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ROTONDE DE CARTIER G R A N D E C O M P L I C AT I O N S K E L E TO N 9 4 0 6 M C THE ULTIMATE FEAT IN FINE WATCHMAKING, THE “POINÇON DE GENÈVE” CERTIFIED ROTONDE DE CARTIER GRANDE COMPLICATION SKELETON IS THE EMBODIMENT OF THE EXCEPTIONAL EXPERTISE OF CARTIER’S MASTER WATCHMAKERS. THE WATCH BLENDS THE FLYING TOURBILLON, PERPETUAL CALENDAR AND MINUTE REPEATER COMPLICATIONS IN AN EXTRA-FLAT MOVEMENT. ESTABLISHED IN 1847, CARTIER

cartier.com

CREATES EXCEPTIONAL WATCHES THAT COMBINE DARING DESIGN AND WATCHMAKING SAVOIR-FAIRE.

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From UAE: 800 Cartier (800-227 8437) Outside UAE: + 971 4 425 3001


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CONTENTS BUSINESS

18 FIRST WORD

36 BUSINESS

54 AUTOMOTIVE

20 LEADERSHIP

38 SOCIAL BUSINESS

56 BUSINESS

22 INVESTMENT DESTINATION

42 ENTREPRENEUR

58 GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

24 COVER

44 BUSINESS

62 ENTREPRENEUR

30 PROFILE

48 ENTREPRENEUR

64 WATCH REPORT

34 ENTREPRENEUR

50 PHOTO ESSAY

Will executives buy the Apple Watch? Best selling author Robin Sharma Greece’s new day Hillary Clinton Sheikh Mohammed Al Rahbani NYC cake boss Sylvia Weinstock

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Can d3 compete globally? A Detroit non-profit is giving away free homes Jo Malone is back in business Reinventing dunhill Michelin chef Jean-Georges

Maserati CEO

First Arab hypercar designer Ralph Debbas Passport Index ranking

Pascal Raffy on breathing life into his watch brand Best of Basel 2015

Gaza’s water crisis

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CALIBER RM 030 POLO DE ST-TROPEZ Declutchable rotor Automatic movement Power reserve circa 55 hours Declutchable and adjustable rotor geometry Winding indicator Date display Free sprung balance with variable inertia Double barrel Baseplate, bridges and balance cock made of titanium Torque limiting crown in titanium Balance: glucydur, 4 arms Inertia moment 4.8 mg·cm², angle of lift 53° Frequency: 28,800 vph (4 hz) Spline screws in grade 5 titanium for the bridges and the case Interior flanges in carbon fiber Baseplate and bridges in grade 5 titanium, wet sandblasted, titalyt® treated Barrel bridges pvd coated Sapphire blasted and hand-drawn surfaces Titanium centre case and atz ceramic top and lower case Limited edition of 50 pieces Only available at Richard Mille Boutiques

RICHARD MILLE BOUTIQUES Dubai

Abu Dhabi

Doha

www.richardmille.com 2015 MAY / JUNE

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LIFESTYLE 70

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70 GADGETS

78 FASHION ENTREPRENEUR

92 LITTLE BLACK BOOK

72 ART

80 HOTELS

94 FASHION

74 YACHT

84 DINING

96 HOROLOGY

76 DESIGN

88 TRAVEL

Sleek summer gadgets

Hamza Harb explores conflict architecture

Enjoy the dolce vita with the Oceanic 90

Modern Arabia

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Tumi creative director’s bittersweet past

Private Islands

The coolest al fresco venues in Dubai

Tennis champ Tim Henman’s London

Burst into summer with a splash of colour

A table top timepiece

Hvar, Croatia

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EDITOR’S LETTER GLOBAL CITIZEN PUBLISHER Armand Peponnet EDITOR Natasha Tourish - nt@global-citizen.com SUB EDITOR Tahira Yaqoob - ty@global-citizen.com LIFESTYLE EDITOR Nausheen Noor - nn@global-citizen.com ART DIRECTOR Omid Khadem - ok@global-citizen.com FINANCE MANAGER Muhammad Tauseef - mtauseef@reachmedia.ae CONTRIBUTORS Amanda Fisher, Emma Inglis, Celia Peterson, Ben Flanagan, Daniel Bates, Laura Binder, Rachael Taylor, David Francis, Janice Turner, Luke Leitch

ince announcing in mid-April that she will run for president in the US elections next year, Hillary Rodham Clinton has had her foot down fullthrottle on the pedal and it seems she won’t slow down until her motorcade arrives in the White House once again. She declared: “Everyday Americans need a champion and I want to be that champion” - a rather puerile statement on the surface but enough to keep the momentum going at the Democrats HQ and a pre-cursor to much more controversial statements such as seeking full citizenship for illegal immigrants if elected and hinting at a softer approach on crime during a recent speech at Columbia University in New York. As the only female Democratic contender for the nomination, Clinton’s campaign is sharply focused on taking down her fellow party opponents but the approach is neither a throwback to her husband Bill’s glory days in power nor even her tenure as Secretary of State. The former First Lady has made it clear she is taking the fight not to the centre left but by being as far to the left as she can be, even more so than Barack Obama. In this issue’s cover story (pg 25), we sat down with Clinton before America’s worst-kept secret about her presidential hopes got out. But the question then and now still remains: does the idea of a female president upset the status quo in America even more than the idea of a black president did? Speaking of millionaire comeback queens, we talk to the British entrepreneur Jo Malone (p42) about her new company Jo Loves and how she overcame the darker period in her life when a contract clause prohibited her from creating new fragrances after she sold the eponymous brand she founded to Estee Lauder. Also in this issue, we talk to the first Arab car designer, whose $3.4million hypercar Lykan played a starring role in the recent Furious 7 movie. Meanwhile the CEO of Maserati admits the Middle Eastern market will not be in any rush to queue up for its new electric-petrol hybrid SUV, the Levante. Before the temperature quickly becomes unbearable as we approach summer, our lifestyle guide has your al fresco dining all mapped out, as well as your summer wardrobe before you sail away to our travel destination, Hvar in Croatia.

PRINTED BY Masar Printing and Publishing www.global-citizen.com www.issuu.com/global-citizen www.facebook.com/GlobalCitizenMag MEDIA REPRESENTATIVE Fierce International Dubai Internet City Business Central Tower A - Office 2803 T: +971 4 421 5455 - F: +971 4 421 0208 tarek@fierce-international.com

REACH MEDIA FZ LLC CHAIRMAN Armand Arton CEO Armand Peponnet - apeponnet@reachmedia.ae ADVERTISING sales@reachmedia.ae SUBSCRIPTION subscription@reachmedia.ae Dubai Media City, Building 8, Office 87, PO Box 502068, Dubai, UAE T: +971 4 385 5485 - Email: info@reachmedia.ae Copyright 2015 Reach Media. All rights reserved. Neither this publication nor any part of it may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the permission of Reach Media. Where opinion is expressed it is that of the author and does not necessarily reflect the editorial views of the publisher or Global Citizen. All information in Global Citizen is checked and verified to the best of the publisher’s ability, however the publisher cannot be held responsible for any mistake or omission enclosed in the publication.

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Photo by Martin Schoeller


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CONTRIBUTORS

Laura Binder

Daniel Bates

Rachael Taylor

Former group editor at Hot Media Publishing in Dubai, Laura has left life in the Emirates for her native UK, where she writes for international luxury titles. In this issue, she takes us to the yacht-dotted seas of Hvar.

is a British freelance journalist based in New York. He is a regular contributor to the Daily Mail, Daily Telegraph and Daily Express in the UK and has covered major stories in his decade as a reporter, from the BP oil spill to the Boston Marathon bombing.

is a watch and jewellery journalist based in London. She was the founding editor of UK business magazines Professional Jeweller and WatchPro and now writes for a variety of specialist and luxury titles around the globe.

Celia Peterson

Emma Inglis

Ben Flanagan

is a Dubai-based photographer, filmmaker and writer whose work has been published in the New York Times, Der Spiegel, Financial Times Holland and Die Zeit. She has covered humanitarian missions and had photographic exhibitions in Copenhagen and Dubai.

is a trained psychologist and cut her teeth in newspapers in London since the 1990s. She now writes for newspapers and magazines from Conde Nast Traveller to the Daily Telegraph on a wide range of subjects. In this issue, she meets perfume mogul Jo Malone in London for Global Citizen.

writes primarily about Arab affairs in the UK and Middle Eastern business. He writes for outlets including The National and the Al Arabiya News Channel, drawing on 14 years’ experience in journalism. He started his career at the Observer newspaper in London.

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TOGETHER WE GROW

To empower the future leaders of Qatar, Boeing supports the exciting projects of Qatar Foundation for Education, Science and Community. Leading through partnership Discover more at boeing-me.com/together

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ONE WORLD. 199 PASSPORTS. The Passport Index is the world’s first online interactive tool, which collects, displays and sorts the passports of the world by country, power rank and even by colour. The USA and UK are ranked 1st, while the UAE is ranked in 31st place, with access to 104 countries countries visa free.

THE BIG PICTURE

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www.passportindex.org


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GLOBETROTTER MAY

9 MAY 2 2 N OV

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Venice Biennale, Giardini- Arsenale, Italy

Elite Summit 2015, Fairmont Le Montreux Palace, Switzerland

Al Gaffal Traditional Dhow Race, Burj Al Arab Hotel, Dubai

The 56th International Art Exhibition titled All the World’s Futures will see 89 countries showcase their exhibitions, with Grenada, Mauritius, Mongolia, Mozambique and the Seychelles all participating in the historical Pavilions at the Giardini, Arsenale venue for the first time.

The leading private wealth management forum bringing together the family offices and independent financial advisors of Europe’s wealthiest individuals and families with internationally-renowned fund and asset managers. The invitation-only event offers an intimate environment for in-depth discussion of the key drivers shaping both family governance and global asset allocation.

The Al Gaffal 60ft traditional Dhow race will celebrate its 25th anniversary this year, when 100 traditional boats set sail off Sir Bu Na’ir island at sunrise and finish at the iconic Burj Al Arab hotel. Spectators can watch all the action live from the shores or on specially chartered Dubai ferries. The sailing race honours the pearl divers who were integral to the emirate’s development.

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Concours d’Elegance, Lake Como, Italy Set on the idyllic shores of Lake Como, Concours d’Elegance gathers together the best categories of historic cars, concept cars, prototypes, and motorcycles, in a weekend of grandeur and refined luxury. Even without taking part in the beauty pageant, you can savour the magical and unique experience first hand as a “Friend of Concorso”.

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Art Basel, Basel MCH Swiss Exhibition Switzerland Global Art collectors and enthusiasts will descend on the Swiss town of Basel to take in the coveted international art show for Modern and contemporary works, bringing over 300 leading galleries from around the world to the heart of Europe.


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THE FIRST WORD PERSPECTIVES FROM THE TOP

ARE SMARTWATCHES A SMART PURCHASE? When it launched last month, the Apple Watch sold out within minutes. Its success has put its manufacturers Apple on track to enter the luxury brand market, with starting prices at $350 for the basic model and up to $17,000 for the top of the range gold options. GC asks whether UAE-based executives will be investing in the new technology. BY SHANE PHILLIPS

PETER ENGLAND

chief executive, RAK Bank “I will not be buying the Apple Watch, at least for now, even though I am keen on tech gadgets and am generally an early adopter. I already have enough trouble keeping chargers around for my iPhone and iPad between my home and office and particularly when I travel. The idea of having to charge my watch every night makes it even more complicated. I am also not convinced you need this technology on your wrist when you will still have your phone in your pocket most of the time anyway.”

VIMAL SETHI

managing director Middle East, Synechron technology consulting company “I will be buying the watch but not to tell the time or to display it as an exquisite accessory but because it makes a statement. It says I am connected with the real world today - the digital world. From keeping a check on my health to monitoring my portfolio, email and spending habits, or even making day-to-day payments, the watch will soon become our most personal device.”

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THE FIRST WORD

GEORGE RIDING

chief financial officer, SAP software and technology solutions firm “I have not bought one yet but they look very cool. I like the styling options and the strap is clever. I can see a new industry starting up from that alone. I need to find out how it can make my average day better. On these grounds, I need more time to assess. However, this launch legitimises the smartwatch and I am bound to get one sooner or later.”

MUJEEB HAZZAA

chief commercial officer, Extra electronics goods firm “I would purchase an Apple Watch. With its entrance into the wearables segment, I believe Apple’s brand penetration will raise awareness of such products. I expect the watch to add value to consumers’ lifestyles and give them another component within the company’s eco-system, which has become such a prominent part of our daily lives.”

DEEPAK BABANI

chief executive, Eros Group electronics distribution “As a product, the watch exhibits features similar to the Samsung Galaxy Gear S. On the work front, the scheduler reminds you of appointments, missed calls, texts and other messages right on your wrist. On a personal front, the health app, weather forecasts and autosetting of the clock in the city you arrive in are important. Over time, I foresee wearable technology will fast integrate into the lives of consumers. Fashionable designs will be a challenge to traditional Swiss watchmakers.”

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LEADERSHIP

THE NEW WAY TO WIN IN BUSINESS Bestselling author and CEO Robin Sharma gives his top tips on leading without a title BY ROBIN SHARMA

he old way of leading is dead. Many of our bestknown organisations have fallen and some of our most revered leaders have lost face. The global economy has now transformed and with all the new media ranging from Twitter to YouTube, everyone can now build a following and lead in their field. We have just entered what I call “the decade of leadership”. Leadership has become democratised. I am not at all suggesting that we do not need titles or people at the top of the organisations to set vision, manage the team and take overall responsibility for the ship. What I am suggesting is that we now work and live in a world where leadership is not just something executives do. It is something everyone needs to do for their organisations to survive, especially in this period of change. And just imagine if you inspired every one of the people who work with you to shift from being victims in any way to showing outright leadership in their work. Your firm would be unstoppable. For the past 18 years, I have had a simple mission that has become my obsession: to help people in organisations to lead without a title and play their best in all that they do. This mission has allowed me to serve as the private leadership advisor to many billionaires and celebrity entrepreneurs, helping them to create immense leaps in their business results while living lives they now adore. I have distilled everything I have learned into a step-by-step formula that I have shared in my latest book, The Leader Who Had No Title: A Modern Fable on Real Success in Business and in Life, published by Simon and Schuster. Here are six smart moves that you can make today to start changing the game and create exceptional results:

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1. Remember that you can lead without a title Leadership has less to do with the size of your title than the depth of your commitment. I’ve seen front-line employees, taxi drivers, and carpet installers doing their work with the passion of Picasso. Leadership is not really about authority. It is about a choice you can make to do your best work each and every day, regardless of where you are planted. Actually, leadership is less about a position and more about a mindset and behaviour and a way of navigating the world. It is about relentless optimisation, standing for world-class, being a merchant of wow, being graceful amid turmoil and making the world exponentially better because you were here. 2. Shift from victimhood to leadership No great career, business, or life was ever created on a platform of excuses. Too many people play victim at work. They blame the boss or the economy or the competition or the weather for their less than mediocre results. Leaders without a title are different. They get that they have power: it may not be the power granted through a title like CEO or SVP. But they have power - and that is the power to see opportunity amid crises, drive positive change and encourage everyone on your team. And it is the power to step into the person you have always wanted to be. 3. Innovate or stagnate To lead without a title is to leave everything you touch better than you found it. Mediocrity happens when people refuse to change and improve all that they do. Look what happened to some of the big car companies when they slowed down their devotion to innovation. The competition ate them for breakfast


LEADERSHIP

Robin Sharma is the bestselling author of The Leader Who Had No Title

and put some out of business. The best leaders and the best enterprises have a hunger to improve. It is such a deep part of their culture, they know of no other way to be. And that is the edge that makes them great. Please simply remember that the illusion of safety is always more dangerous than the threats of uncertainty and that all change is hard at first, messy in the middle and beautiful at the end. 4. Become a value creator versus a clock watcher Success comes from the value you add rather than from the “busy-ness” you show. What is the point of being really busy around the wrong things? Leadership is a game of focus. Focus on fewer but smarter activities, the ones that create real value for your teammates, customers and the world at large. The best leaders on the planet are all about impact. Their dominant obsession is to create ridiculous amounts of value for as many people as possible. They get that the swiftest way to make $1 billion is to solve a problem that serves a billion people. At my annual four-day leadership and elite performance event called the Titan Summit that I host every December, I walk participants through a game-changing methodology

called “the 10 times value obsession” designed to make their companies become absolute market leaders. They shift from having customers to creating what I call fanatical followers. This comes from focusing more on delivering awesome value and less on making the sale. 5. Put people first Southwest Airlines founder Herb Kelleher famously said: “The business of business is people”. We have a ton of technology yet less and less humanity. Let us remember people do business with people they like, trust and respect. So build your team, meet your customers, deepen human connections, treat others with respect - and put people first. 6. Remember tough times build strong leaders Look at any exceptional leader and you will find they stepped into their leadership best during a period of crisis versus calmness. To lead without a title is to hunt for opportunity amid every adversity. Every setback has the seeds of an opportunity. Companies like Apple, Google, GoPro, Facebook and Amazon were built because their people leveraged disruptive times into brilliant wins and refused to give up when faced with difficulty.

