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2004/05 ANNUAL REPORT

Sparking Ideas About Cultures & Worlds Beyond Our Own

W H E R E

T H E

W O R L D

M E E T S

T H E

W E S T

Chair’s and President’s Message Chair’s and President’s Message

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Highlights from 2004/05

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Support

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Financial Review

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Board of Governors

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Current and Upcoming Exhibitions

Glenbow Museum is one of Canada’s most entrepreneurial museums. Through a variety of dynamic and changing exhibitions and programs along with a broad collection of art, artifacts, and historical documents, Glenbow Museum builds on a commitment to preserve western heritage while simultaneously providing visitors with a glimpse of the world beyond.

WHERE THE WORLD MEETS THE WEST

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The past twelve months have seen Glenbow Museum grow and refine its thematic exhibitions, reach out to young families, western history aficionados, and the arts community, and significantly revamp its governance structure. Looking back we have worked hard to share in Calgary's growing prosperity, and to reflect the way Calgarians view their world and their place in it. Simply put - Glenbow is in synch with Calgary, and expanding our capacity to tell the stories our visitors want to hear.

Glenbow Museum began when petroleum entrepreneur and lawyer Eric Lafferty Harvie discovered oil in 1947 in Leduc on land to which he held the mineral rights. With his newfound prosperity, he decided to pursue his favourite passion — collecting — and simultaneously return some of his good fortune back to the region that had been so generous to him. Mr. Harvie's goal was to collect objects representing the history and culture of Western Canada as well as from around the world. After many years of travel and collecting, Mr. Harvie amassed a huge museum collection which included an extensive collection of artifacts from North America including Aboriginal peoples, frontier exploration, and the development of western life. He complemented this collection with extraordinary artifacts and art from Asia, West Africa, South America, and islands in the Pacific. In 1966, Eric Harvie and his family donated his impressive collection of art, artifacts, and historical documents to the people of Alberta. Today, Eric Harvie’s vision of Where the World Meets the West continues, as Glenbow Museum invites visitors to explore three major special exhibitions annually, and an eclectic range of permanent galleries featuring significant Western Canadian and international collections.

Portrait image: John Gilroy, Untitled [Portrait of Eric Harvie]. Collection of Tim Harvie. This annual report reflects Glenbow Museum’s fiscal year April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005.

Glenbow Museum finished the fiscal year 2004-05 with some strong achievements linked to the six goals of our 2000-2005 Strategic Road Map. Chief of these was the substantive completion of the Goal 1 fundraising campaign for Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta. This new gallery will dominate Glenbow’s third floor and open in the spring of 2007. At year’s end we had received $4 million from the Provincial Government. We are very optimistic that we will receive a further $5 million from the Federal Government. Our community campaign is going well and we are confident that we will receive a further $2million from the private sector. This effort represents Glenbow’s largest ever capital campaign, and will enable us to double our school program capacity when the new gallery opens. In the quest for increased attendance to our second floor thematic exhibitions, Goal 2 of our Road Map, we drew a total museum attendance of over 160,000 in 2004-05, an increase of over five thousand the prior year. Four significant shows contributed to this growth: The Mysterious Bog People, (presented by AIM Trimark) closed its seven month run on May 24, 2004; Capturing Western Legends: Russell and Remington’s Canadian Frontier, (presented by Norrep Funds Hesperian Capital Management Ltd.) ran from June 19 to October 11; Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession, Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation, (presented by The American Express Foundation) ran from October 30 to January 30, 2005; and Our River: Journey of the Bow (presented by Enbridge Inc.) flowed from February 19 to June 5, 2005. Each of these exhibitions continued building on our vision: to be where the world meets the west. In this way the Bog People and Rodin came from the outside world to Calgary; conversely, Russell and Remington and the Bow gave the best of southern Alberta to our visitors. The Glenbow illustrated its cultural bridging function in all four shows, challenging our visitors to see the history of Alberta in global terms, and the history of the globe through our Alberta lens. Eric Harvie, our entrepreneurial and eclectic collecting founder, expected exactly this from Glenbow when he conceptualized the museum’s mission forty years ago. He wanted us to be Calgary’s lay university. Our Goal 3 is designed to give our staff the incentive to research and publish, and often finds expression in Glenbow publications. This past year saw the production of The Bow: Living with a River, with essays by Gerald T. Conaty, Daryl Betenia and Catharine Mastin. The book continues our successful string of collaborations with Key Porter Books of Toronto, and has performed well in bookstores across the west. Glenbow’s Collection Goal (no. 4) was well served by the ongoing superb curatorial and conservation care provided by our Collections staff. A $748,000 Infrastructure Canada-Alberta Program grant allowed us to undertake a major collections storage upgrade for Cultural History. We also undertook significant deaccessioning of Grade 4 (not of museum quality or outside of our core mandate) material was successfully undertaken in Calgary and New York with the Province of Alberta’s authorization. We exceeded our $2 million operations revenue fundraising goal (no.5), continuing our reputation as one of Canada’s most entrepreneurial museums. Long-time Glenbow supporters will already know that we receive just over 30 percent of operating revenues from governments, in a country where the national norm for institutions of our size is in the range of 50 to 90 percent.

Background image: Boys fishing the Bow River near Centre Street Bridge, Calgary, 1971 Photographer: The Calgary Herald; Glenbow Archives NA-2864-19152

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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Our local, national and international profile has continued to grow (Goal 6) during the year as a result of all of the above initiatives, augmented by travelling exhibits, op-ed contributions by the C.E.O., and a steady flow of positive responses for loan requests and the provision of high quality research support services by Glenbow’s Library and Archives. Overall we have made a significant contribution to life-long learning during the last 12 months, reaching nearly 40,000 school children, and inspiring repeat visitation by family members and friends alike. We understand that a positive first visit to a museum can literally chart a career. Stephen Jay Gould, the Harvard professor who wrote so brilliantly about the geologic record of species evolution and British Columbia’s Burgess Shale fossil beds kindled his interest at the age of 5 when his father took him to the American Museum of Natural History. As soon as the little boy saw a Tyrannosaurus Rex in the lobby he was hooked for life. Whether the first visit to a museum sparks a career path, or simply develops a life-long interest in the arts and culture, we at Glenbow consciously work to ensure that our exhibitions and programs evoke these kinds of responses. Today as we consider Glenbow Museum’s role in Canada’s cultural community, and the founder’s dream for the museum, we are convinced that our programs and business model are well linked. This past year has seen a Board initiated revamp of our standing committee structure, adding both a Collections and a Governance committee to the existing Development and Audit/Investment committees. Executive Committee has been disbanded, and all Glenbow Governors now have at least one standing committee assignment. From time to time ad hoc committees are formed to deal with issues such as endowment fund policy, renegotiation of the Provincial contract for services, or the review and approval of labour collective agreements. A clear distinction has been maintained between the strategic oversight function of the board and the duties of management. The final product of the new governance model and the synergies it creates is both sustainability for Glenbow and lifelong learning opportunities for our public. We aim to be the kind of museum that you just cannot stop visiting.

Let the magic of your mind enlighten you.

Ian Bourne BOARD CHAIR

Michael P. Robinson PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

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Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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“I think a museum is a wonderful Christmas morning with family and friends… And if you quickly rip open the present, find out what’s in it, throw it to the ground and go for the next one, you’re a nodder. But if you open it slowly, piece by piece, loving the wrapping, loving the ribbon, loving the card, you’re looking at it deeply and searching for the spirit. So that’s what I think a museum is.” Leanne, grade five

Inspiring life-long learning Children are innately curious. They are eager to explore and learn about themselves, and the world around them. Museums offer endless opportunities to encourage children to observe, explore, hypothesize, and create as they develop their own interpretations and concepts. At Glenbow Museum, hands-on exploration and discovery, both in the classroom and the museum, offer a chance to construct knowledge from personal experience. But museums aren’t just for kids. At Glenbow each person leaves the museum with an experience that is uniquely theirs. We provide the content and context to stimulate thought but it’s an individual’s creativity and spirit that bring the museum walls to life. Our museum educators encourage their students to look deeply using all of their senses when looking at an artwork or artifact. And our educators also say that often adults become “nodders”, simply looking at an artwork for mere seconds, nodding their head in appreciation, and moving on to the next piece. But “nodders” aren’t really looking and thinking deeply about the work. They’re just skimming the surface.

