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PLACE: TRANSFORMATION AND CHANGE …

Welcome to 21 Century Learning – Links to Our Collection. This online module and supplemental education guide was developed to allow access to hundreds of digitized images and lesson plans from Glenbow Museum’s collections. Our hope is to extend our vision of ‘More people, interacting with art, culture and ideas more often.’ st

Please visit and enjoy 21st Century Learning – Place: Transformation and Change.

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This educator’s package presents insightful information about Glenbow’s collection of Historical, Modern and Contemporary Art. The information encourages students to examine artwork from the Glenbow Museum’s collection and look carefully and critically in order to create dialogue and thoughtful discussions about the art, its purpose and how its role has evolved throughout the years. Included in this guide are:  Information on the Art Collections including high-resolution photographs, online and print readings and resources.  Lesson plans including discussions for looking at primary sources, curriculum connections and lesson plans for a variety of ages and abilities.  Detailed listing of vocabulary and concepts.  Suggested sources for further research and other information.

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CONTENTS History of Glenbow Museum Program purpose Educational guide purpose Education Module Listing of Images Vocabulary Curriculum connections Lesson Plans Lesson One: Place: Transformation and Change … Grade 1 – 6 Lesson Two: Place: Preservation of Transformation Grade 7 – 12 Acknowledgements Readings and Resources

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HISTORY OF GLENBOW MUSEUM Glenbow Museum began with the remarkable vision of petroleum entrepreneur and lawyer Eric Lafferty Harvie. Mr. Harvie came into his fortune when oil was discovered in 1949 on land near Leduc and Redwater, for which he held the mineral rights. With this prosperity, he decided to pursue his favourite passion — collecting — and simultaneously return some of his good fortune back to the region that had been so generous to him. Mr. Harvie's goal was to collect the objects representing the history and culture of Western Canada as well as from around the world. Eric Harvie began collecting material relating to the history of Western Canada in the 1950s, developing an extensive collection of art, artifacts, books and archival material from North America that tell the fascinating story of Aboriginal peoples, frontier exploration, and the development of western Life. He built on these North American collections with extraordinary artifacts and art from Asia, West Africa, South America, and islands in the Pacific, eventually amassing a huge museum collection. Establishing the Glenbow Foundation in 1954, Mr. Harvie's collection became an eclectic blend of western history and international art and artifacts. In 1966, Eric Harvie and his family donated his impressive collection of art, artifacts, and historical documents to the people of Alberta. Today, Glenbow Museum is one of the largest museums in Canada, playing an essential role in defining Western Canadian culture.

PROGRAM PURPOSE The intent of Glenbow Museum’s Digitization Project is to infuse Alberta classrooms and communities with Glenbow Museum’s collection of culture and art. The importance of engaging viewers in primary source investigation is essential to developing creative thinking, visual literacy and observational skills. This program was developed in conjunction with the Glenbow Museum and the Alberta Government to establish exciting curriculum connections between the Glenbow Museum and Alberta communities. This program consists of six exhibitions of digitized images from our collections, educational materials for viewers of all ages and online resources. We encourage you to spend time with each online exhibition and use these resources.

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EDUCATIONAL GUIDE PURPOSE The purpose of this educational guide is to assist educators and other viewers with the incorporation of the Glenbow Museum Digitization Program into the classroom or other educational site. This guide contains education philosophies for looking at and working with primary sources, vocabulary on relevant terms, curriculum connections and ways to gather meaning from the artifacts. Also included are suggested lesson plans for a more in-depth look at the various areas of content. The lesson plans include questions to encourage discussion and deeper looking, inquiry-based activities, extensions and assessment. All of these lesson plans can be adapted to any age or ability level. Please take time to preview the educator's guide and enjoy Place: Transformation and Change ‌ from Glenbow Museum’s Digitization Program.