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INVESTMENT DESTINATION

THE PHOENIX REBORN After years of crippling debt and austerity measures, there is a new wave of optimism in Greece, thanks to a newly-elected government promising change – but will the leftist Syriza party be open to foreign investment? BY AMANDA FISHER

o one would deny it has been a tough few years for one of the world’s oldest civilisations. Greece is no stranger to financial difficulty. A recently–released Bank of America Merrill Lynch survey shows Greece has spent 90 of the past 192 years in either default or debt restructuring, more than countries like Mexico and Russia. Even so, the global financial crisis that surfaced in 2008 was particularly unkind. In 2010 the recession, compounded by years of unwise spending by Greek governments, placed the country on the brink of sovereign default. The Troika, made up of the International Monetary Fund, the European Central Bank and the European Commission, came to the rescue with several bailout packages amounting to more than $273 billion, conditional on severe austerity measures and structural reforms to bolster the weakened economy. Things have pulled back since reaching that precipice but the country still has a national debt of about $345 billion, according to the statistics portal Statista. It also has a debt-to-GDP ratio at an all-time high of 177 per cent, nearly double its average from 1980 to 2014 and close to eight times its record low of 22.6 per cent in 1980. The ratio is used by investors to gauge a country’s ability to make future payments on its debt and affects borrowing costs and government bond yields. While unemployment fell slightly at the beginning of the year, it stands at more than 25 per cent and tens of thousands of Greeks have left the country seeking jobs elsewhere. This backdrop might not make Greece seem the most appealing country to invest in – but optimism exists. “Where the risk is, so are the profits,” says George Hatzimarkos, the South Aegean regional governor. “That is very old but so true. You will not make profits if you do not take risk. If you are prepared to earn four per cent a year [in interest] the United States is waiting for you. You want more money? You have to take a risk. In Greece there are opportunities and the possibility of profits.” Hatzimarkos, who is also the former president of the Dodecanese Islands Chamber of Commerce, says the best

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prospects for investors are in fields like infrastructure, renewable energies, food, tourism and the maritime industry, which services islands in the Greek archipelago. “This is a sector [that] in years to come will attract very big investments – yachting in general, marinas, ports and the cruise industry,” he says, adding: “The quality of materials our land produces is unique.” Greece, he says, is the perfect island-hopping destination. “The international cruise industry is very interested in all the islands, not just Santorini and Rhodes. It is looking for new destinations. The problem is the new cruise ships are very big because they are trying to make [the industry] much more profitable and we do not have the infrastructure for boats of this size on the islands.” Hotels are another opportunity for investment, something foreign investors have been quick to jump on board with, he says. At a Greek travel conference in Dubai in February, Marketing Greece public relations manager Athina Vorilla said tourism accounted for about one – fifth of Greece’s GDP and workforce. “We Greeks say every time there is an obstacle, something good comes out of it. The last two years are proof that we remained strong, came together and ended up being one of the leading destinations, according to the United Nations World Tourism Organisation – and we had two record – breaking years [in visitor numbers]. “Last year there were 23.5 million visitors to Greece and that was an increase from the previous year, which was already a record year. So far, bookings are strong and we are very confident and optimistic that the upswing is going to continue.” UAE investors, along with China, have been some of the most important, according to the Greek ambassador to the UAE, Dionisios Zois. He says both private and government investors have been investing in Greek resorts, the food sector and tourism in general but “there are more in the pipeline. What is important for us is the UAE in general is looking seriously into more investments in the country”. In May last year, the UAE foreign minister Sheikh Abdullah Bin Zayed Al Nahyan announced a raft of investments


INVESTMENT DESTINATION

Image courtesy of Getty Images

“You will not make profits if you do not take risk. If you are prepared to earn four per cent a year [in interest] the United States is waiting for you. You want more money? You have to take a risk. In Greece there are opportunities and the possibility of profits.”

worth nearly $10 billion at the second UAE-Greece joint ministerial committee meeting in Athens, which included the redevelopment of a former Athens airport by Abu Dhabi-based Al Maabar International Investment. Sheikh Abdullah also announced a bid by the Abu Dhabi Investment Council for the luxury Astir Palace resort in Athens and an agreement between the Abu Dhabi National Energy Company and Greece’s Terna Energy to explore potential investment opportunities. To investors worried about Greece’s chequered economic and political history, Zois says, “I would say they should not be nervous. The stability is there.” He cites the four – month extension of the bailout programme granted to Greece by its European creditors at the end of February. “The other factor is Greece is the European country which is nearest to the region and someone who makes investments there can take advantage of its position in Europe and of its membership of the European Union.” But what of the doubts over Greece’s continued membership of the EU, especially given the January election of the staunchly socialist Syriza party led by Alexis Tsipras, which has made it clear it will not cow to the will of the Troika? “For us there is no such question,” says Zios. “Greece will remain in the Eurozone. This is the decision of the government and the overwhelming majority of the Greek people.”

Then there is the new government’s anti-privitisation policies. Surely this might interfere with the courtship of foreign investment? Zois says while it is yet to specifically outline in which areas it will seek foreign investment, “the new government will definitely put an emphasis on investments”. Hatzimarkos agrees. He thinks Syriza will have to leave any anti-privitisation principles behind when the political reality hits. “The new government will soon realise that [bringing down] unemployment rates from 28 per cent cannot be done without investments,” he says. “They need new jobs. It is that simple. Greece is running out of money right now and where do we get this money from? The private sector. Does the Greek private sector have the ability to do it? No. It also suffers from six years of austerity measures. So where is the money? Abroad.” He says he is ready as governor to protect any foreign money that comes into his region. “I say to potential investors one thing: ‘If corruption hits your door, let me know. I will stop it yesterday’.” Whatever happens, it is clear Greece has a long way to go to get its house in order. The ambassador says, however, an air of confidence and unity prevails in the country. “As long as you have that, the success of the government’s priorities is certain. But it is not easy. It is not going to change overnight.”

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Janice Turner / The Times / The Interview People

Photo by Martin Schoeller

COVER STORY

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COVER STORY

HILLARY FOR AMERICA? Dubbed the Sisterhood of the Pantsuit, women are coming out in force to support Hillary Clinton’s declaration that she will run for president next year. Her male critics might still shout “make me a sandwich” - but does a female president threaten to upset the status quo even more than a black president? BY JANICE TURNER

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COVER STORY

t has begun. Within 24 hours of Hillary Clinton declaring she will run for president, I have seen her called a bitch. I have read that at 67 — the same age as Ronald Reagan, younger than John McCain — Clinton is too old and Bill O’Reilly on Fox News believes “there’s got to be a downside to a woman president”. When Clinton, as Secretary of State, met Aung San Suu Kyi, the Burmese dissident figurehead expressed her desire to be a “flesh and blood” politician. Hillary warned her it is not for the faint-hearted. She should know. Her 2008 bid was a son et lumiere of sexism: the college jocks heckling “make me a sandwich”, the novelty Clinton nut-crackers shaped like thighs, the South Park skit about a nuke in her private parts. To a certain segment of America, Clinton was not a Yale scholar and senator legitimately running for high office but a school maam, a shrew, every middle-aged man’s angry, litigious first wife. Ten months ago, interviewing Clinton in New York, I wondered why she would go through that hell again. She knew the battle ahead. “Anybody,” she said, “who gets into the public arena these days knows full well it is a brutal, unforgiving environment.” She believed criticism had worsened for women with a vile, online judgmentalism. Growing up in the 1960s, “there wasn’t the constant holding up of a certain model of what a woman’s body is supposed to look like and the veiled message that you do not measure up, that you are not good enough”. Of her energy and appetite to campaign, there is little doubt. At that time Clinton was in a political holding pattern - launching her careful, dry memoir Hard Choices about her million-mile diplomatic mission, gathering strength and awaiting the birth of her grandchild. But the circus around her was already presidential. The secret service agents whispering into earpieces by the lift, the super-sharp, devoted West Wing-esque young aides, the roses on the table chosen to match precisely the cerise of her jacket. Unlike female TV anchors of the same vintage, Clinton has not dabbled in facial cosmetic surgery nor starved herself to please a youth-obsessed nation. She is a slightly-built, wellpreserved, handsome woman. She looks her age, but without doubt is the fastest-thinking person I have interviewed. Neither Sheryl Sandberg, George Osborne nor Condoleezza Rice can rival her synaptic snap, the infinitesimal space between a question ending and the fluent, perfect, nuanced reply. When I suggested the image of the president is youthful

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vibrancy, all that running up the steps of planes, she laughed: “Wear flat shoes, that’s my advice. I think you can have individuals of all ages, all backgrounds, all attributes who exhibit energy and those that do not. But I don’t think it is so much age as how you conduct yourself.” How should a woman presidential hopeful conduct herself? That has been Clinton’s dilemma. If a man speaks and is tough, he is strong; a woman is a ball-breaker or a bitch. Clinton was “glacial” because she was too clever to suffer fools, a haughty blue stocking as First Lady for preferring health reform to baking cookies. Yet after the famous photo of Barack Obama’s cabinet witnessing the on-screen death of Osama bin Laden, a shocked Clinton, with her hand over her mouth, was judged womanishly weak. In 2008 she downplayed her feminist credentials and based her run on her intellectual calibre and experience. This time Clinton is standing for women. Her daughter Chelsea has already said America is ready for a female president. And outside Clinton’s New York book signing, hundreds of those queuing were gagging for her to run. But she does not only attract Manhattan liberals. In 2008 in small-town Ohio, I interviewed socially conservative women disinclined to vote Democrat but who would turn out for her because Hillary’s appeal is summed up in the slogan on her unofficial merchandise: the Sisterhood of the Pantsuit. Pantsuit Woman is not a glamourpuss. She is practical, grafting, selfless, nononsense. She works an extra job after a sticky divorce, takes a casserole round for a bereaved neighbour, puts her children’s problems to rights. After decades playing second fiddle to her husband Bill, enduring his affairs and saving her marriage, Clinton the survivor is the pantsuit queen. And being Secretary of State, when she was finally given a job worthy of her talents, flying the world and free from her husband’s shadow, raised her cool status. The photo of her in sunglasses in an army transport plane, unsmilingly checking her BlackBerry created the internet meme “texts from Hillary”. Its message was that Clinton got the job done and told it like it is. Consequently she has been more playful with her image. Besides “Flotus” and “glass-ceiling cracker” her Twitter biog includes “hair icon”. Besides, the hard, impermeable, quasimasculine facade is perhaps not her best election mode. In 2008, with her party’s nomination slipping away, exhausted and speaking in a New Hampshire coffee shop, she began to cry. You could hear the tyre screech as women in station wagons headed for the polls: she won that primary, if not the race. It is easy to forget, when you meet this burnished, expensively


COVER STORY

Clinton Foundation has links with unpleasant regimes, that far from wishing to constrain neoliberal capitalism she is too cosy with Wall Street. Maybe so, but her supporters will counter no male politician is perfect either and that Clinton is the best shot at power women have had yet. Whatever her tawdry wheeler-dealing, Hillary has never deserted her feminist principles. As Secretary of State, she argued that girls’ education built economic development and women’s rights were human rights to leaders across the world who, she recalls, sat rolling their eyes. Is America ready to elect a grandmother? I have just read a discussion about Clinton’s hormones, the likely temperament of the post-menopausal woman, as if oestrogen-depletion can be more dangerous than a surfeit of testosterone. She said: “We have had so many grandfathers in the White House that I think for someone to say: ‘In my mind you are disqualified because you might be a grandmother’ is just so ridiculous.” They will say it all the same, because a female president — perhaps more than a black one — threatens the status quo. Angry men will still shout “make me a sandwich” at Hillary Clinton in 2016. But the difference is women, not just in America but all over the world, are ready to watch her back.

Image courtesy of Getty Images

dressed, former First Lady that she was a draper’s daughter from Park Ridge, Illinois, a spectacled swot who won a scholarship. In her first memoir she recalls her awe at sophisticated Yale girls smoking cocktail cigarettes and talking of Europe. She never left the US until she met Bill. Just before my interview she had been attacked for saying she took highly-paid speaking engagements because after they left the White House, she and Bill were “broke”. Can she understand what she calls in her campaign launch video “everyday Americans?” “Of course. I know how hard life is,” she said. “Bill and I had student loans. Neither of us was born with some kind of social standing and wealth. We were very fortunate because he was in public life for a long time but the flip side of it is that we really had to hustle to put together the resources that we needed once we got outside the White House. We could not go to some family estate or some beautiful home. We had to get out there and do it for ourselves.” The word “hustle” is characteristically frank. Her critics say she is no valiant outsider, but a tough machine politician, a dynast tainted by her husband’s scandals, Whitewater and Lewinsky, plus her own secret emails in office. They say the

Hillary’s dilemma: How should a woman presidential hopeful conduct herself? Above, she gets it just right, unsmilingly checking her BlackBerry created the internet meme “texts from Hillary”. Its message was that Clinton got the job done and told it like it is. 2015 MAY / JUNE

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COVER STORY

WHAT THEY SAY

“Mrs Clinton has never been too graceful in her statements. When people push boundaries too far, it is not because they are strong but because they are weak. But maybe weakness is not the worst quality for a woman.” Vladimir Putin in an interview with the French TV channel TF1, 2014 “I know Hillary Clinton. I served with Hillary Clinton. She does not have the right vision to lead America.” The Republican former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum reacts to her campaign launch “She lost me when she voted for the war without looking. Look at her sources of funding. Monsanto [the agrochemical firm behind Agent Orange] is in there.” Actress Susan Sarandon, 2015 “The more she tries to moderate her image, the more she compounds her exposure as an opportunist.” David Axelrod, a former senior advisor to President Barack Obama in his 2015 memoir

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“Hillary Clinton has taken money from countries [where] rape victims are publicly lashed. It is a grand hypocrisy.” Republican senator Rand Paul criticises the Clinton Foundation’s funding on NBC’s Meet The Press “Even Nixon didn’t destroy the tapes.” The Republican national committee chairman Reince Priebus criticises Clinton for wiping her server, deleting emails from her personal account, which she also used for official work “Hillary’s assessment of the events in Benghazi was undoubtedly shaped by the PTSD she had from escaping snipers in Tuzla, Bosnia.” The conservative blogger Jim Geraghty draws parallels between Clinton’s fictitious account of being fired upon when arriving at Tuzla airport in 1996 and her statements about the 2012 terrorist attack on the US compound in Benghazi, Libya, in 2014 “On her watch we have witnessed the rise of Russia, Iran and ISIS. We know that a Hillary Clinton administration would be no different to an Obama administration. ObamaCare, amnesty and the ongoing assault on our constitutional rights would continue.” Texas senator Ted Cruz, a Republican presidential candidate, on the campaign launch

Image courtesy of Getty Images

“While I was working on those streets watching those folks see their jobs shift overseas, you were a corporate lawyer sitting on the board at Wal-Mart.” Barack Obama, on his soon-to-be Secretary of State, during the 2008 primary debates


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PROFILE

SAUDI’S MYSTERY BILLIONAIRE Sheikh Mohammed al Rahbani is one of the wealthiest men in the world but you won’t find him on any Forbes rich list. GC meets him in his London townhouse to find out why he shuns the limelight and why he is a big supporter of American President Barack Obama

ou probably haven’t heard of the Saudi billionaire Sheikh Mohammed al Rahbani – and that suits him just fine. The 49-year-old’s business interests are vast, spanning an air-conditioning venture in his native country, a steel plant currently under construction in Abu Dhabi and vast swathes of undeveloped land across the Gulf. But you will not see the sheikh courting Forbes – or, indeed, taking the magazine to task – over its annual ranking of billionaires. Nor will you see the Al Rahbani name splashed across billboards in Saudi Arabia, Kuwait or the UAE, the three key countries where the family plans to develop land bequeathed by the sheikh’s late father. Despite coming face-to-face with a journalist for a rare interview, Al Rahbani remains the resolutely quiet billionaire, who generally shuns the limelight.

