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glenwoodnet

ISSUE N.25 // YEAR two // MAY 2014

your online community resource

Glenwood High School Band Teacher retires After 39 years Girls Track team wins Hawkeye 10 conference

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GlenwoodNET ISSUE N.2.5

EDITORIAL Executive editor

Tammie McCue | tammie@glenwoodnet.com Assistant Editor

Liz Gunkelman|

writer

Rose Deighton | writer

Steph Richards | Video Production Manager

Vince Salerno |

ADVERTISING Advertisement Sales

Steph Richards Rose Deighton

Published by: McQnet Productions Glenwood Iowa www.mcqnet.com

Contributors: Sunshine Dalton, Glenwood Public Library, Mills County Health, John Wayne Birthplace.

SUBSCRIPTIONS AND FEEDBACK www.glenwoodnet.com | tammie@glenwoodnet.com ŠMcQnet Productions 2014.

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Editorial What an issue we have for you this month!

Wow! What an issue we have for you this month. So much going on in our iittle town! Our student writers have been busy trying to make this worth your time reading. Feel free to drop us a note to let us know how we’re doing or if you have idea’s for articles or for improvement. Thank you for your continued support. Oh, and if you’d like to be notified when an issue comes out, simply fill out the form on www. glenwoodnet.com.

Tammie McCue

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COMMUNITY

EDUCATION

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06

Glenwood Aquatics Center Fails

Glenwood Band Instructor Retires

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After Prom - Worth it? Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt.

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Contents SPORTS

EVENTS

LIFESTYLE

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15

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Hawkeye-10 Conference Champs

Library Lines

Awards Preventing Childhood

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John Wayne Birthday Celebration

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Glenwood Band Instructor Retires Rose Deighton

Rose Deighton

Instructor Pete Jacobus has decided to retire after 27 years of teaching in the Glenwood School District. The vocal music instructor taught band from 1987-1996 for Glenwood Middle School and 19962014 for Glenwood High School. Jacobus made the decision to retire in December.

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“I turned 66 in March, and felt that I had had a long and successful career,” said Jacobus. “I want to spend more time with grandchildren.” Jacobus taught for 43 years, from 1971 to 2014. He started at Anita Community Schools, then went to Corning Community Schools before teaching at Glenwood. Band was a large part of Jacobus’ life. “I will miss conducting a band everyday. It has been my life,” said Jacobus. When he announced to GCHS students he was retiring, many was upset. “The students were very upset,” said Jacobus. “They didn’t want Mr. J to leave. But over time, they have accepted my decision, and wish me well in my retirement.” Jacobus has helped Glenwood better themselves and win many awards. The Marching Band has earned 26 Division I Ratings in the past 28 years. The Concert Band has 10 straight Division I Ratings at State Contest, and earned a Gold Award at the Worldstrides Heritage Performance New Orleans Contest in April. The Jazz Band has qualified for the Iowa Jazz Championships for 11 years in a row. The 8th grade band earned Best in Class Awards three times at Drake University, the Adventureland Festival of Bands and Page 8

“I will miss conductin has been


ng a band everyday. It my life.”

was runner-up this year. “I think the Glenwood Community Schools Band Program is stronger than it has ever been,” said Jacobus. “I think we have strong, caring, passionate, and dedicated band students that will continue our traditions, and keep the program well known at the local, and state level.” Jacobus has worked hard to make Glenwood band the best it could be. He never gives up when wanting to accomplish something. “I have so many memories, but I think having the band play “Bayou Breakdown” after having 3 or 4 different years bands attempt it might be right near the top,” said Jacobus. The student’s reaction is part of Jacobus’ favorite part of teaching. “I like to see the joy on the student’s faces when they play through the music without mistakes when it has been a struggle to play it before,” said Jacobus. He gets expose students to other cultures and take band trips, like the recent one to New Orleans, Louisiana. Both choir and band students went on the trip and performed. “I love seeing them enjoy events, like our recent trip to New Orleans,” said Jacobus. Jacobus not only hopes to influence his students, but have a lastPage 9


