Page 1

glenwoodnet

ISSUE N.2.3 // YEAR two // MARCH 2014

your online community resource

Glenwood Students go to trial PlowCams now online 38 stunning pages easy to customize

Tax Tips beauty and elegance

gnet


gnet

GlenwoodNET ISSUE N.

EDITORIAL Executive editor

Tammie McCue | tammie@glenwoodnet.com Assistant editor

Liz Gunkelman | writer

Rose Deighton | writer

Steph Richards | Video Production Manager

Vince Salerno |

ADVERTISING Advertisement Sales

Steph Richards | Rose Deighton

Published by: McQnet Productions Glenwood Iowa www.mcqnet.com

Contributors: Lorrie Rasmussen, Rasmussen Accounting; John Hart Iowa Department of Transportation;

SUBSCRIPTIONS AND FEEDBACK www.glenwoodnet.com | tammie@glenwoodnet.com ŠMcQnet Productions 2014. All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of McQnet Productions is strictly forbidden.

2


glenwoodnet.com

3


Editorial Wow do we have an issue for you this month. First we’d like to welcome Liz Gunkelman to our team. Liz fill the role of Assistant Editor helping me with organization and leadership of our students. As for this issue, we have articles from the DOT, tax expert Lorrie Rasmussen, and a special article written by Liz as well as some wonderful articles written by our students. Last month we also started a new subscription to the magazine. As always, it is free. Subscribers will get the magazine in their inbox as soon as it is published. If you’d like to subscribe, go to our website at http://www.glenwoodnet.com and sign up!

Tammie

4


Contents COMMUNITY

EDUCATION

OTHER

11

06

25

12

Students go to “Mock” trial

Business Spotlight: Woods and Wyatt, PLLC

TAX TIPS PART 2

21

14

CULINARY CLASS

28

MEET STEPHANIE

MARYOTT TAKES STATE

PLOW CAMS NOW ON LINE

18

GLENWOOD HOSTS INDIVIDUAL STATE SPEECH

glenwoodnet.com

5


Glenwood Students go to “Mock” trial

6


Stephanie Richards

Robin Hundt Glenwood, Iowa

The plaintiff State of Iowa vs. the defendant Tatum Woodley, the case title of the 2014 Mock Trial competition, will sound familiar to the students who have made an addition to their extra-curricular opportunities. The case consisted of college students interacting with one another via a school affiliated social forum. The mock trial participants were glenwoodnet.com

7


to prove the innocence or guilt of the defendant regarding the allegations of cyberstalking and cyberharassment. Instructor Robin Hundt decided to start a Mock Trial team at Glenwood Community High School. In her efforts, she sparked an interest in many students. “I always liked to debate, and why not join Mock Trial. It could turn out to be something great,” said freshman Lauren McKee. The students that were presented with this opportunity will benefit from their experiences. Hundt hopes to introduce a professional atmosphere to her students. “Mock Trial will be an excellent introduction to the workings of the judicial system and will also allow students to see if they are truly interested in law and trial process,” said Hundt. 8

All District Outstanding Attorney: Stepha

All District Outstanding Witness: Sara W


anie Richards received two nominations. Hayleigh Palmer received one. Woods and Hayleigh Palmer received one nomination. glenwoodnet.com

The preparation for the competition; however, is a rigorous process. The students began by reading the case materials and memorizing rules and stipulations for the competitions. “It will be helpful for everyone to know each others parts, so we’re not nervous and also if someone gets sick,” said McKee. Although this program is just beginning, Hundt has background in this area. She has coached middle school Mock Trial teams as well as competed on one at the college level. “I have coached Mock Trial at Kearney Catholic High School. My students won their first two competitions, but did not move onto state,” said Hundt. “I saw incredible growth in their reasoning and oration abilities.” Her experiences will benefit the new group because they 9