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He has homes in the Swiss town of Gstaad – where he spent time as a child – and in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. But he counts his six-storey London townhouse as his primary home. “You live the life of being anonymous here,” he said of London. “Nobody looks at you, I like that a lot.” Sitting in his main residence – an immaculate townhouse a stone’s throw from the famous Harrods department store – he talks through his main business interests. His tone is as modest as one could expect, given he is sitting opposite a photograph of himself next to a beaming President Barack Obama. “We are a very low-key family. We like to keep it as such,” says Al Rahbani. “We do what we have to do. But we are not bragging.” Profiles of Saudi billionaires invariably invoke comparisons with Prince Alwaleed bin Talal, who made his name in business at a young age after investing millions in Citicorp, now Citi.

Photography by Andy Barnham

BY BEN FLANAGAN


INVESTMENT DESTINATION

Prince Alwaleed recently had a public spat with Forbes after the magazine estimated his wealth at a mere $20 billion – some $9.6 billion less than the prince claimed. The publisher’s allegation that Alwaleed had knowingly caused the share price of his Kingdom Holding Company to rise and therefore inflate his own net worth led the prince to sue Forbes for defamation. That is not something Al Rahbani will be doing. For while he acknowledges he is very much in the billionaires’ club, he is averse to the idea of being publicly listed among some 1,826 others on Forbes’ rich list, where he should be – but isn’t – listed. “You don’t have to go and say: ‘Oh here I am, look what I have,’” he says. “People know.” Al Rahbani’s primary business is the Saudi Finn Ducting Company Limited (SAFID), which manufactures air distribution products such as ducts and vents. The Riyadh-headquartered company was founded in the late 1970s by his late father, Sheikh Haleem al Rahbani, in conjunction with Nokia.

Back then, everyone thought the Finnish firm was in fact Japanese, says Al Rahbani. The fact that Nokia later grew into a household name illustrates his father’s vision, he adds. SAFID eventually came under his ownership and he is currently chairman of the company. It is now expanding into other product lines such as air handling units – giant devices used to ventilate large buildings – and, sometime in the next few years, external air-conditioning units. The company – which Al Rahbani says is growing at more than 10 per cent annually – has its own research and development centre, where it looks at how to improve efficiency in cooling systems and examines the use of solar power technology. SAFID requires a lot of galvanised steel for the production of ventilation ducts. It currently buys this material locally or imports it from Japan but Al Rahbani came up with a better idea - to build his own steel factory. With partners AJ Group in Dubai, SAFID formed the United

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PROFILE

“We are a very low-key family. We like to keep it as such. We do what we have to do. But we are not bragging.”

Iron and Steel Company, another of Al Rahbani’s key business interests. The company is building a Dh1 billion cold press steel plant in Abu Dhabi, which is set to start operating by the end of next year, about a year behind schedule. Crucially, SAFID will buy about 20 per cent of the galvanised steel the factory produces. It doesn’t take an MBA graduate to see the joined-up thinking in Al Rahbani’s ventures. The steel plant will supply SAFID, which makes ventilation parts for buildings. And buildings are what Sheikh Mohammed plans to develop on the massive land plots left to his family by his late father. Al Rahbani senior amassed so much land that he was known in Saudi Arabia as the “King of Property”, his son says. The plot in Kuwait alone – said to span 18km by 12km and worth at least $2 billion – is so big that a dedicated team is required to keep tabs on its borders. Other land owned by the family includes plots in Saudi Arabia worth at least $1.5 billion – including 1.6 million square metres in Jeddah City – and smaller plots in the UAE. The land is managed by Rahbani Group Holding, primarily by the sheikh as head of the family, but also by his sister, Princess Maha, who joins us for the interview. The Al Rahbanis have already built around 3,000 villas in Jeddah but have long-term plans for the development of the rest in conjunction with partners. Negotiations have already begun in Kuwait with a timeline of about three years while other areas will take longer to develop, Al Rahbani says. “We are really not in a rush,” he says. “Properties can get sick but they do not die. The price might fluctuate here and there but at the end of the day, it is there for you.” Al Rahbani’s interests go beyond property and the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) business. He is an investor in the San Diego-based Pathway Genomics, which

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specialises in genetic profiling to determine an individual’s risk of specific diseases. He has taken the concept to the Saudi government, proposing widespread DNA screening for the population, but acknowledges this will be “a long discussion”. He sees Pathway Genomics primarily as a business venture. But there is also a humanitarian aspect to it, as there is with his general philanthropic work, which includes a programme to distribute food to poor families in Saudi Arabia. He is also a supporter of the Clinton Foundation and has strong ties with the United States, which stretch back to his education. One of four children, Al Rahbani attended the International School in Geneva and King Saud University in Riyadh. He later spent some time studying in the US and met his Washington DC-born wife Kate at Boston University. That was 18 years ago and the couple now have three children aged 13, 15 and 17. Al Rahbani’s parents were clearly an inspiration to him and keeping both their business and personal legacy alive is a dayto-day concern for him. “My dad was my hero and I learned a lot from him. And my mother was everything to me,” he says. Aside from his parents, another of Al Rahbani’s personal heroes is Obama, whom he has met several times. His first meeting with the US President was at a private dinner in Los Angeles three years ago. “I was impressed. He is so humble and he is human,” he says. It is such qualities – humbleness, generosity and steering clear of the limelight – that Al Rahbani says he would like to pass down to his own children – along with, of course, his unknown billions. “The legacy I’d like to leave my kids is the same legacy as my parents left for me,” he says. “I teach them always to be humble, to appreciate what they have in life – and not to take anything for granted.”


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ENTREPRENEUR

THE REAL CAKE BOSS At 85, she has made a fortune selling luxury cakes to the rich and famous but New Yorker Sylvia Weinstock isn’t slowing down anytime soon - she is expanding her cake empire to the Middle East BY DANIEL BATES

he is arguably the most famous luxury cake maker on the planet but Sylvia Weinstock has never once hired a publicist. During her 30 years in the business, she has never had a PR company to represent her, nor has she ever taken out an advertisement. Clients like Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones have found her entirely on word of mouth alone, an anathema in our hyperconnected age. Weinstock’s formula is simple and one that has worked since 1982: if you want the best then come to her. It is a formula her elite clientele seem happy to pay up to tens of thousands of dollars per cake for. They include, in her words, “people with discerning taste” and come to her from relationships built up over many years. Weinstock has been called the ‘Leonardo da Vinci of cakes’, but ask how she sees herself and she prefers a comparison with the designer label Hermès. “When I say Hermès, I always consider them high price and the best,” she says, adding, “And Leonardo Da Vinci didn’t get paid enough for his work.” Now aged 85, Weinstock says she has always had “tunnel vision” in her business, “I don’t have a competitor. I don’t consider that we have any competitors. “We are who we are. There are other people in the cake business but they are not our competitors.” Customer loyalty is vital too, she says at the five-storey Tribeca townhouse she completely renovated herself in the early 1980s that now serves as her office, showroom and home in New York. Once she does a wedding, the children’s birthdays follow.

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Sylvia Weinstock

Then when the children get married, they call her. When the children’s children do the same, they call her too. Such an approach has meant she has worked with the Saudi royal family for many years, a relationship that helped inspire her latest venture. In December last year, Weinstock opened the first store outside New York in Kuwait. The venture is a partnership with Denise Kabbani, a former lawyer turned Weinstock protegee who tracked her down after reading one of her books in Harrods in London. Operating under a licence, Lily by Sylvia Weinstock will make its own cakes on site and ship them within Kuwait. Weinstock says she chose Kuwait because it was a country that is “friendly to Americans and friendly to women”. She ruled out Dubai because she thought it was too much of a ‘party place’, although Kabbani has earmarked Dubai as the next outlet under a separate licence if things work out. Weinstock says, “In Kuwait we saw shopping areas that are


ENTREPRENEUR

[like] Madison Avenue. Women drive cars, there is a lot of freedom there and very sophisticated people. A lot of women have careers.” Kabbani explains the store employs 10 staff divided into a flower team, bakers, designers and deliveries, just as Weinstock has in New York. She says Weinstock “trusts that I have the skills and taste to give my customers the taste they want with the high quality that is the reputation of the brand”. “Colours here might be different from the US. Fillings could be fig or pistachio or date, [which are] not common in the United States but very much part of the palate in my country.” Kabbani will also have to import some of Weinstock’s personality too, which has played no small part in her success. In person Weinstock is a charming mix of therapist, comedian and outspoken Jewish grandmother who is partial to a glass of vodka at 3pm. She serves me a whiskey while we talk in her wellappointed sitting room. Her personality is as oversized as the black glasses that swamp her face. She is an open book, an ask-meanything kind of gal. Weinstock, who married her husband Ben in 1949, was a kindergarten teacher until she beat breast cancer at the age of 50 and decided to spend the rest of her life doing something she loved. Her big break came when a cake she made was bought by a well-connected chef, who served it to a gathering of wealthy Manhattanite wives. One of the women ordered a cake for a party at the Pierre Hotel and after that, her name “spread like measles”. Weinstock says, “There is something called luck. Never diminish the word.” Being the “first kid on the block” in the luxury cake business certainly helped her, as did the boom years of the 1980s when

she worked what she once described as “26 hour days”. Living above her factory meant Weinstock was always on call, seeing deliveries off, meeting clients and often working six or seven day weeks. Even today she is known to fly with a cake to ensure it arrives and is unpacked from the 18 boxes or so in which it is transported. Nowadays Weinstock’s neighbours include Mariah Carey and an apartment round the corner recently sold for $50 million, but in her mind she still has a “$1.98 mentality”. She says, “I think being real and living in reality helps because I understand the client. “I understand what I’m selling but at the same time I understand what’s happened to the numbers and you don’t get very much for $1.98 any more.” The economic crash in 2008 hurt her business but she says they are now “past that” and the number of guests at weddings is creeping up from 100 and going as high as 300. Given that the quality of her cakes is hardly ever called into question, Weinstock says the only real problem with clients is the price. She says, “It is always a matter of money. I will not fudge it or compromise on quality. “If you use the best ingredients and you use fine labour and you turn out something very special, I’m sorry to tell you but that is costly.” As to why she is finally expanding in the middle of her ninth decade, Weinstock says legacy did not even cross her mind. With a grin, she says, “I am going to live a very long time. Chanel, Dior, St Laurent and Givenchy died - all these people died but their names still work. “People that created something, their name still goes, so why not?”

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BUSINESS

D3’S HIGH-FLYER Lindsay Miller’s piloting skills came in handy when she was charged with creating a fashion and design hub in Dubai in just 18 months BY AMANDA FISHER

n aerobatics, a hammerhead is a move that requires the pilot to take the plane, at full speed, into a straight vertical climb before turning it 180 degrees and plummeting directly downward. The career of Lindsay Miller, the managing director of the new Dubai Design District (d3), seems to have followed similarly unpredictable twists and turns – which is apt given the hammerhead is the most proficient move Miller, a qualified pilot, can pull off. But the 40-year-old mother-of-three has relied on that sense of spirit and derring-do in her current role. She has been charged with shaping a fashion and design district in the heart of Downtown Dubai to rival the likes of Brooklyn in New York and London’s Shoreditch. While they took years to develop organically, however, she had just 18 months. “It is definitely not easy and one of the challenges we have to

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accept [is] a certain amount of chaos,” says Miller. “We cannot control everything. That is really where it is challenging for us. What do we control and what do we let progress organically?” Miller has a remarkably varied CV at a relatively young age. Taking the most out of life is a skill she learned early, she says, from her fire-fighting father dragging his young family around the globe in pursuit of his passion. It did not take long for Miller to follow suit. The Canadian’s degree in film was swiftly put to one side when she discovered her love of flight. “I took a flight in a small acrobatic aeroplane and I loved it,” she says. “I was 23 years old and I just changed the whole plan.” Miller quickly attained commercial multi-engine pilot and instructor licences, working as a flight instructor for Air China pilots in the process. But when the 9/11 attacks took place in September 2001,


BUSINESS

it “changed airlines”, she says, and prompted a career change. “The airline industry really struggled after that,” she says. “It looked like there was going to be a delay and I was just impatient.” Miller instead set about establishing her own music video production business. In Canada, the film industry is heavily grant-based and she quickly learned how to get what she needed, she says. She proved so successful that roles followed with the National Film Board of Canada and Toronto International Film Festival. Miller says those jobs gave her a sound footing in industry development, which came in handy when she joined Tecom Investments upon migrating back to the Middle East, where she had lived as a young girl, although in Libya rather than Dubai. Having spent summers visiting the city as a university student, she says: “I came full circle back to Dubai, where I still had family. The purpose was really to look at developing the media industry here, which I was very passionate about. I felt if it could be done right, it could really shape society.” After successfully overseeing the launch of Dubai’s Internet City and Media City, Miller was a natural choice for the ambitious task of creating an organic design district to rival New York’s Brooklyn and London’s Shoreditch – and quickly. But she was not sure she even wanted the job initially. Miller says she did not have confidence the region was ready for a dedicated fashion and design industry in mid-recession 2009. Several years later, when the idea was back on the table, everything had changed. “When we started looking in 2012, these industries had green shoots already,” she says. “We started to see design was really cross-pollinating with fashion and there was a great opportunity to bring it all together.” In the course of her research, Miller discovered a thriving local scene with designers like Latifa Saeed and Khalid Shafar working quietly in parts of Dubai. But she still needed to be coerced into the role. “I did not put my hand up,” she says. “I had just had a baby and felt it was such a high stakes project that it would take a massive commitment. It did but it has been well worth it.” In less than two years, Miller has managed to drum up a huge amount of support and buzz both locally and internationally for the multi-million dollar d3, set to house 10,000 people by the end of the year. Last October, Tecom announced d3 would be one of the subsidiaries to benefit from a $1.23 billion investment. With more than 200 licences already granted for companies to set up in the design quarter, which supports both free zone and onshore licences, Miller says a number of top international labels are looking to open headquarters, with the likes of Hugo Boss and La Perla already on board. There have been more than 3,500 expressions of interest and when the first four of 11 buildings were handed over in mid-March, they were already 87 per cent full. Miller says d3, which has had huge government backing, will be the catalyst to develop the “very important design

Lindsay Miller, managing director of d3

movement taking place within the region” - on a par, she says, with the impact of the early 20th century Bauhaus movement in Germany or the 1930s Harlem Renaissance in the US. “I really see something of that scale is going to happen,” she says. “If you see what is going on with the abaya, 10 years ago it was something people wore from a certain culture but no one else would wear it unless they had to. Now people are doing interesting things with it, regardless of culture and religion.” The abaya will reach “iconographic status internationally”, she says. She expects the equivalent in the design world, too, thanks to the space d3 will provide, with architects working seamlessly in the fashion world and vice versa, big international brands discovering small local designers and tourists accessing genuine innovation. But while an area like Shoreditch developed organically over decades, can Miller really create something similar – or better – in just 18 months? Enthusiasm and government support exists in spades, she says. Although Miller will not disclose rental costs, she says they span the spectrum and Tecom is guaranteeing market competitiveness. And while she says she has learned a lot from previous Tecom ventures, her time in aviation has proved invaluable. “Being a flight instructor is about breaking down an activity to its most critical components and making sure people are always following procedures,” she says. “This can seem so messy when you are going fast. A lot of times we take a step back and [review].” So does d3 have the impetus to really take off? “It is a lot of pressure but the support is there from the community, the government and the private sector. I really cannot ask for more. It seems like a recipe for something really interesting.”