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Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

As one of the grade five Museum School students explained, “A museum is a crystal ball. When you are walking past, being a nodder, it looks like an ordinary glass ball. If you look at it deeply with your five senses, you can see the history in it and also what they are doing today.” At Glenbow, we often learn more about ourselves by viewing the world through children’s eyes and hearts. When was the last time you truly let the magic of your mind enlighten you? Do the drums in our West African gallery bring out your musical side? Did you smell the flowers and the water from a painting featured in Our River: Journey of the Bow? What sounds do you hear when looking at the ship in the Warriors gallery? Does the sight of a canoe make you think of the call of a loon? Can you feel the sense of peace and friendship within our Asian gallery? Next time you visit Glenbow, take the time to truly look at the art and artifacts. It will open up a whole new world that will capture your imagination.

Top left image: Dorothy Knowles, Reflections on the Bow River, 1991, Acrylic on canvas, Collection of Glenbow Museum.

Embracing ideas and cultural understanding

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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…we strive to offer exhibitions and programs that spark an interest in past moments in time, new cultures, and other worlds beyond our own.

The Spirit of Students “Five year olds throw the word “Glenbow” around in conversation like “Spider-Man” and “SpongeBob SquarePants”, says Rhonda McLean, Kindergarten teacher at W. H. Cushing Workplace School in downtown Calgary. By the end of the 2004/05 school year, this kindergarten class visited Glenbow six times participating in the popular school program, “There is Magic in my House”, visiting the Our River: Journey of the Bow exhibition four times, and creating their own artistic creations in The Discovery Room. Following tours with Glenbow’s Senior Curator of Ethnology, Dr. Gerald Conaty, these kindergarten students returned to their classroom wanting to “ask Gerry” every time they came up with a question about the river. In all of Glenbow’s school programming initiatives, curators, collection technicians, writers, and researchers lead the students carefully through some of the museum’s most fascinating collections providing activities that engage the students’ busy hands and minds. Through these experiences, children are taught to be critical viewers and thinkers – skills they will draw upon throughout their lives.

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Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

Each year approximately 40,000 students come through Glenbow’s doors. We hear of young students having so much fun at Glenbow that they brought their families back for a visit on the weekend. We also hear stories from educators where students are truly impacted by their visit to the museum such as the young boy suffering from language and thought-processing deficits who sat himself down in the lotus position for twenty minutes in front of the large Buddha in the Many Faces, Many Paths: Art of Asia gallery. Through this form of non-verbal communication, it was apparent that this golden sculpture spoke to him. In a world of fast-paced images and technologies, twenty minutes of stationary thought for any child is incredibly significant. Another example comes from a student whose energy, curiosity, and perhaps even defiance, made them wander away from their class group during another field trip. When asked by his teacher if he would have the same desire for flight at the museum, he responded with surprise and disgust, that he “really didn’t think so, there are too many interesting things to do at the Glenbow, I won’t have time to run off.”

According to grade five teacher Judy Dofoo from Cambrian Heights School, “the art and artifacts at Glenbow are a microcosm of the world and all that is in it. That’s why the museum is such an ideal place for children to further explore the multi-hued and multi-textured fabric of a culture.” She has brought her class to Museum School many times, widening her students’ eyes to a few of the approximately 95% of the museum’s collections hidden away in storage. At Glenbow Museum, hands-on exploration and discovery, both in the museum and through outreach programs at schools, offer a chance to construct knowledge from personal experience. It’s in this learning environment called Glenbow where students can access a wealth of ideas to enrich the process of getting to know who they are and the world around them. And while we know we don’t impact every student in the same way, we strive to offer exhibitions and programs that spark an interest in past moments in time, new cultures, and other worlds beyond our own.

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05

Special Exhibitions

HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05 Below: Auguste Rodin, The Kiss (detail), c.188182, date of cast unknown. Bronze. Background: Auguste Rodin, The Ring (La Ronde), (detail), c.1883. Engraving. Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation.

Above: Bog People products.

Middle: Stetson Hat, Montana Peak Style, ca. 1900 Glenbow Museum

The Mysterious Bog People

Above: Charles M. Russell, The Wolves (detail), (previously titled “George Lane Attacked by Wolves in 1886”), 1914, Glenbow Museum

Capturing Western Legends: Russell and Remington’s Canadian Frontier

October 18, 2003 to May 24, 2004

June 19, 2004 to October 11, 2004

Over 110,000 visitors examined the ancient European remains and over 400 artifacts in The Mysterious Bog People exhibition at Glenbow. As one of only two Canadian venues for this exhibition, Glenbow was also the creator behind the very successful BSI: Bog Science Investigation program inviting students and the general public to take on the role of forensic scientist as they investigated a hypothetical body found in a bog. BSI welcomed over 45,000 visitors and 200 school programs during the exhibition’s run, and was sold to the International Bog Team marking the first time that Glenbow Museum programming has been developed and sold as a component in a major travelling exhibition. The Mysterious Bog People is a unique partnership with the Niedersachsisches Landesmuseum in Hannover, Germany; the Drents Museum in Assen, The Netherlands; the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec, and Glenbow Museum in Calgary.

Capturing Western Legends was an exciting exploration of the people, places, and events that shaped southern Alberta. Through the eyes of the great western artists, Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington, curated by Lorain Lounsberry and Monique Westra, this exhibition provided an unique opportunity to see the original images that helped shape the west portrayed in popular culture from TV westerns of the 1960s and Hollywood films. Visitors were fascinated to learn about fakes and forgeries by examining Warrior’s Return, purchased by Glenbow over 40 years ago as an original Remington. Long considered one of Glenbow’s treasures, this painting was extensively researched and examined only to discover it was not an original Remington at all! A “Fakes” exhibit was developed to share this fascinating story with Glenbow visitors. Audiences also wrangled up seats to see excerpts of classic Hollywood westerns and met the late Charlie Russell played by a character actor giving a fascinating glimpse of Charlie’s life behind-the-canvas.

Above: Evan Penny, Self-portrait, 2000, epoxy, resin, pigment, hair. Courtesy of the artist.

Bow River postcards created by students at W.H. Cushing Workplace School

Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession,

Our River: Journey of the Bow

Sculpture from the Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Foundation October 30, 2004 to January 30, 2005

February 19, 2005 to June 5, 2005

For the first time in Calgary, Glenbow Museum presented the famous sculptures of Auguste Rodin, one of the most important sculptors of the 19th century. Glenbow welcomed enthusiastic crowds to the Rodin exhibition, and due to popular demand, extended museum hours to midnight on the closing weekend. Working in partnership with Alberta Ballet, Glenbow produced the very popular Ballet in Bronze, an original dance presentation choreographed by Sabrina Matthews, which sold out for all four performances. Other innovative programming initiatives included a first-ever French character actor of Camille Claudel who performed alongside the English-speaking Rodin character actor, sold out curatorial tours with Glenbow art curator Monique Westra, and Rodin biographer Ruth Butler. Glenbow also took the opportunity to examine figurative sculpture with the startlingly realistic works of Evan Penny in Evan Penny: Absolutely Unreal, and Malvina Hoffman: From the Heart, featuring works by Hoffman, a pupil and friend of Rodin’s, and American sculptor in her own right.

In celebration of Alberta’s Centennial, Glenbow was pleased to share the story of how the Bow River has helped shape and define our region from geological, cultural, historical, and artistic perspectives. Visitors were able to look at the Bow River as a source of spiritual inspiration for many artists and cultures; but also to learn that it is one of the most heavily engineered rivers in Canada, supporting one third of Alberta’s total population base. Glenbow produced a book with Key Porter Press, The Bow: Living with a River, to accompany the exhibition, written by Glenbow’s senior curator of ethnology, Gerald Conaty, PhD, with essays by senior art curator Catharine Mastin and project manager Daryl Betenia. And Glenbow’s unique community membership with the W.H. Cushing Workplace School welcomed the talented works of students from kindergarten to grade three who developed postcards representing their views of the Bow River. These cards were displayed and distributed throughout the museum.