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EDUCATION MODULE

Catherine Ross, Stella Mere [detail], 1996-99, Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008.120.001

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LISTING OF IMAGES Catherine Ross Canadian (b. 1956) Stella Mere, 1996-99 aluminum, steel Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.120.001 Karin Bubas Canadian (b. 1976) Exterior Study at Night #12, 2002 photograph Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.011 Victor Cicansky Canadian (b. 1935) Armchair Tomato, 2006 dense foam, UV paint, clearcoat Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.044.001 Thaddeus Holownia Canadian (b. 1949) KM. 141, 1999 colour contact photographic print on RC paper Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2007 2007.143.012 Chris Flodberg Canadian (b. 1976) Overpass, 2004 oil on canvas Collection of Glenbow Museum; Purchased with funds from the Historic Resource Fund, 2008 2008.063.001 Orest Semchishen Canadian (b. 1932) Clouds and Field, Southern SK, 1990 black and white photograph, silver gelatin print Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.055.473 7


John Hartman Canadian (b. 1950) Nobuo's Mountain, 2000 oil on linen Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.084.002 Robin Collyer Canadian (b. 1949) Regents Park, 2004 photograph on paper, edition 1/5 Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.004 John Noestheden Dutch/Canadian (b. 1945) Seventeen Galaxies 2007 acrylic and titanium ore on paper From the series Titanium Drawings Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.071.003 Gershon Iskowitz Polish/Canadian (1921-1988) Untitled C-118, 1977 watercolour on wove paper Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Jerry Radowitz, 2008 2008.088.009 Lynn Cohen American/Canadian (b. 1944) Warehouse, Canadian Wildlife Association Ottawa, 1979 photograph, edition 4 Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.014 John Brocke Canadian (1953-2009) Via La Butte, 1986-87 oil on linen Collection of Glenbow Museum. Gift of Lazare Family- Montreal, 2009 2009.023.001

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VOCABULARY

Abstract – Having only intrinsic form with little or no attempt at pictorial representation or narrative content <abstract painting Art - The expression or application of human creative skill and imagination, typically in a visual form such as painting or sculpture, producing works to be appreciated primarily for their beauty or emotional power Collage - An artistic composition of materials and objects pasted over a surface, often with unifying lines and color Contemporary Art/Artist –Artists who create contemporary art, i.e. those whose peak of activity can be situated somewhere between the 1970s (the advent of postmodernism) and the present day. Modern Art – Modern art refers to artistic works produced during the period extending roughly from the 1860s to the 1970s, and denotes the style and philosophy of the art produced during that era. Oil Painting – Is the process of painting with pigments that are bound with a medium of drying oil — especially in early modern Europe, linseed oil. Photograph – The descendents of the original inhabitants of North America. First Nations, Inuit, and Métis peoples have unique heritages, languages, cultural practices and spiritual beliefs. Photography – A group of people with commonalities that may include culture, language, values and beliefs, interests, practices and ways of life, history and /or geographically defined shared space. Place – Differences in groups having a variety of languages, ethnicities, nationalities, with in a shared space. Triptych - a : a picture (as an altarpiece) or carving in three panels side by side b : something composed or presented in three parts or sections

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CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS ART Grades 1 - 6 Reflection: responses to visual forms in nature, designed objects and artworks Depiction: development of imagery based on observations of the visual world. Expression: use of art materials as a vehicle or medium for saying something in a meaningful way Grades 7 - 12 Record: Students will acquire a repertoire of approaches to record visual information. Investigate: Students will develop the ability to investigate visual relationships in the environment and in their recorded images. Communicate: Students will demonstrate technical competencies and express individual insights. Articulate and Evaluate: Students will apply visual, analytical and critical skills and develop control and competency. LANGUAGE ARTS 1.1 Discover and Explore 1.2 Clarify and Extend 2.1 Use Strategies and Cues 3.1 Plan and Focus 3.2 Select and Process 3.3 Organize, Record and Evaluate 3.4 Share and Review 4.1 Enhance and Improve 4.3 Present and Share 5.2 Works within a Group

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LESSON PLANS PLACE: TRANSFORMATION AND CHANGE… Recommended grades: 3 - 6 Time required: 30 minute class lessons Materials needed: Cardstock or firm paper, images included in this package, drawing materials, glue, scissors, text collage materials and copies of Definition of Place included below

INTRODUCTION What is place? What is the definition of place…or what is your definition of place? Prior to the advent of cameras and computers, an artist’s role was to capture this ‘place’; this moment in time, these instances that people wanted to keep for posterity for years to come. In this program, students will come to learn the definition of place and what it means to them. They will explore and discover how place changes within seconds and although humans are attached to capturing these places, a split second later they’ll have changed.

OBJECTIVES At the end of this lesson, students will have learned:

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The definition of place and how and why this has been important to artists through the ages.

Information on the art and artists included in this package.