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SOCIAL BUSINESS

WRITE MOVE Bankrupt and riddled with crime and poverty, Detroit has been deserted by a quarter of its population in a decade. An innovative regeneration scheme aims to attract new residents by giving away free homes to writers BY TAHIRA YAQOOB

least two years, living rent free and paying nominal taxes and insurance. If they last the course, they get to keep the house at the end. The catch? The houses being renovated and given away by the non-profit organisation are in Detroit, America’s most blighted city, filled with tens of thousands of ruinous, empty buildings and a symbol of post-industrial decay. Riven by gang crime, violence and riots – epitomised by the edgy rap lyrics of the city’s most notorious son, Eminem - Detroit was declared bankrupt two years ago in the largest municipal bankruptcy in US history with debts amounting to $18.5 billion.

Image courtesy of Getty Images

ike most new property owners, Casey Rocheteau is furnishing her nest with the accoutrements that will make her house feel like a home. “I got the last piece of furniture I needed to feel like my house was completely furnished – a dining room table,” says the 29-year-old poet. “There is something intensely comforting to me about having a table specifically for breaking bread with other people. It’s a kind of nostalgia for me.” If Rocheteau is clinging to the notion of home, it is little wonder. She is part of a social experiment called Write a House, in which writers-in-residence agree to take up post for at

The Detroit Blight Task Force is to tear down 40,000 abandoned buildings in the city

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SOCIAL BUSINESS

Casey Rocheteau moved into the Peach House (pictured here) after winning it the first Write a House competition and relocating from New York to Detroit

The preceding decade saw the culmination of the so-called “white flight”, when – thanks to racial segregation and the decline of the auto industry which once made it a flourishing, affluent hub – the population plummeted from nearly two million in the 1950s to less than 700,000 today. Between 2000 and 2010 alone, a quarter of the population left and today, 85 per cent of residents are black and have an average income hovering near the poverty line. Property journalist Sarah Cox, 32, the editorial director of the website Curbed.com, was drawn to Detroit from New York four years ago to report on its extraordinary slump. While attempts are being made to revive and restore derelict buildings in a $1 billion scheme, particularly in the city’s Downtown area, only last year the Detroit Blight Removal Task Force, appointed by American President Barack Obama, found more than 78,500 abandoned, dilapidated buildings and advised the city to tear down 40,000 of them. That demolition is happening at a rate of 200 houses per week. Together with her friend, fiction writer Toby Barlow, 50, Cox founded Write a House in 2012 with the idea of regenerating a community in need and filling a vacuum with writers who could be as much a part of society as reflecting and documenting it in their work. Now the full-time director of the programme, she says:

“We sat down three years ago and were talking about writers’ residencies. We were thinking about doing other ones that already exist. They are generally in these beautiful houses and bucolic settings and then we thought about Detroit, where the real estate market is not like that. “It seemed to us, given the vacancy and given that there were these houses that needed saving, it might be interesting to try to recruit writers to live here. Because the houses are cheap instead of saying, ‘Come hang out here for a few months and write your novel’, it made sense to give them away and try to recruit more residents to the city.” The pair bought three homes in foreclosure auctions, held by mortgage lenders to try to recoup loan costs after homeowners in crisis default on payments. Two were bought for $1,000 each and a third at $5,000 but renovation work on the first, dubbed the Peach House, amounted to another $70,000. Work has just begun on the second. Barlow put in some of his own money and US organisations like the Knight Arts Challenge and the Hudson-Webber Foundation donated up to $50,000 each toward the restoration project. Write a House hired local firms Patrick Thompson Design and builders Zac Cruse, who in turn used apprentices from Detroiters Working for Environmental Justice, a scheme to

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reverse the city’s decline by creating jobs for young graduates. “In some ways,” says Cox, “the biggest problems are the biggest opportunities to try something. “This is about putting something back into a community that needs it. We are buying houses in places where other people are not buying these houses. “They are vacant and while the circumstances that led them to be empty are unfortunate, it is not something we are causing. “We are just trying to turn around things that no one else wants. These houses are in very bad shape and it is basically like building a new house.” The first house was offered up for grabs in a competition last year. Entrants, who could be poets, fiction or non-fiction writers, were asked to submit a writing sample and explain in 300 words why they would be suitable recipients. Prerequisites of entering were being a US citizen on a low income and proving how they could contribute to the literary community of Detroit, whether through a blog, magazine or teaching children writing skills. Rocheteau, who is mixed race and was brought up in Cape Cod in Massachusetts by her mother, who has French roots, and her Cape Verdean stepfather, was at first appalled. “A writer friend of mine had posted it on Facebook and I thought, ‘That’s a terrible idea’,” she says. “I think there is a way in which people in their twenties, who are creatives or young professionals, look at Detroit and think they could buy a house cheap. It feels uncomfortable – it is just gross and feels predatory. Initially when I saw it I thought: ‘Is this just a glorified project toward gentrification?’’ But she was persuaded to apply by a black poet friend. The 350

applicants were whittled down to 10 finalists and Rocheteau, who had just completed a masters in history and was struggling under the weight of $100,000 in student debts, was awarded the first house last November. When she is not writing in her bubblegum pink kitchen, the poet teaches creative writing twice a week at two schools in the city, Western International High and Detroit International Academy for Young Women. They are deprived, she says, simply because of where they are, “I think that is true of the whole school system in Detroit. “They have been under emergency management for so long that it is sometimes hard to tell what is going on and so many schools have closed that at Western, I have 40 people in the classroom because it is basically two schools [squeezed] together. “The education system overall in Detroit is in need of some kind of help. Schools do not have the kind of support they need.” In one class, she asked students to write about the controversial deaths of two black Americans, Eric Garner and Michael Brown, at the hands of police. “The conversations I had were very fruitful in terms of getting them to think about the idea of the hashtag blacklivesmatter,” she says. “It is about them expressing their emotions and knowing they are going to be heard by a room full of their peers. “Part of that cannot be separated from what is happening in Detroit but it is also personal for them.” Write a House has just opened applications for its second house, which will be awarded in September. See http://writeahouse.com/apply/ for details

The second house (above) is a work in progress. Rocheteau’s new retreat (right) is the first time she has owned a home

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House images courtesy of Michelle and Chris Gerard

SOCIAL BUSINESS


‘Witness from Baghdad’ by Halim Al-Karim, 2010 Sovereign Asian Art Prize finalist

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ENTREPRENEUR

COMEBACK QUEEN British millionaire Jo Malone is back with her new brand Jo Loves after years in the wilderness BY EMMA INGLIS

o Malone had barely set foot in Shanghai as an ambassador for the Great Festival of Creativity when things got off to a rocky start. Her newly created fragrances, which were being showcased as part of the event celebrating British innovation, had arrived but none of the equipment on which it was supposed to be displayed had been allowed through customs. In desperation, she went on a mission and chanced upon an Ikea, where she splashed out $300 on a makeshift pop-up stand. Few in the audience at the event last month, where she appeared alongside the likes of designer Kelly Hoppen and chef Angela Hartnett, would have guessed the extraordinary lengths she had gone to for an event pulled off with aplomb. But such a comeback is typical of the 51-year-old entrepreneur, who is back in the business she knows best after selling her eponymous fragrance brand. Malone has spent years in the wilderness after a contractual clause prevented her from re-entering the market following the sale of her perfume line. But her enforced exile is now over with her latest venture, Jo Loves, where she is back creating bath products and candles with her trademark unusual combinations of scents. Inside her store in London’s Belgravia, the air is filled with the sweet citrus smell of pomelo as customers clamour for a space at the luxury fragrance store’s brasserie bar, where you can sniff a cocktail shaker full of frothy shower gel. The perfume mogul herself sits behind the shop floor in an all-white room. The bespoke candles she has just launched took “three years of gruelling creativity and hard work” and involve a scented interior and base, with the customer choosing which two fragrances to combine. How does she know which ones will work together? “That is what has taken me three years,” she laughs. “We tested about 700 fragrances to work out which ones will work. We have done all that hard work for you.” She is no stranger to hard graft. As a child, Malone lived a

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ENTREPRENEUR

Malone has spent years in the wilderness after a contractual clause prevented her from re-entering the perfume market

Jo Malone’s store Jo Loves on Elizabeth street in Belgravia, London

“hand-to-mouth existence”, spending Saturdays selling her father’s paintings in markets. She discovered a knack for being able to sell and to “tell a powerful story and emotionally connect with the buyer”. “I was probably better at it than he was,” she says. She left school at 14 to care for her mother, who had worked for the American cosmetics firm Revlon, after she suffered a stroke. Two years later, she left home and started her own business making bath oils from the kitchen of her onebedroomed flat. From there, she slowly grew the Jo Malone brand, opening her first store in 1994 and turning her name into a global luxury business selling perfumes, candles, body creams, oils and bathing products. In 1999, she sold the business to Estee Lauder Companies in a deal reportedly worth millions but stayed on as creative director until she left in 2006. For five years after she left Estee Lauder, she was contractually prevented from re-entering the market. Compelled to create and unable to do so, it was a “very unhappy time”, she says. But for now, the mother-of-one is back doing what she loves, building her new brand. “It was never about one little shop on the street,” she says. “We are much bigger behind the scenes than what you see front-of-house. Jo Loves was always about building another global brand. “I had a big responsibility to make sure the consumer was not confused - that they did not think the two companies were connected. We had to be very structured, ordered and concise in what we do.” Her rise to become a millionaire has not been without its stumbling blocks. Malone is severely dyslexic and “really

struggled until I was about 15. Even now I still confuse left and right and have difficulty telling the time”. In 2003, when she should have been enjoying her success and time with her young son, she was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer and had a double mastectomy. More recently, her husband and business partner Gary, to whom she has been married for more than 30 years, fell seriously ill shortly before she opened the Jo Loves store in October 2013. Yet Malone is philosophical and has learned to live in the moment. She says she is an artist before she is an entrepreneur: “I have to make fragrances. I would do this for nothing. “This is my joy and makes me feel I have something to give to life.” Malone has a neurological condition called synaesthesia, which affects sensory perception. It meant she could smell colour and sound as a scent from a young age. “When I create a new scent, I have all these notes in my head, all these memories connected with fragrance and I will start to hum a fragrant tune in my mind. Then, piece by piece, I link it all together,” she says. A recent appearance on Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs helped drive sales for Jo Loves. “The letters we had were just staggering, from parents whose children are dyslexic to people starting businesses and those who have lost businesses - and interestingly, lots of men who were really inspired by it.” A book chronicling her life in retail is on its way. It clearly delights her. “Not bad for a dyslexic,” she laughs.

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THE SUIT MAKES THE MAN Alfred Dunhill’s creative director John Ray talks about reinventing the 122-year-old luxury goods brand

Photo by Andrew Vowles

BY LUKE LEITCH

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BUSINESS

thruster ejected horses from his business model to focus instead on accessories for riders of a new form of transport: the car. “What I like so much about Alfred,” says Ray, “is that he responded to trends and changes in the way that people wanted to live their lives. He went from saddlery into cars when there were still very few on the road because he could see there was a future in it. And after the Motorities thing [Alfred produced a line of accessories called Dunhill Motorities], he got into the tobacco thing. And tobacco became the height of sophistication. He was a spirited man. I like that he wasn’t stuck.” Ray, who is in his late fifties, says this over a second cup of strong black coffee taken in the top-floor apartment of Bourdon House, once the Duke of Westminster’s Mayfair residence, now one of two flagship ‘Homes’ (a mix of members’ club, store, restaurant and hotel). Maybe it is the caffeine — or perhaps my lack of politeness — that fires the force of his reaction to the next question: had Ray been 21 when he was handed the reins at Dunhill as Alfred was, would he have done anything differently? “I can’t answer that! If you could put me back to 21…” Had he got this gig when he was 21, well, it would likely have been a disaster. At that age Ray was working, unfulfilled,

Luke Leitch London Evening Standard / The Interview People

hen you think about it, it is odd there is only one bona fide, blue chip luxury label that counts as a proper London brand. (And no, it’s not Burberry; that began life in Basingstoke and its soul resides in Yorkshire.) Rolex started in Clerkenwell but upped sticks to Switzerland 96 years ago. Mulberry is from Somerset, Paul Smith hails from Nottingham, Asprey comes from Surrey and Boodles is forever Liverpool. Sure, Stella McCartney is from London, as are Jimmy Choo, Alexander McQueen and Victoria Beckham, but these businesses are fashion labels: they need at least a few more decades under their tightly cinched belts to start edging anywhere close to haute Hermes territory. No, the only true luxury brand — one globally synonymous with swank and with a network of several hundred stores around the world — that you could properly call Made in London is Dunhill, the capital’s daddy of luxury. The history of Dunhill is riveting, a tale of gutsy innovation, wartime derring-do and international adventure. So it seems correct to introduce John Ray, the current keeper of the Dunhill flame, by going back to the founder Alfred Dunhill, who was 21 years old when he inherited his father’s King’s Cross saddlery in 1893. In a short time, the young

Bourdon House, Dunhill’s flagship store in London

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BUSINESS

in graphic design and advertising. Two years later he followed his gut, applied to Central Saint Martins art school and fondly recalls blowing his generous Scottish grant — he hails from Dundee via Edinburgh — on clothes. “I would go and spend every single penny in Browns on Comme des Garcons. I didn’t care. I remember spending £870 on a jacket — in the 1980s, remember — it had one big lapel and one small one. I was convinced this was the life investment, the jacket that would last me forever.’ After graduation he went to the Royal College of Art, then in 1992 started working for the designer Katharine Hamnett, first as an assistant and then as head of menswear. “I never really liked designing womenswear because I could never have thought I could understand what it felt like as a woman to put on a dress. But I was always really clear what it felt like as a man what to wear. That was what interested me. I did not want to be a fantasist.” After four years with Hamnett, Ray joined Gucci, where Tom Ford was creating a bold new template for fashion. He stayed for a decade but two years after Ford’s departure in 2004, Ray was shown the door when total control of the brand was handed to Frida Giannini, who departed earlier this year. Ray spent six years in stasis after that, rebuilding his home in Dundee and generally enjoying life. He is resolutely single but spends lots of time with his mother, brother, nieces and nephews in Scotland, entertaining at home and cooking lavish meals for them from a battered Conran cookbook. He received job offers — including the Dunhill role after the creative director Kim Jones went to Louis Vuitton in 2010 — but did not fancy it: “At the time, it did not sound right and I wasn’t interested.” Then in 2013, Dunhill came back and he bit: first as an under-the-radar consultant, then as creative director proper. So what changes has Ray imposed on the fabric of Dunhill? So far his collections have emphasised tailoring and starred jackets cut longer than previously — he detests the short-skirt “bum-freezer” cut. His silhouette stays modern thanks to tapered trousers that don’t flap or billow at the calf. That long and lean combination is at present unusual in fashion — and that is because, really, this is not fashion at all. It is cultured, ever so slightly bohemian English tailoring that should appeal to alpha males in any field, from hedge fund managers to forwardthinking, finery-loving techies (such as Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom, who is trying to get his colleagues to dump the

hoodies and pool sliders and get into ‘tie Tuesdays’). Now settled in at Dunhill, Ray and his chief executive Fabrizio Cardinali have a delicate path to tread. The problem lies not with the Ray-designed clothes or the Walthamstowmade leather goods — the Dunhill watches, cufflinks, White Spot pipes, Rollagas lighters and Namiki pens are as beautiful as ever. The conundrum is this: how to transmit to the wider world Ray’s version of Dunhill — an archetype of London-born masculinity — rooted in tradition and discretion, unsullied by dandyism, when that very manifesto makes crassly shouting about it a no-no? “That is a really good question. And it is exactly where we are at the moment. We need to let the world know what we do and it needs to be done in a clearly understandable way. You have to condense being British into a small number of things or a look. It is very easy to go off on a fashion look that is too strong and you end up looking a bit European. We want to bring it right back and make Dunhill really clear. But that is difficult when you are dealing with subtlety and have clothes that don’t mess with fashion. Because without getting into Union Jacks and red telephone boxes and pinstripe suits with bowlers, it is really hard to articulate what is British.” Ignoring the implicit self-deprecation in that answer — which is itself pretty British — Ray has probably already found his solution. The company has worked to tighten its offering, reducing the blazer and polo shirt output that performed well in Asian markets but which undermined the perception of the brand. Now he is quietly broadening Dunhill’s reach, this month launching Icon, a leather-scented fragrance created by Carlos Benaim (the nose behind the original Polo Ralph Lauren), in a metallic engine-turned cylinder that harks to the brand’s motoring past. He is also steadily developing his menswear collections in a direction intended to encourage a new generation to discover Dunhill and stick around. “You know,” says Ray, “I spent a lot of time watching people on the streets. Because when you live in the fashion bubble you get a very wrong sense of what people, real people, want to wear. And what they want is quite defined. The thing about menswear is that it lasts. Apart from that Comme des Garcons jacket, I have a pretty classic wardrobe. Boring? Maybe, but I like it. It is a uniform. When I buy a coat I spend a lot of time in it. It becomes a friend. If you feel right in what you put on, then you can go out and face the world feeling right.”

