weekend, with about 240 people attending. “I feel a lot of pride,” said Leon Caspersen, who owns the farm with his wife, Irene. “Farming has been good to us. We did real well. We hope to keep it in the family for another 100 years.” According to Leon’s son, David, his father is 91 years old and is still as sharp as a tack. Leon and Irene are retired, but currently own the 160 acre family farm. “It’s in the blood, and will be for as long as you live,” said the 64-year-old David Caspersen, who has actively farmed the land for 46 years since he graduated from Newman Catholic. “It’s a good life. You are your own boss. We’ve made a pretty good life here.” Leon said that things have changed since he began farming. He said his father, who retired in the late 1960s, didn’t get a tractor until 1941. “My grandpa would turn over in his grave if he saw what we spend today,” he said. “He could buy a team of horses with what we pay for seed corn.” Randy Pearce, who is Leon and Irene’s son-in-law (married to their daughter, Mary Kay, for the past 46 years), said

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PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED‌

The Caspersen family celebrated its Century Farm designation with a party over Labor Day weekend.

An overhead shot of the Caspersen Family Farm during the “Century Farm Party” held during Labor Day weekend.

Leon Caspersen sits on one of the family’s tractors during the Century Farm party held at the farm over Labor Day weekend.

the Century Farm party was a huge success, and included food, beverages, live music, memorabilia and activities for the children. “We chose to delay the celebration until 2021 due to the cancellation of the Iowa State

Fair in 2020,” he said. “Even the weather cooperated.” Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

David (son) and Leon (father) Caspersen hold up the sign and certificate given to them by the State of Iowa that designates their family farm as a Century Farm.

he Caspersen Family Farm is located at 8194 Ulmus Ave. in Rockwell, in the Township of Owen, in Cerro Gordo County, and consists of 160 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Thomas C. and Johanna (Sievertsen) Caspersen, the grandparents of the current owners, purchased the original 160 acres for $175 per acre on Feb. 25, 1920. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Thomas C. and Johanna (Sievertsen) Caspersen, then by Paul G. and Mary E. (O’Rourke) Caspersen, and now Leon J. and Irene M. (DeRock) Caspersen. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. None of the original buildings remain standing. The Caspersen Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Leon and Irene Caspersen. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641421-0556.

CENTURY FARM

Pruin Family Farm, 1920 land, the current family farm Pruin Family Farm, 1920‌ was first owned by BJ Broer, then Ruth (Broers) Smith, the grandOwners: Douglas and mother of the current owners, and then Douglas Pruin. Tamara Pruin‌ The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. he Pruin Family Farm is The Pruin Family Farm is one located at 16316 190th St., of 476 Century Farms recogMason City, in the Townnized in Iowa in 2021. The names ship of Bath, in Cerro Gordo County, and consists of 80 acres. on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: BJ Broers, It is unknown how the first Frank and Ruth (Broers) Smith, family member originally oband Douglas and Tamara Pruin. tained the farmland, but BJ Boroers, the great grandfather of Jerry Smith is sports editor and the current owners, purchased special projects editor for the Globe the original 80 acres for $212 an Gazette. You can reach him at jerry. acre on Feb. 10, 1920. IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌ smith@globegazette.com or by While the family was not the The Pruin family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair. first owners/settlers of the farm- phone at 641-421-0556. GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

N4 | Sunday, October 17, 2021

Globe Gazette

HERITAGE&CENTURY FARMS HERITAGE FARM

HERITAGE FARM

Jorde Family Farm, 1871 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Jorde Family Farm, 1871‌ Owner: Travis and Arlene Jorde‌

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he Jorde Family Farm is located at 1537 400th St in Kensett, in the Township of Lincoln, in Worth County, and consists of 239 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Tore Gordon, the great-grandparent of the current owner, purchased the original 80 acres in 1871. While it is unknown if the family was the first owners/settlers of the farmland,

the current family farm was first owned by Tore Gordon, then by Knut Gordon, the grandfather of the current owner, then Thelma Gordon Jorde, the mother of the current owner, and now Travis and Arlene Jorde. The Jorde Family Farm is one of 205 Heritage Farms and 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Travis and Arlene Jorde. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

CENTURY FARM IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Burrington family was presented with a Iowa Heritage Farm and Century Farm certificates during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Burrington Family Farm, 1863 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Burrington Family Farm, 1863‌ Owner: Ken and Helen Burrington; Dean Johnson‌