IMAGES Please Print in Colour if Possible

Karin Bubas Canadian (b. 1976) Exterior Study at Night #12, 2002 photograph Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.011 At first glance this image could be mistaken for a dimly lit indoor room overlooking a bright view of a sunny exterior through a large window. However, this colour photograph was taken from the back porch of a house at night. Do you see the car hidden behind the porch and the old vinyl covered chair? A closer look through the curtainless window reveals a large, brightly lit room with books and shelves. Beyond, the neighbor's window has plants on the windowsill. This image might feel haunting to the viewer because there are no people in the photograph other than the photographer, but there are many clues that suggest these spaces are inhabited.

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Thaddeus Holownia Canadian (b. 1949) KM. 141, 1999 colour contact photographic print on RC paper Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2007 2007.143.012

There were elements that exactly corresponded to the way I like to look at a landscape. The pipeline was very modern and it happened very quickly. I think one of the attractions for me was the fact that it was going to happen, was going to change, and then it was going to be done. I liked the aspect of compressed time. I titled the works by the kilometer, which seemed like an engineer's way of naming. - Thaddeus Holownia

"Anatomy of a Pipeline" is a photographic narrative of laying a pipeline over 568 kilometers from the coast of Nova Scotia to the border of Maine. The photographs were taken over a twoyear period. In this image at the 141st kilometer mark, the artist chose to photograph the deeply carved out ground, which seems to split the horizon of trees right down the middle.

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Chris Flodberg Canadian (b. 1976) Overpass, 2004 oil on canvas Collection of Glenbow Museum; Purchased with funds from the Historic Resource Fund, 2008 2008.063.001

Do you recognize the city in this painting? It's a portrait of Calgary, but in this work Chris Flodberg uses roads as the main subject rather than people or buildings. More precisely, this is the overpass where Bow Trail and Crowchild Trail meet. In the distance, the silhouette of the Foothills Hospital can be seen. Is there something in this painting that doesn't seem right to you? The artist chose not to paint any vehicles on the roads, which makes everything look eerie and still on a cold winter day. Even if there are no cars on the roads there is still sign of human activity: you can see puffs of smoke coming out of the heated buildings in the background.

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Orest Semchishen Canadian (b. 1932) Clouds and Field, Southern SK, 1990 black and white photograph, silver gelatin print Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.055.473 Semchishenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photographs are direct and simple. He revels in the clean forms and expansive skies of the prairies. Here, the horizon is countered by the fence posts, while the curved form of the stone is complimented by the soft curves of the solitary cloud. The receding fence pushes the eye into the near infinity of the field. By exploiting the simple balance and natural state of the landscape the artist is letting it speak for itself. What sort of feelings to prairie landscapes evoke in you? Why do you think artists are drawn to these minimal landscapes?

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John Brocke Canadian (1953-2009) Via La Butte, 1986-87 oil on linen Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Lazare Family- Montreal, 2009 2009.023.001 Like all of Brockeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paintings Via La Butte is carefully composed. A hill (butte) forms a gentle triangular shape in the work, creating a feeling of stability and balance. On the right, a large white bull looks towards the viewer. Barely visible at the crest of the hill is a satyr (a creature thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s half man and half goat), while a small orange airplane ascends on the left side of the work. The setting of Via La Butte is on Highway 1, between Calgary and Banff. This location is both sacred for the First Nations people, and the first outcropping of the rocks that eventually form the Rocky Mountains. What was the artist trying to accomplish by combining so many different elements in one image? Why do you think the bull is looking directly at the viewer?

