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POWERED BY GLOBAL ADJUSTMENTS

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Candid Chennai 12 places in Chennai that epitomize globalism

22 A Festival a Day...

A Festival a Day...

Festivals as connecting threads in India’s multicultural mindset

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SOPHISTIC

SILK ATION IN

E-1, LOTUS COLONY, CHAMIERS ROAD, NANDANAM, CHENNAI 600 035 | +91 97899 37149


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Dear Readers,

Editor Ranjini Manian Managing Editor Yamini Vasudevan Creative Head Prem Kumar Circulation P. Devaraj Advertising

I wanted to share with you the essence of my recent learning. I am taking an online spiritual improvement class. Through this, I realised how technology can be an enabler. We are 35 seekers in 25 different locations and, via ZOOM classes, we are able to ‘gather’ in one place to learn from one another and from a self-help teacher and programme. Whether you are based in Minneapolis or Friburg, Mumbai or Manhattan, the human spirit faces the same ups and downs. One of the members, Lauren, summed up the goal in the following manner, to help us make progress at our core: It speaks to building our devotion for coworkers who lob unpredictable responses at us; parents who are facing diminishing health, memory and capabilities; husbands who are facing the demands of age and responsibility; our children, who we cherish but who challenge our patience. It requires us to build our mental muscle in any relation where selfless service (aka love) is part of the package.

Given that our worlds seem to spin in an increasingly frenetic pace, and we face stresses and challenges on a minute-byminute basis, it is sometimes hard to keep our actions and responses calm, centred and loving. There is always room and hope for improvement. Here are three practices I am following this month to strengthen my ability to express my love more easily, and revel in mindful freedom: 1. Juggle likes and dislikes. Do one thing that you dislike during this week. At another time, resist doing something that you like. 2. Take the attitude of no expectations: ‘There is nothing I want from you; I just want to give.’ 3. Concentrate on your own personal conduct, not on how others act. In this spirit, do take a look at our article on the power of love that can be harnessed to create positive ripples in our family, work and society (Value Vignettes, page 52). Also, do take a look at our article on festivals as a mirror of Indian values – in particular, the emphasis on renewing connections between family and community, and nature in a holistic sense (Driving Forces, page 56). And don’t miss our special tribute to Chennai’s curated picks (page 38) , as we celebrate its founding as Madras, in August of 1639.

Chennai Shobana Sairaj Bengaluru Meera Roy Delhi/NCR Ruchika Srivastava Mumbai/Pune Ashish Chaulkar

To subscribe to this magazine, e-mail info@globaladjustments.com or access it online at www.globaladjustments.com Chennai (Headquarters) 5, 3rd Main Road, R A Puram, Chennai – 600028 Telefax +91-44-24617902 E-mail culturama@globaladjustments.com Bengaluru #333/1, 1st Floor, 9th Main, 14th Cross, 2nd Stage, Indira Nagar, Bangalore - 560038 Tel +91-80-41267152 E-mail culturamablr@globaladjustments.com Delhi-NCR Level 4, Augusta Point, Golf Course Road, Sector 53, Gurgaon 122002, Haryana Mobile +91 124 435 4224 E-mail del@globaladjustments.com Mumbai #1102, 11th floor, Peninsula Business Park, Tower B, SB Road, Lower Parel, Mumbai – 400013 Tel +91-22-66879366 E-mail mum@globaladjustments.com Hyderabad Suite-18, 3rd Floor, Rajapushpa Business Centre, Stone Ridge Centre, Opp. Google, Hitec City – Kondapur Main Road Hyderabad – 500 084 Tel +91 40 48687956 E-mail hyd@globaladjustments.com Printed by K Srinivasan and published and owned by Ranjini Manian. Printed at Srikals Graphics Pvt Ltd at #5, Balaji Nagar, 1st Street, Ekkattuthangal, Chennai – 600032 and published at Global Adjustments Services Pvt. Ltd., #5, 3rd Main Road, Raja Annamalai Puram, Chennai – 600028. Editor Ranjini Manian Disclaimer Views and opinions expressed by writers do not necessarily reflect the publisher’s or the magazine’s.

Editor | globalindian@globaladjustments.com


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Cover Image

Photo: Kathlijn FRUITHOF, Belgium The nagalinga is a unique fragrant flower ( grows on the cannonball tree) ) which is offered as a handpicked offering to the divine. In this issue we pay tribute to Culturama Curates Chennai via this image.

Advisory Board Members N. Ram is an award-winning journalist and former Editor-in-Chief of The Hindu. He is Director of Kasturi & Sons Limited, publishers of The Hindu. Suzanne McNeill lived in India for seven years before returning to Scotland. She is a freelance writer and graphic designer. Liz Neisloss is a veteran journalist and writer who has worked for CNN based from Singapore, Chennai and at the United Nations in New York. She is now based in Mumbai. G. Venket Ram is an acclaimed photographer and the creative mind behind many a Culturama issue. www.gvenketram.com Annelize Booysen is a business consultant and social entrepreneur. She lived in Asia for more than a decade, which included three years in India. She is currently based in the United States. Namita Jain, founder of Jaldi Fit, is a leading fitness guru and a businesswoman who helms Kishco, a world-class cutlery brand.

Contributors Susan Philip is a freelance writer based in Chennai, and the editorial coordinator of Culturama’s various coffee table books. Eknath Easwaran (1910–1999) was a spiritual teacher, author and interpreter of Indian literature. In 1961, he founded the Blue Mountain Center of Meditation and Nilgiri Press in California. Preeti Verma Lal is a New Delhi–based writer/ photographer. If God asked her what she wanted, she’d tell Him to turn her into a farmer who also writes lyrically. www.deepblueink.com. Shailaja Khanna is a amateur musician and musicologist, and writes on matters of music. She is an Adviser with the Department of Language Art and Culture, Himachal Pradesh government. She also advises the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts on theme concerts, and archives North Indian classical music at Prasar Bharti, Delhi (Doordarshan).

Letters to the Editor Dear Editor,

The piece on Father’s Day was a much needed reminder of the important role men play in society, and the need for parents to raise responsible boys who will become good role models. - Hema Shastri, Mumbai

Dear Editor,

I enjoyed the article on the interpretation of time in India. I did not know that time had so many meanings in Indian culture – and that there are so many ways to interpret it. - Ken Macpherson, USA

Dear Editor,

The pictorial feature on the Musical Instrument Museum was a wonderful virtual tour! Very proud to see Indian music represented so well in such a renowned museum. - H. Kripal, Chennai

Dear Editor,

I enjoyed the write-up on different types of mangoes in the May issue. With the summer ending, it is now a long wait to get our fill of the golden fruit. - Ram S. Bengaluru

culturama – Subscribe Now! Get your copy of Culturama as a hard copy or as an e-magazine - visit www.culturama.in to subscribe For other enquiries, e-mail us at culturama@globaladjustments.com or call us on +91-44-2461 7902


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DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT Learning Experience

Purpose designed campus | International teachers Serene environment | Easily accessible from OMR & ECR

# 33A, Clasic Farms Road, Sholinganallur, Chennai - 600119, India | Ph: +91 44 4860 3757 www.internationalvillage.org


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Contents Regulars

28 Feature India has been a favourite muse for Hollywood – we look at the many facets of the subcontinent that have been shown through the Western lens.

India’s Culture 12

Short Message Service

Short, engaging snippets of Indian culture.

24

India Diaries

Music to welcome the monsoon – and summon the rains too.

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In Focus

How did an American woman of Turkish origin come to love the sari and yoga in equal measure? Didem Atahan Fabig, wife of the German Consul General to Chennai, tells us more.

56

Driving Forces

Indian festivals hold several layers of meaning – and subtly influence people’s behaviour on individual and communal levels.

Journeys Into India

64

At GA Foundation

Creating work-life balance requires a special set of skills – which the Global Adjustments Foundation imparts through its workshops.

65

Champion Women

Want to know a secret that will help you succeed wherever you go? Listen up.

Relocations and Property 66

Space and the City

Property listings in Chennai.

52

Value Vignettes

What is the one quality that will enable us to rise above ourselves and create a positive impact on the larger society? We take a closer look at preethi or love.

38

Culturama Curates The best of Chennai’s offerings – from jewellery to cafes, clothing to healthcare.


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SMS by Suzanne McNeill

Short cultural snippets for an easily digestible India

Art/textile/craft: Toda Embroidery The Toda people who live a pastoral life in Tamil Nadu’s Nilgiri Hills are famous for their elegantly draped shawls called puthkuli, cream or white cotton textiles that are decorated with black and red embroidery. The finish of the embroidery is so fine that it looks like weaving, particularly as the stitching is reversible so both sides of the shawl can be worn. Puthkuli embroidery is sewn using a single-stitch darning needle to create bands of distinctive geometric patterns based on motifs from the natural world. The pattern is formed with a countedthread darning stitch: the small running stitches of the embroidery thread are sewn over and under the warp and weft threads of the fabric, counting the number of threads to work over as the design requires. A small amount of tuft is allowed to stand out on one side of the textile as an additional embellishment.

Food: Puran poli (Maharashtra / Karnataka)

Puran poli is a popular Maharashtrian flatbread stuffed with a sweet lentil filling that is prepared on special occasions such as Ganesh Chaturthi and Diwali. The dough of the flatbread, the poli, is made with white flour, water and ghee. This is stuffed with the puran, a mixture made from chana dal (chickpeas) that have been cooked and ground to a smooth consistency with sweet jaggery and flavoured with cardamom or nutmeg. The dough is divided into small portions and rolled into small flat rounds. A lump of the dal mixture is placed in the centre of the dough, the edges are gathered up around the puran, sealed together and the bread is rolled out like a thick chapatti. This is cooked in a hot griddle with ghee until evenly browned and puffed up, and served immediately with tea or coffee.