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ing impact on them. “The best part of being a teacher is knowing that, maybe not now, but in the future, something you did will have a lasting effect on a student,” said Jacobus. Five of his students have become four year All State Musicians, which is considered the highest honor a high school student can achieve, and many other former students have gone on to be music teachers. “I have been very blessed in my life to be able to touch lives,” said Jacobus. Not only does Jacobus teach his students to become skillful musicians, he teaches them life skills. “I hope that in addition to helping my students achieve success in Band, I have given them life skills that they can use forever,” said Jacobus. “I tell them, “Good Enough, Isn’t”, “Early is On Time, On Time Is Late, And Late is Inexcusable, and “Make Good Choices”.” Although he will miss a lot, there are a few things Jacobus will not miss. “I won’t miss fundraisers, or early morning practices,” said Jacobus. Jacobus will be missed in Glenwood. He taught students about band and about life. Throughout his career, he has formed many lasting relationships with students. “You can’t be an educator without building deep and lasting relationships with the students,” said Jacobus. “Over the years, I have had the privilege of working with so many great kids, it will be a big void in my life, and I will miss them a lot.”

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Awards Preventing Childhood Obesity Community Grants ARTICLE SUBMITTED BY MILLS COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH

(May 1, 2014 – Omaha, Neb.) – Ten metropolitan area organizations and five college-bound seniors are joining Children’s Hospital & Medical Center in its efforts to combat childhood obesity. Children’s awarded $250,000 in Preventing Childhood Obesity Community Grants and up to $20,000 in Preventing Childhood Obesity Community Scholarships on April 30, 2014 at an awards luncheon featuring Miss America 2014 Nina Davuluri.

Child Saving Institute Initiative: Childhood Health Matters Through Childhood Health Matters, the Child Saving Institute will implement a healthy living curriculum, increase daily physical activity, reduce screen time, and replace energy-dense, high fat floods with nutritious whole foods. In addition, an on-site community garden will allow families to plant and harvest fresh produce.

Each non-profit organization received $25,000. Children’s 2014 Preventing Childhood Obesity Community Grant recipients and their initiatives are:

Council Bluffs Community School District Initiative: Opening Minds to Healthy Living The Opening Minds to Healthy Living program will expand nutrition education and physical activity programs to middle school classrooms and increase program implementation in elementary classrooms throughout the Council Bluffs Community School District.

Building Healthy Futures Initiative: Building Healthy Futures through Youth-Driven, Peer-Led Obesity Program Building Healthy Futures through Youth-Driven, Peer-led Obesity Program is a pilot designed to empower young people to create a culturehealthy living within the school community. Utilizing a Youth Health Advisory Council, students will educate peers on ways to have a healthier lifestyle within their school and community by addressing nutrition, physical activity, and body image.

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Families in Action Initiative: Families in Action Families in Action is a multi-faceted program that impacts the health and wellbeing of Latino youth and families. Grant funding will support the organization as it expands fitness classes, nutrition education and mobile health screenings.


Girls Incorporated of Omaha Initiative: Farm to Table The Girls, Inc. Farm to Table program aims to make healthy food familiar and desirable to young girls, encouraging them to make better eating choices and carry those habits into their homes and communities. Resources include nutrition, cooking and gardening classes. Gretchen Swanson Center for Nutrition Initiative: TeachKidsNutrition.org An expansion of the Gretchen Swanson Center for Nutrition’s Omaha Nutrition Education Collaborative will allow for the development and distribution of physical activity videos for early care providers and parents. The videos and an accompanying workbook will be added as online resources at www.TeachKidsNutrition.org. Mills County Public Health Centers Initiative: CATCH a Healthy Mills County Kid Mills County, Iowa Public Health will provide CATCH Early Childhood curriculum to preschool classrooms and child care centers throughout the county. Lessons highlight hands-on activities to