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Place - noun \ˈplās\ Definition of PLACE 1 a : physical environment : SPACE b : a way for admission or transit c : physical surroundings : ATMOSPHERE 2 a : an indefinite region or expanse <all over the place> b : a building or locality used for a special purpose <a place of learning> <a fine eating place> c archaic : the three-dimensional compass of a material object 3 a : a particular region, center of population, or location <a nice place to visit> b : a building, part of a building, or area occupied as a home <our summer place> 4 : a particular part of a surface or body : SPOT 5 : relative position in a scale or series: as a : position in a social scale <kept them in their place> b : a step in a sequence <in the first place, it's none of your business> c : a position at the conclusion of a competition <finished in last place> 6 a : a proper or designated niche or setting <the place of education in society> b : an appropriate moment or point <this is not the place to discuss compensation — Robert Moses> c : a distinct condition, position, or state of mind <the postfeminist generation is in a different place — Betty Friedan> 7 a : an available seat or accommodation <needs a place to stay> b : an empty or vacated position <new ones will take their place> 8 : the position of a figure in relation to others of a row or series; especially : the position of a digit within a numeral 9 a : remunerative employment : JOB b : prestige accorded to one of high rank : STATUS <an endless quest for preferment and place — Time> 10 : a public square : PLAZA 11 : a small street or court 12 : second place at the finish (as of a horse race) — in place 1 also into place a : in an original or proper position b : established, instituted, or operational <systems in place> 2 : in the same spot without forward or backward movement <run in place> — in place of : as a substitute or replacement for : INSTEAD OF — out of place 1 : not in the proper or usual location

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HOW TO LOOK AT ART SENSORY LOOKING FINDING THE MEANING IN ART Recommended for Grades 1 - 6

FIND An artwork that makes you CURIOUS. What colours, lines, shapes, and textures do you see?

LOOK DEEPLY And notice the WORDS AND IDEAS that pop into your head as you OBSERVE the artwork closely. What is going on in this scene?

USING YOUR SENSES Use your imagination and walk into the artwork. What PLACE in the artwork have you walked in to? Are you COMFORTABLE there? Imagine the sounds you might hear. What do you SMELL AND TASTE? What EMOTIONS come to you in this place?

YOUR LAST WORD What is the artist COMMUNICATING to you? Is there a feeling, message or story?

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HOW TO LOOK AT ART CLAIM / SUPPORT / QUESTION A REASONING ROUTINE Recommended for Grades 7 – 12

MAKE A CLAIM ABOUT THE ARTWORK Claim: An explanation or interpretation of an aspect of an artwork.

IDENTIFY AND SUPPORT YOUR CLAIM Support: Things you see, feel and know that support your claim.

ASK A QUESTION RELATED TO YOUR CLAIM Question: Alternative explanations, counter-evidence, puzzles or challenges that could call your claim, or its support into question.

Take a few moments to look quietly at an artwork. Use the rountine to helkp frame your thoughts. Take turns using the routine, so that each person makes a claim about the artwork, identifies support for the claim and raises a question about the claim. Following each person’s report, take a moment as a group to discuss the artwork in relation to the claim, before moving to the next person.

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ACTIVITY PROCEDURES PLACE: TRANSFORMATION AND CHANGE … Recommended grades: 3 - 6 Time required: 30 minute class lessons Materials Needed: Images provided in package, writing tools, scissors, glue, collage materials, text materials and Definition of Place (included in this package)

The purpose of this activity is to create understanding about the definition of place and the concept of time. Place can be interpreted in many different ways and time can truly change things. Perhaps a mountain will erode, a river will find a new path or subjects will move. Throughout the years the idea of capturing place and time has changed. In the past a human could use memory to capture place and in turn use it in their artwork. As years went on, with the advent of the camera, suddenly that exact moment in time could be captured...for the first time ever it really was seized at that exact instant. But is it real? No. It’s a photograph. In seconds that moment in time changes and becomes different. The goal of this activity is for students to use the images provided, visualize and create the moments in time prior to and after the original image, creating a triptych.

INSTRUCTIONS 1. Print out 5 - 6 copies of the Definition of Place – depending on your class size.

2. Triptych’s have been utilized as a format in art for centuries. In cathedrals and galleries around the world one can view the narrative content and storytelling methods used within a triptych. With the students together in a large group explain a Triptych, their function in art and how they are made.

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3. Triptych â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a : a picture (as an altarpiece) or carving in three panels side by side b : something composed or presented in three parts or sections; especially : TRILOGY

4. Create a large scale Triptych background using fairly firm paper or cardstock.

5. Split the group into 5 or 6 smaller groups and give each group a copy of the Definition of Place.

6. Utilizing the images included in this package, have the students look through and decide their favourite image and match it with a definition of Place they believe works well with the image.

7. With the original photo as the centre piece, create a triptych that shows the moments, hours or days before the original image. For example: If the image depicts the mountains with the sun in the middle, the students will draw the moments in time before this - move the sun in the sky and perhaps the shadows on the mountain peaks and add it to the left panel of the triptych...on the right hand side create the moments after.