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Name: Sonam Kapoor Bollywood star Sonam Kapoor is as well known for her fashion sense as she is for her work in front of the camera. She was born in Mumbai in 1985 into one of the film industry’s famous dynasties. Her father is actor-producer Anil Kapoor, globally one of India’s most recognised film actors, and her grandfather, uncles, siblings and cousins are all in the business. Kapoor graduated in Political Science and Economics, and then studied theatre and arts in Singapore. She intended to become a director and writer and on her return to India started working as assistant to director Sanjay Leela Bhansali, who then cast her in his musical Saawariya in 2007. Kapoor discovered a passion for acting, learning her craft on set, but it was not until 2013 that she had her first box-office hit playing a headstrong but emotional middle-class girl in Raanjhanaa. Accolades have followed, and Kapoor garnered wide critical acclaim for the 2016 thriller, Neerja, winning several best actress awards for her role. Now one of Bollywood’s highest paid actresses, Kapoor campaigns for inclusiveness, gender equality and LGBT rights. Opinionated and outspoken, she opts for roles in films where she can grow as an artiste and as a person, and loves working with new actors. She is an avid reader, and her love of fashion, particularly vintage clothing, has marked her as one of Bollywood’s most stylish stars. Kapoor recently starred in the biographical comedydrama Pad Man, inspired by the social activist who revolutionised thinking about menstrual hygiene, and her current film, Veere Di Wedding, is one of the highest-grossing Hindi films featuring a female lead.

Word: Natak

Natak is used in common Hindi parlance to mean ‘over-acting’, ‘overreacting’ or ‘putting on an act’. This idiomatic use plays on the related meanings of the original Sanskrit word, which translates as ‘drama’ and encompasses the entire tradition of dramatic literature and performance. More generally, it means to stage a play or to create a dramatic scene. There are many types of natak. Sangit is the Sanskrit word for music or singing, so a sangit-natak is an opera. The Sanskrit adjective uljalul means ridiculous, thus an uljalul-natak is an absurd drama. A nukkad-natak is a street play (nukkad meaning ‘end’ or ‘turning point’ of a road). Related to natak is the word nautanki, the folk operatic-theatre which, before the advent of Bollywood, was a popular form of entertainment in the villages and towns of North India. It is based on the folk story of the wooing of Princess Nautanki of Punjab by a local boy, Phool Singh, and is accompanied by elaborate musical recitals. Nautanki features intense melodic exchanges between two or three performers, sometimes backed by a chorus. Natak also describes someone who is acting up, making a fuss or being unnecessarily self-indulgent, and the word baazi, meaning ‘to put on’, is often attached to it. So we hear: ‘Stop this natak-baazi, I know that you aren’t really sorry’ or ‘He is known for his natak. Don’t get taken in by him. And since Indians love to use rhyme, it expands to natak-watak, such as ‘Politicians are known for their natak-watak!’


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In Focus by Yamini Vasudevan

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Going the Whole

Yards

One of the first things I tell Didem Atahan Fabig is that I actually intended to wear a sari to our first meeting. Intended, but did not carry out, as the sari did not sit the right way – despite employing every tucking and pleating trick I knew. She laughs, points to her pants-and-blouse ensemble, and tells me she had considered wearing a sari, too, but changed her mind due to time constraints. I know of Didem’s love for the six-yard drape from a (sari-centred) Facebook group that we are both part of. We talk briefly about how we are besotted with saris, her preferred weaves and favourite shopping spots. Our conversation veers into several areas. She shares about her experience of having lived across different countries (Turkey, United States, Germany and India, to name a few), and how she has come to love Chennai. We touch on her work as well. A psychologist by profession, she has worked with people from various backgrounds. In recent years, while in Chennai, she worked with (primarily female) victims of immolation – by accident and intent. She aims to research further on acts of violence perpetrated against women and the tendency towards suicidal acts and self-harm amongst them as well. As the wife of the German Consul General – and on her own – she has been active on the social front, too, and

Didem Atahan Fabig, an american woman of turkish origin and wife of the German Consul GENERAL to Chennai, touches on how she makes the most of living across counries and cultures is well appreciated for her enthusiastic participation in local social events and causes. A few months ago, she started a jewellery line, and is now working with artisans from Jaipur to create pieces that are suited to Western tastes. Her ability to wear so many hats with panache is impressive. Her warmth and open manner make for a wonderful conversation – some excerpts from which I have shared below. As the ‘unofficial’ diplomat spouse, you must have seen and interacted with people from varied cultures. Tell us about the cultures that have been of particular interest to you.

To be candid, I wouldn’t like to define myself as a diplomat’s wife. I followed a path of my own, and moved


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Didem Fabig's jewellery by Viswa & Devji

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around the world for my education and professional life. I hope to have a larger identity than that of a wife, even though this is undoubtedly part of it. My journey into the world and interaction with different cultures started when I left Turkey, the country of my birth, to do a master’s degree in psychology in Europe, and when I started working with migrant children at the Red Cross in Luxembourg. Following that I moved to New York City, United States, and subsequently back to Europe. Studying and working in different cultures and contexts in the mental health field was an eye-opening experience. The possibility of knowing people through my profession as a psychologist was a very exciting opportunity and gave me the possibility of seeing the person and his or her personality. I began to try and see beyond the culture(s) they ascribe to, and through their lives and struggles itself. You have been immersed in the experience of living in India. What are three things you will always take with you?

After many years of curiously digging into India and Eastern philosophies, learning yoga and quietly being allured by India, my husband’s posting in Chennai was a dream come true. I had visited North India before but didn’t know much about the South – the landscape, temples, traditional sari and dhoti, jasmine-adorned women, kolams, South Indian food and its distinct flavours, Carnatic music and traditional dance forms… all the rich heritage that was waiting to be discovered. It has been an enriching experience in so many ways, and I feel like it will take a while to absorb and sort out all that we have experienced as a family over the past four years. I think I can divide my appreciation for India into three parts. First is the life in India, and the way scenery and sensual stimulation lie in wait everywhere you go. Whether it is Mumbai’s multi-layered buildings, with the old and new laced


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“After many years of curiously digging into India and Eastern philosophies, learning yoga and quietly being allured by India, my husband’s posting in Chennai was a dream come true.”

Didem Fabig's jewellery by Viswa & Devji

together, or the view through the dense trees on key Chennai streets that give you a hint of how it was once.... Second, of course, is the people of India – the warmth and joy that you see on people’s faces on the street. Last but not least is the crafts and aesthetics of the country. There is no end to deepening one’s knowledge and getting inspiration about the different layers of cultures and crafts that exist here. You have been an ardent sari and bindi wearer. Tell us about what the sari means to you.

I have been in awe of saris for as long as I can remember, whether it was the statuesque Indira Gandhi in her iconic saris – images of that were engrained in my brain as a child, or the very fond words about Indian fabrics spoken at home. I always believed nothing could top a silk sari as formal evening wear, and I admired women who wore it. They looked so glamorous! There was always something that stunned me and made me wonder about this piece of clothing. As we settled down in this beautiful city, I slowly found the courage to drape my saris and, then, realising the freedom it gave the female body, I made the decision to wear them as often as possible. Is there any one sari that is particularly close to your heart? Which one is it, and why?

All the saris I have picked up bring back lovely memories. I look at travelling as a great opportunity to source saris from different parts of India, and I also enjoy going to exhibitions by the Crafts Council of India, where different styles from other states are accessible. Whether it is an Assamese Bodo weave that I bought at an exhibition, or a Kalamkari from Rangachari in Mylapore, or a Kanchipuram from Nalli’s, all the saris have their own story.

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I must say, though, that I was very excited when I found an antique Parsi border sold by a Hyderabadi shop owner at an exhibition here in Chennai, and made a sari out of it – which opened my eyes to the gara world. I wondered where I could get one of those famous garas. During a trip to Mumbai, I decided to track down a gara sari, and invested about 5 hours in this mission in south Mumbai. Finally, I managed to acquire a 40-year-old Parsi sari at an antique store! I think the hue of the red is rare to find these days, and the finesse of the subtle embroidery carries so much beauty. It was a miracle that there were no stains on it! I must add that what moved me most was a dear friend’s gift of a Benarasi pink and gold sari. I took me a while to grasp how this magical colour combination worked on a sheer and yet solid texture. More than that was the thought and love with which it was given, which meant so much. This sari is, and will remain, the queen of my wardrobe. You have written about the healing power of yoga for trauma victims. Do you practice yoga regularly? How has it helped your life?