Exhibition Total Attendance Statistics at Glenbow The Mysterious Bog People

110,614

Capturing Western Legends

39,229 Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession

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Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

49,366

Our River: Journey of the Bow Glenbow Museum

39,658 ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05

Travelling Exhibitions

Programming Highlights

HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05

School Programs

From historical photographs of grain elevators to an exhibit on fakes, Glenbow shared its unique stories of Western Canada with audiences throughout North America in 2004/05. Echoes from the Dust: The Disappearing Prairie Grain Elevator One hundred and thirty thousand people were able see how the disappearance of these familiar wooden structures has had a profound influence on the rural prairie. This exhibit of black and white photographs and artifacts of historical grain elevators has travelled throughout various communities across the West. During its major renovations, the Galt Museum in Lethbridge introduced “Galt at the Mall” displaying exhibits at Lethbridge’s major Park Place Mall. Approximately 100,000 mall visitors saw Echoes from the Dust displayed at Park Place this past winter/spring. Feb. 28 - April 25, 2004 • Estevan Art Gallery and Museum, Estevan, SK May 29 - July 25, 2004 • Langley Centennial Museum, Fort Langley, BC Aug. 28 - Oct. 24, 2004 • Grande Prairie Museum, Grande Prairie, AB Nov. 13 - Jan. 9, 2005

• Glenbow Museum

Feb. 11 - April 24, 2005 • Galt at the Mall, Park Place Mall, Lethbridge, AB

Capturing Western Legends For the first time the works of great American western artists Charles M. Russell and Frederic Remington were examined from a Canadian perspective. Both Russell and Remington spent time in southern Alberta painting what became the legendary tales and spirited personalities synonymous with the Canadian West. The success of this exhibition in Calgary in summer 2004 has been matched by the great enthusiasm of our American counterparts with thousands of people seeing the exhibition in both Kentucky and Texas. The “Fakes” exhibit, developed once Glenbow learned that its prized painting, Warrior’s Return by Frederic Remington, acquired nearly forty years ago, was not in fact an original Remington, became a key component of this travelling exhibition. Feb. 5 – May 8, 2005

• Speed Museum, Louisville, Kentucky

May 26 – Aug. 21, 2005 • Panhandle Plains, Canyon, Texas

June 17 - Sept. 5, 2005 • Vancouver Museum, Vancouver, BC

Nitsitapiisinni: The Blackfoot Way of Life Nitsitapiisinni welcomed over 20,000 visitors while on display at the Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, UK and nearly 18,000 at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec. Combined with the 87,000 visitors who saw this successful touring exhibit at the Kunsthal in the Netherlands, the stories of the Blackfoot were shared with over 125,000 people. Like the permanent gallery at Glenbow, the travelling exhibition presents the Blackfoot story from the Blackfoot point of view – building on a 15 year collaboration between Glenbow Museum and the Blackfoot people.

• Museum School welcomed 985 students, teachers, and teaching assistants during the past school year. Of significant interest was the week-long visit of a deaf and hard-of-hearing class from Stanley Jones Elementary School. In additional to their hearing impairments, many of these students were learning English as a second language. While this led to many new challenges for our educators including learning how to adapt their teaching styles for students who lip read and using microphones with various channels, Museum School Coordinator Michele Gallant led her team to create a very specialized Museum School experience. • Glenbow Museum welcomed 39,178 students this year. The coming year welcomes new challenges as Glenbow closes our third floor Alberta history galleries for renovations for the new permanent gallery, Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta scheduled to open in 2007. Glenbow has developed innovative outreach programs to ensure we maintain our reputation and ability to deliver hands-on quality programs during the renovation period.

In Focus: Photographing the Alberta and Montana Frontier, 1870-1930

50s Forever Going back to the origins of the suburban home featuring life-sized rooms of authentic 1950s furniture, décor, clothes, toys, and music, over 17,000 people in Manitoba have enjoyed this fun and nostalgic trip back in time. April 3 – July 3, 2004

• Manitoba Museum, Winnipeg, MB

March 11 – May 14, 2005 • Courtenay and District Museum, Courtenay, B.C. Sept. 15, 2005 – Jan. 15, 2006 • The Museum of Western Art, Kerrville Texas

Oct. 22 – Jan 15, 2006 • Medicine Hat Museum, Medicine Hat, AB May 1 – Sept.15, 2006

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Glenbow Museum

• Sir Alexander Galt Museum, Lethbridge, AB

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

Arctic Life: Lomen Brothers Photography

Family & Youth Programs

Thousands of people at Park Place Mall in Lethbridge examined 33 framed historic photographs of striking Inuit portraits, studies of Inuit life, reindeer herding, and the city of Nome in Alaska. This exhibit gives a very small sample of the many images that the adventurous Lomen Brothers took in the vast north around the turn of the last century.

• The Discovery Room welcomed 28,494 visitors; an average of 78 people a day.

May 2 – Aug. 12, 2005 • Galt at the Mall, Park Place Mall, Lethbridge, AB Feb. 1 – May 31, 2006

• Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre, Yellowknife, NWT

Adult Programs • Glenbow offered seven After Hours programs which drew a total attendance of 1,822. • Terrific Tuesdays Talks welcomed 2,362 to this very popular lecture-style program aimed at seniors.

Special Events • Glenbow Museum and Alberta Ballet co-presented an original program of dance inspired by the work of Auguste Rodin on December 11, 12 & 13, 2005. This performance entitled Ballet in Bronze was choreographed by Alberta Ballet’s Sabrina Matthews with audiences totalling 795 people for the four performances. • Glenbow art curator Monique Westra offered Up Close and Personal with Rodin, an exclusive evening tour sharing her in-depth knowledge of Rodin in this entertaining two hour gallery experience. A third tour was added due to popular demand totalling 99 people for the three tours.

Featuring 32 framed historic photographs of sweeping landscapes, impressive wildlife, bold people, and stirring events over 1,200 people have revisited this romantic vision of the disappearing western frontier. Difficult as it was, photography from this frontier period was often informative and artistic.

Jan. 30 - June 6, 2004 • Museum of Science and Industry, Manchester, UK Oct. 7, 2004 - Feb. 13, 2005 • Canadian Museum of Civilization, Gatineau, QC.,

• Seventy-five children ages 8 to 13 participated in Glenbow Sketch Club, a drop-in program from February 19 to March 26 which was offered as an older option to Family Fun Weekends. This program will be a registered program beginning in fall 2005.

• Family Fun Weekends attracted 4,813 people to this popular drop-in program offered on Saturdays and Sundays from 1:00-4:00 p.m. This was an average of 120 per weekend program.

• Over 150 people attended Reconsidering Realism: A Panel Discussion Surrounding the Works of Evan Penny on opening weekend of October 30, 2005. Moderated by nationally acclaimed art critic Nancy Tousley, this panel examining contemporary sculpture included renowned artists Evan Penny (Toronto), David Clark (Halifax), Chris Cran (Calgary), and Eric Cameron (Calgary). • A full house in Glenbow’s theatre welcomed renowned Rodin biographer Ruth Butler as she discussed her book Rodin: The Shape of Genius on Saturday, January 22, 2005. Two hundred and twenty-five people explored the dynamic and passionate life and work of Auguste Rodin. This lecture was presented in collaboration with Alliance Française.

• Discoveries Big & Small hosted 146 participants in this program designed to meet the needs of homeschoolers.

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

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HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05

ICAP Highlights

Facts and Figures

HIGHLIGHTS 2004/05

BEFORE

AFTER

160,927 visitors in 2004-2005

Library & Archives Statistics

Saturday, January 29, 2005 during Rodin: A Magnificent Obsession drew the highest daily attendance with 2,975 visitors (Glenbow stayed open for extended hours for the closing weekend (from 9:00 a.m. to midnight.)

985 students participated in the ChevronTexaco Open Minds Museum School for a total number of 184 programs

Phone enquiries Fax enquiries Mail enquiries Email enquiries In-person visits On-line research queries in Library & Archives databases

39,178* students attended Glenbow Museum school programs during the 2004/05 school year

389 teacher workshops were delivered

300 volunteers contributed in excess of 17,000 of hours (not including volunteer hours for Glenbow’s Board of Governors)

253 gifts of cultural property were donated to Glenbow Museum with a value of $10,077,855

3,067 39 182 2,467 3,059 35,000*

TOTAL

43,814* * This number is approximate.

Glenbow Museum Revenue 10%

25% 11%

25 new purchases valued at $102,362 were added to the collections * This number includes teachers, teaching assistants, school volunteers,

12%

and student teachers and a preparatory outreach program.