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he Burrington Family Farm is located at 15461 325th St., in Osage, in the Township of West Cedar, in Mitchell County. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but John N. Johnson, the great-grandfather of the current owner, purchased the original 280 acres in 1863. While it is unknown if the family was the first owners/settlers of the farmland,

the current family farm was first owned by John N. Johnson, then NJ Johnson, the grandfather of the current owner, then Herbert Johnson, the father of the current owner, then Marvin Johnson, and now Dean Johnson and Ken and Helen Burrington. The Burrington Family Farm is one of 205 Heritage Farms and 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Dean Johnson, and Ken and Helen Burrington. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette. com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Aukes family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Aukes Family Farm, 1921 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Aukes Family Farm, 1921‌ Owners: Ronald E. Aukes and Douglas L. Aukes‌

HERITAGE FARM

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he Aukes Family Farm is located at 1321 400th St. in Buffalo Center, in the Township of Grant, in Winnebago County, and consists of 232 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but E.B. Aukes, the great-grandfather of the current owners, purchased the original 154 acres for $223.50 per acre on March 1, 1921. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the

current family farm was first owned by E.B. Aukes, then R.E. Aukes, the grandfather of the current owners, then Raymond G. Aukes, the current owners’ father, and now Ronald and Douglas L. Aukes. The farm’s main crops are corn, soybeans and cattle. The original barn is still standing. The Aukes Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Ronald E. aukes and Douglas L. Aukes. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette. com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

CENTURY FARM

Abbey Family Farm, 1920 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Sullivan family was presented with a Iowa Heritage Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Sullivan Family Farm, 1870 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Sullivan Family Farm, 1870‌ Owner: Carol M. Sullivan‌

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he Sullivan Family Farm is located at 2114 State Line Rd. Stacyville, in the Township of Union, in Mitchell County, and consists 124 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Peter Bissen, the great-grandfather of the current owner, purchased the original 124 acres in 1870. While it is unknown if the family was the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Peter Bissen, then by John P. Bissen, the grandfather of the current

owner, then Bernard J. May and Regina (Bissen) May, the parents of the current owner, then Robert and Audry May, the brother of the current owner, then John and Carol Sullivan, then John J. and Carol Sullivan, and now Carol M. Sullivan. The Sullivan Family Farm is one of 205 Heritage Farms and 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Carol M. Sullivan; May/ Bissen Farm. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

Abbey Family Farm, 1874‌ Owners: Carol J. Abbey, Scott P. Abbey and Drake A. Abbey‌

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he Abbey Family Farm is located at 41457 232nd Ave., in Joice, in the Township of Center, in Winnebago County, and consists of 256 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Bert and Minnie Abbey, the grandparents to Carol J. Abbey purchased the original 110 acres for $220 per acre on March 1, 1920. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by

Bert and Minnie Abbey, then by Carol’s parents and Scott’s and Drake’s grandparents Gene and Valeda Abbey, and now by Carol J., Scott P., and Drake A. Abbey. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The original buildings are no longer standing as the original home was replaced in 1969. The Abbey Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The name on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair is: Abbey Family Farm. Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

Sunday, October 17, 2021 | N5

CENTURY FARMS

CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Carolan family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Braun family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Carolan Family Farm, 1917 Braun Family Farm, 1903 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Carolan Family Farm, 1917‌ Owners: John and Marianne Carolan‌

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he Carolan Family Farm is located at 3077 155th St. in Charles City, in the Township of Niles, in Floyd County, and consists of 148 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Henry Girkin, the great-grandfather of the current owners, purchased the original 148 acres on

March 1, 1917. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Henry Girkin, then by the current owner’s grandparents, Diedrich Elmer Girkin and Myrtle Girkin, and then John and Marianne Carolan. The farm’s main crops are corn, soybeans, oats and hay/straw. The original barn is still standing. The Carolan Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: John and Marianne Carolan.