I have been a believer of yoga since I started practising with my teacher, Dharma Mitra, in New York. Until then, I was only half-heartedly into yoga. Dharma’s approach was beyond the physical and I started realising the strength of my body, which was reflected in my mind. More importantly, the presence of a guru built up my trust in the process. I remember my second session with Dharma, where I could do a headstand – which was great! I had been afraid of doing so until that moment. For me, yoga is about acknowledging oneself and the moment, and staying in it while letting go of the fear of the next moment. I know it is easier said than done. Yoga surely has shaped my life and made me a better version of myself. When I underwent teacher training with a Kripalu master for a year, my lifestyle changed further. I became very grounded and felt that I began to flow with life more easily. My capacity to function as a psychotherapist deepened, and I became more confident. Coincidentally, I had a lot of positive and nurturing influences around me. Since then, yoga has been my safe haven. In the kind of therapy I do, which is Gestalt therapy, the idea of health is very holistic. So, we use the body a lot, and pranayama, mindfulness and sometimes even asanas come in handy. The knowledge of yoga can really help teach us methods to cope with anxiety, depression and stress. During my research in Chennai with burn survivors, yoga made it

Didem Fabig's jewellery by Viswa & Devji

possible to connect with women beyond language. I was able to see their resilience and their will to heal while doing yoga with them. I felt their affection and appreciation for the attention and support they got. Yoga and self-reflection exist in the core of all religions and spirituality under different names. For me, personally, Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras are the most appealing of these teachings as I find them pure, sensible and still applicable to our current lives. In general terms, what are some things women can do to help empower their fellow women – be it at work or in society at large?

I think, as women, we can do a lot for each other – more than we even realise. A woman who is strong, commands respect and exudes self-confidence is not easily welcomed by society. She also usually intimidates others as patriarchy requires women to be submissive and accepting. When we see traits of strength and confidence in other women, we should do everything we can to support them and applaud their courage, instead of feeling intimidated and being judgmental. First, women have to accept each another’s choices, whatever those may be, and support each other socially. I also feel that if more mothers were to allow their daughters to decide for themselves, and be the ones who make their life choices, we could raise strong and determined


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w w w. a i s c h e n n a i . o r g As a part of their studies, Elementary School students grow their own organic food. It's always a great feeling for the students to see the germination of the seed into a sprout. This time they planted cucumbers, basil, and tomatoes to use as toppings for organic pizza. The students check the status of the growth, and they record everything on a regular basis.

#AISCEarthDayEveryDay


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women who would lead and command. Clearly, it is not only women’s responsibility to empower women. In a country where violence against women is increasing, it is disturbing that the offenders are known to their victims in more than 94 per cent of the cases. If we want a change to take place and if all of us are really working towards women’s empowerment, men should work with us in this endeavour. Men can be the best role models for the next generation by treating all women with respect. As a psychologist, writer and speaker, you juggle multiple roles. What are some tips you would share with women who handle multiple roles and responsibilities on keeping it all together and succeeding?

Sometimes it is difficult to distinguish all the identities that come into play. I like to write, study, practice and consult, and have recently started to design my own line of jewellery (no doubt inspired by the beauty around me in India). I think what you can provide and contribute to society does not depend on where you are or what you do. It all depends on finding a bridge between what you can offer as a person and the needs of the people around you. If you can fulfill a need in a place you live in, you become a part of that place; you participate in the life of the community and become much more aware of what is going on. You genuinely care about the people, their needs and perceptions and participate in the way that best matches your upbringing, education and goals in life. You, however, become part of it only if you actively choose to.

You are an American, a woman of Turkish origin, married to a German man – a successful marriage of cultures and countries. In a world where we see the lines of differences getting stronger by the day, what are some things you can share from your life experience in terms of respecting and celebrating differences?

In marriage, mutual respect is crucial. Allowing each other to grow and develop in life is very important. I think of myself as not being married to a German but to my husband, Achim, who happens to be German. I feel that coming from different cultures can enhance and enrich a relationship and create an interesting bond that is beyond cultures. However, it takes great effort to understand each other’s ways of thinking and living. I think it all depends how one internalises culture, and how much exposure one has had. In our case, we both were curious, well exposed to the world, and open to change. We saw in each other an interesting person, rather than someone from ‘here’ or ‘there’. Also, the presence and discovery of those differences makes it even more interesting and exciting to live together.

In that sense, I would suggest that, rather than merely going with the flow, make your choices actively. Keep yourself nurtured with healthy relationships and do as much as you can to fulfill your potential. As women, we often torture ourselves with the need to become the best mother, the best in our profession and so on, and we rarely find time to appreciate who we are. So, I say, we should make that time for ourselves, and Didem Fabig's jewellery by make it beautiful. Viswa & Devji


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India Diaries by Shailaja Khanna

Monsoon Melodies

In North India, Raaga Malhar is said to be the music of the rains – and is traditionally PERFORMED DURING THE MONSOON OR THE PRE-MONSOON. There are also fables and real-life anecdotes of rains brought down, thanks to a soulful rendition of the enchanting raaga


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Swami Haridas sings as Tansen and Emperor Akbar (extreme left) listen

personifying the appealing aspect of the rains. The music of this season reflects this joy – all versions of Raaga Malhar are lyrical, tender and easy on the ear. The emotive effect is soothing. The lyrics tend to emphasise the visual imagery of dark clouds, thunder, rain drops, jhoolas (swings)…

A version of Raaga Malhar is associated with Saint Surdas

The searing heat of the plains of India is dispelled by the welcome dark clouds of the monsoons – joyously awaited by everyone. As Pandit Ravi Shankar once said, while everywhere else in the world rains are viewed as a nuisance, in the subcontinent they are welcomed and bring the muchneeded respite from the scorching heat. In North India, Raaga Malhar is the music of this ecstatic season, a raaga* that is said to bring on the rains, and is traditionally performed during the monsoon or pre-monsoon. Rains is always considered romantic, and the various Malhars too are regarded as lyrical romantic raagas,

Originally, while it was actually Raaga Megh that was said to bring the rain, Malhar became more popularly associated with rain from medieval times onwards. The raaga was modified by Tansen (1506 – 1589), a prominent musician who was a part of Mughal Emperor Akbar’s court. Tansen was regarded as the Father of modern North Indian music, and the modified version of Raaga Malhar is called ‘Mian Ki Malhar’ (meaning ‘Mian’s Malhar’, as Tansen was referred to as ‘Mian ji’). A common fable associated with, and quoted with regard to, the raaga and rain goes back to the time when Tansen’s daughter, Saraswati, sung Raaga Megh to bring down rain to cool her father’s fevered body. While this may or may not be entirely true, there is no doubt that even today, many cities in North India (including Pune, Kolkata and Indore) hold music festivals in which only versions of Malhar are sung. Almost all classical Hindustani musicians follow the age-old tradition of only singing or playing Malhar from mid-June to end-August – the usual time of the monsoon in North India.


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A pictorial depiction of clouds gathering when Raaga Megh is performed

A version of Raaga Malhar is associated with Saint Meera Bai

There are various versions of Malhar performed today, including the versions of saint-composers such as Surdas (Surdasi Malhar/Sur Malhar), Meera Bai (Meera Malhar), Ramdas (Ramdasi Malhar) and Charju (Charju Malhar). Other versions of Malhar have been created by the joining of other raagas to Malhar, such as Gaur Malhar, Jayant Malhar, Des Malhar, and Chaya Malhar. Tales centred around how Malhar concerts bring on the rains abound. In 1973, after seven years of drought in the desert city of Bikaner (in Rajasthan), a powerful vocal aalap** of Mian ki Malhar, in the pure ‘Senia’ tradition (Tansen’s lineage), brought about a swirl of rain clouds and then the much needed rains! The late Allah Jilai Bai, the last of the famous maand*** singers of the court of Maharaja Ganga Singh of Bikaner, used to recall the private concert with awe. While the sound of notes has an undisputed physical effect, the association of emotions with certain notes is a powerful factor. One is conditioned to expect the rain while listening to Malhar, which is perhaps why there are so many instances of rain pouring down while Malhar is performed. Ustad Wasifuddin Dagar, a 20th-generation musician in

an unbroken line, descended from Swami Haridas’s (Mian Tansen’s guru) lineage, put it, “Why should one disbelieve a tradition that has been handed down through the generations? I have personally not heard Mian Malhar result in rain, but I have heard of an incident when my uncle Ustad Nasir Zahiruddin Dagar stopped singing Mian Malhar, and told his disciple who was listening to him to go home. By the time the disciple stepped out, it had started to rain copiously!” In the Carnatic tradition, Raaga Amrutavarshini is said to bring rain. There is the fable of Muthuswami Dikshitar (regarded as one of the forefathers of modern Carnatic music) singing his composition in the raaga, whose lyrics included the evoking words “Varshaya varshaya” (rain rain) – and it indeed did rain, apparently. Mian ki Malhar has also inspired film music composers, with several songs being picturised in the rains to songs that had elements of Malhar in them. This was as early as the film Tansen (1942), with “Baraso re” based on Raaga Megh Malhar. The most memorable song based on Mian ki Malhar is perhaps “Bole re papihara” from the film Guddi (1971). Whether the Malhars bring rain or not, there is no doubt that the raaga is associated with rain – and one looks forward to hearing various versions in the monsoon season.

*Raaga refers to a set of notes, with prescribed note usage, that forms a melody capable of indefinite improvisation. ** Initial introduction of the Raga, with exploration of notes without percussion. *** A vocal singing style of Rajasthan.