will have a coach that knows just how much preparation and dedication is needed to succeed. “This activity takes an extreme amount of time and learning dedication,” said Hundt. “I believe the biggest challenge in preparing for Mock Trial is getting to the level necessary for competition.” The practices are an hour and a half long and are predicted to lengthen as competition approaches. The team not only works with Hundt, but they have brought in attorney Matt Woods to help them with the process. “Having a ‘real’ attorney assist us is not just an advantage, it is necessary,” said Hundt. “A trained attorney who knows the law inside and out, is so much better prepared to help the students, than even the most dedicated and knowledgeable coach could ever be.” The attorney helped them to know what to expect at their district competition held at Iowa Western Community College on Mar. 5. “The biggest challenge about mock trial was having to think on your feet during the competition. It was also a challenge to be well prepared,” said sophomore Sara Woods. The team has two attorneys and six witnesses. Their district competition consisted of a series of trials of the State vs. Woodley case. “Arguing on both sides was very difficult because it required my team members and I to know the case inside and out and prepare for both arguments,” said Sara Woods. Though the team did not make it to state this year, the new team plans to use their experience from this season to benefit them next season. “I think since we have experienced it and know what to expect, we can use that knowledge for next year, apply it and grow further from there,” said sophomore Sarai Waddell. District Outstanding Attorney: Stephanie Richards received two nominations. Hayleigh Palmer received one.

10


Business Spotlight:

Woods and Wyatt, PLLC Liz Gunkelman

Business: Tammie McCue Photography

Woods and Wyatt, PLLC is a hometown law firm located on the square at 10 N. Walnut Street. The practice covers many aspects of law including business, municipal, and family law. The attorneys’ work also includes the areas of real estate law, agricultural law, and general litigation. In 2011 the Glenwood practice was purchased from Peter’s law firm and Woods and Wyatt was founded. Justin Wyatt hales from Loma Linda, CA and studied at Creighton University to obtain his B.S. degree and later pursue a degree in law at the same university. Wyglenwoodnet.com

att graduated from Creighton’s law school in 2003. Matt Woods has worked in Glenwood since 1996 and is happily raising his three children here. Woods appreciates the locale and the type of clients he works with here. Woods recently helped with the high school students’ mock trial. He found the students to be very open and eager to learn trial court procedures and enjoyed his time working with them. Originally from Mason City, Iowa, Woods holds degrees in business from the University of Iowa and law from Creighton University. 11


Tax TIPS Part 2

Lorrie Rasmussen, Rasmussen Accounting

Filing Status for Same-sex Married Couples. If you have a same-sex spouse whom you legally married in a state (or foreign country) that recognizes same-sex marriage, you and your spouse generally must use the married filing jointly or married filing separately filing status on your 2013 return, even if you and your spouse now live in a state (or foreign country) that does not recognize same-sex marriages.

12

American Opportunity Credit. The American Opportunity Credit (AOC) is a modification of the Hope Credit that was set to expire on December 31, 2012. The maximum annual AOC amount is $2500 per eligible student for qualified education expenses (including course materials) paid for each of the first four years of the student’s post-secondary education in a degree or certificate program. 40% of the AOC is refundable. The AOC is phased out for taxpayers with Modified Adjusted


Gross Income between $80,000 and $90,000 ($160,000 and $180,000 for MFJ taxpayers). ATRA extends the AOC through December 31, 2017. Standard Mileage Rates. The 2013 rate for business use of your vehicle is increased to 56.5 cents a mile. The 2013 rate for use of your vehicle to get medical care or to move is increased to 24 cents a mile. Part 3 of 3 in April: • Why Should You and How Long Should You Keep Records? • What is the Taxpayer Advocate Service? • When Should You File and What if You Cannot File on Time?

glenwoodnet.com

13


Maryott Wins Big with Samsung Solve for Tomorrow Rose Deighton

Instructor Betsy Maryott’s environmental science class has been buzzing with activity. They recently created the bumblebee video. The three minute video is the third and final step to the Samsung Solve for Tomorrow contest. Maryott discovered the contest and filled the form out online explaining why she wanted to participate in the competition. In November, she received a congratulatory letter on being one of the top five winners in level one. She received two tablets and the opportunity to go to the next level. In the second level, Maryott had to write a very detailed lesson 14

plan for her bumblebee project and ended up being the state winner. Maryott along with 50 other national finalists moved to the third level which had to explain why they are doing the project and what the project is about. “It is an awesome project,” said Maryott. “The nation knows about bumblebees so it is a great issue.” To help the environmental science class learn more about bees, they brought in assistant professor of entomology Doug Golick along with a few others from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. “We learned many things


glenwoodnet.com

15


about bees and how they would live out their lives in a box and an actual hive,” said junior Blake Miller. The purpose of the project is teaching the students the importance of bumblebees as well as making an impact on the environment. “They learned about bumblebees and making a difference,” said Maryott. “Bumblebees are the only animal that can pollute tomatoes.” In the video, the students focused on loss of habitat and mono culture. Their goal was to find the best artificial home for bees. “We made boxes that we differed in size and shape and put a variety of objects in it,” said junior Kristina McIntosh. “We used the ends of cattails, hay and all different things. Maryott wrote the script, then the students performed it, critiqued the script, help set up the scenes, build the set and make the costumes. The environmental science class took a week filming the scenes which took place at a fictional bee school. Maryott focused on making the script funny and entertaining. 16