10%

11%

22% 25%

20%

Attendance at Glenbow Museum Paid Admissions General attendance Glenbow members Group visits School programs* Museum School* Special events

New storage for nearly 27,500 artifacts in Cultural History

81,221 17,785 3,428 39,178 985 3,141

Fundraising 12% Government of Alberta Investment Income City of Calgary 20% Commercial Activities Admissions & Memberships

$ 3,099,725 2,738,000 22% 2,407,562 1,478,338 1,314,369 1,181,224

TOTAL

$ 12,219,218

5%

25% 22% 20% 12% 11% 10%

7%

Imagine building a closet for over 27,000 pieces of clothing, accessories, toys, and sports equipment! That’s exactly what Glenbow Museum did over the past two years. With the financial support of Infrastructure Canada-Alberta Program (ICAP), Glenbow overhauled its storage areas on the 7th floor for part of the Cultural History collections. The first phase, which is now complete, consisted of approximately 700 rolled textiles, 12,000 pieces of clothing and accessories, and 5,000 societal artifacts. The second phase, completed at the end of August 2005, consisted of approximately 2,400 recreational accessories such as toys and sports equipment, 1,100 Calgary Stampede collections, 1,400 other saddles and accessories, 1,400 dolls and accessories, and 3,500 personal accessories.

In preparation for the project, large industrial objects were moved from the 7th floor to the off-site warehouse temporarily, creating an on-site swing space large enough to hold the collections from one phase to another. The collections were then moved out of their storage area into the swing space and the surrounding collections were protected while the original wooden cupboards were replaced with new compact storage facilities. The collections were then returned to the new storage; each artifact with a new mount and bar-coded with identity tags for accurate inventory purposes. Led by Collections Technician and Project Supervisor Camille Owens, the team included four technicians and two mount makers working closely with the curators and other technicians to complete this enormous task.

Total Paid Admissions

Non-Paid Admissions Library & Archives Other non-paid admissions

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

10%

Glenbow Museum Expenditure 13%

3,059 13,115

5%

20%

7%

30%

15% 10%

Total Non-Paid Admissions

16,174

Grand Total Admissions

160,927

13% 20% 15%

Attendance for Travelling Exhibitions Arctic Life: Lomen Brothers Photography Capturing Western Legends Echoes from the Dust Fifties Forever In Focus: Photographing the Alberta and Montana Frontier, 1870-1930 Nitsitapiisinni: The Blackfoot Way of Life

100,000* 16,500* 148,000* 17,301

TOTAL

322,773*

1,226 39,746

* This number is approximate.

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30%

144,753

* 39,178 indicates numbers from PED including Museum School numbers each day teacher workshops, One Day School, Museokits, and Extended Learning. The 985 participants in Museum School are included in the School Programs total.

Core services $ Program & exhibit development Commercial activities & fundraising Building maintenance Collections management Depreciation & amortization Library & Archives TOTAL

3,706,427 2,394,772 1,877,647 1,522,037 1,235,750 854,329 606,284

30% 20% 15% 13% 10% 7% 5%

$ 12,197,246

The Revenue and Expenditure numbers include gifts-in-kind as well as amounts recognized in the financial reporting.

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Acknowledgements of Support Glenbow Museum relies on community participation to achieve excellence in its exhibitions, programs, event and services. We receive meaningful support from our members, donors, volunteers, and other partners. Glenbow is proud to acknowledge the significant contributions made by the following supporters over the past year: ($100,000 + ) AIM Trimark Investments American Express Foundation in Canada Bumper Development Corp. Ltd. The Calgary Herald Calgary Region Arts Foundation Canadian Heritage, Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program Canadian Heritage, Canadian Culture Online Program CBC/Radio-Canada Chevron Canada Resources Enbridge Inc. Infrastructure Canada – Alberta Program

Sundog Printing Ltd. Total E&P Canada Ltd.

Patron – ($50,000 – $99,999)

Laurel & Rob Chad Estate of Stu Hart Evamy Family Flowthrough Fund at The Calgary Foundation Lynn & Richard Grafton Jim Hall Susan Healy Victoria Henry Joe Konrad Continuous Contribution Fund George Mihalcheon

Benefactor –

Glenbow Museum is one of Canada’s most entrepreneurial museums generating nearly 70% of its revenue from fundraising, sponsorships, and admissions but we continue to maintain strong relationships with the three levels of government who play ongoing roles in Glenbow’s operations.

Alberta Gaming Community Initiatives Program BP Canada Energy Company Burlington Resources Canada Ltd. Devon Canada Corporation Hyatt Regency Calgary Nexen Inc. Pattison Outdoor Inc. Joan Snyder Trico Homes Inc.

Lead Donor – ($25,000 – $49,999)

Government of Canada At the federal level, Glenbow Museum holds strong ties with the Canadian Heritage Ministry. Under the Canadian Heritage umbrella, agencies such as Canada Council, Museums Assistance Program, Virtual Museum of Canada, and other grant programs support special projects, operations, and capital initiatives. The Government of Canada, administered by Western Economic Diversification Canada, has also contributed to Glenbow’s major projects, including the development of the new permanent Mavericks Gallery. Province of Alberta Glenbow Museum and the Province of Alberta have enjoyed a 39-year relationship that dates back to the Museum’s creation by an act of the Legislature. From a $5 million initial legacy contribution in 1966, the Province, represented by the Ministry of Community Development, continues its relationship with Glenbow today through a fee-for-service agreement for curatorial care, maintenance, and access to the collections. Community Development, as well as several other Ministries, also support Glenbow’s initiatives.

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Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

The Province’s most recent contribution to the development of the new permanent gallery, Mavericks, is a legacy gift in celebration of Alberta’s Centennial. City of Calgary The City of Calgary has also been a longstanding supporter of Glenbow. Clean offices and exhibit floors, light and heat are but a small part of the janitorial, maintenance and utility services the City provides at no cost through the Telus Convention Centre. The City has been donating its services since Glenbow Museum moved into its current building in 1976. The Glenbow Centre, as the building is known, houses Glenbow’s operations including temporary and permanent exhibits, collections storage facilities, and administrative offices. The Glenbow Centre is leased to the City by the Province for a nominal amount of $1 per year. The City also supports Glenbow operations through the Calgary Region Arts Foundation. Glenbow Museum salutes the City of Calgary, Province of Alberta, and the Government of Canada. Together their commitment and support have helped transform Glenbow into a premier western cultural institution that reaches out to local, national, and international audiences.

Anonymous Eleanor Bond Canada Council for the Arts

Pioneer –

($5,000 – $9,999) Anonymous Alberta Museums Association ARC Resources Ltd. Avenue Magazine Ruth Barker Jan & Ron Brenneman Calgary International Film Festival Calgary Public Library Canadian Heritage, Museums Assistance Program Cascades

Julie Oakes Gail & David O'Brien Osler Hoskin & Harcourt

Trailblazer –

($1,000 – $2,499) Anonymous Barry R. Aldred Terry Allen & Rhys Renouf Elizabeth & Robert Andrews Alex Archila Rosemary & Miles G. Atkinson Barbara J. Baker Meme & Edward G. Battle Wade Becker Desiree & Dan Belot Jenny & Hy Belzberg Blakes, Cassels & Graydon Heather & Ian Bourne Brawn Foundation Brewster Transportation Carol Brisbin & Gilles DesRosiers Pauline Brown Josie & Kenneth Bruce Sally Burkell Calgary Ski Club Donna & Delton Campbell CIBC Mellon Citibank Canada Ziva & Noah Cohen Karen & Lauchlan Currie Joanne Cuthbertson & Charles Fischer Joanne & Jack Davis Rita & Edwin Dodge Dora Lam Professional Corporation

Ann Cross

Nancy Pencer RBC Foundation Travel Alberta

Great West Life Assurance Company

Joan Tronningsdal

Hesperian Capital Management Ltd./Norrep Funds Masters Gallery Ltd. Barbara McMorland Petro-Canada Precision Drilling Corporation Art Schwartz Virtual Museum of Canada

TUSK Energy Inc.

Michael Dutczak Jane & Glen Edwards

Viacom Outdoors

EllisDon Construction Services Inc.