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Feature by Preeti Verma Lal

The Reel India

India and Indians have been portrayed in various forms in Hollywood films – a few clichéd, a few unusual, others layered and realistic. We take a look at some of the most iconic characters and representations from yesteryear to now It was an evening ritual. A paunch-ed Bhatiaji would park his rickety grey scooter outside our thicket fence, wipe sweat off his brow, tighten the brown belt holding his mighty midriff, open the canvas satchel hanging languorously by the back tyre and pull out a few VHS tapes. Those black brick-like tapes that spooled movies in our gleaming video cassette recorder. My father would choose the newest release and hand Bhatiaji a few crisp notes. In that small town, Bhatiaji was the Hollywood deliverer; he was god’s messenger for film lovers. The leatheretteseat cinemas in the small town would rarely show the latest Hollywood hits. I was little and my mind unable to parse a pirated cassette from an original. Now, I assume Bhatiaji brought pirated tapes. Now, I know I grew up on pirated Hollywood films. On a grainy tape of the Bond-film Octopussy, the tall Kabir Bedi as Gobinda in a turban and crisp suit was Kamal Khan’s (played by late French actor


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Kabir Bedi (left) as Gobinda, and Roger Moore as James Bond in Octopussy

Louis Jourdan) loyal henchman. He could beat, thrash, punch, smile, grind his teeth and deftly flush Khan’s dirty dealings. He fought AK-47-wielding men with bare bands. The typical Bond macho sideshow. Bedi can look handsome even in a loin cloth; in uncreased suits, he looked dapper. The turban gave away his

Indian-ness and when an antenna snapped on his hand, he screams, falls off the aircraft’s fuselage and dies. My heart twitched. No one likes a handsome man to die a gory death. Till date, Kabir Bedi is the only Hindi film actor to appear in a James Bond movie. Gobinda, however, is not the only Indian character to have appeared on Hollywood 70 mm. Over the years, Indians have been portrayed in various nuances in Hollywood films. A few cliched, a few unusual. Others layered and realistic. Slices of India added to the narrative. Critics and cineastes have debated and argued about the portrayals. Their views ranged from utter disgust at the overload of grim realities and the ubiquitous taxi driver to a more tolerant acceptance of creative freedom and license. Perhaps no other Hollywood film with an Indian character has garnered more attention than Gandhi, Richard Attenborough’s magnum opus (1982). Being a biopic helps hold the story together closer to reality; and even 36 years after its release, the film remains a definitive statement on Gandhi's political philosophy and the Indian quest for

The funeral scene in ‘Gandhi’ holds the Guinness Book of World Records for employing 400,000 extras – it is a record of the largest number of extras in one scene of a film Ben Kingsley (left) on the sets of Gandhi with director Richard Attenborough


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playing Jamal Mallik tells an American couple, right after they find that their rental car has been stripped for parts. The slums in Slumdog Millionaire are bathed in golden light; they are brighter and livelier and stylised in Boyle’s hands. A few characters look real, others too exaggerated. The slum dwellers were miffed at being tagged ‘slumdogs’ (a term invented by screenwriter Simon Beaufoy; the original novel, by Vikas Swarup, is called Q&A). There was the all-too-easy defence that Slumdog Millionaire is awash with clichés because it is a homage to Bollywood movies. Jamal’s story is almost fairytale, but the film’s simulation of ‘the real India’ is discordant. Many years later, Dev Patel returns as Saroo Brierley in Lion, a film based on the non-fiction book A Long Way Home by Brierly. The book depicts the life of Brierley, who 25 years after being separated from his family in Burhanpur, India, sets out from Australia, to find them. Shot in various parts of India, the film pans the underbelly of Khandwa, Kolkata,

A scene from Slumdog Millionaire

statehood. And, for many, Ben Kingsley's performance in the title role, which won him an Oscar and worldwide fame, is the finest portrayal of the man. A realistic and mostly chronological account of Gandhi’s life, this film is treated more reverently than all other films huddled together. Not that it had no detractors. The Carnegie Council for Ethics on International Affairs describes Gandhi as “certainly a flawed film. The middle part, with the aforementioned cycle of violence, arrest, fast, negotiate, is mind-numbing in its repetitiveness—but, at the end, you know and love Bapu.” “At certain points in the film, Attenborough attempts to humanise Gandhi: he reacts violently when his wife Kasturba refuses to clean the ashram's latrines and later she discusses her husband's infidelities with Margaret Bourke-White. But the overall impression at the end of the film is that Gandhi was almost a deity,” the Carnegie Council website adds. Another Oscar-feted film had an Indian as the protagonist. In Danny Boyle’s Slumdog Millionaire, Jamal Mallik, a tenacious slum-kid wades through abject poverty to win the biggest prize on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire. There’s a scene that no cinegoer has forgotten. “You wanted to see the real India? Here it is.” Dev Patel

Dev Patel as Saroo Brierley in Lion


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The Man Who Knew Infinity Starring Dev Patel in the role of Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887–1920), the Indian mathematician whose contributions to the theory of numbers include pioneering discoveries of the properties of the partition function. He had almost no formal training in mathematics. He was the second Indian to be inducted as a Fellow of the Royal Society. Recognised as one of the greatest mathematicians of his time, his birth anniversary, December 22, is celebrated as National Mathematics Day. The Man Who Knew Infinity is a must-watch, not for acting or cinematography but to understand the genius of Ramanujan.

In ‘the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen’, Naseeruddin Shah looks typically north-west Indian with beard hanging to his chest, a bejewelled turban, and embroidered blue robe Naseeruddin Shah as Captain Nemo (third from left) in The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

orphanages, railway stations and life under a bridge and in ghettos. The grown-up Saroo is bred in Australia and what unspools on the silver screen is a truthful representation of an Indian growing up in Australia just as the India of a 5-year old Saroo in Khandwa (Madhya Pradesh) is. While Danny Boyle and Garth Davis delve into ‘reality’, British director Stephen Norrington borrows Captain Nemo from Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, in which this polyglot son of an Indian prince first appears. In Norrington’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003), Naseeruddin Shah plays Captain Nemo. In the film, Shah looks typically northwest Indian with beard hanging to his chest, a thick moustache bunching up with the beard, a bejewelled turban, embroidered blue robe carrying in his heart a not-unheard of hatred for the British Imperialism. Thankfully, Indians in Hollywood remain brown. As brown as Kumar Patel in Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle. Played by Kal Penn, Kumar is a medical student in the making, absolutely Kal Penn (right) as Kumar, with John Cho in Harold and Kumar Go to White Castle


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Ben Kingsley’s India connection Not many know that Ben Kingsley was born as Krishna Pandit Bhanji to Anna Lyna Mary (an actress) and Rahimatullah Hari Bhanji (a doctor). Kingsley’s father was born in Kenya and was of Gujarati origin. Ben took his stage name Kingsley from the famous Kingsley Hall where Gandhi stayed in 1931. torn between the ideals of his doctor-father and the highs of hoodwinks and adventures. Kumar chooses the latter and hurtles down on a rollercoaster of drugs, crime and some pretty crazy stuff. A few described Kumar as emblematic of the current reflection of Indian students abroad, but not many agreed. If Kumar is an approximation of a typical Indian abroad, Jess Bhamra (Parminder Nagra) in Bend It Like Beckham lives the football bias in a conservative Indian family in London. Every teenager identified with Bhamra and her struggle to break the mould. At the

Parminder Nagra as Jess Bhamra (left) with Keira Knightley in Bend It Like Beckham

other end of the NRI spectrum is Dr. Cliff Patel of Silver Linings Playbook. Anupam Kher plays the shrink to protagonist Pat Soletano, Jr. (Bradley Cooper). Patel has a heavy Indian accent, loves his drink and is also an ardent Eagles fan. Soletano does not take Patel seriously until the day he meets him in the parking lot before a baseball match. It’s as if therapy itself weren’t sufficient until the patient had evidence that the doctor – and foreigner – is ‘just like us’ or even ‘one of us’. I will confess that the name Piscine Patel sounds weird to me. It makes me laugh. Mercifully, it was shortened to Pi in the Life of Pi (2012). In the American survival drama film based on Yann Martel’s 2001 novel of the same name and directed by Ang Lee, Suraj Sharma and Irrfan Khan (older Pi) play Piscine Patel, a boy from Pondicherry who adopts the name Pi (the Greek letter, π) to avoid the sound-alike nickname Pissing Patel. At 16, he survives a shipwreck in which his family dies, and is adrift in the Pacific Ocean on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger who he calls Richard Parker. The family's conversations and setting in the film can be swapped


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Neel Sethi in and as Mowgli

Karan Soni (left) as Dopinder in Deadpool

Whenever my mind wavers to create a list of Indians in Hollywood, a song crawls in like an ear worm. The iconic Raj Kapoor song ‘Mera Joota Hai Japani’ as Deadpool jumps into the cab and Dopinder, the lovesick cabbie, is startled. A Hindi song in the opening sequence of a superhero film was a nearimpossibility. Karan Soni as Dopinder slips into the cliched Indian cabbie role, and all he got in the film was a friendly palm slap from Wade Wilson (Ryan Reynolds) instead of any real money. But Dopinder is going mainstream – he is now Deadpool’s getaway driver.

Mr. Stevens as Benjamin Jarhvi in Short Circuit 2

with any real middle-class dining table conversation. There are no trappings, no exaggeration and no frills. Here, I am talking of the film family, not the fabulous 3D renderings. Another Hollywood film with an animal-bent is The Jungle Book. Based on Rudyard Kipling’s book of the same name, Mowgli (Neel Sethi) is the red underwear-clad exuberant child who was parted from his parents during infancy and raised thereafter by a sympathetic pack of wolves. In April this year, director Andy Serkis unveiled Mowgli, a dark, gritty retake on Kipling’s The Jungle Book. Serkis admitted that the new film was trying to delve into Mowgli’s journey as an outsider, as an other, trying to find his identity. The trailer shows Mowgli (Rohan Chand) as a baby and residents of the Indian jungle, including Shere Khan (the tiger and Kaa (the snake).