teach and encourage healthy eating habits and promote physical education. OneWorld Community Health Centers Initiative: South Omaha Shape Up With the “South Omaha Shape Up” program, OneWorld Community Health Centers will develop a nutrition and exercise curriculum for promotoras - lay community health workers. The promotoras will teach health lessons to children, childcare providers and parents. Visiting Nurse Association (VNA) Initiative: Cooking Matters The Visiting Nurse Association will bring Cooking Matters classes to Children’s. In a group education setting, professional chefs and registered dieticians share nutrition education, cooking skills, food safety, meal planning and food budgeting strategies. Whispering Roots, Incorporated Initiative: Let’s Grow Through the “Let’s Grow” community aquaponics program, Whispering Roots will teach students

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(and adults) the process of growing food through cutting-edge, soil-less aquaponic systems. “Let’s Grow” strives to change eating behaviors and attitudes through hands-on learning and growing activities. Children’s Hospital & Medical Center also awarded its first Preventing Childhood Obesity Community Scholarships to five high school seniors who will pursue a four-year degree related to a career in health or wellness. Children’s 2014 scholarship recipients are: • Ginny Algya, Omaha Bryan High School • Nicole Burns, Omaha Westside High School • Ruth Ellis, Millard North High School • Maria Reyes, Omaha South High School • Riley Siffring, Arlington High School Each student receives $1,000 for the first year, with the scholarship renewable for up to three additional years ($1,000 per year), depending on the student’s academic standing and relevant area of study. Proudly serving children since 1948, Children’s Hospital & Medical Center (www.ChildrensOmaha.org) is recognized as a 2013-14 Best Children’s Hospital by U.S. News & World Report in cardiology and heart surgery, and gastroenterology and GI surgery. It is the only full-service, pediatric health care center in Nebraska providing expertise in more than 30 pediatric specialty services to children across a five-state region and beyond. Located in Omaha, the 139-bed, non-profit hospital operates the only Level II Pediatric Trauma Center in the region and offers 24-hour, in-house services by pediatric critical care specialists.

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Library Lines

submitted by Sunshine Dalton

The Glenwood Public Library’s 2014 Summer Reading for Teens (6th grade through 12th grade, or up to 17-years-old) begins with registration during the week of June 2-6 and ends July 31. The theme is “Spark a Reaction!” and teens will receive 4 reaction papers and a cool magnetic bookmark when they sign up. Read and record your reaction to each book. Every reaction paper (up to 5) will be another en-

try into the grand prize drawing at the end of July. The more you read and react, the better your chances of winning! On June 12, drop in the Living Literacy Lab between 11am and 4pm, and we’ll show you how to mix your own compilation CD. Bring a blank disc, or buy one from the library for $2, and we will even burn the mix for you. Help make root beer at 3pm on June 16 , and then enjoy

the fruits of that labor when we make root beer floats on at 3pm on June 20. Then, make sure to check out a copy of the first book in a new YA series, “After the End” by Amy Plum on May 6 when it releases because we will Skype with Plum in Paris at 11am on June 26! Look for the July schedule of events in the next edition of Library Lines!

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Glenwood Aquatic Ce Fails to Pass Rose Deighton

The Glenwood Community failed to pass the $4.75 million bond on May 6 for building the new aquati City residents needed a majority of 60 percent to win the vote, but only 52 percent voted for the aquatic aquatic center while 465 voted against it. “We got the majority vote but we needed the super majority,” said Shane Keeling, a member of the aq mittee. “It comes down to 12 to 15 families, whether that be husband or wife or girlfriend or boyfriend The aquatic center planning committee made up of the 9 members, Mary Gunderson, Maddi Sieck, B Don Scarborough, Carol Robertson, Dana Fuller, Kristine Russmann, and Shane Kelling met many tim firm JEO to create the images of the pool and discussion finances.

