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This can all be summarized in that eSports needs stronger investments and financial input to provide the common basis of marketable ventures and so that stems the idea of depending on publishers to further the scene. In truth, the involvement of publishers is at their own discretion, though for companies like Blizzard Entertainment, where they don’t reward careers for participating in their own product feels unjustified, almost criminal. In contrast, Riot Games’ outreach to the scene is the immediate solution to some of the strongest issues of today while Valve’s long-term plan is what may ultimately become the standard for eSports business and the interest of future tournament/team organizations. Yet

September/October 2013

The Compendium for Valve’s The International 3 portrays a proper set of standards to creating a real return for the producers of these organizations while also offering immediate merchandise for the supporters. work and less creative control on the products they service in eSports. For players, it means another platform of competitions, standardized to be fair (or so it’s claimed) to everyone in all regions. With more reliance comes more territory demand and the publishers are moving in. It’s not a charity for these multi-million dollar companies; it’s business. And so far, eSports has not hit its stride in terms of business return. Is legitimizing eSports helping to create stronger business models for those investing so much in it already, or is it more in regards to converting consumers of the title into active followers of the organizations and thus spend? Why can’t it be both?

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• Teams becoming more than marketing agencies, reliant on sponsors and private investments to finance themselves. • Better merchandising and products/services from event organizers, at a reasonable price for fans and supporters • Players needing salaries that surpasses minimum wage, with benefits

at the same time, are we truly expecting so much from publishers because of their capabilities or only because of their current involvement now? For event organizers, a publisher’s involvement means more paper-

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is a new venture and yet one ideal world or the other also means doors of opportunities close and so do the interest of certain ambitious individuals. In the grand scheme of things, those truly affected by these different models are the fans and the teams and organizations who must play by the rules of the groups that provides them with the prize money and the stage to compete and entertain. As an outsider, we are not nearly as affected as those who must compete and live up to the different pressures of certain leagues, whether it is the ruthless system of Riot’s LCS or disproportionate regional competitions of Blizzard’s WCS, players must adapt and as this scene grows. Legitimizing eSports is bound by the priority of legitimizing the professions and endeavors within:


GLHF Magazine Issue #7