In an interview to The New York Times, comedian Aziz Ansari recalled watching an Indian character in an American movie for the first time. The film was Short Circuit 2 (1988) in which a humanised robot named Johnny 5 goes to New York and bonds with an Indian scientist named Benjamin Jarhvi. Ansari remembered how seeing an Indian character in a lead role had a powerful effect. Much later he realised that the Indian guy was actually a white guy. The character was played by Mr. Stevens, a Caucasian actor. Rather than cast an Indian actor, the filmmakers had Mr. Stevens sit every morning in a makeup chair and get painted an ‘Indian colour’ before going on set and doing his ‘Indian voice’. I am hoping never again in Hollywood will there ever be a Caucasian painted in an Indian colour. There will be real Indians in real characters on the Hollywood 70 mm.


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Chennai is always touted for its culture, tradition and heritage. However, this city has more to it than the eye can see – from landmark architectural wonders like the stone chariots at Mamallapuram to the burgeoning music and dance fests, from top-notch international cuisine to fashion that brings Indian elegance to Western design. Culturama opens up the best sides of Chennai to newcomers and visitors. We bring to you, ahead of Madras Day, a specially curated selection of places and services that will satiate your needs and wants, and make you feel right at home.


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Unconquerable luxury Are you missing your favourite global designers? Worry not as Palladium brings to you some of the most famous designers from around the world to quench your thirst for luxury. Palladium is a symbol of global luxury across India. For the first time in Chennai, it brings renowned brands from across the world, thereby setting the city on a path towards becoming one of the luxury capitals of India. Palladium Chennai is a luxury shopping centre spread across nearly 2.5 lakh sq. ft. with 75 stores across three levels. It provides a unique shopping experience in its aesthetically designed ambient spaces. Palladium hosts various luxury brands like Canali, Michael Kors, Coach, Hugo Boss, Paul & Shark, Kate Spade, Tumi and several others. It is housed in the same complex as Phoenix Marketcity, which is an established shopping Centre in Chennai and is part of the mixed use development. The luxury centre draws its design and architecture inspiration from renowned artists and landmarks from around the world, bringing together various elements that play on the five senses. The master plan was created by

internationally acclaimed architect Benoy, while the design and interiors were articulated by Urban Studio. The facade has been inspired by the tufting on the Chanel bag; the dome in the lobby with its video projections is a nod to the Sistine Chapel; and the mirror cladding on the ceilings is inspired by the Sheesh Mahal. Look closely and you will even find the sleek lines of the iPhone in how the various services have been incorporated into the space. Apart from the luxury brands, Palladium hosts high street brands namely Shoppers Stop, H&M and Splash. Brands like Shaze, Le Creuset, Meena Bazaar, Vajor, Coverstory, Kazo, Cadini, Nike Kicks Lounge, Being Human, Springfield and New Balance have opened their first stores at Palladium, Chennai. Palladium Website: www.palladiumchennai.com Shopping mall:

When I moved to Chennai, I was told that my access to world class brands would be limited. When Palladium opened here and brought some of the best names to my new home Chennai, I was thrilled. Guess where I bought my anniversary gift? At Coach in Palladium – Karina Zheng


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Asian Boulevard Your love for Asian food can be discovered at Chennai’s Soy Soi as it brings to you Asia on a plate

Heard about this place from a colleague and I’m glad I checked this place out. Do book in advance as the restaurant was packed. Good food and decent mock tails. Tom kha soup was amazing. Beef and the Duck Bao were nice and flavourful. The meat could have been a little more tender, but the juices of the beef went down well with my cucumber cooler. Definitely coming back for the Prawn Chueng. Chennai needed this place for casual diners. Hats off to the chef and his team for the food and friendly service. Long way to go but definitely on the right track. – Al Mansaray

Soy Soi brings to their customers a wide variety of Asian street food flavours under one roof. One of our key objectives is to offer iconic dishes from each region such as Singapore chicken rice, Vietnamese Pho, Indonesian Nasi Goreng and Phad Thai from Thailand. Most expats living in Chennai have worked in the South-east Asian sub continent and are familiar with the authentic flavours of such dishes. Soy Soi is an Asian ‘Eat Street’, which essentially means bringing together the diverse food flavours from across this region in the relaxed comforting environment of an upscale restaurant. Visit this exquisite restaurant to get some refreshing new flavours from exotic cuisines like Vietnamese, Burmese, Thai, Indonesian, Malay and Singaporean. We guarantee that you will visit them to dine again. Resturant:

Soy Soi |

FB: soysoiindia


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Efficiently yours Science discovers something new with the human body often and clinical laboratories have to update themselves with each finding. Neuberg Ehrlich Clinical Laboratory’s vision is to helm the battle against disease by placing the most advanced diagnostics tests within the reach of the common man, across the globe – an International Diagnostics Alliance with a relentless focus on quality, cutting-edge technology and uncompromising ethics. Established in the year 1938, Ehrlich was one of the oldest stand-alone clinical laboratories in India. It has been serving four generations of citizens in Chennai and has been a pioneer in bringing the best in class technologies and services in the field of laboratory medicine. ECG, digital X-Ray, ultrasound, echocardiogram, dental and eye checkup, spirometry, audiometry and treadmill are some of the many services provide. Being Chennai’s oldest

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Prioritise your health and concerns related to it by getting all the vital check-ups done with Neuberg Ehrlich laboratory’s upgraded technology laboratory with several branches across India and overseas, Ehrlich is the first CAP and NABL accredited laboratory in Tamil Nadu. There is a wide-ranging array of over 5,000 tests. It comprises an integrated wellness and preventive health unit serving 100+ major corporate clients, walk-in clients, referral laboratories and, clinical trials/pharmaceutical companies. It has facilitated online access for a hassle-free report collection. It not only has Chennai's first and only drive-in blood collection facility but also personalized health check-ups. This globally recognized clinic has the capacity to understand every different human body and nature, which makes it a preferred clinic to visit.

Health is wealth and as clichéd as that sounds, it is true. When we had to get our master health check done, Neuberg was recommended to us. Their professionalism, expertise and state-of-the-art facility impressed us. – Nathan Howard Neuberg Ehrlich laboratory Website: www.ehrlichlaboratory.com Lab:


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Lap of luxury Where can a visitor feel at home? Right where luxury and comfort meet: come experience Citadines OMR

When we shifted from Paris to Chennai, I was concerned about living arrangements and how my family would adjust. The six weeks we spent at Citadines reassured me and helped me feel like Chennai could be my home. – Jimmy

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The global lifestyle of an international traveller is a perfect fit at Citadines OMR, Chennai. With world class design and modern vibes, this 269-unit apart’hotel is designed to work and live comfortably, making it the ideal location for globetrotters. Expats have the luxury to choose from a variety of apartments, and customise their lifestyle and budget so they enjoy their stay in Chennai like never before. One can also enjoy the range of hotel-like services including daily housekeeping, daily complementary buffet breakfast, high-speed Wi-Fi, travel desk services and more. Ascott Limited, a Singapore-based company which owns Citadines, has over 30 years of experience in managing serviced residences. Citadines OMR is located right in between Chennai’s scenic East Coast Road that is dotted with restaurants and quaint cafes and is right along out famous coast, and Velachery (a suburb of Chennai) that has emerged as a hub for shopping, dining and recreation. After a hard day’s work, visit Phoenix Market City Mall, Chennai’s popular high street retail destination, or catch the latest movies at AGS and Mayajaal multiplexes, all located a short drive away. For the weekend, a 45-minute drive down the East Coast Road will get expats to the coastal town of Mamallapuram where they can enjoy some lip-smacking seafood, explore historic shore temples and shop around for ethnic clothing and souvenirs. Live, work and relax in this residence that suits the expats, lifestyle: from studios to one-or two-bedroom units with a fully equipped kitchen. Citadines, Chennai website: www.citadines.com service apartment:


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Vintage Wonders Old is gold - literally at Toran, where you can find bespoke furniture that is handpicked from around the world

My wife and I really enjoyed shopping for our new Indian home at Toran. The myriad rich hues and patterns really appealed to us. We would definitely recommend Toran to other relocating expat families. – Gareth Bailey

Store:

Toran |

www.fb.com/ToranHomeDecor

If vintage but functional style is your pick, Toran (in Kilpauk) is the place you should head to. Begun in 2013 by Kavitha Chordia, Toran brings antique pieces from around the world, and restores and refashions them to make them suitable for modern-day homes. If you prefer something more minimalist and modern, there are some industrial-style pieces to pick from as well. Furniture apart, the store features an exquisite array of shawls, handwoven rugs, kilims, pichhwais and miniature paintings. All their pieces are bespoke, so you would be assured of owning a one-of-a-kind piece. Those seeking expert advice can check in with Toran's in-house interior design consultants, who help with private and commercial spaces. Toran's commitment to go the whole nine yards when it comes to sourcing is unmatched. Antiques are restored and refurbished not just for the sake of business, but out of the belief that each finely crafted piece has its own history, which needs to be acknowledged and celebrated. This is the secret behind the brand's success, seen not just in its burgeoning clientele in Chennai, but also its growing presence in the international market (in countries such as New York, Atlanta, Poland and the UK).


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Teething Troubles

Did you know that a person’s mouth could be home to more than 6 billion bacteria – more than the entire human population on earth? While this may be a startling fact, it is also an indication that you should visit your dentist on a regular basis to ensure that dental problems are detected and addressed at the earliest. This gains further importance because dental health is a primary element in determining our overall health – after all, who can enjoy the day with a debilitating toothache?