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ENTREPRENEUR

A SOUPCON OF SAVOIR FAIRE GC meets the Michelin-starred chef and restaurateur Jean-Georges Vongerichten ahead of his new restaurant opening in Dubai

hen Jean-Georges Vongerichten has some spare time, he likes to go and smell his restaurants. The Michelin-starred chef drives to one of his 12 outlets in New York and gives the place a “sniff”, as he calls it, and can spot a problem within half an hour. French-born Vongerichten — who has more than 30 restaurants around the globe, including Spice Market in the W Doha and a soon-to-open venue in the Four Seasons hotel in Dubai — has developed this sixth sense after 42 years in the business but still obsesses over the little details. Hygiene and cleanliness are the most important things to him and he jokes he can spot dust on a shelf on the other side of the room. It drives him “crazy” when his staff do not to answer the phone for reservations, as they are a diner’s first impression of the restaurant. As Vongerichten sees it, he is not in the restaurant business ­— he is an entertainer. He says, “I love the cooking part. I’m still excited to get up in the morning and attack, [to] think about food. But for me it is about pleasing people. Restaurant people come in, there is a stage and we have to perform. “It is fun to see people leave with a big smile and if they are not smiling I send a waiter to find out why. “Nobody should ever leave angry, hungry or disappointed.” We meet at his flagship restaurant on the corner of Central Park in New York where he is every bit the entertainer — affable, relaxed and talkative. He is still as hungry for success as when he started out back in 1973, although now he has a global empire, including some

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venues with three Michelin stars. His innovative mix of French and Asian cuisine catapulted him into the celebrity chef league as an international brand. His latest venture is a new restaurant in the Four Seasons Resort Dubai in Jumeirah Beach in partnership with local investor Khaled al Mheiri, who became a friend after dining with him in New York for years. Vongerichten, who already has restaurants in Las Vegas and China, felt Dubai was a good market to open in as people eat out seven days a week. He says with his eponymous restaurant Jean-Georges Dubai, he was given carte blanche to design the space, which will be a montage of the “best of the best” from his New York restaurants. There will be about 80 covers in total over two rooms and the menu will encapsulate everything from fine cuisine to burgers. He says, “I think in this part of the world you need a variety of things. “They like larger menus, which is all the more challenging for the kitchen. Often there are big tables. You need to have lighter food because the climate is very hot so [less] cream and butter and very rich food. “We will have mocktails and a juice bar with fresh juices and smoothies.” The launch will be at the end of the month just before Ramadan starts in June. Vongerichten shies away from the word franchise to describe the project, even though he will not be there himself to run the restaurant full-time.

Photo by Francesco Tonelli

BY DANIEL BATES


ENTREPRENEUR

Instead, he is picking a team to remain in Dubai for the first two months followed by a second wave, who will remain there for another three months. After that, there will be monthly visits to ensure quality, plus Skype calls to monitor progress. Vongerichten is all too aware of how things can go sour when your empire is as large as his but he says he will never let a restaurant lose money. “There has to be a bottom line. It is a very fragile business,” he says. Seven years ago he was sued by eight waiters working in his New York restaurants amid claims they were denied tips and not paid properly. The restaurants denied any wrongdoing and said they had complied with labour laws but Vongerichten settled for $1.75 million. Today he says part of the key to his success is “taking care of my people.” Vongerichten believes the key to success is being a good communicator and says he is “very good at finding people.” His chef at The Marc in New York has been with him since 1985 while his chef at Mercer has been there for a decade. “I have distributed the wealth among the people with me for a long time,” he says. “I am very loyal and direct so people like that. “I need that to operate. I need my people, I need my team. I think without a team in the restaurant business, it is all about people, so you are not much without them.” His business interests include cookbooks. He shows off a recipe book for meat dishes where everything is measured out to the gramme and explained in detail and looks as foolproof as it gets. We move to the kitchen where he inspects a delicate rice and congee broth that will go on the menu of his new vegetarian restaurant. Three chefs hover expectantly, the youngest looking especially nervous, as he tastes it. Another chef with a mohawk haircut gives a second opinion, “Needs more salt.” I am still savouring my mouthful as we go back to our table where Vongerichten tells me how he got into the restaurant business “late” at the age of 16. He grew up in a suburb of Strasbourg in Alsace, France, where his parents ran a coal business. Every day his mother would cook a simple lunch in a big pot for 40 people to feed a mixture of workers and family. Vongerichten recalls his bedroom acting as a “steamer basket” as it was directly above the kitchen.

Michelin star chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten (pictured in his New York restaurant) will open his namesake restaurant at the Four Seasons resort in Dubai

He would know what was on the menu before he got out of bed. His father wanted him to take over the business and sent him to engineering school but he was not interested and got kicked out after six months. At 16, his mother and father took him to a three-star Michelin restaurant as a treat, where he had an epiphany and thought to himself, “This is it”. Vongerichten says, “I had never been to a restaurant. When I saw the ballet of the waiters, I could not believe it. I did not realise you could make a career out of it.”

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A man on the back of a water delivery truck

GAZA’S TICKING WATER BOMB Time is running out for Gaza as its residents face a severe threat to their water supply

arrived in Gaza two weeks after the ceasefire of Operation Protective Edge, the seven-week Israeli bombardment which claimed the lives of about 2,200 Gazans and 73 Israelis, the latter mostly soldiers. Anyone who has been to Gaza through the Erez crossing will know the feeling of walking through these long, eerie concrete tunnels complete with security gates and cameras, all devoid of people. As I reached the Hamas checkpoint, a security guard offered me a cup of tea and a chair while waiting for my permit and said: “Thank you for coming to Gaza.” At sunrise I went to one of the worst-hit neighbourhoods, Shajaya, close to the border with Israel. It was obvious where

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Israel was situated as you could see lights around the landscape in stark contrast to Gaza, which suffers crippling electricity shortages. During my visit, it only had four hours per day. Every day at sunrise, I returned to this neighbourhood, shared many cups of coffee with the inhabitants on top of what remained of their homes. They fetched water from a humanitarian-supplied water tank, broke up some twigs and put the kettle on top. It took surprisingly little time to get used to the apocalyptic landscapes, the horrendous stories of bombing, bloodshed and murder and paradoxically, the extreme calm that now befell these neighbourhoods. It was easy to forget where you were

Photography by Celia Peterson

BY CELIA PETERSON


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A man fills up a jug with water supplied by the UN and Oxfam in the border town of Beit Hanoun.

and what had happened. The resilient Palestinians in Gaza were trying to get on with their lives once again. The Gaza Strip, a small stretch of 365sq km with a population of 1.8 million, is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Palestinians in Gaza depend on their only source of water - the underground coastal aquifer. The yield capacity of the aquifer does not exceed 55 million cubic metres per year while the demand in Gaza is nearly quadruple that at more than 190 million cubic metres per year. This stress and overabstraction from the aquifer directly leads to the deterioration of the water quality. As a result, by next year the aquifer could be rendered unusable and by 2020, the damage will be irreversible. Israeli blockades restrict the flow of vital equipment and materials needed to upscale the water sector, which causes many vital infrastructure projects to be indefinitely halted. As a result, 95 per cent of the water abstracted from the coastal aquifer is contaminated with dangerous levels of nitrate and chloride and is unfit for human consumption. This is a huge threat to public health. The high salinity and nitrate levels lead to major suffering and diseases, such as blue baby syndrome, which stops blood cells carrying oxygen to the heart and can lead to death and problems in the kidneys and digestive system. The municipal water that comes from the tap is neither

suitable for human consumption nor domestic purposes and does not correspond with standards set by the World Health Organisation (WHO). As a result, most families in Gaza are left with no option but to buy drinking water from private companies at a high cost, with some paying as much as a third of their income on water. Then there is the lack of treatment of wastewater, due to a need for investment and a lack of energy supplies. The wastewater sub-sector situation is even more challenging than securing an adequate water supply. The Palestinian Water Authority (PWA) is working to develop three wastewater treatment plants in the north, middle and south of Gaza. It is about to finish the northern plant and is in the early stages of production for the central and south. However, the lack of available resources means untreated effluence is pumped into the sea on a daily basis with hugely negative impacts on the environment and public health. Gaza’s sandy beaches used to be full of human life but these days they are mainly empty. The sea smells bad and few fish are available in the three-nauticalmile area Palestinians are allowed to fish, greatly affecting the fishing industry and their livelihood. The Gaza Strip already faced a protracted water crisis before July last year. The recent war caused the unprecedented

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A young girl awaits the arrival of water so she can fill up bottles for her family, Beit Hanoun. Storm water collection point in Khan Younis, it provides the residents of Al Amal neighbourhood with (50) fifty cubic meters per day of fresh water for drinking purposes only.

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PHOTO ESSAY

destruction of water, sanitation and electricity infrastructure in Gaza, disabling any provision of these basic services to the population of the Gaza Strip. Areas such as Shajaya and Beit Hanoun suffered massive damage to their water systems and are currently being dealt with on a humanitarian level. This cannot be taken forward unless other interventions happen, such as removing the rubble and opening the streets to enable the PWA to at least build a temporary water supply structure. The wastewater system is also not functioning in these areas. Water stations and sewage plants depend on energy for operation. Right after the conflict, Gaza relied on four hours of electricity per day. PWA tries to compensate with standby generators but they are totally dependent on the availability of fuel. These generators cannot cope with operating 24 hours a day, even if fuel is available. The water distribution system in Gaza is far from full and the water pressure is low. Electricity is essential for the functioning of water pumps that extract and distribute water to households and businesses as well as for the operation of wastewater treatment plants. Fuel is running out on a regular basis and only with strong pressure and emergency negotiations with donors and the Israeli authorities can a basic supply of emergency fuel for water and sanitation be secured. Rebhi Al-Sheikh, deputy chairman of the Palestinian Water Authority, says: “Unless the energy issue is resolved, we do not believe the water supply and wastewater services in Gaza can be improved, even if we had the investment.” The PWA has designed a programme of intervention for additional water supplies to Gaza. It is vital to limit the abstraction from the aquifer and replace it with alternative water supplies. The water sector intervention strategy for Gaza involves building three desalination plants to counteract the issues with the aquifer. These small plants will produce 13 million cubic metres of drinking water a year. The first stage of one of the plants is complete, the second plant is under implementation and the third is in the design phase. The second step is building a central seawater desalination plant with the national water carrier and power supplier. The

cost of the water development programme is $450 million. Half the funds needed have been secured but clarifications are needed to secure commitment from the international community before work can proceed. The first is how to overcome Gaza’s sharp deficit in energy supplies as desalination projects need lots of power. The second factor is the security and political situation and Israel’s position: will such a project be targeted for attack and destruction? PWA has assigned a consultant working to develop the tender documents and the preliminary designs and contracted by the European Investment Bank (EIB). Among the options are whether to build an energy plant, increase the energy supply from the Israeli or Egyptian sides or use renewable energy such as wind or solar power. The PWA is now discussing the first chapter of the report suggesting an increase in energy from the Israeli side, which would require a commercial agreement with the Israelis. The Oslo Accords in 1995 secured Palestinians’ right to additional supplies of water every year. Two decades later, less than half that amount has been delivered while the five per cent specifically allocated to Gaza has never been received. There are rich underground water sources beneath the West Bank and the majority of Palestinian land, but 90 per cent of this water is seized and controlled by the Israelis. The PWA estimates its water share of the Jordan river should be 250 million cubic metres per year - yet does not receive a single drop. “Gaza should benefit from the water resources in the West Bank and the Jordan river,” says Al-Sheikh. The humanitarian community is rebuilding for a third time what has been destroyed in Gaza. For reconstruction to be meaningful, EWASH, a group of Palestinian and international NGOs and UN agencies that work in the water, sanitation and hygiene sector, have called upon the international community to insist Israel guarantees free entry of materials, access to energy, electricity and water and a viable economy to guarantee the sustainability of investment. For more on the water campaign visit https://secure.avaaz.org/en/ petition/Gaza_to_run_out_of_drinking_water_by_2016/

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BUSINESS

WHEN EAST MEETS WESTER Ahead of the launch of its new SUV Levante, the head of Maserati tells why the Middle Eastern market demands exclusivity

Some of the customers will tell you ‘One of 100? That is not exclusive enough. One-of-a-kind, that’s what I really want.’” If a single phrase could epitomise the UAE’s luxury goods purchasing ethos, it would surely be that. The man imparting the insider knowledge is Harald Wester, the Maserati boss and head of Alfa Romeo. After a 24-year career encompassing positions at a range of marques, including development positions at Audi and Ferrari, the straight-talking German mechanical engineer is in prime position to disclose high-end customers’ desires. Wester recently visited Dubai to promote Maserati’s new exclusive Quattroporte developed in collaboration with Ermenegildo Zegna, the fashion company charged with enhancing the interior finish. Having premiered at the Frankfurt

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Motor Show in 2013, the bespoke cars have finally rolled off the line. Only 100 models will be available worldwide, hence its unofficial title ‘one of 100’ and the sentiments behind Wester’s opening gambit. Despite his testament on the desire for exclusivity in the region (which represents one per cent of the global total), there has been a healthy appetite for the machine. All 12 allocated to the GCC have already been sold, says Wester. “We dedicated slightly more than the share of distribution we would have required and there are more requests. “We are trying to see if there are other regions where we can steal some and bring them over here.” It is this demand that has encouraged Wester after the financial collapse of the world’s markets in late 2008 negatively impacted the automotive industry across all markets. He maintains mass


BUSINESS

producers came off worse, however. “The big industrial machine means if something happens and you hesitate to react, you are left with lots of products which are not sellable anymore. “The best thing you can do is strengthen your brand and to have a good global presence and distribution. If one market goes down, you have others. Keep your breaking point as low as possible and decrease your reaction time whatever may happen.” At the moment, business is good. Even though the GCC may not be one of the top markets in terms of sales volumes, unlike the US and China, per capita it is a goldmine for the top brands. “There is a huge amount of money,” says Wester. “But if you look to the growth rates in real estate for example, we are behind. I’m happy with it, though. The growth we have had has been good for us. We are a luxury brand and we don’t want to over-extend.” Despite those claims, the Italian badge has set a worldwide sales target of 75,000 by 2018. Given last year’s units moved brought the total sold to 36,500, that will be a hefty climb in three years. Yet Wester is banking on Maserati’s upcoming foray into the lucrative crossover sport utility vehicle segment with the Levante to bolster performance. “SUVs globally account for more than 50 per cent of the luxury car market,” he says. “[They account

for more than] 500,000 out of a million sold that cost $75,000 and above. It is the most popular product in the region and will be a significant contributor to our future growth. “We will launch in spring next year. It will be on sale here at the end of the first semester.” Where it is going to be first rolled out, in territories including the US and Europe, the Levante is being heavily marketed as an electric-petrol hybrid. As yet, the GCC has shown no substantial desire to buy into such an vehicle. “The global regulations are pushing more and more in this direction. In a region where you produce oil and it is 25 to 30 cents a litre, it is not the most urgent thing you need to have,” Wester says. “It will not be hybrid here from the beginning but I expect a plug-in hybrid version to become available in the second half of 2017.” Whether the luxury product-buying public takes up the environmentally conscious offer come 2017 remains to be seen. Yet given the rate in which this limited edition Zegna Quattroporte has flown off the order books and the fact a maker such as Lexus recorded a 50 per cent jump in sales in a recession-hit 2011 when it introduced its LX range of SUVs, the outlook looks bright for Maserati.