Where Calgary

Fast Forward

Major Donor – ($10,000 – $24,999) Anonymous Alberta Environment Anadarko Canada Corporation Ltd. ARC Financial Irene & William Bell Leslie & David Bissett Communication Canada Chris Cran Pauline & Hugh Dempsey William Gathorne Burns Cheryl Gottselig Gowling Lafleur Henderson LLP Imperial Oil Foundation Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited Angus McNee The New Sun Fund at The Calgary Foundation Randal L. Oliver The Rozsa Foundation Mary & Richard Shaw

Partner –

($2,500 – $4,999) Anonymous Baytex Energy Trust Margaret Brodylo Burnet, Duckworth & Palmer Gertrude & Martin Cohos Copyzone Jocelyne Daw & Robert Page Alison & Ken Delf Mary Ann & Don Cormack (Devonian Foundation) Rick Ducommun M.G. Eaton & Kim Kertland Enmax Energy Corporation Estate of Luke Lindoe Investors Group MacEwan Family Charity Fund at The Calgary Foundation Margaret & Ted Newall Tim O’Connor Doreen Orman Pirie Foundation Diana & Ted Rozsa Muriel Tassie The Ranchmen’s Club Waterous & Co Lynn Webster & Michael Robinson

Bonnie & Arthur Dumont

Tanis & Robert Lefroy Dorothy & M. Earl Lomas Jeanne & Peter Lougheed Cynthia & A. Webster Macdonald Lori Macdonald & John McConnell L.W. MacEachern Diane & Lawrie Mack Sheila MacKenzie Dora Helen & James A.N. Mackie Patricia & Peter Mann Lynn & Ken Martens Margaret E. McCready Janice McDougall & Gervais Goodman Dorothy & Jim McLeod Maureen McTeer & Joe Clark Jean Merriman National Bank Financial Donald Peacock Ruth & Rob Peters & Family Erna-May Pierce D. Miles Price Susan Purcell & Mitchell B. Cohen Beth & Gordon Rankin Greta Raymond & Darrell Myroniuk Maria Rees Phyllis & Chris Robb Vera Ross Marianne Santopinto Leanne Sereda & Larry Barkley Jim Shaw Ramsis Shehata Ryan Sluggett Heather & Herb Snowdon Margaret & Ron Southern Esther & J. Alvin Speers Judith A. Sproule

Stephanie & Brian Felesky Claudia & Randy Findlay FirstEnergy Capital Corp. Franklin Foster Fraser Milner Casgrain Annie & David Freeze Eleanor & Cos Gabriele Bernadette Geronazzo & Cody Slater Colin Glassco Marg & Wilf Gobert Joan & Don Greenfield Joy Harvie Maclaren & Don Maclaren Robin Harvie John R. Hemstock Gail A. Hinchliffe Julia & John Homan Virginia & Alan Hunter Carolyn & Larry Hursh Terri Illingworth & Robert Wilkinson Edward A. Johnson Kent Jones Phyllis Kane & William Pepler Jessie E. Kerfoot Phyllis Konrad Judy Lawton & Stuart Miller Pauline & Edmond Lee Kelly Leech Marjorie & Francis Lefaivre

St. Andrew Caledonian Society of Calgary Charles B. Stalnaker Elaine & Grant Stapon Muriel E. Stewart Carolyn & David Tavender Telus World of Science Bill & Jean Toole Family Donor Advised Fund at The Calgary Foundation TransAlta Corporation TransCanada Corporation Betty & Ernie Trosch Toni & Paul Trudel United Way of Calgary and Area Catharine & L. Fred Valentine Beth & Randy Vander Voort Evelyn & Darol Wigham Wigham Resources Ltd. Rhonda Wishart & John Cuthbertson Frances Wright Deborah Yedlin & Martin Molyneaux Hostelling International Canada - Pacific Mountain Region

Voyager –

($750 – $999) Alberta CGIT Association Michele & Lloyd Buchanan Roberta & Rory Cory

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

15

Joan & Ken Crowshaw Alasdair Fergusson Anne Fraser Corine & Stefan Frick Wanda Godwin Paulette & Sid Greenner Faye & David Haigh Jean Helmer F. Richard Matthews Edward C. Phelps Warren & Gregory Robertson Janice & James Shea Caron & D. Michael Stewart

Explorer –

($500 – $749) Anonymous Carol & Fred Abbott Active Environmental Services Judi & Tim Anstett Kathleen Ashford David Ballard Frances Birdsell Susan Boardman & Brian Nelson Robert Brews Marlene & Don Campbell Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers Harold Carlyle Arlein & Dov Chetner Beth & Soren Christiansen Gay & David Claydon Phyllis & William Cochrane Alex Crocket Shan & Donald Cross Lucy & Jay Cross John F. Crossley Frank Dabbs Joe-Anne D’Avignon & Michael Quinn William Dobbs Wilma & Thomas Dobson Robert Elias Barbara Fish & E. J. Laurence Ms. D. Anne Fitzpatrick Hannelore Gewers Margaret E. & Rick Harrop Janet Harvie & Britt Simmons Dick & Lois Haskayne Linda & Milt Hohol Hounsfield Heights-Briar Hill Community Association Cheryl & Andrew Howden Barbara & Brian Howes Gerald Knowlton Lamont Family James & Helen Laycraft Dawne & Eric Lofkrantz Brenda & James F.N. Mackie Joan MacMillan Patricia & Donald Maier Beverly & Fred Mensink Mind Designs Inc. Thomas & Maxine Moslow Mary Murphy Eleanor & Robert Riley Barbara & James Robinson Joanne & Harry Schaefer Tessi Schier & Steve Calderwood Ralph & Elizabeth Scott Catherine Smith Kim Spink David Thomson Wyn van der Schee Betty & Arthur Ward Sue & Terry White

16

Glenbow Museum

Supporter –

($250 – $499) Anonymous ACE, Child Development Centre Linda M. Achtemichuk Patricia Ainslie Sharon & Terrence Allen Janice & John Anders Mary Anne & Don Andrews Lorene Archdekin & Tim Friesen Associations Plus Irene M. Bakker Margaret Bawden & Crawford Smith Marianne & Jean-Claude Beauvilain Patricia & Jack Benedict Trevor Bennett Anne & Frank Bercha Berens Energy Ltd. Beverly & Gerald Berkhold Frances & Dale Birdsell Ann Boerner & Daryl Barber Jean & Leonard Bolger Linda & Ken Bolstad Diane Boss & Harry VanderVlist Lynn Bowers

Eddie & John Gareau Lynne & Stephen Gibson Doreen & David Gilmour Karen Goodrich Marjory & Thomas Gough Pamela & Hubert Gray Lois & Rod Green Eleanor & C.R. Guest Reri Haakmeester Christine & Ken Hale Shannon Hallett Marilou & Tom Hamel Deirdre Hamstead Noreen Hargrave Sandi & William Hartman Patricia J. Hawkins Jane Hayes & Derek Smith Linda & James Herbert Robert Hodgson Ian Hundey John H. Inglis Judy Inglis & Cameron Reid Frances & Michael Jamison Judith & Peter Jekill

Susan & Charles Nabors Jamie Niessen Margaret & John Noakes Lisa & Michael O’Hara Margaret Olive & Darrell Marshall Pauline Olthof Eliza & Gary Palmer Elaine & Gary Park Lesley & Tom Parker Karen & Gordon Paul Monica & Jim Paul Jenne & Allan Pedden Mary Peet Dyan Pettigrew & Max Marina Tietje Piera Bernice & John Pilling Aileen & Tom Pinder Frances A. Plaunt Diana & Marlin Polowick Andree Powers & Bill Jarvis Imelda & Steve Raby Tasneem Rahim Bonnie Ramsay Skitmore & Robert Skitmore

Evelyn & James Brown Jennifer & Leo Bushman Marie-Rose & Raymond Bussiere Beverley Butler Ines & Harvie Campbell

Constance M. Jones Sharon Jones & Cornelis Koster Michele Kalny & Andrew Crichton Lisa & Antony Kam Herbert Kariel

Matt Campbell Virginia Capen Vicki & Doug Cass Carol-Anne & David Chambers Rejean & Horace Champagne Inna Charkova & Jos P. Van der Velden Bill Chester Quynh & Bill Chestnut Deborah Chow-Fagan & Steve Fagan Oliver Christensen Virginia Christopher Audrey & John Coats Pat & Joel Cochrane Yanka & Robert Cochrane Martha Cohen Angela Corsi Anne S. Crawford Laurie & William Csokonay Gynell Dawson Leslie & Jim D’Andrea