While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current Braun Family Farm, 1903‌ family farm was first owned by Gottfried Owners: Christopher S. Braun, Walk, then Alvina (Walk) Braun, grandKeith A. Braun, Steven L. Braun, mother of the current owners, then Everett and Chrystal Braun, parents of the curand Rita Jean Bebler‌ rent owners, and now Christopher Braun, Keith Braun, Steven Braun and Rita Bebler. he Braun Family Farm is located at The farm’s main crops are cattle, hogs, 2077 400th St. in Grafton, in the Township of Union, in Worth County, corn, beans and chickens. The house built in 1945 is still standing in use. and consists of 43 acres. The Braun Family Farm is one of 476 CenIt is unknown how the first family memtury Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The ber originally obtained the farmland, but names on the certificate presented at the Iowa Gottfried Walk, the great-grandfather of the current owners, purchased the original State Fair are: Christopher S. Braun, Keith A. Braun, Steven L. Braun and Rita Jean Bebler. 120 acres on Feb. 20, 1903. GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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CENTURY FARM

Evans Family Farm, 1921 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Evans Family Farm, 1921‌ Owners: Terry and Sharon Evans‌

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he Evans Family Farm is located at 2281 280th St. in Clarion, in the Township of Lincoln, in Wright County, and consists of 154 acres. It is unknown how

the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Gustave Hilpipre, the grandfather of the current owners, purchased the land for $32,800 on Feb. 26, 1921.

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While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Gustave Hilpipre, then by Raymond and Marie Hilpipre,

Sharon’s parents, and now Terry and Sharon Evans. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The original house and barn are no longer standing.

The Evans Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Terry and Sharon Evans.

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

N6 | Sunday, October 17, 2021

Globe Gazette

CENTURY FARMS

CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Greenzweig family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Eilertson family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Greenzweig Family Farm, 1920 Eilertson Family Farm, 1920 ers/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Robert E. Greenzweig Family Farm, 1920‌ Greenzweig, then by Virgil E. Greenzweig, the current owner’s father, and now Owners: Galen and by Galen V. Greenzweig. Charlotte Greenzweig‌ The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The original house and barn are he Greenzweig Family Farm is lostill standing. cated at 2275 215th St. in Charles The Greenzweig Family Farm is one of City, in the Township of West St. Charles, in Floyd County, and consists of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate pre80 acres. sented at the Iowa State Fair are: Galen It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, and Charlotte Greenzweig Family. but Robert E. Greenzweig, the grandfather of the current owner, purchased the Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can original 80 acres for $13,600 or $170 per reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com acre on April 10, 1920. While the family was not the first own- or by phone at 641-421-0556.

owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Eilertson Family Farm, 1920‌ Osman Tobias Eilertson, then Leslie Owners: David and Tobias Eilertson, and now David Eugene Eilertson and Sue Ellen Eilertson. Sue Eilertson‌ The farm’s main crops are corn and he Eilertson Family Farm is located soybeans. Some of the original buildings are still standing. at 1969 500th St. in Northwood, The Eilertson Family Farm is one of in the Township of Deer Creek, 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in in Worth County, and consists of 80 2021. The names on the certificate preacres. sented at the Iowa State Fair are: David It is unknown how the first family and Sue Eilertson. member originally obtained the farmland, but Osman Tobias Eilertson, the grandfather of the durrent owners, pur- Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can chased the original 157.5 acres for $200 reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com per acre on Feb. 19, 1920. or by phone at 641-421-0556. While the family was not the first

GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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CENTURY FARM

Goplerud Family Farm, 1920 current family farm was first owned by Chris and Dora Goplerud, then KenGoplerud Family Farm, 1912‌ neth and Marion Goplerud, the parents Owners: David and Judy of the current owner, and now David and Judy Goplerud. Goplerud‌ The farm’s main crops are corn he Goplerud Family Farm is located and soybeans. The original buildings are no longer standing. at 4631 Cameo Ave., St. Ansgar, in The Goplerud Family Farm is one of the Township of Otranto, in Mitchel 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa County, and consists of 310 acres. in 2021. The name on the certificate It is unknown how the first family presented at the Iowa State Fair is: Gomember originally obtained the farmplerud Family land, but Chris and Dora Goplerud, the grandparents of the current owners, purchased the original 160 acres for $213 Jerry Smith is sports editor and special IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌ projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You per acre on Feb. 28, 1920. can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette. The Goplerud family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the While the family was not the first 2021 Iowa State Fair. com or by phone at 641-421-0556. owners/settlers of the farmland, the GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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CENTURY FARM

Harman Family Farm, 1911 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Harman Family Farm, 1911‌ Owner: Dorothy Harman‌

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he Harman Family Farm is located at 1303 Broad St. in Plymouth, in the Township of Plymouth, in

Cerro Gordo County, and consists of 139.7 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but John Frank Harman and his wife, Dora Harman purchased the original 139.7 acres on Feb. 28, 1911. The farm was then

owned by Roy L. Harman (father to Robert Harman, Dorothy’s husband), then Eva M. Harman (mother to Robert, Dorothy’s husband), and then to Robert L. and Dorothy K. Harman. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The Harman Family Farm is one of 476 Century

Congratulations to all FaMilY FarMs!