One of the most important factors for our overall well-being is dental health. an appointment with the JGHR clinic would be what the dentist ordered…

Founded by Dr. Janakiraman in 1962, the JGHR clinic has developed and established standards for quality dental care over four decades. Taking the reins from his father, Dr J. Hariharan has over 25 years of experience as a dental practitioner and is skilled in implant surgery. He has done extensive studies on the early diagnosis of oral cancer and evinces a special interest in the field of aesthetic dentistry. The mission of the organisation is to offer internationally accepted quality standards. Over the past four decades, JGHR has earned a reputation for exacting standards, professionalism and patient-centric procedures – and is much sought after by locals and expats alike.

The team were extremely professional. World class equipment and best practices followed made me believe that they are even better than any I have visited in Australia. – Bruce M Evans

JGHR Website: www.jghrdental.com Clinic:


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Reinvent Your Wardrobe embrace wearable luxury When high fashion brands are just about embracing the concept of sustainability, Collage – a multi-brand designer store – has been committed to bringing a host of luxury labels, under their roof since 2004. Their curation of garments and accessories equates luxury fashion to discerning craftsmanship, handwoven fabrics, rich colours and the philosophy of their designers and labels.

Luxury couture with an Indian touch – shopping at Collage is how I treat myself every couple of months. – Alicia Gonzales

With well over 50 brands from across the country and designer labels that truly stand apart from one another, there's much in here to impress discerning fashionistas and individuals with a very refined taste in fashion. Store:

Collage | FB: collagestylenew | www.collagestyle.in

Website:

Insta: collage.style


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Customised Handcrafted memoirs

Handcrafted products always make for great gifts, especially when you can customise and personalize them. On Zwende’s online store you can now buy quirky indian gifts, in just a few clicks

I was introduced to Zwende at an event in Bangalore, India, just a few weeks before I was heading back home to the United States for Christmas holidays. I was looking for really unique, thoughtful gifts to carry back for my friends and family. I instantly fell in love with the products and customisation that Zwende was offering. Beautiful, handcrafted lampshades, bags and accessories - the perfect gifts to carry back and the best part was that I could customise each gift, especially for the person I was gifting it to. I got all my gifts on time and very well packaged. Folks back home absolutely loved the gifts, and the stories behind each gift. Zwende is quite addictive. I have recently customised my dream tote bag and am eagerly looking forward to getting it. – Amanda

Nothing is better than getting beautiful art forms customised to suit your taste, more so when it makes you and your loved ones feel special. Zwende helps you customise and visualise bags, accessories and home décor in just a few clicks. You can choose the shape, design, colour and even the material to create a wonderful product. The store curates exclusive handcrafted Indian art forms with a contemporary twist. These pieces are handcrafted, for you, by skilled artisans and master craftsmen. Zwende has a wide range of products both in their Genuine Leather collection and in their Vegan collection. Vegan products include hand block-printed Kalamkari and Ajrak fabric bags in faux leather and also cork accessories which are natural, eco-friendly and waterproof. Its wide range of gifting options, unique home décor and admirable Indian crafts make it an expat-favourite store. ‘Why choose when you can create’ is Zwende’s belief and that is what makes this store inimitable. Zwende has a huge collection of bags, accessories, stationery and lampshades - in all possible shapes and sizes. You must definitely visit Zwende to make your own, one-of-a-kind products that match your requirements, personality and design aesthetic - be it finding a hand-painted lampshade that matches the rest of your decor; or a work bag that is just the right size, shape and style; or a weekend bag that carries all you need; or a personalised wallet that has your name or initials on it. Store: The Zwende Space | FB/Insta: @ZwendeDesign Website: www.zwende.com


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fine jewellery loved globally

Experience royalty with silver and take away with you a piece of Chennai from Sukra jewellery’s exclusive collection

I visited Sukra to buy some silver anklets for my daughter who was born in India. I was so happy with the superb service, number of options for jewellery and the delicious coffee that they served. – Julianna

Chennai is home to various fine jewellery stores with a variety of options, designs, metals and even locations to choose from. One among these is the famous Sukra Jewellery, which is located amidst the busy streets of Mylapore. Unlike most jewellery stores, Sukra specialises in fine silver jewellery and creates beautiful designs. This three-storeyed store has everything in silver – from gorgeous jewellery pieces to beautifully crafted silver articles. Established in 1979 by Mr. Kalkiraju single-handedly, Sukra now stands tall with an incredible collection of silverware, dinner sets, silver flatware, silver corporate gifts and gift articles. It is also one of those very first stores to have a 92.50% melting purity on silver articles. Sukra's wideranging designs, assured quality, trust and integrity makes it a hotspot for expats. Sukra Jewellery Website: www.sukra.com Store:


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Education is key Searching for the right school for your kids in Chennai? Find a world class education at the American International School Chennai Finding the right school for you and your child is an important decision for any family. The American International School Chennai (AISC), located in Taramani, has extensive, state-of-the-art facilities, and offers academics, arts, athletics, play and opportunities for serving the local communities. This 13-acre campus holds two wonderful libraries with over 60,000 resources, a 25-metre swimming pool, two gymnasiums, fitness centre, a 750-seat auditorium, tennis courts, track, soccer fields, playgrounds, two design & discovery labs, 53 newly redesigned classrooms, a teaching kitchen and two cafeterias. The school is centrally located, 6 km from both downtown Chennai and the airport, and it is a short ride to the gorgeous East Coast Road (ECR). AISC has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Schools and Colleges (MSA, Philadelphia, U.S.A.) and the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO, England).

from South East Asia, South America, Australia, New Zealand and Africa. English is the language of instruction across all grade levels at AISC. AISC follows North American standards from Early Years to Grade 12 and also offers the Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate Program to students in grades 11-12. Grades 3-12 benefit from a BringYour-Own-Technology (BYOT) program; this technology could be an iPad or laptop. AISC offers an extensive array of activities and clubs for students in the elementary, middle and high school. Students can also travel within India and internationally when they participate in Model United Nations, Operation Smile, Theatre program and a variety of sports. Graduates in the Class of 2018 will attend universities in Canada, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Everything AISC does comes back to its Mission: “ Together we inspire a love of learning, empowering all students with the courage, confidence, creativity and compassion to make their unique contribution in a diverse and dynamic world”.

AISC's 850 students come from diverse backgrounds which include Koreans (30%), North Americans (20%), Europeans (25%), Indians (8%), Japanese (14%), many more School:

American International School Chennai |

Website:

Living all over the world, my family has been exposed to some of the topmost schools. This has helped me affirm my belief that AISC is more than just a great school. It’s a community that we are proud to be a part of. – Ben, Former parent www.aischennai.org


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Healing

Touch

Give yourself the gift of holistic health – with Ananta Spa specialised massage treatment The human body is subjected to various external and internal stresses, much of which is absorbed without our knowledge or awareness. We must ensure that a regular routine of cleansing and massage is followed to keep ourselves healthy and stress-free. Those who are looking for outer and inner rejuvenation should visit Ananta Spa, which offers traditional and authentic massages. The spa, which is celebrating 10 years, has professional, certified therapists deliver authentic massage therapies that are designed by trainers from Thailand and Bali. The oils used are imported, and are tested for purity. The ambience is welcoming and calming, and a high level of hygiene is maintained across all outlets for all massage therapies provided. Every therapy is executed with the intention of meeting the client’s need – be it relaxation or relieving pain in any specific area. The coming together of all these elements ensures a holistic sense of healing and well-being. Ananta Spa has branches across Chennai, Bengaluru, Coimbatore, Pondicherry and Udaipur.

My first spa experience ever. Though I was hesitant in the beginning I loved it right from the moment I entered the place. It's ambience was so warm and welcoming and the staff was very professional,skilled and comfortable. Loved it overall . – Ms.Sarayu Raghunandan Ananta Spa Website: www.anantaspagroup.com Spa:


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Rise. Shine. Repeat Golden beaches and cool waters, heritage landmarks and cultural delights, shopping and choice of varied cuisines Mamallapuram awaits

Tamil Nadu Tourism, Chennai Website: www.tamilnadutourism.org

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Mamallapuram (also known as Mahabalipuram in local parlance) is a small town nestled along the coast of the Bay of Bengal (around 58 km south of Chennai). A bustling seaport in the 7th century, and a centre of economic prosperity, the place is now a UNESCO world heritage site and is best known for its stone temples that were carved from rock. The best known sculptures are a series of chariots associated with prominent characters from Indian mythology as well as cave sanctuaries and open-air rock reliefs dedicated to Indian deities and depicting scenes from the epics. Take a walk around Mamallapuram and revel in the ancient land's history; pick up a souvenir from any of the small shops that dot the perimeter (be sure to make a tough bargain!); and take your pick from the many restaurants in the vicinity (there are cafes and restaurants serving Asian, American and European cuisine). Too late to head back? Why not check in to one of TTDC's accommodation options and extend the holiday a wee bit longer? All the more worth if you can pack in a boat ride at Muttukadu Lake (the backwaters of the Bay of Bengal), which is a hop, skip and jump away from Mamallapuram - and start with TTDC's Boat House at Muttukadu Lake once you are there.


