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OVERVIEW

Energy Renewable energy and nuclear power are in the mix.

T

he Western Cape hosts the country’s only nuclear power station at Koeberg, north of Cape Town, and it has a pumped water storage plant and three open-cycle gas turbines. In October 2017 a site just north of Koeberg was approved by the National Department of Environmental Affairs as the site for a new plant. The South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (NECSA), the state body that oversees research and development of the sector, welcomed the decision after a variety of places in the Western Cape and Eastern Cape were listed as potential sites for several years. The decision to actually go ahead and build the plant has not yet been taken, but it seems that the South African government is determined that a new plant should be built. There is considerable opposition to this drive, not least because of the expected cost of the project. The energy landscape of the Western Cape is undergoing rapid change. The potential of renewable energy is being realised and there is a strong lobby to build a gas-to-energy plant in the province. One of the Cape’s prime tourism sites has installed a solar-powered microgrid. Robben Island is a perfect example of where a stand-alone power source can be used very effectively. Solar photovoltaic panels will produce about half of the power needs of the island, which include a working harbour and a desalination plant. Lithium-ion batteries will store energy. The system was set up by Sola Future Energy and ABB and paid for by the National Department of Tourism.

WESTERN CAPE BUSINESS 2018

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SECTOR INSIGHT The sun is set to power Robben Island.

The City of Cape Town wants to generate 20% of its electricity from renewable resources by 2020. To achieve this goal, the city in 2017 took the National Department of Energy to court in a bid to allow the city to buy electricity directly from independent power producers. The city argues that it has been waiting too long for a response from the department on this issue. There have been long delays in the signing of national power purchase agreements (PPAs) with independent power producers. According to the South African Renewable Energy Council (SAREC), signing the outstanding PPAs will unlock R58-billion in investor value. There were high hopes that the deals would be signed in October 2017, but then a new minister of energy was appointed. Since the start of the national Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Pro c u re m e n t Pro gr a m m e (REIPPPP) nearly R200-billion has been attracted to the creation of new energy sources in South Africa.

Western Cape Business 2018  

The 2018 edition of Western Cape Business is the 11th issue of this highly successful publication that, since its launch in 2005, has estab...

Western Cape Business 2018  

The 2018 edition of Western Cape Business is the 11th issue of this highly successful publication that, since its launch in 2005, has estab...

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