& Dorothy Harman. Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The name on the certificate presented at the Jerry Smith is sports editor Iowa State Fair is: Robert and special projects editor

for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry. smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

Sunday, October 17, 2021 | N7

CENTURY FARMS

CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Kinzle family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Kinzle Family Klukow Family Farm, 1919 Farm, 1900

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Klukow family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current Kinzle Family Farm, 1919‌ family farm was first owned by Henry Owners: Janiece Walk Kinzle, Diedrick Walk and Louise Henriette Junkermeier, then Paul Frederick Walk and Joyce Walk Simanton, Arliene Opal Walk, parents of the current Judeen Walk Keiran, owners, and now Janiece Kae Walk Kinzle, Debra Walk Teachout and Joyce Annette Walk Simanton, Judeen Marie Walk Keiran, Jerry Allen Walk, Debra Kevin Paul Walk‌ Jean Walk Teachout and Kevin Paul Walk. The farm’s main crops are corn and soyhe Kinzle Family Farm is located beans. Only an original pole barn remains at 2092 420th St. in Kensett, in standing. the Township of Barton, in Worth The Kinzle Family Farm is one of 476 County, and consists 115 acres. It is unknown how the first family mem- Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented ber originally obtained the farmland, but Henry Diedrick Walk and Louise Henriette at the Iowa State Fair are: Janiece Walk Junkermeier, the grandparents of the cur- Kinzle, Joyce Walk Simanton, Judeen Walk Keiran, Debra Walk Teachout and Kevin rent owners, purchased the original 120 Paul Walk. acres for $18,000 ($150 per acre). GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Klukow Family Farm, 1900‌ Owners: Nancy A. Klukow‌

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he Klukow Family Farm is located at 1749 480th St. in Buffalo Center, in the Township of Lincoln, in Winnebago County, and consists of 155 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but William H. and wife Steffentje Jurgens, the great-grandfather of the current owner, purchased the original 237 acres on Feb. 28, 1900. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the

current family farm was first owned by William H. and wife Steffentje Jurgens, then Henry W. Jurgens, the great uncle of the current owner, then Johan (Joe) and wife Hattie Jurgens, the grandparents of the current owner, then William and wife Grace jurgens, the parents of the current owner, and now Nancy A. Klukow. The farm’s main crops are corn, soybeans, sweet corn, and cattle. The original house is still standing. The Klukow Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Doug and Nancy Klukow.

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N8 | Sunday, October 17, 2021

LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

CENTURY FARMS CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

Pleasant Grove Farm was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Redenius family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Pleasant Grove Farm, 1921 Redenius Family Farm, 1912 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Pleasant Grove Farm, 1921‌ Owners: Mary A. and Steven E. Wendt; Thomas R. Meyer‌

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he Pleasant Grove Farm is located at 4187 Raven Ave. in Kensett, in the Township of Kensett, in Worth County, and consists of 80 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Lewis (L.C.) Kenison and Louise V. Kenison, the grandparents of the Wendts, and great-grandparents of Meyer, purchased the original 80 acres for $170 per acre on July 20, 1921.

While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned Lewis (L.C.) Kenison and Louise V. Kenison, then Glennis H. Steigerand and Doris E. (Kenison) Steiger, parents of of the Wendts and grandparents of Meyer, and now Mary A. (Steiger) Wendt and Steven E. Wendt and Thomas R. Meyer. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans, and sheep (wool). Some of the original buildings remain standing. The Kinzle Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Mary Ann (Steiger) Wendt and Steven E. Wendt; and Thomas R. Meyer.

GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Redenius Family Farm, 1912‌ Owners: Gerald and Yolanda Redenius‌

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he Redenius Family Farm is located at 520 250th St., in Britt, in the Township of Orthel, in Hancock County, and consists of 80 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Menne Redenius, the grandfather of the current owner, purchased the original 160 acres on Feb. 29, 1912. While the family was not the first

owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Menne Redenius, then Menno and Lora Redenius, the parents of the current owner, then Elwin and Linda Redenius, the brother of the current owner, and now Gerald and Yolanda Redenius. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The original house is still standing. The Redenius Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Gerald and Yolanda Redenius.

CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Schmitt family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Schmitt Family Farm, 1920 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Schmitt Family Farm, 1920‌ Owners: Robert F. and Patricia K. Schmitt‌

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he Schmitt Family Farm is located at 2221 Kirkwood Ave., in the Township of Ulster, in Floyd County, and consists of 220 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Nickolas and Mary Schmitt, the grandparents of the current owner, purchased the original 190 acres for $150 per acre in February 1920.

While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Nickolas and Mary Schmitt, then Louis and Edith Schmitt, the parents of the current owner, then Edith Schmitt, and now by Robert F. and Patricia K. Schmitt. The farm’s main crops are hay and CRP. The original house and barn are no longer standing. The Schmitt Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Robert F. and Patricia K. Schmitt.

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Douglas Redenius family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Doug Redenius Farms, LLC, 1920 owners/settlers of the farmland, the Doug Redenius Farms, LLC, 1920‌ current family farm was first owned by Menno and Trientje Redenius, then Fred Owners: and Trienette Redenius, the great uncle of the current owner, then Marjorie Douglas Redenius‌ Stecker, the second cousin of the current oug Redenius Farms, LLC, is located owner, then Gerald and Yolanda Redenius, the parents of the current owner, at 540 260th St., in Britt, in the and now Douglas Redenius (Doug RedeTownship of Orthel, in Hancock nius Farms, LLC). County, and consists of 114 acres. The farm’s main crops are corn and It is unknown how the first family soybeans. The original buildings are no member originally obtained the farmlonger standing. land, but Menno and Trientje Redenius, Doug Redenius Farms, LLC, is one of 476 the great-grandparents of the current Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. owner, purchased the original 200 acres The names on the certificate presented at for $212.50 per acre on Feb. 13, 1920. the Iowa State Fair is: Redenius Farms. While the family was not the first GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

Sunday, October 17, 2021 | N9

CENTURY FARMS CENTURY FARM

CENTURY FARM

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Theobald family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

The Zinn family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair.

Theobald Family Farm, 1874 GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Theobald Family Farm, 1874‌ Owners: Ed and Brenda Theobald‌

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he Theobald Family Farm is located at 4645 Quail Ave, Stacyville, in the Township of Stacyville, in Mitchell County, and consists of 275 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Peter and Barbara Theobald, great-grandparents of the current owners, purchased the original 234 acres on Dec. 29, 1874. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned

by Peter and Barbara Theobald, then Thomas and Gertrude Theobald, the grandparents of the current owner, then Clement and alvina Theobald, the parents of the current owner, and now Edward and Brenda Theobald. The farm’s main crops are corn and soybeans. The original granary is still standing. The Theobald Family Farm is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Edward and Brenda Theobald.

Zinn Family Farm, 1920 grandfather of the current owner, then Elise H. Zinn, the grandmother of the Zinn Family Farm, 1920‌ current owner, then Marjorie Z. Zinn, the Owner: Robert H. Zinn‌ mother of the current owner, and now he Zinn Family Farm is located at Yale Robert H. Zinn. The farm’s main crops are corn and soyAvenue and 140th Street, in Klemme, in the Township of Avery, in Hancock beans. The Zinn Family Farm is one of 476 County, and consists of 160 acres. Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: George Zinn, Edgar but George Zinn, the great uncle of the current owner, purchased the original 80 N. Zinn, M.d., Elise H. Zinn, Marjorie Z. acres for $10,000 ($125 per acre) on March Zinn, Robert H. Zinn. 5, 1920. While the family was not the first own- Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can ers/settlers of the farmland, the current reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or family farm was first owned by George by phone at 641-421-0556. Zinn, then Edgar N. Zinn, M.D., the GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

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Jerry Smith is sports editor and special projects editor for the Globe Gazette. You can reach him at jerry.smith@globegazette.com or by phone at 641-421-0556.