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Value Vignettes by Susan Philip

The Way of

Love

It has many avatars. Poets have celebrated its various forms down the ages, and it continues to be a muse for all genres of art. It is love. The Bhagavad Gita lists love – Preethi – among the qualities that characterise the ideal woman


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She was born Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu in far-away Macedonia. In her own words, she was Albanian by blood, and by citizenship, an Indian. But she belongs to the world, which knows her as Mother Teresa. She came to India as a member of the Irish order of nuns known as the Sisters of Loreto in 1929 and started her career in the country as a teacher in a school in Darjeeling. In course of time, she took her final vows as a Catholic nun, and shifted to a school in Kolkata, then Calcutta. As a teacher, she reached out to her students, offering love and guidance. But it was the abjectly poor, the sick, the lonely and the dying people that she saw outside the walls of the convent who kept intruding into her thoughts. Finally, her mission became clear to her. She heard God’s voice telling her to love and care for those who had no one to love and care for them. She founded the Missionaries of Charity to do just that, starting with zero material resources, and a heart filled with limitless love. Mother Teresa braved suspicion and insults, spitting and stone-pelting. She went where no one would have gone voluntarily, into squalid slums filled with dirt and disease, and into colonies of lepers and outcasts, and did whatever she could to ease their suffering. She established the Nirmala Shishu Bhavan where unwanted children find love and care. Her guiding principle was to do small things with love. As she once said, “It may happen that a mere smile, a short visit, the lighting of a lamp, writing a letter for a blind man, carrying a bucket of charcoal, offering a pair of sandals, reading the newspaper—may, in fact, be our love of God in action.” Today, the spotless white sari with its trademark inkblue border designed by Mother Teresa for herself and her sisters is well-known in India and abroad. It symbolizes Love of the highest order. The Missionaries of Charity have established homes in Asia, Africa, Europe, Australia and in North and South America. Each of these homes is a powerhouse of love and care. Mother Teresa was conferred the Bharat Ratna, India’s highest civilian honour. She won the Nobel Prize for Peace. She died in September, 1997. In 2016, she was conferred Sainthood by the Roman Catholic Church, and is now officially known as Saint Teresa of Kolkata. But to the poor, the sick, the orphaned and lonely, these awards and epithets do not matter. To them, she and the compassionate family of nuns and brothers who carry on the work she began are personifications of Love.

At the core Women are traditionally seen as loving and kind. Certainly, love is a ‘soft’ emotion, whether it’s the tie that binds a mother to her child, a couple to each other, a person to his country, or man and the Divine. But it is by no means a ‘weak’ emotion. The ability to love is a quality that runs deep, and its very

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Contrary to what many of us think, love is not the opposite of hate – it is the other side of indifference. Inclusivity is at the core of this kind of love depth is a mark of its strength. In one way or another, love is the power that sustains all relationships, involving men and women alike. It drives out negative qualities, is patient, giving and forgiving. Most importantly, love is an inclusive emotion, not a divisive one.

Sindhutai Sapkai

“Love is the only way. There’s power in love. Do not underestimate it,” said Martin Luther King, Jr. “We must discover the power of love, the redemptive power of love. And when we discover that, we will be able to make of this old world a new world.”

Editor’s Note Contrary to what many of us think, love is not the opposite of hate – it is the other side of indifference. Inclusivity is at the core of this kind of love. It raises the human spirit. In our own lives, being kind to the person you live and work with, is an expression of love. It blesses the giver more than the receiver. When this innate feminine quality is used in its best version, no country, no team member at work and no government can be apathetic to the other’s need. Thus, it meets relational, organizational and even national goals.

Echoes at home and elsewhere Life and legend are full of examples of what love can do. It makes heroes of ordinary people, and brings royalty on par with ordinary mortals. Sindhutai Sapkai of Maharashtra, married off at the age of 10 to a man 20 years her senior only to be thrown out a few years later, found herself on the streets alongside many orphaned or unwanted children. She took charge of as many of them as she could, begging longer to care for them. Over the years, she has looked after over 1,400 orphans, educating and marrying off many of them. However, love in action need not be seen only in the case of social workers or people who run charitable institutions – it can, and should, be the basis of reforms and innovations in the corporate world, too. Take for example, the India Inclusion Summit, which was initiated by V.R. Ferose, Senior Vice President and Head of Globalisation Services at SAP.

V.R. Ferose

When their young son was diagnosed with autism, Ferose and his wife realised that specially abled children and adults faced far too many hurdles in all areas – school, hospitals, public places and so on. To create a more inclusive mindset – one that views specially abled in the same light as we view everyone else, he began the India Inclusion Summit. Today, it is a global platform of support and sharing. Ferose, who was a part of Davos, the annual summit by the World Economic Forum, is now actively engaged in promoting the hiring of autistic people in corporates. Love empowers us to do what we can, with whatever resources we may have on hand. We may have a few rupees or a few million, but the work we do, be it in the business sphere or in the social sector – if it stems from the core of love – will be guided by the Supreme Being.

Well said! “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace; where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; and where there is sadness, joy.” – A prayer of St. Francis of Assisi


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Driving Forces by Suzanne McNeill

A Festival a Day… There is a joke that, in India, there are 365 days and 366 festivals in a year. For sure, India abounds in festive occasions – on a personal and communal level – and it is these celebrations that act as connecting threads in the subcontinent’s multicultural society

Life is one big celebration in India! An annual cycle of festivals marks the birth of deities and the arrival of spring, the richness of the harvest and devotion to the gods, the banishment of evil spirits and the victory of light over dark at the onset of winter. Colourful and joyous celebrations, festivals offer a key to understanding Indian attitudes and behaviour as well as people’s deep-rooted values.


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Photo: Melissa ENDERLE, USA

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Many festivals have their origins in the celebration of particular seasons of the year.

Taking a Closer Look India’s festivals have three layers of meaning: the outer layer of ritual and celebration; the inner rationale from which the festival originated along with the mythology and values that drive the festival; and the deeper spiritual significance at its core. These layers are apparent in Ganesh Chaturthi, the festival that celebrates the birth of the popular elephant-headed god, Ganesha. The rituals include taking a day off work, eating modaks (sweet dumplings), singing and dancing, decorating statues of Ganesha and then immersing the statues in the sea. The sociological background to the festival came from the nationalist Lokamanya Tilak, who organised the first Ganesh Festival to build national unity, popularising this god who is the remover of obstacles. Creating a buzz through song and dance is typically Indian! Finally, the deeper significance of Ganesh Chaturthi is symbolised through eating the dumplings, which represent the bitter-sweet nature of life, and welcoming the immersing of the god as a symbol of life’s circularity and impermanence.

Of Legend and Myth Many festivals have their origins in the celebration of particular seasons of the year. Holi, the exuberant festival of colours, is held at the advent of spring. Harvest is marked by Pongal in southern India, when symbolic rituals


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of cleaning and cleansing are accompanied by thanking the sun god and the garlanding of the cattle that helped reap the harvest. Onam is western India’s harvest festival, and commemorates the annual return of King Mahabali, banished to the netherworld by the gods, but permitted to visit his people once a year. They give him a rapturous welcome, and fairs, stage shows and processions are part of the festivities.

Each festival has a rich mythological legacy, which is often reiterated through oral storytelling and stage plays

Festivals honour the gods. Navratri venerates Durga, the warrior who slew the buffalo-headed demon; Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity, who brings good fortune; and Saraswati, goddess of knowledge and music, who instils wisdom. The major celebration of the year is Diwali, the festival of lights, which marks the victory of light over darkness. Diwali is celebrated in honour of the return of Rama and his wife Sita to their kingdom of Ayodhya after 14 years’ exile, whose way was lit on a dark, moonless night by little lamps placed outside houses. For Muslims, Eid is the festival that celebrates the end of the month of dawn-to-dusk fasting, called Ramadan. It is marked by a great feast that celebrates the obedience shown by the Prophet Ibrahim to Allah. India’s more immediate history is celebrated by significant secular festivals. The birthday of Mahatma

Gandhi, Independence Day and the day India became a republic are major public holidays.

The Here and Now The Sanskrit word for festival, utsava, also translates to mean joy, gladness and merriment and is most often used to represent communal temple festivities, where the presence of the deity is the focus of the celebration. These are socio-religious celebrations that purify the devotees, avert malicious influences and renew society. Important stages in an individual’s life are also marked by celebration. Samskara (meaning ‘sacrament’) are the festivities that mark rites of passage such as birth, coming of age and marriage. Even death is marked by samskara, the funeral ceremonies that ease the soul of the deceased towards reincarnation. Public festivities are often viewed as social functions and all are expected to participate. It is common for Indians to take a day off work to celebrate their birthday or wedding anniversary, and the whole family will be involved in the celebration. Extended family members will travel great distances to attend the rituals that mark the significant rites of passage of their relatives. Gift-giving has become a huge trend in Indian celebrations, and Indians enjoy making a splash with their money at such times. Jewellers make hay during the spring festival Akshaya Tritiya when many people buy gold, and Amazon now holds a Diwali mega-sale to encourage spending.