8. To finish the images students can print out and use an interesting font and add text, collage materials and add their definition of place into the piece.

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9. Once the projects are done, exhibit them around the room and allow the student’s time to view each piece. Have a class critique and allow the students time to discuss their own ideas of place how they have added this inspiration into their artworks. Does each student’s piece reflect what the class would consider place? How does your piece differ from your neighbours? Discuss how the student’s ideas of place have changed or stayed the same. Discuss why each student chose their images and words to visually describe place.

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PLACE: PRESERVATION OF TRANSFORMATION Recommended grades: 7 -12 Time required: 45 minute class lessons (can be combined for older students) Materials Needed: Images provided in package, camera, writing tools, scissors, glue, collage materials, text materials and Definition of Place included in this package

INTRODUCTION What is place? What is the definition of place…or what is your definition of place? Prior to the advent of cameras and computers, an artist’s role was to capture this ‘place’; this moment in time, these places that people wanted to keep for posterity for years to come. In this program, students will come to learn the definition of place and what it means to them. They will explore and discover how place changes within seconds and although humans are attached to capturing these places, a split second later they’ll have changed.

OBJECTIVES At the end of this lesson, students will have learned:

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The definition of place and how and why this has been important to artists through the ages.

Information on the art and artists included in this package.


IMAGES Please Print in Colour if Possible

Karin Bubas Canadian (b. 1976) Exterior Study at Night #12, 2002 photograph Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.011 At first glance this image could be mistaken for a dimly lit indoor room overlooking a bright view of a sunny exterior through a large window. However, this colour photograph was taken from the back porch of a house at night. Do you see the car hidden behind the porch and the old vinyl covered chair? A closer look through the curtainless window reveals a large, brightly lit room with books and shelves. Beyond, the neighbor's window has plants on the windowsill. This image might feel haunting to the viewer because there are no people in the photograph other than the photographer, but there are many clues that suggest these spaces are inhabited.

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Victor Cicansky Canadian (b. 1935) Armchair Tomato, 2006 dense foam, UV paint, clearcoat Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.044.001 What do you call a person who watches a lot of television? A couch potato! This funny expression isn’t the only saying that refers to vegetables when we speak of doing nothing. For example, we can also say that someone’s “vegetating”. Do you think the artist used these expressions as inspiration for his Armchair Tomato? In addition to the fun play on words, this glossy, cartoon-like sculpture of a giant red tomato sitting in a life-size blue armchair is also amusing to look at. Armchair Tomato is fabricated with dense foam covered with a hard coating, then painted with a UV paint and protected with Clearcoat. This is a relatively new technology that is now being widely used in advertising as well as theme park and zoo architecture. The three-dimensional objects made with this technology can withstand public display in indoor and outdoor settings. A number of artists are finding it to be a useful medium for the fabrication of art. 25


John Hartman Canadian (b. 1950) Nobuo's Mountain, 2000 oil on linen Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.084.002 In the winter of 2000, I was resident artist at the Art Gallery of Kelowna [in British Columbia]. The gallery director at that time was Margaret Dryden. Her home was located north of the city on the height of land between Lakes Okanogan and Kalamalka. I was intrigued by the view of the small mountain just north of her house. She told me that Nobuo Kubota's family had worked in the orchards under this mountain during or immediately after their internment here in the Second World War. She said that the mountain became a place of spiritual solace to Nobuo. The reclining figure in the sky is Nobuo. His parents are on his back. There are full fruit baskets beside them. To Nobuo's right and under his head is an image of the thousands of boomed up fishing boats confiscated from Japanese Canadians during the war. - John Hartman

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Chris Flodberg Canadian (b.1976) Overpass, 2004 oil on canvas Collection of Glenbow Museum; Purchased with funds from the Historic Resource Fund, 2008 2008.063.001 Do you recognize the city in this painting? It's a portrait of Calgary, but in this work Chris Flodberg uses roads as the main subject rather than people or buildings. More precisely, this is the overpass where Bow Trail and Crowchild Trail meet. In the distance, the silhouette of the Foothills Hospital can be seen. Is there something in this painting that doesn't seem right to you? The artist chose not to paint any vehicles on the roads, which makes everything look eerie and still on a cold winter day. Even if there are no cars on the roads there is still sign of human activity: you can see puffs of smoke coming out of the heated buildings in the background. 27