The limited edition Quattroporte developed in collaboration with Ermenegildo Zegna

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ENTREPRENEUR

STANDING OUT FROM THE PACK Lebanese entrepreneur Ralph Debbas is not yet 30 but is already making a name for himself in the luxury car manufacturing business BY NATASHA TOURISH

t is an achievement for most 29-year-olds to own a supercar - let alone build one. But creating the world’s most expensive car is just the beginning for Lebanese entrepreneur Ralph Debbas. Debbas is the founder and chief executive of Dubai-based W Motors, a luxury automotive firm that has designed the world’s most expensive car, the $3.4 million Lykan HyperSport. Born into a family of industrialists in Beirut, Debbas was determined from an early age to strike out on his own. His father had been a chocolatier for 35 years, supplying Le Chocolat products to Emirates airline, Costa Coffee and the Burj al Arab hotel among others. But his son’s desire to “create the world’s first Arab hypercar” and bring the production of the luxury automotive industry to the Middle East for the first time had been a childhood dream. “Since I was a kid, I have wanted to design my own car,” says Debbas from his spanking new all-white top floor office in Jumeirah Lake Towers. “I love design and engineering and was born into a family of entrepreneurship.” It took Debbas and his partners seven years to create their first hypercar and given the colossal price tag, no expense was spared on the Lykan HyperSport, which features in the latest Fast and Furious franchise movie, Furious 7. After studying design at the American University of Beirut, Debbas moved to England in 2005 to study a masters in automotive design at Coventry University, where he met Anthony Jannarelly, his current design director at W Motors. After graduating, the young entrepreneur headed to the heart of European car production in Italy, where he decided to get

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hands-on experience as a car designer. But it was short-lived after a stint at the coachbuilding firm Superleggera in Milan. “I saw the atmosphere of how to build cars in Milan but immediately knew I did not want to work for anyone because working for a company meant doing what other people wanted,” he says. “I knew my own creation would take years so I moved back home immediately.” To get his hypercar project off the ground, Debbas rallied a few of his former university contacts and asked them to come to Lebanon to work with him. He managed to fund the initial design stages of the Lykan (a reference to the mythical qualities of werewolves) with proceeds from another design consultancy company he set up called the Wolf Design Innovation group (WDI). WDI managed yacht, furniture and architectural design projects in Lebanon, which kept the project afloat “until things started getting serious”. He formed W Motors in 2012 and enlisted the help of his parents, banks and an investor to grow the funds needed to take the car into production in Torino, Italy, where it was built by Magna Steyr engineers. Backed by the Lebanese private bank FFA, Debbas moved the company to its Dubai headquarters at the end of 2012 and unveiled his creation at the Qatar motor show the following year and then at the Yas Marina track in Abu Dhabi, where a select audience got to experience 0-60kph in less than three seconds and an ultimate top speed of 395kph. “I wanted to bring a new industry to the region and to create something really amazing,” says Debbas.


ENTREPRENEUR

The fledging car designer managed to pull off the kind of publicity money can’t buy when the Lykan HyperSport landed a starring role in one of this year’s biggest blockbuster movies, Furious 7, which was partly filmed in Abu Dhabi, although the scenes where the Lykan stunt car was used were actually filmed in Atlanta in the US. Debbas hopes the release of the movie, which premiered in the UAE last month and broke box office records by taking $384 million worldwide in its opening weekend, will help him sell the remaining three out of the seven Lykans that the company produced. The number seven has proven to be more than a little lucky. “The number seven in Arabic is a V shape and we have this V all over the car as a design feature. Then there are seven days of the week, the lucky number seven and the seven emirates of course,” he says, adding those factors were compounded by the Furious 7 association and the fact it took seven years to build. Another aspect was cost saving: “The side of it most people do not know is if you produce less than 10 cars, it is much easier to do testing and safety requirements because it is considered a limited edition.” Debbas has already set the wheels in motion to build his own production and assembly facility in the UAE. “We are looking at building a new facility that will provide A to Z services either in Motorcity or Al Quoz. The plan is to create

a whole new industry with new job opportunities for people from the region.” This will perhaps appease the naysayers, who have pointed to the fact apart from funding, there is little connection to the Middle East as W Motors contracted an Italian factory to manufacture the Lykan while the chassis and engine are made by RUF in Germany. Debbas responds by pointing to other big car manufacturers and says they are no different: “Look at the Mercedes-Benz G Class. It is built in Austria but it is a German brand. How can I produce a car of the same standard as everyone else if I am trying to be the best when there is no one here to help us? It made perfect sense to go outside to get expertise from international companies. “Now it is time to bring it home and hopefully by the end of this year, we are going to have the first assembly workshop in Dubai so all the cars will be built here.” Until then, Debbas is concentrating on the release of his next supersport model, which has a slightly lower price tag of $1.6 million, at the Dubai International Motor Show in November. He is also hoping the release of Furious 7 will help him shift the remaining three Lykan HyperSports he has in his garage at W Motors. To date, two have been sold in China, one in the US and one to a buyer in Dubai.

The $3.4 million Lykan had a starring role in this year’s blockbuster movie, Furious 7

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GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

THE MOST POWERFUL PASSPORTS IN THE WORLD Arton Capital has devised an interactive tool to rank global passports

n a world that has ever-changing political and economic circumstances and uncertainty, flexibility and adaptability can be taken for granted by some. To move freely within the European Union or to travel visa-free to hundreds of locations might seem like a given for many but to others this is something they might think they can only dream of. To be allowed to enter a country visa-free is not determined on beliefs or morals but on what piece of paper you hold in your hand. Your passport. Your passport is one of the most important documents in your life but to some, it reduces the opportunities for themselves and their families at better education, careers and standard of living. So how do you know if your passport helps or hinders you and what can be done to allow yourself and your family flexibility to travel freely? Financial advisory firm Arton Capital created the Passport Index that allows you to sort passports for countries around the world by a “passport power rank”. Using an interactive tool, users can discover the world’s passports on a map by country name, power rank and even by the colour of their covers. The ranking is based on points accumulated for each country that the passport holder can travel visa-free. The country list is based on the 193 UN member countries and six territories, totalling 199 locations. “Working in an industry that is so sensitive to origin and nationality, we wanted to display the diversity, the beauty and the power of world’s passports while providing truly important information on the power of passports,” explains Armand Arton, president and chief executive of Arton Capital. The ranking puts the US and UK first, passports which give access to 147 countries without an advanced visa (travelling visa-free). In second place are France, Germany and South Korea and the least desirable passports to hold, according to the ranking, are the passports of the Solomon Islands, Myanmar

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(Burma), South Sudan, Sao Tome and Principe. In the Middle East, the UAE is currently ranked in 31st place with access to 104 countries visa-free. (The UAE is the first Arab country to be entitled to enter schengen without an advanced visa and to be extended this right from the European bloc.) Qatar follows in 52nd place while Bahrain and Saudi Arabia are both ranked at 57th in the list. The index allows users to assess their rank and if it does not favour their circumstances, explore dual citizenship in a country which grants more freedom or is more “powerful”, says Arton. “We are seeing a growing trend from less desirable passport holders researching the benefits of citizenship-by-investment programmes, meaning investing in a nation and adding value to its economy, with the overall outcome of becoming a citizen and holding a passport from the country,” he says. Citizenship-byinvestment programmes have become increasingly popular among governments as a way of attracting foreign investment into struggling economies, including the US and UK, but are also available from smaller Caribbean nations, offering key benefits to their passport holders. Dominica, for example, an island which was once a British colony, allows visa-free travel to the UK. Countries such as Hungary, Bulgaria, Cyprus and the UK also give their passport holders almost unrestricted access into Europe – a tempting benefit for those who might struggle otherwise to access the continent. Skeptics have labelled such programmes in the past little more than a trade in passports. However, Arton says that perception is wrong and ignores how global citizenship programmes can “improve lives, support national economies, generate investment, disperse wealth and increase employment opportunities”. Arton adds no individual should be judged solely on a piece of paper but rather “what they can bring to a country, how they can add value and contribute – we facilitate this freedom.”


the power of Global Citizenship. So should you.

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GLOBAL CITIZENSHIP

With an interactive tool, the passport index allows users to discover the world’s passports on a map by country name, power rank and even by the colour of their covers.

The red passports including the UK, Mongolia and Singapore

The green passports including Libya, Zimbabwe and Saudi Arabia

The blue passports including Kenya, the USA and Slovakia

The black passports including Vatican City and Malawi

TOP 5 MOST ‘POWERFUL’ PASSPORT RANKINGS: 1

US and UK

147 countries

2

France, South Korea and Germany

145 countries

3

Italy and Sweden

144 countries

4

Denmark, Singapore, Finland, Japan, Luxembourg and The Netherlands

143 countries

5

Switzerland

142 countries

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BUSINESS

KEEPING TIME Taking a 192-year-old watch brand into its next century while preserving its legacy is a tall order for chief executive Pascal Raffy BY AMANDA FISHER

ascal Raffy claims to have retired at 38. He left the family pharmaceutical business in 2001 because his oldest daughter Audrey complained he was travelling too much to spend quality time with her. But the Lebanese law and languages graduate obviously misunderstood the definition of retirement. The same year he wound up his pharmaceutical interests, he bought the longstanding but ailing Bovet watch brand and can hardly be described as hands off. If the move came as a disappointment to Audrey – and there is no indication it did – it certainly injected life back into the 192-year-old watch firm. In the years since 51-year-old Raffy took over at the helm as the chief executive and owner, the company’s carefully crafted timepieces, which can take up to six months to make and more than five years to design, have become sought-after across the world. “In 2001, I stopped everything because I wanted to take care of Audrey, who complained one day to my father saying she was the most happy girl in the world but one thing was missing to her: her father was travelling too much,” says Raffy. Since he took over, Bovet has gone back to its roots. A selfdescribed lover of all things classic, Raffy presided over the reintegration of full manufacturing including movements and dials and has pushed a renaissance in the Chinese market that first made Bovet’s name in the 19th century.

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“I wanted the house of Bovet to be the house of 3,000 timepieces only [per year],” says Raffy. “I insist on this. I don’t want mass production. Here we talk about limited quantities because it is art.” Being a luxury good means three things to Raffy: a clear identity based on patrimony, limited quantities and handcrafted workmanship. Unlike many of the mainstream high-end watch brands, Bovet does not advertise. Raffy says he would rather invest money in his products than in marketing – and it seems to be paying off. One third of the company’s watches are bespoke and go for sums up to $1.25 million. Raffy says the high prices are justified because these are not simply watches but art. For some pieces, adorned with a painting of Madonna and child, watchmakers famously spend three months painting through a microscope. Aptly for someone in the timekeeping business, Raffy says good things cannot be rushed. “I never pressure my watchmakers. I always say take the time,” he says. “When you are ready, you sign the paper [to say] your timepiece is perfect. “I prefer this because how do you ask an artisan who is expressing his passion to have a timeframe? It is illogical.”


BUSINESS

“I never pressure my watchmakers. I always say take the time”

Raffy says globalisation is “helping art and art is somewhere also helping globalisation. You need the two of them to find the right balance”. Technological advances and access brought about by global markets mean the company is incorporating “lighter, more reliable materials without touching the soul of Bovet”. “Do I wish my house [of Bovet] to last?” he adds. “Yes, of course. It is a moral duty.” He says timelessness is the key to long-lasting timepieces. “A watch indicates the time like a timepiece but [so does] my iPhone and my computer. A timepiece keeps the time through the century.” One important component is Bovet’s global sales, with an almost equal share in each of its four markets, Asia Pacific, the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Bovet’s strategy is to strengthen its presence in China and the Middle East. “We are building our presence in mainland China in the next five years,” Raffy says, acknowledging the growing competition Bovet has faced. The Middle East is also on the radar and Bovet has been in partnership with the UAE’s watch specialists Ahmed Seddiqi and Sons since 2007. Raffy expects to double revenues in the Middle East within five years. He foresees a strong future for the brand: “If we build tomorrow very strong and are proud of our past, then we preserve education for the next generations.”

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THE BEST OF BASEL 2015 GC travelled to the historic Swiss city to highlight a few standout timepieces BY RACHAEL TAYLOR

BREGUET TRADITION CHRONOGRAPHE INDEPENDANT 7077 When your eye first falls upon the Breguet Tradition Chronographe Independant 7077, it can take a while to know where to focus your attentions; there is a lot going on within its delicately fluted 18ct white gold case. If you simply want to check the time, you’ll find it within a miniature silver dial quirkily offset at 12 o’clock to make room for a clear view of the watch’s mechanisms – the real star of this timepiece. After acclimatising to the elegantly mesmerising show of the movement in action, click the screwed pusher and watch as the chronograph function sends oversized blued steel seconds round the dial, with up to 20 minutes of timing kept score on the counter to the left-hand side of the dial; the other sub dial is an indicator for the watch’s 50-hour power reserve. A click of a second pusher will snap the two hands back to their starting positions. This is in no doubt a bewitching mechanical wonder, but the 64

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true magic lies within, where you will find not one but two independent movements, one to power the time and the other to facilitate the chronograph, complete with its own gear trains, escapements and springs. Two movements would usually require two independent power sources with barrels and springs, as well as individual crowns for winding those separate barrel springs, but Breguet has developed a patent-pending flexed blade spring that takes the place of a second mainspring and provides enough power for up to 20 minutes of chronograph timing, charged by the actuation of the chronograph’s reset function. If you stop too long to think about the technology housed within this incredible watch, it can be overwhelming. Instead just click the pusher, watch the whirr of the movements and relax back into the beauty of groundbreaking horological excellence.