CENTURY FARM

Biofuel industry Tweeten pushes for Life ‘all-the-above’ Estate, Experts await word on variety of issues, including ethanol GENE LUCHT

Iowa Farmer Today‌

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Things are looking up, but they are also very much up in the air when it comes to ethanol this year. While ethanol production facilities have benefited from an improved national economy as the U.S. emerges from the economic doldrums of the COVID-19 pandemic, industry experts are anxiously awaiting word on a variety of items being considered in Washington, D.C., that could impact biofuels. “It’s a nervous time,” says Monte Shaw, executive director of the Iowa Renewable Fuels Association. At the plant level, 2021 has been a definite improvement over 2020, according to Mike Jerke, manager at Southwest Iowa Renewable Energy (SIRE) in Council Bluffs. “It was a significant challenge,” Jerke says of 2020, when drivers suddenly began putting far fewer miles on their cars and fuel usage dropped dramatically. “There was enough pain inflicted.” Many facilities either closed or ran at less than full capacity during that time. In 2021, demand has picked up and margins improved for most ethanol producers. There have been challenges, such as a shortage of labor and the increased cost of finding labor. In some areas the derecho storm that hit a large swath of Iowa in 2020 caused some challenges finding corn. “It took a chunk of corn supply out of the picture,” Jerke says. But an improving economy and better crops have thus far made 2021 better than the very difficult pandemic year. “We’re going to have a re-

spectable year,” Jerke says. But Jerke and Shaw both say there are still a number of issues causing concern among farmers and the makers of ethanol. Electric cars are a huge topic of discussion. The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to come out with new rules and numbers for biofuel blending requirements soon, and the rumors flying around have many in the industry concerned that the Biden administration might make moves that would hurt ethanol producers. Then there are issues related to climate change and carbon that could be good for ethanol but could also go against the industry. Please see BIOFUEL, Page N10

1919

GLOBE GAZETTE STAFF

Tweeten Life Estate, 1919‌ Owners: Duane Tweeten and Diane Nelson‌

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he Tweeten Life Estate is located at 19300 345th St. in Forest City, in the Township of Mount Valley, in Winnebago county, and consists of 120 acres. It is unknown how the first family member originally obtained the farmland, but Oliver B. and Nettie F. Tweeten, the grandparents of the current owners, purchased the original 40 acres

IOWA DEPT. OF AGRICULTURE‌

The Tweeten family was presented with a Iowa Century Farm certificate during the 2021 Iowa State Fair. for $7,000 ($175 per acre) on June 14, 1919. While the family was not the first owners/settlers of the farmland, the current family farm was first owned by Oliver B. and Nettie F. Tweeten, then Wallace R. and Carol J. Tweeten, and now the

Carol J. Tweeten Life Estate for David, Douglas, Richard and Duane Tweeten and Diane Nelson. The farm’s main crops are corn, soybeans, and hogs. While the original house and barn are not standing, one of the original sheds remains.

The Tweeten Life Estate is one of 476 Century Farms recognized in Iowa in 2021. The names on the certificate presented at the Iowa State Fair are: Carol J. Tweeten, David Tweetne, Doug Tweeten, Dick Tweeten, Diane Nelson and Duane Tweeten.

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N10 | Sunday, October 17, 2021

LEGACIES OF THE LAND

Globe Gazette

Space remains for conventional tillage as trends change

Paul Mugge, a farmer in Sutherland, Iowa, utilizes conventional tillage on his farm, but with his three-year rotation of organic corn, organic soybeans and a small grain or legume, he only needs to till every three years. That tillage comes between the small grain/ legume year and the corn. “It’s very easy to kill with a disk and field cultivator,” Mugge said. “I make a lot of trips, but those trips are fast and light. I’m trying to lose as little soil as possible.” Mugge said conventional tillage is the best option for weed control on his farm. Being an organic farmer, he doesn’t have access to

the herbicides that other farmers may use. He also said it fits in his farm’s rotation. He said they’ve come to this schedule after years of trial and error, particularly after becoming organic 20 years ago. “That’s why I have to cultivate everything,” he said. “I rotate tillage systems (each year), I rotate fall crops, I rotate cover crops, and I think that’s all important.” Mugge said something he wants to continue doing is removing passes across his land. Going full tillage every three years is a start, but he said organic farmers sometimes catch flack for using too much energy with their till-

age. On average, he said, organic farms will use less fossil fuels than conventional farms. “It’s mainly because of nitrogen fertilizer,” he said. “Fossil fuel energy goes to making anhydrous ammonia, and I don’t use any of that. I use my red clover and animal manure. From a fossil fuel part of the equation, I’m doing OK.” He noted the other part of the debate is resource conservation, which is why Mugge opts to limit tillage to his every-three year standard. He said tillage makes the soil vulnerable to erosion, but using other conservation methods can help combat the losses.