Public festivities are often viewed as social functions and all are expected to participate. Photo: Naomi SONNENBERG, Ireland


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This painting shows Krishna joining in the sighting of the moon for Eid. It is symbolic of how unity is an underlying theme in Indian festivals

Cultural Expressions During a religious festival, the statue or symbol of the deity that normally resides within the temple shrine may be bathed and dressed, adorned with flowers, and then carried in elaborate procession through the streets, accompanied by devotees. Orissa’s annual Rath Yatra, or Chariot Festival, is the most famous example, attracting 2 million worshippers. Huge clay statues of Ganesha are installed around Mumbai in special structures called pandals during Ganesh Chaturthi. On the eleventh day of the festival they are paraded through the streets, accompanied by singing and dancing, and taken to the sea to be immersed. The Dussehra festival, which commemorates the victory of Rama, hero of the Ramayana, over the villainous Ravana, culminates with the burning of effigies of Ravana and his accomplices. At the heart of each festival is the ritual of prayer and the seeking of blessing, and all share common elements including decoration, new clothes, music and dancing, and loud fireworks. It is customary to offer food to the gods during festival pujas, and feasting with family and friends is integral to the celebrations.

The Aikya factor Bonfire Night in Britain marks the execution of Guy Fawkes, convicted of attempting to murder King James I, by the burning of effigies and fireworks. Thailand’s annual Songkran celebration marks the Thai New Year with trips to the temple, family parties and huge

Songkran celebrations in Thailand

water fights in which water bombs, hoses and plastic water guns are used to drench the celebrants. Chuseok is Korea’s harvest festival, a three-day holiday during which Koreans return to their ancestral home towns, hold memorial services for their forebears, feast on traditional food and play folk games.

In Conclusion… India’s more unusual festivals include Lathmar Holi in Uttar Pradesh, where women beat men with lathis (big sticks), Punjab’s rural Olympics, which include bullock cart races and competitors pulling vehicles with their hair, and Thaipoosam in Tamil Nadu, in which devotees of Lord Muruga pierce their mouths and parts of their bodies with sharp rods and hooks connected to a decorated structure that they pull along! Every day is a festival in India!


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At GA Foundation by Usha Ramakrishnan

A Fine Balance The Global adjustments Foundation aims to empower career women to enable their success in the workplace and home When a woman becomes a champion of her own life, she helps build the nation. With their 100-plus years of cumulative professional experience, clubbed with training, the women who are part of the Foundation pass on their experience and expertise to working women. The relevant subjects discussed in the interactive workshops include self-esteem building, communication and team building, fitness and nutrition, gender understanding, stress management and meditation. “It truly gave me some moments of self-realisation. It was a very inspiring program and I know how to be a PROUD communicator. An extremely interesting and practical workshop,” said Mala, of Shriram Value Services, a participant in one of our programmes. At the Daimler Benz Bus Company, CEO Mr. Thomas Frike launched the workshop for their women employees and joined in at the end of the programme to better understand their expectations.

From top: Job Plus programme for work–life balance; Self-esteem building at Shriram Value Services; Empowering women at Daimler; Stress management via inner strength.

The work–ife balance program for our team was extremely well received and the women were motivated to work with increased team spirit personally and professionally. I even asked that the programme be run for all 1,000 employees. Thomas Fricke, CEO, Daimler Buses India

If you are a manager in a corporate organisation, college or high school, please invite us to hold a sample seminar to empower women at your institution. The seminars will be free of cost for the institution and trainees. Content can be tailor-made on request. Call Usha Ramakrishnan, Director, Global Adjustments Foundation at +91-9840520394 or e-mail usha@globaladjustments.com Follow us on:

/GlobalAdjustments

/GlobalAdjustmentsFoundation


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Champion Women by Ranjini Manian

Listening empowers

Here are some key tips to enable better listening skills, and a look at the benefits that accrue

Barbara Annis, the gender intelligent expert, shares that women use 50 per cent more words than men – it is a scientific fact. So, what if empowered women were to speak up but balance it with the art of listening? It would be a winning combination! It pays to become comfortable with looking directly at the speaker, keep our minds concentrated so that we grasp the nuances of what the other person is saying, and keep our hearts connected to our ears while we grasp the speaker’s emotions. Listening is not the same as obeying; it is about taking in the facts without mental filters and then acting as per the need of the hour. For example, when a family member criticises an action at home, or when a boss disagrees at work, they may be criticising only our actions. A self-confident woman listens and then responds with, “I am sorry you feel that way. How about we…” and then provides an appropriate solution. Here are three ways on how listening benefited me: 1.

Proactive listening showed that I was truly going to add value.

2.

Getting comfortable with silences helped boost my self-confidence.

3.

Not completing the other person’s sentences provided real solutions.

Proactive listening makes a great impression on others, while passive listening (deadpan, expressionless listening) does the opposite. Proactive listening involves making quiet sounds such as uh huh, okay, true, and nodding intently. Such responses make people want to open up to us. Listening also helps in proper information gathering.

Comfort with silence makes for confidence in conversation. If the other person takes a moment to think through the answer to a question asked, why hurry and rephrase that question or add explanatory comments? Do we think that the other person is judging us during the silence – and, hence, our nervous need to talk more? By holding back words, we display self-confidence and give the speaker the freedom to truly communicate. Isn’t it a coincidence that ‘listen’ and ‘silent’ use the same letters? I have heard a wise saying: “Whether you think you know or you think you don’t – you are right.” There is no need to try and sound intelligent or get ahead of one’s self by saying out loud what we think the other person means. Patiently waiting till the end, digesting the comments, and then responding turned out to be a thoughtful gesture on my part – and led to positive results on several occasions. Once, a visa officer in the American Consulate started to say, “When do you plan to…” I had mentally formed a reply: “I am returning on August 8” – but held back the words. His question actually was: “When do you plan to visit the country again?” I smiled and replied, “Oh, I will go in December again for a conference. I will be going regularly to the US as my sister lives there, and my work takes me there, too.” The response? “Okay, collect your passport with a five-year multiple entry visa.” These three tips lead to effective listening skills, which go hand-in-hand with the P.R.O.U.D.* communication tool we stress on in all life-coaching women’s empowerment workshops at Global Adjustments Foundation. *P.R.O.U.D. Positive and Proactive, Respectful, Oriented to solutions, Understandable and Direct.

Ranjini Manian is the Founder–Chairperson of Global Adjustments Foundation, and aims to use life coaching for mindful living to encourage women's empowerment.


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4 Chennai Property Your solution provider for excellent quality rentals of home and office with 21 years of experience in ‘global adjustments’. Write to us at info@globaladjustments.com

Villa for Rent in Perungudi (OMR) Spacious villa on a gated community, posh and quiet location. • Ground + 1, 4 Bedrooms, 4,300 sq.ft. • Semi-furnished • Servants’ quarters • Car parking space • Club house, Garden, Gym • 100% Power back-up

Villa Laasya Muttukadu / ECR • Built up area – 4,000 sq.ft. • Garden – 3,600 sq.ft. • Land extent – 4 grounds • Power back up – 100% • Servants’ quarters included

A Spanish-style villa with rustic-chic decor, Villa Laasya is fitted with Italian chandeliers and the most exotic varieties of Italian and Turkish marble. Bedrooms and the living room are surrounded on two sides by gardens and large, full-length windows. The house is fully fitted with exquisite grade 1 teak wood, including pure teak ceiling rafters. Generator power back-up and CCTV cameras are also provided. With a club-like feel, this beautiful villa is ideal for those who seek exclusivity, luxury and style.

For details, call 90032 57192 For more properties, call Global Adjustments at +91-44-24617902/+91-9500 111 777, or e-mail realty@globaladjustments.com Please note that any changes to the information above are done at the property owner’s sole discretion. Global Adjustments assumes no responsibility for such changes.


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igniting Sparks of Happiness... is a niche initiative to make the children realize that each one of them have the potential to spark and are indeed Unique. An overall development of the child along with emphasis on the physical aspect is provided at iSpark. We strongly believe that a strong body, mind and soul will help the children to be holistically happy and aspire to inspire others. At the studio, the physical activity is designed and monitored by experts and appropriate guidance is given towards healthy eating by nutritionists. Children are like buds and starting at a young age will make them bloom into beautiful flowers as adults.

YOUNG CHAMPS

YOGA

Research reveals that habits cultivated between the ages of 2-7 years, stays for a lifetime! At iSpark we endeavour to develop the right habits in children from a young age by providing them a holistic experience! The children are introduced to physical agility, mental flexibility and inner strengthening through selected varied activities such as Fitness, Dance, Confidence & Communication, Book Reading, Healthy Eating & Creativity. So why wait? Let’s begin early... Days: Monday to Friday Time: 2 PM to 7 PM (Personalised packages available)

Breathe In...Breathe Out... Yoga is nothing but a state of alignment of the Body, Mind & Soul. At iSpark we believe that Yoga can take children a long way in life to discover an alignment in their thoughts, expressions and feelings. Through yoga we introduce asanas, breath awareness, chanting and silence time across all ages. Therapeutic classes are also given for adults and elders by senior teachers well versed in this field. Days: Tuesday & Thursday | Monday, Wednesday, Friday Time: 4PM - 5PM | 12PM - 1PM

BOLLYWOOD DANCE SESSIONS Humma Humma, Balam Pichkari or Kaala Chashma, get ready to jump, sweat, move and have unlimited fun with Bollywood Dance Classes at iSpark :) It’s time to break those inhibitions while feeling Fitter, Stronger & Happier! Days: Monday, Wednesday, Friday | Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday Time: 11AM - 12PM | 6PM - 7PM

www.isparkholistic.com | contactispark@gmail.com | 044-43570807| 8825970607


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Culturama July 2018  

The July edition of Culturama has a smorgasbord of delights. For movie and history buffs alike, we have a special feature that delves into t...

Culturama July 2018  

The July edition of Culturama has a smorgasbord of delights. For movie and history buffs alike, we have a special feature that delves into t...

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