Robin Collyer Canadian (b. 1949) Regents Park, 2004 photograph on paper, edition 1/5 Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.004 Look closely at this image, what do you see? Are you looking at a building, a reflection of a building, or neither? Upon closer inspection you can see that this photograph of an apartment complex in a park-like setting has been altered. The artist seems to have layered two or more images over each other, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been done in such a puzzling way that you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really figure out how all the pieces fit. Robin Collyer likes to work with images from the everyday world that surrounds him, and changes them in such a way that makes us think twice about what we see, or think we see. 28


John Noestheden Dutch/Canadian (b. 1945) Seventeen Galaxies (from the series Titanium Drawings), 2007 acrylic and titanium ore on paper Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of the Artist, 2008 2008.071.003 Count the red ovals in this work and you will see that there are seventeen. If you know the title of the work, and if you knew that galaxies are usually represented by the colour red in star guides, it would be a good guess if you said that the red ovals in this work represent galaxies. If the red ovals are galaxies, then what are the black spots? The artist gives us no more hints in the title, and black isn't used to represent any specific thing in star maps. They are circular rather than oval-shaped, and they come in a wide variety of sizes. What do you think they represent: stars, planets, or maybe black holes? What if you knew that the black circles aren't painted, but that they are actually holes punched through the paper? 29


Gershon Iskowitz Polish/Canadian (1921-1988) Untitled C-118, 1977 watercolour on wove paper Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Jerry Radowitz, 2008 2008.088.009 The brilliant watercolours in this series are all the same size and share many qualities: luminous colours floating on white grounds; the spontaneous application of dabs of four colours on wet paper; and a sense of exuberant animation. Each watercolour is a remarkable, joyful improvisation on colour and space. There is a lot of movement in this painting. Can you guess which colours the artist applied first by looking at how the colours are layered? Can you tell which direction he was painting in by examining his brushstrokes?

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Lynn Cohen American/Canadian (b. 1944) Warehouse, Canadian Wildlife Association Ottawa, 1979 Photograph, edition 4 Collection of Glenbow Museum; Gift of Paul E. Bain, 2007 2007.111.014 Lynne Cohen is known for her photographs of domestic and institutional interior spaces, which have included living rooms, public halls, retirement homes, laboratories, offices, beauty spas, shooting ranges, and military installations. This is an image of an office space that was photographed in 1979. Are there clues in the room that suggests this office belonged to a person working for the Canadian Wildlife Association? Do you think this space might have changed since then, if it still exists? Cohen photographs the spaces as she finds them and does not modify them in any way. Even if we know these places are real, they still give the impression that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re viewing a theatre set with a large empty stage and bright lights overhead. All her images never feature people living and interacting in the spaces, but a human presence can always be felt through certain elements decorating those spaces. 31


Place - noun \ˈplās\ Definition of PLACE 1 a : physical environment : SPACE b : a way for admission or transit c : physical surroundings : ATMOSPHERE 2 a : an indefinite region or expanse <all over the place> b : a building or locality used for a special purpose <a place of learning> <a fine eating place> c archaic : the three-dimensional compass of a material object 3 a : a particular region, center of population, or location <a nice place to visit> b : a building, part of a building, or area occupied as a home <our summer place> 4 : a particular part of a surface or body : SPOT 5 : relative position in a scale or series: as a : position in a social scale <kept them in their place> b : a step in a sequence <in the first place, it's none of your business> c : a position at the conclusion of a competition <finished in last place> 6 a : a proper or designated niche or setting <the place of education in society> b : an appropriate moment or point <this is not the place to discuss compensation — Robert Moses> c : a distinct condition, position, or state of mind <the postfeminist generation is in a different place — Betty Friedan> 7 a : an available seat or accommodation <needs a place to stay> b : an empty or vacated position <new ones will take their place> 8 : the position of a figure in relation to others of a row or series; especially : the position of a digit within a numeral 9 a : remunerative employment : JOB b : prestige accorded to one of high rank : STATUS <an endless quest for preferment and place — Time> 10 : a public square : PLAZA 11 : a small street or court 12 : second place at the finish (as of a horse race) — in place 1 also into place a : in an original or proper position b : established, instituted, or operational <systems in place> 2 : in the same spot without forward or backward movement <run in place> — in place of : as a substitute or replacement for : INSTEAD OF — out of place 1 : not in the proper or usual location