He credits his high soil organic matter to using cover crops and other practices. “I have narrow prairie strips and most of my farm is on a contour, so I don’t lose a lot a lot of soil,” Mugge said. “I’m sure I lose some — everybody does — but I try to limit that as much as possible.” Cruse said most tillage is going to reduce density of the soil — a trade-off. However, doing it in a way such as on Mugge’s farm often helps counter some of the soil health concerns. “If you are going to incorporate alfalfa or clover, the increased soil erosion that can follow — depending on rainfall — is countered by the soil conservation you get during the years in which you have small grains growing in that rotation,” Cruse said. “To really see the effect, you have to see the soil erosion potential over the entire time frame of the different crops that are used in the rotation.” He said there has been a bigger trend of farmers moving toward less tillage. He said when he was first working in agronomy, the idea was the blacker the soil was, the better the farmer operator was perceived to be. Now, that mindset has changed overall. “The overall trend is to leave more residue on the soil surface,” Cruse said. “That, and reduce energy expenditure in terms of the tillage operation.”

hurt it, such as the increased use of waivers for refineries under the Trump administration. Right now the industry is watching the discussions about infrastructure in Congress as well. At the end of the day it is possible they come out better than before, but some of the things being discussed and some of the rumors coming out of Washington are unsettling, Shaw says, adding that “the policy picture is bleak.” The bleakest part of that picture is the rumor that EPA intends to reduce the RFS conventional biofuel levels for 2020, 2021 and 2022. That would be devastating, Shaw says.

“It’s not what I expected from the Biden administration,” he says. “The numbers are so horrible I hadn’t contemplated them.” The Renewable Fuels Association in Washington, D.C., also spoke out on the issue and praised some farm-state Democrats in Congress, including Rep. Cheri Bustos of Illinois and Cindy Axne of Iowa, for their letter to the administration regarding the EPA rumors. A group of farm organizations, including the American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Farmers Union, as well as the corn and soybean associations, also sent a letter to the White House regarding the EPA rumors.

There are several other issues out there, some of which could be addressed in the bipartisan infrastructure bill or the larger budget reconciliation bill that includes a number of large investments in infrastructure and climate. Shaw says a change in language to add the words “and more” to the 10% ethanol language in present legislation would offset a recent court ruling and open the door to more E15 blends in the market. And the infrastructure bill includes some money for biofuel infrastructure that would be beneficial to the industry. What’s more, Shaw says the California carbon rules may open

the door for more biofuel sales in that state as it attempts to reduce carbon emissions. If the federal government doesn’t move to deal with the challenges to E15, the industry will likely look to state-bystate fixes, he adds. Electric cars are another challenge, since they don’t use liquid fuel and thus don’t burn ethanol. Jerke says the country tends to “get very excited about the next new thing” and that sometimes means leaving behind other good options. “We need an all-the-above approach,” he says. “I don’t think it is good for the country to put all its eggs in one basket.”

No-till practices are front and center in tillage discussions AARON VINER

Iowa Farmer Today‌

At nearly any field day, there is likely to be a presentation on the benefits of abandoning conventional tillage. Erosion, water retention and soil health are the main talking points when discussing a transition to limited or no-till practices. However, conventional tillage is still an important part of many farms in the Midwest. Whether it’s for weed control or incorporating manure, Richard Cruse, director of the Iowa Water Center and agronomy professor at Iowa State University, said tillage has benefits for plenty of operations. “It could be a moldboard plow or a chisel plow system that does some mixing,” Cruse said. “It could be a farming system that has feedlot manure applied to the surface, where there is value in not leaving it on the soil surface, or systems where they are trying to avoid herbicide use.” He said in many cases, tillage is also used to kill overwintering cover crops, where the intent isn’t to disturb the soil. One instance where full tillage works optimally is on some organic farms.

Biofuel From N9

The frustrating thing, Shaw says, is that it seems every new president says nice things about ethanol on the campaign trail and then proposes things that could hurt the industry once they are in office. This has been true of every president since the Renewable Fuels Standard was passed. Presidents Barack Obama, Donald Trump and Joe Biden all said supportive things about ethanol and all have generally done some things to boost the industry but also did or proposed things that

A farmer works on fall tillage in a field near Forest City.

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