“I enjoyed watching the kids practice and be in character,” said Maryott. “When they put the costumes on they came alive.” Throughout the process, the class had to get all the supplies needed for the video. They needed a variety of things from wood to costumes to have a successful video. “I was flooded with generous people bringing me supplies,” said Maryott. “They’ve been really supportive. It is great for kids to see the community behind this.” The students and Maryott credit the community with all the help and donations needed. “The parents in the community have been amazing,” said Maryott. “I very much appreciated the support the community has given the project.” On Feb. 12 Maryott sent the video to Samsung. She was not one of


the 15 national finalists but still won $15,000 in video equipment and $20,000 in Samsung technology for the school. “We are trying to make our community better through science,” said Maryott. “We are a little school, but little things make a difference.” Students used in picture: Senior Madison Woodrum as the glenwoodnet.com

Bee Queen and the four Bee students junior Kennedy Hall, junior Blake Miller, junior Alexa Gress, and junior Randi Newman

17


One performer stands in front of an audience. Palms sweating, time 01. is running short. The student waits for the judge to look up signaling them to begin. The judge finally makes eye contact with the performer. For the single student, it is time. The Glenwood Community School individual speech team coached by instructor Russell Crouch, Bobbi Jo Rohrberg, and Deb Fajardo went to Shenandoah on Mar. 1 to participate at districts. Out of the 36 entries for the 10-12 grade team, 25 moved on to state. For the ninth grade team 11 out of six entries will be coming at state.

ROSE DEIGHTON

18


“I think the students did very well at district contest,” said Crouch. “There was some great competition and some tough judges so it was a good day for us. There are 14 different events that participants competed in, ranging from 5 to 8 minutes in performance time. Students are allowed to compete in two different categories. The 10-12 grade team and ninth grade team are each allowed three students per event. Like many other activities, practice is a large part of success. “I constantly am reading and tweaking my speech for hours,” said junior Sierra Halls. “It is ridiculous.” Categories such as literary program, poetry, and storytelling are popular with students and do not require memorization of the scripts whereas categories such as expository and review require students to write their own script and memorize it.

“I have been impressed by the students’ abilities to take on new categories,” said Fajardo. “I think that when students can step out of their comfort zones in new categories, they are challenged to grow in their speaking abilities. The uniqueness of Individual Speech is what draws some students to participant. Not only do they have many categories to choose from, there event is strictly individual. “It is a team but it’s individual,” said Halls. “You have a very large sense of person. You don’t have to rely on anyone else.” Because of this, there is no one to fall back on if one struggles. The participants face many challenges when performing. “Getting in front of people [is hard] and actually doing it because I’m very shy,” said senior Whitney Moody. “But I’d recommend it to anyone who can do it, it gives you a chance to get in-

Glenwood Hosts Individual State Speech glenwoodnet.com

19


volved and get out there.” Not only does nerves and shyness have to be overcome, the ability to speak is vital. “I think the hardest part is slowing down, and modifying the speech so people can understand and react to it,” said Halls. The atmosphere of individual speech is what makes some performers come back every year. “The whole atmosphere and the people in it are amazing to talk to,” said Halls. “I had conversations with people I probably wouldn’t have talked to.” The state contest is being held at Glenwood on Mar. 15 this year, which gives the team a home field advantage. Many community members will help to make the contest successful. The last time Glenwood hosted a speech competition was district large group last year. The team is busy preparing for the competition 20

and plans to take advantage of the location of state. “It will benefit our students to be competing in their home school,” said Rohrberg. “Having the contest at ‘home’ means we are likely to have a larger turnout of locals in the audience. Performing for familiar faces is always a bonus.”