Heather Kelly & Denisse Hans Elsie & Aubrey Kerr

Lois & Lance Rees Christine & Gordon Reese Vicki & Stu Reid Adele & Ernest F. Roberts Margaret & Lloyd Rodway Kirsten Ross Dean Ruether & Denis Cote Diane & David Scott Ruth & Cliff Secter Gloria & James Sherbut Lisa & Markham Silver Mary Elizabeth Skeith Donald M. Skinner Barbara Snowdon & Dale Ellert Margaret & John Sparling Perry & Geneva Spitznagel Tracy & Myron Stelmaschuk Mary L. & Barrie Stephens Brigid Stewart Chris & Wane Stickland Shannon & Barry Sullivan

Irene & Walter DeBoni Louis & Marcelle Desrochers John Duckett Janet & Dave Duncan Mary & J. Bruce Dunlop Richard Dunn Hilary & Allan Elliott Anne Evamy Maida & Barry Evans Janet & Douglas Ewens Margaret & Brian Exton Verna Jean Fairbrass Joy & Cornelius Fehr Jan Ferguson Geraldine I. Fish D. Anne Fitzpatrick Uta & Brian Fox Jennifer Francis Yolande & Howard Freeze Doris & Otto R. Friedenreich David Friesen David Fulton Susan & Richard Galloway J. Louise & William Gant

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

Maria & John Kimber Simone & Jim Kirby Karen Konrad Kathy & Glenn Krahulic Dawn & William Kruse Rosemary & Rick Kry Karen & Andrew Kryzan Sharon & Robert Lainchbury Michale & Richard Lang Elisabeth & Anders Langeland Patricia & Lorne Larson June M. Larson Rebecca & Stephen Lathrop Theresa Lavender & James Faraday Debbie & Glenn D. Laycock Ellen & Loring Lee Hazel G. Litzgus Paul Luxford Helene & Raymond Mahaffey Georgia & Bill Martin John Martland Diane M. Matthews Jacqueline Maxwell Janet & Ken McCagherty Deborah & Kim McCaig Mary Lou & John McCormick Conrad W. McCowan Jean E. McCreight Neil McDermid Thelma & D.A. McDonald Inge McDonald Gail & Hector McFadyen Jane McGhee & Herb Selin Janice & Gordon McTavish Mr. & Mrs. Meagher Cheryl Melosky & Carl Brown Eva & Max Miller Patricia & Lindsay Milne Judith & Britton Mockridge Joyce & Donald Moore Barbara & Michael Morin Pearl & Ian Morrison Ruth B. Mowat

Joan & James Sullivan Eric Sundstrom Barry W. Swan Joyce & Gerald Sykes Catherine Tam Helene & Henk Ter Keurs Lynn Thornton & Bob Hamshaw Dawn & Jack Thrasher F. Jim Toews June Townley Yvon & Chris Tremblay Phyllis & Dale Tufts Gertrude & Ken Turner Janice Tye & Murray Hanna Aritha van Herk Matthew Walls Marie Jeanne Walsh Candy & Bill Watson Olga & Lawrence Watson George Webber Penny & J. Graham Weir Jan Weir & Jacques Gendron Meta & Hal Wieser Sandy & Grant Wilde Jacqueline & Ron Wilderman Twila & Wayne Wilson Rondo E. Wood Marnie & Hal Wyatt Penny & Murray Young

18

Management Discussion and Analysis

22

Management’s Report

23

Auditors’ Report

24

Balance Sheet

25

Operating Fund Statement

26

Statement of Operations and Changes for Endowment and Designated Fund Balances

27

Statement of Cash Flows

28

Notes to the Financial Statements

Financial Review

Management Discussion and Analysis OPERATING EXPENDITURE

The following is a discussion and analysis of the financial condition and results of the Glenbow-Alberta Institute for the years ended March 31, 2005 and March 31, 2004. It should be read in conjunction with the accompanying audited financial statements and the other information contained in this annual report.

OVERVIEW The 2005 fiscal year was another very successful year for the Glenbow-Alberta Institute. During the course of the year •

four high quality temporary themed exhibitions were on display,

substantial research and planning work was completed for our new permanent history of Alberta gallery on the fourth floor scheduled to open in fiscal 2007,

$4 million dollars of funding for this project was secured through the Province of Alberta’s centennial legacies grants program. Negotiations for a further $5 million from the Government of Canada’s centennial program are well underway,

A substantial part of the $1.4 million capital project to upgrade collections storage in the cultural history and archival storage areas was completed.

These achievements complement our goals of creating interactive programs and exhibits that our members, visitors and customers want to see, becoming an innovative knowledge centre by providing quality content, refining and building the collection, increasing and diversifying attendance and revenue sources and strengthening Glenbow’s profile locally, nationally and internationally.

OPERATING REVENUES The Institute works to achieve its vision and goals with very strong support and partnerships with the general public, individual and corporate donors, foundations and government. The Province of Alberta’s Alberta Community Development office has a service agreement with the Institute for the provision of curatorial care and public access to the collection which is owned by the Province. This contract provides 25.5% of our annual operating revenues and is renegotiated at the end of its term. A contract is in place for fiscal year 2006 and negotiations for the period after March 31, 2005 will begin in the fall of 2005. Structured fundraising and donations generated $3.1 million or 29% of operating revenues. This represents a substantial increase over prior years. Large contributions were made in support of the Mavericks Gallery and three important new media projects. Admissions and membership revenues have shown slight variations over time. Themed temporary exhibitions and creative programs continue to appeal to our members, visitors and customers. This strategy will continue in fiscal year 2006 and new initiatives will be considered to continue to grow audience and revenue sources. Fiscal year 2006 will mark the beginning of a three year transitional period at the end of which the annual spending rate of the four endowment funds will be reduced to 5 – 5.5% of market values. This strategy has been adopted to maintain the purchasing power of the endowment fund. The operating revenue withdrawn from the endowment funds was reduced by 2.5% in fiscal year 2005. Commercial and other sources of revenue account for 12.4% of operating revenues. These include proceeds from the sale of archival images, museum shop sales, revenues generated by our traveling exhibition program, and rental income.

Support services and administration costs include a wide range of functions that impact all operational areas including: all financial reporting functions, organizational governance, human resources, volunteer resources, information systems and support and new media development, facilities maintenance, visitor services, external professional auditors and advisors, and general office supplies and services. These costs have increased by 30% since March 31, 2004. A large part of this increase is a result of new website initiatives. Three significant website projects were in development in 2005. The new corporate website has already been launched and two other educational websites will be complete by late summer 2005. The cost of these projects to March 2005 was $727k. An additional $250k will be spent to complete them in 2006. Staff costs in this area have also increased substantially. Almost 40% of the Institute’s workforce is employed in these areas and a negotiated settlement of 3% for all members of CUPE Local 1645 has added significantly to operating costs. Program and exhibit development includes designers, public and school programmers, production staff and travelling exhibit coordinators. Additional staff have been hired on term contracts to work on the research and development of a new permanent gallery on the third floor. However, overall costs for the workunit have remained close to 2004 levels as a result of restructuring and staffing changes made at the end of that year. Collections management cares for and maintains the Province’s collection. The decrease in spending in this area results from a reduction in staffing at the end of fiscal 2004. Resources in this area were invested in a major capital project in 2005. Fiscal 2005 is the last year in which collections acquisitions are expected to be funded by the Collections Endowment Fund. In fiscal year 2006 and subsequent years, income earned from the sale of deaccessioned Glenbow collections material which is not of museum quality will be placed in a Glenbow account in the Province’s Historic Resources Fund. This fund will be used for future acquisitions to the Glenbow collection. Glenbow Enterprises includes the personnel and infrastructure costs associated with maintaining and growing our fundraising programs and profile as well as developing and supporting the Institute’s membership program. It also oversees marketing and promotional activities for the organization as a whole and coordinates our publishing program. Costs in this area increased by 8.7%. Additional resources were invested in strategic planning and consulting advice associated with creating a new endowment fund to maintain the Mavericks gallery when it is complete and other innovative stewardship and fundraising initiatives. Amortization decreased by 7.4% in fiscal 2005. Fiscal 2004 included substantial amortization costs relating to our Blackfoot travelling exhibition. Amortization costs are expected to increase in 2006 and 2007 as two large capital projects, the collections storage upgrade costing $1.4 million and the new permanent Mavericks gallery (estimated to cost $9 million) are completed.