WATCH REPORT

BLANCPAIN FIFTY FATHOMS OCEAN COMMITMENT BATHYSCAPHE FLYBACK CHRONOGRAPH The chance to give back while you shop is all too rare in the watch world, but a new release from Blancpain allows you to support the preservation of the world’s oceans whilst adding a really great diver’s watch to your collection. For every one of these 250 watches sold, the brand will donate $1,080 to charities working to improve our seas. As well as its philanthropic properties, what is interesting about the Ocean Commitment is that you can use the timing functions below the waves. Normally you cannot use chronographs underwater but the sealed pushers that control this chronograph can be used at depths of up to 300m. And when you are on your way back up from the depths, the chronograph’s flyback function comes in handy for decompression stops by immediately snapping back to 12 o’clock and resuming timing instantly

when you hit the reset pusher. A standard chronograph would require three pushes to achieve this – one to stop timing, another to reset and a third to start up again – so the flyback function offers a speedier option. The Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronograph itself is not a brand new model but the limited-edition Ocean Commitment version has some quirky features that include a specially decorated winding rotor visible through a sapphire caseback and the blue hues on the dial, strap and ceramic bezel that perfectly complement the grey ceramic case, crown and pushers. And as a final sweetener, every Ocean Commitment Bathyscaphe Flyback Chronograph will be sold with an impressive 475-page book dedicated to the history of Fifty Fathoms. When it first launched in 1953, it was considered the world’s first modern diver’s watch and will be given membership to Blancpain’s Ocean Commitment Circle club.

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WATCH REPORT

HARRY WINSTON MIDNIGHT FEATHERS Since its initial launch in 2012, the Premier Feathers collection has been the reserve of Harry Winston’s female followers, offering up an exotic menagerie of dials made from ethically sourced feathers expertly crafted into dials by Parisian plumassiere Nelly Saunier. Now it has created a version just for men. The beautiful art form of plumasserie, which nearly disappeared with the decline of the millinery trade in the 1960s, is a perfect match with watchmaking and while the women’s versions are delightfully feminine, Saunier and the Harry Winston team have worked carefully to bring feather marquetry to the dial in a far more masculine way for the Midnight Feathers watch. At first glance, the dial appears to be made from wood but what you are actually looking at is an intricate layered pattern of goose feathers and spines.

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The dial has been kept completely clear, other than a pair of simple rose gold hands and the Harry Winston name, which has been applied to the inside of the glass rather than placed on the dial itself. Finishing off the rustic, woody vibes of this charming timepiece is a dark brown alligator strap. Within the 42mm, 18ct rose gold case beats a mechanical movement that can be viewed through a sapphire crystal caseback, its 18ct white gold skeleton rotor swinging beautifully over Cotes de Geneves engraving and bevelled bridges. This dress watch brings not just the joy of owning a piece of horological mastery but is also a fine example of an artisanal craft brought back from the brink of extinction. It is truly luxury craftsmanship at its best and let us hope it is the first of many feathery watches for men.


WATCH REPORT

JACQUET DROZ GRANDE SECONDE DEADBEAT Clear your mind before glancing at the Grande Seconde Deadbeat, because you are about to be greeted by a topsyturvy dial. Though once you get the hang of reading this unconventionally beautiful dial, you’ll never want to go back to the norm. The largest of the three rose gold hands on the dial is dedicated not to minutes but seconds, hence the name Grande Seconde. The hours and minutes hands can be found on a much smaller dial offset at 12 o’clock and below is a surprisingly large retrograde date indicator. Though the dial is simple, its creation certainly was not. It is made from grand feu enamel, which means that rather than painting the numerals and markers on to the dial, the manufacturer applies oxides in gold before putting it into a fire that hits temperatures of up to 900°C, at which point it becomes unalterable.

The Deadbeat part of the name refers to the patent-pending self-winding movement that causes the seconds hand to tick round the dial rather than sweep. While in modern times we’ve become appreciative of a steady sweep, the Deadbeat was highly prized before quartz movements made ticks commonplace. It was originally created to meet the demands of professionals who needed accurate second-by-second timing, such as doctors checking a pulse, and is very tricky to achieve mechanically. To do it, a spring-loaded gear must be placed between the escapement and seconds wheel, loading up and releasing the hand, in this case, every six beats of the movement to create one tick per second. This deceptively simple-looking watch is a bastion of impressive complications and impeccable artisanal craftsmanship and as such is bound to be a conversation starter – but you will have to be quick, only 88 have been made.

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WATCH REPORT

PATEK PHILIPPE CALATRAVA PILOT TRAVEL TIME When the Calatrava Pilot Travel Time was unveiled at BaselWorld this year, it was a jaw-dropping moment. This is simply not what we have come to expect from Patek Philippe, master of the elegant dress watch. While this chunky 42mm timepiece will certainly stick out in a cabinet of Calatravas, Patek does actually have some history with this genre, creating pilots’ watches in the 1930s and this 2015 reincarnation has been presented in an easily digestible, tried-and-tested style. The first thing you want a pilot’s watch to deliver is legibility and it has scored on this front. The dark blue dial, so deep it looks black in most lights, provides a perfect contrast for the luminous 18ct white gold markers and Arabic numerals and blued steel hands, all lavished with Superluminova. Second is a dual time zone to keep track of where you have been and where you are going. Catering for this need with

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beautiful simplicity is a smaller hour hand that can be set to show a second time, with a key on the dial to remind you which hand is for home and which is for the local time zone. To prevent any unintentional changes, the pushers that click the second time zone forward or back in one-hour increments are protected by a patent-pending safety lock. Accuracy is protected too, with an isolator uncoupling the second time-zone mechanism from the going train when changes are being made so that the main time can continue uninterrupted. The one quirk of this watch, other than its maker, is its material. It is only available in 18ct white gold, rather than standard stainless steel of pilot’s watches, which adds to the weight and the price. But when a watchmaking legend pushes the envelope, it is fitting that the only way to get on board is a first class ticket.


Photo courtesy of Team Sager

GLOBAL CITIZEN FOUNDATION

Make a difference by being the difference Discover how we turn local involvement into global impact Global Citizen Foundation supports education research and empowers sustainable development around the world. To find out more about us or to join our cause, please visit www.global-citizen.org. DASHWOOD HOUSE, LEVEL 17, 69 OLD BROAD STREET, LONDON EC2M 1QS, UNITED KINGDOM T +44 207 256 4209 F +44 207 256 4122

Involve. Evolve. Empower. 2015 MAY / JUNE

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LIFESTYLE TREFECTA DRT BIKE Essentially, the Trefecta is a motorcycle hidden inside an electric bicycle. The sturdy 20-inch frame is covered in military-spec aluminum masking its internal components that vamp up its electric power, namely a 4KW motor, a 14-speed Rohlof Speedhub and SmeshGear transmission. It also has a 60-tonne lithium ion battery pack that the German, Dutch and Swiss designers say can last up to 100km without recharging or in this case without you having to pedal to reach top speeds of 44mph.

$25,000

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GIZMOS & GADGETS

SONY BRAVIA X900C 4K TV Sony’s new ultra slim 4KTV is the company’s thinnest television to date with a screen thickness of just 5.08mm. The X900C is going to be actually even thinner than your average smartphone and will even include what Sony calls “vanishing edge” technology, designed to make the screen almost completely and totally bezel-free, thus causing the picture to fill its entire surface. Despite its minuscule frame, Sony says its latest model will boast sharper contrast, clearer blues and greens and more vivid picture than its 4K competitors.

Price not yet released.

LEICA M-P CORRESPONDENT Leica’s new limited edition Correspondent version of the Leica M-P digital rangefinder, designed by the American musician and actor Lenny Kravitz, offers a luxury product in an artificially aged package. Kravitz’s love affair with photography started when he was 21, when his father gifted him with his first Leicaflex. In designing the Correspondent, he wanted to bring back the aesthetics of his old, beautifully aged Leica. The surface of the new camera is covered with snakeskin and the two lenses have been artificially aged, entirely by hand, to suggest “many years of constant use”.

Limited to 125 sets, $24,500

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ART

CONCRETING THE PAST Artist Hazem Harb’s solo show explores the imposition of Israeli architecture on the Palestinian landscape BY NAUSHEEN NOOR

orn in Gaza in 1980, Hazem Harb came of age during the intifadas. The impact of war and conflict has a profound influence on his solo show, The Invisible Landscape and Concrete Futures, currently running in Dubai’s Salsali Private Museum. The exhibition explores architecture within the context of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Photos of Palestine from before 1948 are superimposed with the Bauhaus-style architecture the Israelis brought to the landscape. The vintage photos are based on the Orientalist notion that Palestine was a “land without a people and a people without a land,” says curator Lara Khaldi. “Even when you see people in the original images, they are merely there as ornamentation. The concrete figures are an icon of the Israeli occupation. It brings a sense of foreboding and looks at history from a futuristic point of view.” Harb’s exhibition also features architectural models, sculptures, installations and a series of short videos, questioning how certain architectural styles can delete or cancel out others and what their role is in a hierarchical structure of power. In one installation, he explores the history of the Baramki house, a Palestinian home built in the 1930s, which was later appropriated by Israelis in 1948. Many such buildings were repurposed into homes for Israelis but in the case of the Baramki

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house, it was converted into a museum. Khaldi says: “Even though the architecture still stands, there is a destruction of narrative.” Harb left Gaza for Italy in 2004, enrolling in the Academy of Fine Art in Rome on a scholarship. His career has gained considerable traction in the last several years. In 2008, he was shortlisted for the AM Qattan Young Artist of the Year award. His work is in the collections of the British Museum in London, the Centre Pompidou in Paris and Durham University’s Oriental Museum in the UK. Still, Harb finds it difficult at times to reconcile this charmed existence, living between Rome and Dubai, with the continued conflict in his homeland. It is this duality that continues to inspire his work. “I was born there. I experienced the war and the conflict,” he says. “There was a very big effect on my life. But then everything changed because I experienced two lives in my life. “I always have this memory on my shoulder of the past. I think about this black and white contrast between past experience - or at least the image you have of that experience - and my current life in Italy, which is this space of love, romance and nature. I always have this mixed feeling, thinking about [Palestine] and sometimes it is worry and headache. You are in a safe place, they are not.” Hazem Harb’s solo show, The Invisible Landscape and Concrete Futures, will be at the Salsali Private Museum until June


ART

2015 MAY / JUNE

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YACHT

DOLCE VITA

The Oceanic 90 is a smooth dream of yacht

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YACHT

he Oceanic 90 made its world debut during the 2014 Cannes yachting festival. The very first Oceanic 90 in its straight shaft version was christened My Dolce Vita, which is what surely life must be if you are the owner of this $7 million beauty. Among the amenities offered by this first yacht is an upper deck owner’s suite with private terrace while a VIP suite plus two guest cabins are located on the lower deck. The interior decoration is a result of a study undertaken by the Canados inhouse design studio in conjunction with the owner. The primary wood used throughout includes limed grey oak, Macassar ebony, wenge and lacquered timber. The convertible aft deck with oversized modular sofas can stow a 6.5m diesel-powered Sacs tender while two personal water crafts,

two Seabobs and one JetLev, are stored in the transom garage. An additional stand-up jetski will be installed on the deck, right under the 1.5 tonne capacity. The engine room will be buffered from the lower deck guest cabins by the vast crew quarters and Boffimanufactured galley. The Oceanic yacht stays true to its brand name with the main features of extended outdoor and indoor living spaces, an ability to carry large sports and recreational vehicles, high performance and an ability to navigate at an economic speed with low fuel consumption, resulting in reduced overall operating costs. The DiElec mode (diesel-electric propulsion), an option offered on the 90 ft and the 140ft yachts, is innovative. Masculine design with a huge rear deck and fully laden with toys — this is the sweet life, indeed.

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DESIGN

MODERN ARABIA These pieces are the cutting edge of contemporary Middle Eastern design

Opium sofa, Bokja, Bloomingdale’s Home $7,704

Levitation coffee table, Silsal, $2,500

Voyage en Ikat china, Hermes, $380

Salt and pepper shakers, L’Objet, Bloomingdale’s Home, $917

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Octagonal side tables with mother of pearl inlay, Nada Debs, Cities Dubai, $4,083


DESIGN

Chest, Bernhardt, Bloomingdale’s Home, $1,878

Handcrafted metal mirror, Orient 499, Cities $1,434

Console table, Nada Debs, Comptoir 102, $3,675

Tessellated dining room table, Silsal, $2,660

Handmade brass lamps, Nayef Francis, Cities, $717 each

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XXXX

WALK OF FAME Shoemaker to the stars, George Esquivel escaped poverty and a troubled childhood to become creative director at the luxury brand Tumi BY NAUSHEEN NOOR

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STYLE

s a teenager, George Esquivel could only afford fake versions of branded trainers. In sharp contrast, the Tumi creative director and bespoke shoe designer now creates exquisite handmade shoes that can cost up to $4,500 a pair. He says of the poverty he experienced when he was young: “I think my sense of aesthetics came from the lack [of it].” Raised in Orange County in Los Angeles, Esquivel was the eldest of five siblings with a criminal father who was frequently imprisoned for drug dealings and even murder. “His profession was a professional hustler,” says Esquivel. At the age of 19, Esquivel kicked his father out of their home and became head of the household. He worked in various jobs — as a construction worker, a telemarketer, plumber and truck driver — making ends meet any way he could to support his family. “When you have that type of influence as a father, you just do not know what to do,” he says. “I knew I did not want to do what my father did because it was dishonest and because of the hurt it caused us.” Another escape presented itself in the form of music. Esquivel was a follower of the 1990s punk rock music resurgence, meeting musicians like Gwen Stefani “right before they got massive, just from going to the shows”. On a holiday in Baja, Mexico, with his then girlfriend - who is now his wife - Esquivel found a local bootmaker able to make a customised shoe for him based on a quick sketch. When he returned to California, he started playing around with designs, making shoes for band members he had connected with over the years. The business took off. “All of a sudden, out of a garage, we started making shoes for every musician you could think of in the 90s, from 311 to Jane’s Addiction to Guns’N’ Roses and No Doubt. You name them, we made shoes for them. I think it resonated because at the time, it was different.” Shoe trends in the 1990s were either Doc Martens or creepers. What Esquivel offered was the opportunity to personalise and tailor them. “At the time, you could not order customised Doc Martens or creepers. I kind of skipped to the front of the line with these guys because I knew them and I was a fan of theirs. They would order 20 or 30 pairs at a time. When you have the coolest musicians buying your things, that makes you cool,” recalls Esquivel. Two decades later, his shoes continue to be popular with musicians, particularly hipsters like Bruno Mars and Janelle Monae. Esquivel’s shoes are works of art. He produces about 4,000 pairs a year for private customers and boutiques such as Barney’s in New York and Colette in Paris. Produced in a workshop outside Los Angeles, every shoe is made by hand from a single piece of Italian leather. Even the pale fabric laces are cut in-house and the contrast wing tips are handpainted. Esquivel joined Tumi as creative director two years ago. A frequent traveller, his role took him on the road for 150 days last year. Tumi luggage has become known for producing items its advocates say do not age and are virtually indestructible. Esquivel has been tasked with making the brand more hip and capturing

a fanbase among the younger generation. This means adding a little of his own signature vintage touch to the luggage collection. “I like things to have a story. I do not like things to look so perfect. Natural things like leather should capture some age. It is also a little bit more my aesthetic. It is a little more southern California, more laidback,” he says. Esquivel, who exudes warmth and congeniality, still sometimes cannot get over how much his life has changed in the last two decades. “I laugh - not because it is funny but because I cannot believe how blessed I am. I get paid to do something really cool and my life is pretty amazing now,” he says. The very embodiment of a global citizen, which is also a Tumi marketing tagline, Esquivel describes the term as describing a “world traveller, a trailblazer who inspires you with their everyday life”. Esquivel is now a parent to three children aged 13, 18 and 20 and continues to try to set a good example for them, something he missed out on in his childhood. “I had a teacher who said: ‘When you do things honestly, they are yours,’” Esquivel says. “If you do them dishonestly, someone can take them from you. That’s something I try to instill in my children. Work for it and you can keep it.”