Plow Cams now online for all to see drivers would experi- and resources. In ence on the roadway. extreme conditions, like white out situations, having our staff Initially the camera on the road is putting images were only available to Iowa DOT their safety at risk.” employees. “DurPlow cams images ing the initial phase are now available of the project we to the public via the found that having the images available Iowa DOT’s snowplow location map. helped our supervi“The images increase This winter, the Iowa sors evaluate road the amount of inforDOT has been testing conditions without having to drive every mation available to plow cams in about travelers to assist 100 winter mainteroute themselves,” them in making safer nance vehicles across said John Hart from the Iowa DOT’s Ofand more informed central Iowa. The travel decisions durcams take pictures fice of Maintenance. ing winter weather,” from the dash of the “Driving each route to evaluate the condi- states Hart. The vehicles to visually snowplow location show conditions tions takes a significant amount of time map can be found on AMES, Iowa – Feb. 27, 2014 – “What are the roads like?” and “Where are all the snowplows?” When the snow is falling, those are two of the most commonly asked questions at the Iowa Department of Transportation.

glenwoodnet.com

21


the Iowa DOT’s winter driving” page, www.iowadot.gov/winterdriving. Other resources on the page include 511 travel conditions, traffic cameras, Weatherview and winter driving safety tips.

house by Iowa DOT staff allowing flexibility to quickly make adjustments to the way images are presented to the public.

“We believe the benefits far outweigh the costs for this project,” said Hart. “We want to make Hart said, “Its one thing to see a the best possible use of our re511 map with pink or blue roads sources. We have already proven indicating completely or partially that having these images availcovered roads. But these terms able saves time and money for can mean different things to dif- our winter operations, and we’re ferent people. Being able to see hopeful that the increased inthe road condition out the wind- formation for travelers will help shield of a snowplow gives a bet- save lives, too.” ter indication of the actual travel conditions on the road right While the project has been pilotnow.” ed in central Iowa, plow cams will gradually be added throughout Photos on the map disappear af- the state. The goal is to have covter 30 minutes to assure travelerage over most of Iowa by next ers have the most current images winter season. available. The Iowa DOT is using iPhone 4s for the plow cams. The phones were provided at no cost by the data carrier with the purchase of a data plan. Data plans were negotiated at a reduced rate. The map and application to feed images to the map were created in22

Permission received to reprint from John Hart @Iowa DOT

Contacts: John Hart at 515-239-1312, john. hart@dot.iowa.gov or Craig Bargfrede 515239-1355, craig.bargfrede@dot.iowa.gov - See more at: http://www.news.iowadot.gov/newsandinfo/2014/02/plowcams-now-online-for-all-to-see-iatraffic. html#sthash.yefUmkj5.dpuf


glenwoodnet.com

23


24

The Culinary Class Creates Meals


ROSE DEIGHTON

A smell wafts in the hallway, reaching the noses of hungry students waiting for lunch. Many comment on how good the scent smells but the enticing smell comes from the second floor. The smell can be traced back to Janis Moore’s

glenwoodnet.com

room. The culinary class is busy cooking their next meal. Glenwood Community High School’s culinary class cooks nine meals a semester for their relatives, friends, faculty and staff, and students. Culinary is the highest food 25


class offered at GCHS and instructor Moore would like the students to take both food choices and global foods before taking culinary, but only one is required. The students wanting to participate must fill out an application to apply. “I don’t let them in just because they sign up,” said Moore. “They need people skills and food preparation skills.” There are five main steps that the culinary class follows before each meal. Each of the steps is vital to the outcome of the meals. First, the students must plan the meal. They focus on the aesthetics of the meal, wanting to appeal to color, tex26

tures, temperature, and flavor as well as figuring out how it will visually look on the plate. “We don’t practice any food,” said

Moore. “When you are making the food, there are no doovers.” The second step of the process is sending three to four students to go pick out groceries for the meal that week. The groceries must be put away and stored properly after purchasing. While a few

students are at the grocery store, the others are cleaning the room, making menus, ironing tablecloths, starching and ironing napkins, picking music, and choosing centerpieces.   “We get assigned different jobs,” said junior Jamie Davis. “We write down our name on the job we want, but can also help others. We all get along very well.”   The third step that the Culinary Class performs is the preprep day in which they perform little jobs such as grating cheese and chopping vegetables. “They have to pay