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enter

ic center. The Glenwood c center. 505 voted for the

quatic center planning com[to vote].” Brian Kissel, Deb Stanislav, mes with the architectural

“It’s an investment in the community,” said Keeling. The aquatic center would have contained a lazy river, a pool, competition swimming lanes, kid friendly features, diving boards, free wifi, concessions, lockers, showers. An option they were considering was a projector for swim parties. The aquatic center would have been located by the high school on city property. “It would have impacted the high school programs and be a part of the whole complex,” said Keeling. “It had a central location.” The aquatic center would have been a place where the community and the youth could get together. “The youth in the community needs something positive to get involved,” said Keeling. The aquatic center planning committee was trying to bring in an activity to Glenwood so they do not have to go to surrounding areas. “I think that from a family standpoint, kids have to go outside community, it would be a destination for families to do something positive,” said Keeling. The committee believed the aquatic center would not only bring Glenwood a pool, but a place to get together. “One benefit is that students have a place to hang out together to encourage healthy lifestyle,” said Keeling. “It also brings in additional jobs.” Although there were many positive features about having a pool, the bond failed, not getting enough people in support of the aquatic center to the polls. “Getting more people to the polls [would have helped],” said Keeling. “What they did to get kids to hold sign was good and getting different groups [to vote is important].” The aquatic center planning committee advertised by putting three big signs in town and yard signs. Their goal was one yard sign for every ten houses. They also went to senior centers to talk the elderly about the aquatic center. “There was a lot of people in favor it,” said Keeling. “We tried to get more elderly people to be open to it.” Voters must live in city limits, limiting the voters. People who would like to vote but are outside of city limits are not able to vote. “I do think it’s a key part of what happens,” said Keeling. “People living outside city limits need to rally people inside limits.” Glenwood has not had a pool for 10 years. Keeling said timing is important with big investments like an aquatic center. “It’s always hard to know how much time is enough time,” said Keeling. Page 17


Rams take Conference

Girls first time in 39 years, boys 4th win in a row

Tammie McCue

Girls: Tammie McCue Boys: DeEtte Von Essen

What an amazing night the Hawkeye-10 Conference for Track and Field was for the Glenwood Rams. Both the Boys and Girls took home the championship. Although this is the boys 4th straight win, this was the girls first time winning in 39 years. Cheers could be heard from across the field as the announcement was made. The conference meet actually started in 1974. The Lady Rams won that meet and the following year in 1975. The team will be losing several seniors but Coach Brad Rasmussen is confident in next year stateing, “the girls we have returning are very talented” But the girls were not alone this year. The boys Track and Field team took home their 4th straight title. Boys Coach Mark Starner stated, “I am very proud of our team in their ability to persevere with the numerous obstacles that our team has encountered throughout the year. Injuries may

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have slowed us down at times throughout the spring, but it’s a testament to our team’s depth to continue to compete and win the number of team meet titles. “ Starner mentioned “I am extremely happy for Coach Rasmussen and his staff and team for all of their accomplishments this season and definitely winning the Conference Title. It makes me very proud to be a Glenwood Ram and part of a sport that has had a tremendous season. It’s a historical moment for GlenBoys Track & Field Team congratulating wood Track and Field and very proud to be a part of Girls it.“ Both of Starners daughters competed on the Lady Rams team making it a double victory for him.

Girls Track & Field Team congratulating Boys

Looking forward Starner stated, “We are moving on to the Distict/State Qualifying Meet at Atlantic with our next goal in mind (District Title). We have won the last three District Team Titles (6 of the last 7) and will go for our 4th straight and our seventh in the last eight years. Nothing will be easy, however, we have a lot of work to do and will need some luck to make that happen.