$ 4,000,000 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000 1,500,000 1,000,000 500,000 0

$ 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,500,000 2,000,000

MUSEUM SHOP

SUPPORT SERVICES & ADMINISTRATION

$ 606,284

$ 1,877,647

$ 3,750,126

$ 854,329

1,402,335

617,540

1,727,957

2,873,854

922,181

1,278,213

602,890

1,884,969

2,401,764

703,957

PROGRAM & EXHIBIT DEVELOPMENT

COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT

2005

$ 2,394,772

$ 1,235,750

2004

2,351,771

2003

2,031,773

LIBRARY & ARCHIVES

GLENBOW ENTERPRISES &

AMORTIZATION

1,500,000 1,000,000 CAPITAL ASSETS

500,000

Capital expenditures in 2005 totaled $1.2 million. $702,000 or 58.5% of this balance was spent on the upgrades to the collections storage area.

0

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PROVINCIAL CONTRACT

ENDOWMENT FUND REVENUES

FUNDRAISING

2005

$ 2,738,000

$ 2,393,007

2004

2,688,000

2,454,969

2003

2,563,000

1,649,632

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

ADMISSIONS & MEMBERSHIPS

OTHER ACTIVITIES

COMMERCIAL &

$ 3,099,725

$ 1,181,224

$ 1,328,924

2,152,000

1,146,073

1,456,475

2,155,761

1,158,530

1,387,947

ENDOWMENT FUNDS Despite a withdrawal of more than the recommended target of 5.5%, the endowment funds have maintained their market value in the last 12 months. In fiscal 2003 approximately $1.2 million dollars from the deaccessioning of part of the library collection was deposited in the collections fund. A separate library endowment fund was created early in 2004 and the deaccessioning revenues were transferred to this new fund. In fiscal year 2005, the Institute withdrew $1.1 million more income from the endowment funds, than the funds generated in that year. Fortunately this deficit has been compensated for by the growth of the fund during 2005. However, to ensure that the purchasing power of the endowment funds (which in 2005 provided 22.3% of the Institute’s operating revenues) is maintained, the Board of Governors passed cont…

Museum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow Glenbow

19

Management Discussion and Analysis cont... a motion in June 2004 directing that $25 million of the pooled fund assets be sequestered for strategic and financial management sufficient to meet and not exceed a targeted annual spending rate of 5 – 5.5% of the market value. By March 31, 2007 the Institute will reduce its annual budgetary reliance on the total endowment funds to 5 – 5.5%. A transitional fund of $2.5 million dollars was set aside to bridge the gap in funding as the draw is reduced over a three year period.

Capital Assets The accounting estimates for Capital Assets represent 9.5% of the organization’s balance sheet at March 31, 2005. If the organization’s estimated useful lives of assets were incorrect, the organization could experience increased or decreased charges for the amortization of capital assets in the future.

Recoverability of Long Term Investments

$ 16,000,000

The organization assesses the recoverability of its long-term investments on a regular, recurring basis. The most significant assumptions underlying the recoverability of long-term investments are the achievement of future cash flow and the long term sustainability of the organization. No allowance has been made for the recoverability of long-term investments at March 31, 2005. If the recoverability of a substantial portion of long-term investments is doubtful, the organization could experience an increased charge to Investment expense in future and a reduction in the endowment revenues used to sustain its on-going operations.

14,000,000 12,000,000 10,000,000 8,000,000 6,000,000

Revenue Recognition and Deferred Revenue

4,000,000

The organization recognizes revenue given for a designated purpose or project in the period in which the related expenses are incurred or the project is completed. Revenues received for projects or expenses which will occur in a future period are deferred until that future period. If management estimates of the cost or completion date of the designated activities are inaccurate, revenues could be recognized inaccurately.

2,000,000 0 FOUNDING FUND

LEGACY FUND

COLLECTIONS FUND

LIBRARY FUND

2005

$ 15,645,524

$ 6,346,368

$ 5,084,444

$ 1,337,000

2004

15,775,274

6,454,905

5,271,846

1,308,920

2003

14,411,922

5,694,834

5,904,436

OPERATIONAL RISKS AND UNCERTAINTIES

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES During 2005, the Institute raised $10.7 million dollars to finance its total cash expenditures of $9.8 million through its contract with the Province, fundraising endeavors and self-generated sources of revenue. The additional available cash flow of $8.5k was applied to capital expenditures and working capital. Cash for capital expenditures in excess of cash generated through operations was received through a capital grant received in support of the collections storage upgrade project. In-kind support from the Province and the City of Calgary for the use of the building and the utilities, janitorial and maintenance services associated with it are critical to the organization and allow the Glenbow to fund a far larger range of activities than would otherwise be possible with our existing cash-flow.

Cash-flow in the fiscal year 2006 will require close monitoring as we will be required to spend significant sums for the construction of the Mavericks gallery. A new banking facility has been negotiated to allow us to access funds in an effective and flexible way. The operating budget for 2005 is covered through anticipated sources of recurring funding.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING ESTIMATES Glenbow’s significant accounting policies are described in Note 3 of the Notes to the Financial Statements. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimated. Unless specifically stated below, the organization is not aware of trends, commitments, events or uncertainties that it reasonably expects to materially affect the methodology or assumptions associated with the critical accounting estimates.

The organization depends on fundraising to finance a significant proportion of its activities and strives to maintain an extremely strong profile and reputation with its stakeholders, the business community and government. Therefore, it adheres to high standards of governance and financial stewardship which are regularly reviewed. The organization’s operating budget is approved by the Board of Governors and regularly reviewed, however changes in the economy both locally and nationally have an impact on the amount of operational revenue that can be generated. Large exhibitions are booked at least a year in advance and permanent gallery development takes significantly longer. This restricts the organization’s ability to react quickly to economic and other changes. Two significant agreements which impact our ongoing activities terminate on March 31, 2006 and will need to be renegotiated later in fiscal 2006. These are our Curatorial Care and Public Service Access Agreement with the Province of Alberta and our collective agreement with CUPE Local 1645 to which over 90% of our workforce belong.

LOOKING FORWARD TO 2006 The 2006 budget was built on an assumption of consistent and growing receipts from existing and new fundraising programs, growth in attendance revenues and a 3.5% fee increase in our service contract with the Province of Alberta. Projected operating revenues of $10.1 million are 6.3% lower than our revenues for the fiscal year to March 31, 2005. The operating budget for 2006 does not envisage the same investment in new media projects in the coming year. The main focus will be a large capital project – the new permanent gallery on the 3rd floor.

Our 2nd floor galleries will again host four temporary exhibitions and our work with the collections, archives and library will continue at current levels. General operating costs continue to rise, the 2006 operating budget allows for a 3% negotiated settlement with the membership of CUPE Local 1645 as well as increases in many other fixed operating costs.

The Board of Governors has recommended that over the next five years, the Glenbow work to enhance its existing programs and activities and collaboratively develop two substantial new programs. Feasibility studies and business plans for this Enhanced Glenbow will be developed during the course of fiscal 2006.

Accounts Receivable – Bad and doubtful debts The organization has made no provision for bad or doubtful debts. Aging debts are reviewed monthly. There have been no write-offs during the course of the year and it is management’s opinion that the accounts receivable balances representing 15% of total assets at March 31, 2005 will be received in full. $4 million of this balance represents the balance due under a Contribution Agreement signed in February 2005 with the Province of Alberta for the development and construction of a new permanent gallery on the third floor. If the future were to differ from management’s best estimate of amounts recoverable the organization could experience a bad debt charge in the future.

Inventory Obsolesence The organization reviews its inventory for obsolescence at the annual inventory count carried out close to the end of the fiscal year. It has made no provision for inventory obsolescence. If this estimate is inadequate, the organization could experience a charge to operating expense in the future.

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Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT Glenbow Museum REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow

21

Management’s Report

Auditors’ Report

The financial statements of the Institute are the responsibility of management and the Board of Governors. They have been prepared by management in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in Canada, applied on a consistent basis.