attention to detail which helps in almost everything,” said Moore. “Working with others. being a part of a team, and pulling their weight [is important]”. Full-out prep day is the fourth step, the final day before the students service their meal. Sometimes the students even cut into their lunch time if the jobs are not completed.   “It’s an untold number of hours [put in],” said Moore. “I’m very proud of all the work and effort they put in because they are proud of the [meals] they put out.”   The fifth and final step of culinary is arranging the room, having the servers dress up, and actually serving the meal. They serve around 30 to 40 people per meal. “It is nerve racking ordering plates,” said senior Hunter Ackerson. “But it’s fun because you got to see all the people and how they like the food.” Once they have served the meal, the students are able to eat themselves. Besides the gratification from eating something they have cooked, the students glenwoodnet.com

hand out feedback sheets from the people that attend. “They say they enjoy the meal, feel as if the kids do a good job, have improved in serving from the beginning, and feel as if they get their money’s worth,” said Moore. Not only is culinary beneficial in helping the students to improve their cooking ability, it allows them to learn other valuable life skills “It will help me to learn social skills because you have to wait on people,” said Davis. “It is easier if you want a culinary based job and helps you work with people.” Not only do the students learn skills, working together is vital in culinary. “This group has done an exceptional job working together,” said Moore. “It shows maturity working with all other people.” The thirteen students must learn how to get along and cooperate as a group to make all the culinary meals and jobs possible.

27


Meet Stephanie Stephanie Richards

I was an athlete. I played and participated in nearly every sport. I took a few self defense classes, did studio dance, coach pitch softball, volleyball, basketball, soccer; I even competed in figure skating for ten, almost eleven years. After my athlete phase came to an end, I was still extremely interested in sports. As a sport spectator, I began to develop a lot of opinions about referee’s calls, particular games or match ups, and specifically professional and college level sports. Instead of being that couch potato that used my vocals to make my opinions known, I began to write. Anyone can write. A kinder28

Tammie McCue

gartener can write words, but it takes a dedicated human being to make sense of it. It all began with my fifth grade teacher assigning me a descriptive poem. She said I had beautiful word choice. Diction in writing, I now know, is key. Then on to sixth grade when I was assigned to write a short story. The short story was to consist of seven pages or so that was a true narration, we had a month to complete it. The day after I was made aware of the assignment, my final draft was on my teachers desk. Writing gave me a purpose. Later that day I came in early to recess, to find my sixth grade teacher Mrs. Jus-


tice crying. Yes, my teacher that is constantly yelling at slackers and flustered with the general population of my sixth grade class, crying. She told me that my story was moving. She told me I was a writer. As I made my transition into Glenwood and my even bigger transition into high school, I signed up for the Glenwood Community High School Journalism class. I walked in to a class full of upperclassmen. Not only was I the new girl, I was the freshman. Being lead by such a dedicated staff, I was taught the ins and outs of Journalism. I was given a lot fewer pieces than the others whom had been writing a lot longer than I, I picked up on it. Since then, Journalism has been my main focus. In fact, I plan to major in Journalism and have visited many of the top universities in this department. As my descent into college draws nearer, I plan to translate my passion for sports writing into a news print writing and pursue this in college as well as my future career.

glenwoodnet.com

29


Events

March

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

03

04

05

10

11

12

17

18

19

25

26

St Patricks Day

24/31 30

TUESDAY


Calendar THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

01

Annie - Mills Masquers 7:00pm

06

07

Annie - Mills Masquers 7:00pm

13

14

20

21

27

28

Annual Women’s Health Conference

glenwoodnet.com

08

Annie - Mills Masquers 7:00pm

Sunday

02

Annie - Mills Masquers 2:00pm

09 daylights savings time

Annie - Mills Masquers 2:00pm

15

16

22

23

29

30

Kegs & Eggs 7-11am Keg Creek

Booster Club Auction 5:30pm

31


Events

April

MONDAY

32

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

01

02

07

08

09

14

15

16

21

22

23

28

29

30


Calendar THURSDAY

FRIDAY

03

04

05

06

10

11

12

13

17

18

19

20

24

25

26

Spring Boutique - Vine Street Cellars 6-8pm

glenwoodnet.com

SATURDAY

Sunday

Autism Awareness Walk 10am - 4pm Glenwood Lake Park

EASTER

27

33




  

  

               

34

                 


glenwoodnet.com

35

Gnet march magazine  

Glenwood Iowa Community Magazine - March 2014 Edition

Advertisement