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Every year juniors and seniors build their excitement for prom. Weeks before, discussions and free time are consumed by talking about dresses, tanning, dates, and how everyone cannot wait. Although the dance gains most of the attention and time of the students, many more people are looking forward to something else: After Prom. After Prom takes place after the dance, and many people just choose to attend After Prom. Is it worth the $35 to go? Absolutely. There were numerous events students could participate in from 11:30 pm to around 5 am. The support of the parents and school was awesome. We had so many people who volunteered to lead the activities and help created an amazing After Prom. There was a variety of games. Downstairs in the gym contained several different blow up games from an obstacle course to a basketball game. The blow up games attracted a lot of attention and many stayed down in that area. Although some people could believe that blow ups are for younger age groups, high school students enjoyed them. The blow up games allowed students to be active and keep awake. Other activities outside the gym included several card games and a money game where students tried to grab Page 22

After Prom: T


Totally Worth It Rose Deighton

Rose Deighton

the real money rather than the fake money. Upstairs in the wrestling room was a dance game. I watched several people play it and they had a great time excelling at the game and beating records. Also in the wrestling room was a bucking bull everyone was dying to try as well as a huge, oversized basketball in which students could play team basketball or any other game desired. Outside of the wrestling room, many more games were available. Students could win soda if they could throw the circles and hit the soda, throw balls in cups, play a betting game, and try to walk in a straight line with drunk goggles on, go around the cones, and walk to the chair. All the activities students participated in had a chance to get raffle tickets to put in drawings. Even if students participated, they could win a few raffle tickets. Once students received raffle tickets, they could sign their name on them and put they into contests. There was table full of buckets students could put their raffle tickets in from a $100 Target gift card to Freddy gift cards. Both juniors and seniors had opportunities to get prizes. As well as the raffles, seniors were automatically entered into drawings for senior prizes only if they attended After Prom. Page 23


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A television, mini refrigerator, and coffee machine were some of the large prizes won. Besides all the activities available, in the cafeteria an ample amount of food was provided. Students could chosen from wings, pizza, fruit snacks, candy bars, cookies, nachos, several drinks, and more. At 3 am was a hypnotist, which is one of the students’ favorite part. Students could volunteer to be hypnotised and the others watched. After Prom was really what students made of it. If the students played the games more than once, ate a lot, and filled out a lot of tickets giving them a better chance to win prizes, After Prom was probably worth their money. It gave students a chance to have fun in school and spend the time after the dance in a safe environment. After Prom, like Prom, is a once and a lifetime chance. How often do people get to play on blow ups? How often do people get unlimited food? How often do people have fun at school? After Prom was definitely worth going. It was a great opportunity to enjoy a fun night with classmates.

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John Wayne Birthday Celebration May 23-24, 2014 Article Submitted Jill Hauser- John Wayne Birth place

Winterset, Iowa: With construction underway on the long-awaited John Wayne Birthplace Museum, Duke’s hometown is buzzing with anticipation. To kick off the project the entire community is joining together in presenting the 2014 John Wayne Birthday Celebration May 23 & 24. Page 26

New to this year’s lineup will be a Rodeo/Western Swing Dance on May 23 (admission $15 individually or $25 combined) and special appearances by screen star Lana Wood, who played young Debbie in the acclaimed motion picture classic, “The Searchers.” Also new this year, the Iowa Cow-

boy Mounted Shooters Association present two shows where mounted contestants compete in a timed event using .45 caliber single-action revolvers. And authors Lana Wood and John Wayne’s daughter Aissa Wayne will join New York Times best-selling authors Scott Eyman and Glenn Fran-


kel in a book symposium to discuss their block-buster books on John Wayne and director John Ford. Continuing event favorites are free screenings of classic John Wayne movies at the vintage Iowa Theater, this year featuring “The Searchers,” “Stagecoach” and “The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.” Visitors may also enjoy a Fireman’s Pancake Breakfast, a 5K run/ walk, Pie Squared dessert tasting and tours of Madison County’s legendary Covered Bridges (nominal charges for each). The exciting Birthplace Museum Benefit Dinner takes place Saturday evening at 5pm where guests will enjoy a meal along with music, celebrities and an auction of John Wayne collectibles and memorabilia hosted by the actor’s daughter Aissa Wayne. Reservations are $125 per person. For more information and reservations visit http:// www.johnwaynebirthplace.museum/birthday or call 877-462-1044.

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Events

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May Issue GlenwoodNET