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HOTELS

CASTAWAY ISLANDS These private island resorts will ensure the most relaxing of getaways

COCO PRIVE MALDIVES Perched on the North Atoll with some of the world’s most pristine waters, Coco Prive Kuda Hithi Island offers utter seclusion the minute guests step off the island’s luxury yacht ferrying them from Male airport. The private island, designed by Singapore-based architect Guz Wilkinson, is off limits to everyone except the 12 guests it can accommodate within one master residence. Within this split-level retreat there is a huge master bedroom, living and dining areas filled with bespoke design pieces and a library, indoor and outdoor shower, private jacuzzi and exclusive wine cellar. The only hard choices to be made on the island are whether to swim in the glass-sided swimming pool that stretches half the length of the 1.4 hectare island or take a dip in the Indian Ocean with a snorkel, paddle board or kayak. A private chef, daily housekeepers, diving instructor and beauty and massage therapist are available on demand. Starting from $25,200 per night based on 12 people sharing

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HOTELS

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HOTELS

ARIARA ISLAND PHILIPPINES The ultimate off-the-beaten-track destination, Ariara island is located within the Calamian islands in north Palawan in the Philippines. Arriving on this spectacular private island requires a short hop by helicopter or a domestic flight and boat transfer from Manila. A wonderful mix of lush tropical jungle and luxurious comfort, the island accommodates up to 18 guests in beach-facing rooms in a beautiful villa. Activities abound on the island and guests can choose between windsurfing, jetskiing, sailing through

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the Palawan archipelago or simply kicking back in a hammock on a strip of private beach. Ariara comes with its own PADI dive master and divers of all levels can enjoy the pristine corals, virgin reefs and diverse marine life surrounding the island. A seven-night stay on Ariara island ranges from $475-$715 per person per night. www.lightfoottravel.com


HOTELS

CHEVAL BLANC ST BARTHS, CARIBBEAN The latest member of the Cheval Blanc family, managed by LVMH, is the former Hotel Saint-Barth Isle de France. This is the epitome of Caribbean glamour, with the hotel famous for attracting celebrities and billionaires keen to holiday in laidback style. Flamands Bay is considered the prettiest white sand beach on the island with breathtaking views of northern St Barths. Rooms feature bright white decor with four poster beds and hardwood floors, while

those willing to splurge on a villa have access to a private infinity pool. The finishing touches are bespoke bedlinens and a signature tropical Guerlain fragrance by Thierry Wasser filling the air in this seaside escape. Rooms from $790 per night

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DINING

FAIR-WEATHER DINING Take advantage of these al fresco venues before the summer heat takes hold

COVE BEACH You could mistake this chic new beach club for the French Riviera with its whitewashed minimal interiors, laidback lounge music and even a Cove Beach house rose growing in its own vineyard. One step outside to get a closer look at the pristine blue ocean and the towering Burj al Arab on your left, however, will remind you where you truly are. The food is delectable. Delicate puffs of gnocchi,

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tender roast chicken with foie gras and dreamy lemon meringue tart are all recommended. But the main reason to visit this idyllic location is to enjoy a staycation on the beach, sipping a cocktail and listening to the waves of the Arabian Gulf. Jumeirah Beach hotel, Jumeirah, Dubai, +971 50 454 6920


DINING

ZERO GRAVITY Time is quickly running out for al fresco dining so make the most of it with Zero Gravity’s picnic package. Grab a space on the sand, terrace or garden and tuck into a mouthwatering selection of fresh-baked breads, buns and brioche, cheese, chutneys, smoked salmon, chorizo and cold cuts, all finished off with exotic fruits. Upgrade to the DIY BBQ Grilla option and chefs will also provide you with all the ingredients, tools and expert tips you need to create steaks, seafood and burgers by yourself. Or if that is too much effort, lie back in a beach cabana and let them do all the hard work for you. Zero Gravity, Dubai Marina, Skydive Dubai Drop Zone, Dubai, +971 4 399 0009‬‬

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DINING

THE COURTYARD Fairy lights twinkle beneath the stars in this charming venue in the newly revamped Al Manzil hotel, a favourite with locals and residents alike. The menu is not for the fainthearted with liver, tongue, brain, kidneys and heart all on the table. The nose-to-tail concept means nothing is wasted and the extensive menu includes dozens of cold and hot mezze as well as a wide variety of the kind of Emirati, Levantine and north African dishes usually cooked in the home, from machboos to chicken livers given a tantalising sweetness

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with pomegranate molasses. Jumbo prawns infused with garlic and spices and tossed in chermoula and a whole grilled seabass, flaking perfectly off the bone, are standout dishes. Make sure to leave room for the creamy, light fig tatin with mascarpone and the sticky date cake, a dark, sultry, grown-up affair and a great match for the outstanding selection of Lebanese wines. Al Manzil hotel, Old Town, Downtown Dubai +971 4 428 5888


DINING

PACHA DUBAI With uninterrupted views of the Dubai skyline, the rooftop at Pacha Ibiza Dubai is the perfect outdoor venue to soak up the soulful sounds of the Balearic islands with a sundowner while lingering over Arabic-influenced Spanish dishes. They include olives, succulent meats and fresh fish prepared from the raw bar or over the charcoal grill with seasonal herbs and dips all ideal for sharing. In keeping with the Moorish traditions of the Mediterranean, the

menu features highlights like cured salmon and pickled cucumber salad, aubergine roasted chickpeas, Manchego cheese and pomegranate and crispbread. A selection of ceviche adds to the already extensive offering. Pacha Ibiza Dubai, Souk Madinat Jumeirah, Al Sufouh 1, Dubai +971 4 567 0000

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TRAVEL

ADRIATIC ALLURE

There are few better spots to moor your yacht come summertime than Hvar’s star-studded shores

achts bob idly on baby blue waters, sunlight drenches the harbour and the early risers sip espressos behind their morning papers, pausing only to glimpse the bronzed bodies beginning to saunter along the palm-lined promenade. In Croatia’s port of Hvar, summer mornings are a late and lazy affair. Cruise in by nightfall and you’ll see why: from June, the harbour is rich with the well-known and well-heeled as swan-like yachts — fresh from island hopping across the Dalmatian Coast — slope in to soak up the party atmosphere and the Adriatic’s other ample delights. Its newfound popularity is surprising when you consider just over a decade ago few had even heard of Hvar. War wreaked havoc across the six republics comprising the former Yugoslavia, leaving much of Croatia in a pitiful state of wreck and ruin. In its time, Croatia has had an influx of European invaders — the Romans, Slavs, French, Greeks and Ottomans among them — but, to its credit, has gleaned the best from each and every one and now presents jet setters with a rich tapestry of history, culture and cuisine — not to mention an insatiable appetite for celebration. Today you’ll find Hvar populated by bikini-clad beauties and

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tanned men in pressed pastel shorts. During peak season, wellgroomed Italians dominate — having declared it the ‘new Amalfi’ — while on the water the most enviable vessel to spot is Beluga, a seriously glamorous, ebony-sailed Turkish gullet owned by actress-turned-hotelier and interior designer, Anouska Hempel. Indeed, these shores are now very much on the mega-yacht itinerary. Roman Abromavich and Bill Gates have both cottoned on to the port’s charms, as have countless celebrities. Beyonce has holidayed here (a local tour guide says it is where she first saw a flower called blue ivy, the name later given to her daughter), Valentino sailed in — before sailing out again at the sight of the paparazzi — and Britain’s party-loving Prince Harry was photographed diving into a Hvar hotel pool, fully clothed. Happily, there is more to Hvar than the size of your yacht: its paved chalk-white piazza, picture-perfect harbour and catwalk-like promenade open onto hip hotels, rooftop bars and chic waterside restaurants where the likes of Princess Caroline of Monaco, Eva Longoria and Kevin Spacey have been spotted dining. The local cuisine is superb and, unsurprisingly with shores like these, the most delectable dish is fish. Having only entered the European

Images courtesy of Getty Images

BY LAURA BINDER


TRAVEL

Union two years ago, Croatia’s waters have remained unspoilt by the rest of the continent’s greedy trawlers. There are thought to be some 400 sea creatures, from sizeable squid and giant hot pink langoustines to sea bass, bream and tender tuna. Beyond the pleasures of the promenade, pebbled beaches and enchanting islets are ripe for exploring. If you don’t care to move the yacht (it is tricky enough getting a spot in the first place), a taxi boat can whisk you, wind in hair, to Palenki Otoci,

an archipelago of 16 untapped islets. On dry land, hire a scooter and head up to the hilltop villages you can see from the terracottaroofed dwellings below. A scenic drive takes you high above wavy coastlines, through tiny villages (with as few as four residents in Malo Grablje) on to Hvar’s least touristy town of Stari Grad, where you can escape the throngs. With idyllic islets, authentic fare, beautiful people and high-end nightlife abound, you have to question why Valentino left so soon.

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TRAVEL

WHERE TO GO

STARI GRAD

GREBISCE AND UVALA DUBOVICA

BONJ LES BAINS BEACH CLUB

HVAR MARINA

Where better to top up your tan than Hvar’s hottest beach club? Make for the Amfora Hvar Grand Beach Resort and you’ll find the 1920s white stone colonnade shaded under a pine grove on a small sandy bay. Kick off Havaianas to recline in a private stone cabana and have ice-cold bubbly brought to you by waitresses in crisp white miniskirts.

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Most of Hvar’s pretty beaches will have you balancing on a rock and attempting to step onto a pebbled seabed while maintaining some decorum. But not the silky-sand beach of Grebisce. Narrow and sun-drenched, you’ll find it four kilometres east of Jelsa, just off the Sucuraj road. If you are not opposed to a pebble or two, make for Uvala Dubovica instead. Arguably the most charming cove on the east and set beside an ancient manor house, it is a popular pick with the yachting crowd.

There is more to the marina than the promenade. It is nestled beneath a medieval castle, home to one of Europe’s most romantic piazzas and flanked by the continent’s oldest municipal theatre as well as a Benedictine convent. If you’re feeling generous, the harbour’s shops include several beautiful jewellery boutiques — be sure to step into Tanja Curin’s for stones combed from all corners of the globe.

Images courtesy of Getty Images

Founded by the ancient Greeks in 384 BC, not only is Stari Grad Hvar’s oldest town but also one of Europe’s most ancient. Despite such a claim to fame, you can meander here in relative solitude. Spend an idle day wandering its serene stone alleyways, punctuated by yellow, blue and green shutters, stop off at quaint street cafes for Dalmation nibbles and cool off with ice creams in the sleepy harbour.


TRAVEL

WHERE TO STAY PALMIZANA

Sveti Klement, the largest of the Palenki Otoci islets just a short boat ride from Hvar, is home to Palmizana. Enter this bohemian hideaway and you will find an oasis of lush fauna and bold blooms. Owned by flame-haired artist Dagmar Meneghello, guests can stay in one of seven eclectic stone villas and six colourful bungalows. Do not leave without dining on its hot pink restaurant terrace. The Hvarska gregarda, a Dalmation casserole swimming with lobster, potatoes and shellfish, is a must-try. Rates from $263 per night in peak season

ADRIANA, HVAR SPA HOTEL

If you like your hotels to be in the heart of it, this is the place. A stylish, glossy bolthole set in Hvar’s pulsating heart and with spectacular vistas that stretch over the sea, beyond the marina and across the Old City. Make time for a dip in its rooftop seawater pool, spend a spell in its spa and enjoy a drink of something cool in its ever-popular marina-facing Top Bar. Rates from $341 in peak season

RIVA, HVAR YACHT HARBOUR HOTEL

First opened in 1927, this promenadesited hotel has long enticed a starstudded clientele, from Orson Welles to Jeanne Moreau and Sean Connery. Its monochrome and red rooms each pay homage to screen sirens with oversized portraits to the likes of Brigitte Bardot and Audrey Hepburn. The Riva marina suite is the best in the house. Check in and make the most of a glass-walled bathroom and private harbour-facing terrace. Rates from $247 per night

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LITTLE BLACK BOOK LONDON Retired British tennis star Tim Henman reached six Grand Slam semifinals and won 11 titles in his career. Once ranked number four in the world, he stepped down in 2007 and now has three daughters with his wife Lucy. They live in Barnes, southwest London. Henman shared his favourite spots in his home city with GC on a recent visit to Abu Dhabi for Fortnum & Mason’s Tennis at the Palace tournament.

I love walking along the river in Barnes on a sunny day. It’s really beautiful and still maintains its village-like quality even though it is in the heart of London.

Enjoying a tipple On Davies Street in Mayfair there is an amazing wine cellar called Hedonism. The decor is really different and it has an outstanding selection of wines and spirits with really talented sommeliers. They even have a kids area to keep the children amused.

Fine dining My favourite restaurant is Scott’s in Mayfair. It is primarily a seafood restaurant but also serves seasonal meat and game.

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Images courtesy of Getty Images

Take a hike


Dining with the stars Zuma in Knightsbridge is the best place to spot celebrities. I don’t think I have ever been there and not seen someone famous.

Night at the museum

For the bookworm I am not much of a reader but I do prefer oldfashioned bookshops. There is a chain called Daunt Books in Marylebone, where you can buy a gift subscription where they ask questions about the recipient and then choose a book to send them each month of the year.

Images courtesy of Corbis / ArabianEye.com

There is so much to see at the Natural History museum. You could spend hours and still not scratch the surface. It is a great way to entertain the kids on a rainy afternoon too.

There is so much stunning architecture wherever you look. It is a city filled with history and culture.

Riverside It is great to go on a boat down the river. It gives you a completely different perspective on the city and takes you away from the hustle and bustle.

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FASHION

Botanical print cotton tee shirt, Givenchy, MrPorter.com, $930

Safari jacket, Gucci, Dubai Mall, $2,105

SUMMER IN THE CITY A splash of colour and casual chic means summer has arrived

Slip-ons, Santoni, Rodeo Drive, $390 Espadrilles, Christian Louboutin, $814, Mall of the Emirates Linen blazer, Berluti, Mall of the Emirates, $4,030

Rose print tee shirt, Dolce & Gabbana, Dubai Mall, $695

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FASHION

Sunglasses, G-Star, Dubai Mall, $350 Sunglasses, Lacoste, Grand Optics, $270

Distressed jeans, Dolce & Gabanna, Dubai Mall, $895

Printed tee shirt, Marni, Mall of the Emirates, $260

Seersucker blazer, Polo Ralph Lauren, Dubai Mall, $695

Shorts, Berluti, Mall of the Emirates, $705

Sneakers, Santoni, Rodeo Drive, $595

Floral cotton shirt, Saint Laurent, MrPorter.com, $790

Canvas backpack, Christian Louboutin, Mall of the Emirates, $2,910

Bag, Gucci, Mall of the Emirates, $2,409

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HOROLOGY

OUT OF THIS WORLD A Time-Keeping Spaceship For Your Table

MB&F STARFLEET MACHINE There’s never a dull moment when it comes to MB&F’s creations and their sci-fi inspired timepiece that was released at this year’s Basel fair was no different. The Starfleet Machine, is a table clock engineered by Switzerland based L’Epée 1839 that would look more at home orbiting a planet in space than on your desk. With a 40 day power reserve, the Starfleet Machine is suspended within a steel c-shaped ring, held up by three supporting arcs eluding the starship nature of the design. In the middle is a large aluminum dome

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beset with hour and minute tracks, which are read by rotating hands that follow the curvature of the dome. Underneath the dome, front and center is a visible escapement, being “guarded” by double retrograde seconds in the form of “turret-mounted laser cannons”. They contract over the course of 20 seconds before dramatically expanding again. Limited to 175 pieces, the clock is available in two styles: a “light” version in stainless steel and a “dark” version finished in ruthenium. $35,000


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GEORGE CLOONEY’S CHOICE

Available at:

OMEGA Boutiques - Dubai: BurJuman • Deira City Centre • Dubai Mall • Dubai Festival City • Mall of the Emirates • Mina A'Salam • Mirdif City Centre • Sahara Centre • Wafi and2015 at select Rivoli Stores. 98 MAY / JUNE Abu Dhabi: Marina Mall • Yas Marina • Toll Free: 800-RIVOLI

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