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ACTIVITY PROCEDURES PLACE: PERSERVATION OF TRANSFORMATION Recommended grades: 7 - 12 Time required: 45 minute class lessons Materials Needed: Images provided in package, camera, writing tools, scissors, glue, collage materials, text materials and Definition of Place (included in this package)

The purpose of this activity is to create understanding about the definition of place and the concept of time. Place can be interpreted in many different ways and time can truly change things. Perhaps a mountain will erode, a river will find a new path or subjects will move. Throughout the years the idea of capturing place and time has changed. In the past a human could use memory to capture place and in turn use it in their artwork. As years moved forward, the advent of the camera suddenly allowed exact moments in time to be captured...for the first time ever it really was seized in that exact instant. But is it real? No. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a photograph. In seconds that moment in time changes and becomes different. The goal of this activity is for students to use the images provided and combine them with the definition list to write and create an art piece about what time and place mean to them.

INSTRUCTIONS

1. As a class discuss the idea of place. What is place? When you think of place what do you think of? What do you feel? Does the word make you long for times past or is it somewhere or something that you connect with daily?

2. Print out and distribute the Definition of Place list. Once the students have read through the list encourage them to brainstorm what and how they think about the word place.

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3. Have the students use the How to Look at Art handout and browse the images included in this package. Allow them time to think deeply and critically how these images paired with the definitions make them feel. Where do they think of? Is there a place?

4. Explain to the students that they will be using a camera over a period of days and photographing a place they have considered in this process. It can be any place as long as it speaks to them in some way.

5. Using a camera, find a spot in the world that you love and choose a specific time.

6. Over a period of four days, go to the place at the exact same time. Line the camera up in exactly the same alignment at the exact same time during the four day stretch. The four days do not have to be consecutive they could be spread out over weeksâ&#x20AC;Ś(Teachers you may set parameters around the project)

7. Once the students have photographed their place over the four day period have them print out their images. Notice the changes throughout the days â&#x20AC;Ś the light on a building, the clouds and sky changing, how the sun can be in almost the exact same spot yet somehow look different.

8. On a firm cardstock, have the students begin to layout and create a dynamic image/collage from their photos. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t glue yet. Just layout. Perhaps they could slice up the photos into 4 equal sections and repaint or redraw the image with the changes or simply glue them onto the paper in order of day. Layer, cut up or disassemble and reassemble the pieces.

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9. Once the students have developed their re-imagined images, allow them time to begin writing about what place and time mean to them. Use some of the questions and sentence starters included in this package to begin recording their thoughts in words.

10. Once they have written their piece about place and time, have the students add the writing with interesting text or a paintbrush. Encourage them to show their writing through their images and interpret their images with words.

11. When the students are finished, have them go back to their place. Now take a photograph of their piece in front of the actual place. As a class, Compare and contrast their pieces and allow them time to discuss their piece and its meaning to them.

QUESTIONS AND SENTENCE STARTERS         

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What is your favourite place? Why? Has time changed this place or has time changed you? How does time change things? What can time do to a person? Will it change a person? How? How does time move? What can time do to landscape and our surroundings? Is time real? Is it important to you? What was it about this specific place that made you want to choose it? What do you think about when you think of time?


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This project was funded in part by the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation.

THE GLENBOW MUSEUM WOULD LIKE TO THANK THEM FOR THEIR CONTRIBUTION.

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RECOMMENDED READINGS AND RESOURCES WEBSITES Alberta Curriculum Standards: education.alberta.ca Inquiry Based Learning: http://www.glenbow.org/mavericks/teacher/english/inqbl.html Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary: http://www.merriam-webster.com/ PRINT Heartney, Eleanor. Art & Today. Phaidon Press, Incorporated. March 2008. Stallabrass, Julian. Contemporary Art: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press, USA, March 2006. LINKS TO COLLECTIONS To locate the remainder of the collections not provided in this package, please use the following link: http://ww2.glenbow.org/search/collectionsResults.aspx?XC=/search/collectionsResults.aspx&TN=OBJEC TS&AC=QBE_QUERY&RF=WebResults&DF=WebResultsDetails&DL=0&RL=0&NP=255&MR=10&QB0=AN D&QF0=Audience-mediator2&QI0=Main21cPlace

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/place_full_package