To the Board of Governors of the Glenbow-Alberta Institute:

In fulfilling its responsibilities, management has developed, and maintains, a system of internal controls designed to safeguard assets and the collection from loss or unauthorized use and ensure the accuracy of the financial records. The financial statements necessarily include certain estimates which are made after consideration of the information available and using careful judgments. The Board of Governors exercises its responsibilities for financial controls through the Audit/Investment Committee which is comprised of Governors who are not employees of the Institute. The Committee meets with management and the external auditors to satisfy itself that the responsibility of the respective parties are properly discharged and to review the financial statements before they are presented to the Board for approval. Deloitte & Touche LLP have examined the financial statements for the year 2005, and their report to the Board of Governors is presented herein.

We have audited the balance sheet of Glenbow-Alberta Institute as at March 31, 2005 and the operating fund statement and the statements of operations and changes for endowment and designated fund balances and cash flows for the year then ended. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Institute’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Canadian generally accepted auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform an audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. In our opinion, these financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Institute as at March 31, 2005 and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles.

Calgary, Alberta June 3, 2005 Michael P. Robinson PRESIDENT & CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Marion A. Shill CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER & CORPORATE SECRETARY

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Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT Glenbow Museum REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow

23

Balance Sheet

Operating Fund Statement

AS AT MARCH 31, 2005

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2005

OPERATING FUND

ENDOWMENT AND DESIGNATED FUNDS

TOTAL 2005

TOTAL 2004

ASSETS

TOTAL 2005

TOTAL 2004

Province of Alberta

$ 2,738,000

$ 2,688,000

Investment income

14,555

17,694

Allocation of unrestricted investment income from Founding, Legacy, Collections Library and Designated funds

2,393,007

2,454,969

Fundraising (Note 10)

3,099,725

2,152,000

Admissions and memberships

1,181,224

1,146,073

Museum shop

713,651

666,141

Commercial activities

566,906

745,295

33,812

27,343

10,740,880

9,897,515

661,566

563,910

Central Services

3,088,560

2,309,944

Collections

1,235,750

1,402,335

Program and Exhibit Development

2,394,772

2,351,771

Library and Archives

606,284

617,540

Museum Shop

605,561

599,896

1,272,086

1,128,061

854,329

922,181

10,718,908

9,895,638

REVENUE

Current: Cash and investments

$

419,101

Due from endowment and designated funds

$

25,296

$

444,397

$

387,339

306,771

306,771

68,551

258,230

258,230

245,026

Grants and donations receivable (Note 4)

2,214,696

1,577

2,216,273

1,786,781

Accounts receivable and accrued interest

463,648

_

463,648

310,917

Merchandise for resale

Prepaid expenses

107,868

107,868

136,551

3,463,543

333,644

3,797,187

2,935,165

Capital assets (Note 5)

3,192,278

3,192,278

2,799,278

Grants and donations receivable after more than one year (Note 4)

2,840,637

2,840,637

1,701,157

23,829,879

23,829,879

25,394,534

$ 9,496,458

$ 24,163,523

$ 33,659,981

$ 32,830,134

Investments, at cost (quoted market value – Note 6)

Miscellaneous

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES

EXPENDITURES

Current:

President's Office

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

$ 1,887,150

Due to operating fund Deferred revenue (Note 7)

$ 1,887,150

$ 1,235,503

306,771

$

_

306,771

68,551

2,274,777

2,274,777

2,032,503

4,468,698

_

4,468,698

3,336,557

3,171,553

3,171,553

2,294,551

Long-term: Deferred revenue (Note 8) Fund Balances – Unrestricted (Note 9)

(1,336,071)

(1,336,071)

(965,043)

– Invested in capital assets

3,192,278

3,192,278

2,799,278

24,163,523

24,163,523

25,364,791

$ 9,496,458

$24,163,523

$ 33,659,981

$ 32,830,134

– Endowment and designated

Glenbow Enterprises Amortization

NET REVENUE

On behalf of the Board of Governors:

Ian Bourne,

Herb H. Snowdon, CA

CHAIR OF THE BOARD

TREASURER

$

21,972

$

1,877

The accompanying notes are part of these financial statements.

The accompanying notes are part of these financial statements.

24

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Museum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow Glenbow

25

Statement of Operations and Changes for Endowment and Designated Fund Balances

Statement of Cash Flows FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2005

FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 2005 ENDOWMENT FUNDS FOUNDING FUND

LEGACY FUND

COLLECTIONS FUND

OPERATING FUND 2005 2004

DESIGNATED FUNDS

LIBRARY FUND

TOTAL 2005

TOTAL 2004

TOTAL 2005

TOTAL 2004

$

733,234 $

287,472 $

222,679 $

60,174 $

1,303,559 $ 2,186,436 $

3,455 $

5,625

(1,283,738)

(532,558)

(502,409)

(74,251)

(2,392,956)

(2,436,966)

(51)

(18,002)

Deaccessioning proceeds

18,708

18,708

208,389

Donations

1,065

1,065

1,850

1,937

Publications

22,735

5,106

(550,504)

(245,086)

(278,665)

4,631

(1,069,624)

(42,141)

27,989

(5,334)

EXPENDITURES

$

Items not affecting cash Amortization

21,972 $

1,877 $ (1,227,409) $

26,141 $ (1,201,268) $

(284,968)

854,329

922,181

14,748

14,748

22,921

876,301

924,058

(1,212,661)

26,141

(1,186,520)

(262,047)

427,598

(513,649)

(340,564)

(22,335)

(362,899)

14,103

1,303,899

410,409

(1,553,225)

3,806

(1,549,419)

(247,944)

Net change in investments

1,553,225

(3,318)

1,549,907

248,566

Additions to capital assets

(1,247,329)

(690,340)

(1,247,329)

(690,340)

1,553,225

(3,318)

1,549,907

248,566

56,570

(279,931)

488

488

622

362,531

642,462

24,808

24,808

24,186

419,101 $

362,531 $

0 $

25,296 $

25,296 $

24,808

Changes in non-cash working capital items

INVESTING 75,470

31,761

26,743

6,835

140,809

158,453

134

124

Deaccessioning expenses

2,228

2,228

55,955

Miscellaneous expenses

1,714

40

14,748

14,748

22,921

90,218

31,761

26,743

9,063

157,785

237,329

1,848

164

NET REVENUE (EXPENDITURE)

(640,722)

(276,847)

(305,408)

(4,432)

(1,227,409)

(279,470)

26,141

(5,498)

Fund balances, beginning of year

12,326,577

6,384,886

5,165,757

1,343,071

25,220,291

25,499,761

144,500

149,998

Amortization

TOTAL 2004

OPERATING Net revenue (expenditure)

Allocation of unrestricted investment income to operating fund

Investment expenses

TOTAL 2005

NET INFLOW (OUTFLOW) Of CASH RELATED TO THE FOLLOWING ACTIVITIES

REVENUE Investment income

ENDOWMENT DESIGNATED FUNDS FUNDS

NET CASH INFLOW (OUTFLOW)

CASH POSITION, BEGINNING OF YEAR

CASH POSITION, END OF YEAR Fund balances, end of year

$ 11,685,855 $ 6,108,039 $ 4,860,349 $ 1,338,639 $ 23,992,882 $ 25,220,291 $

170,641 $

144,500

Market Value of Investments

$ 15,645,524 $ 6,346,368 $ 5,084,844 $

128,461 $

119,260

1,337,00 $ 28,413,736 $ 28,810,945 $

$

The accompanying notes are part of these financial statements.

The accompanying notes are part of these financial statements.

26

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Museum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow Glenbow

27

Notes to the Financial Statements NOTE 1

MARCH 31, 2005

GENERAL The Glenbow-Alberta Institute (the “Institute”) operates under the authority of the Glenbow-Alberta Institute Act, Chapter G-5, Revised Statutes of Alberta 1996, as amended. The Institute is registered as a charity under the Income Tax Act and is exempt from income tax. Ownership of the majority of the collections is held by the Province of Alberta. The Institute is responsible for caring for the collection and providing public access. The Institute administers seven collections with over 1.3 million objects, comprised of Cultural History, Ethnology, Military History, Mineralogy, Art, Library, Archives - paper, photographs and negatives. All additions to the collections, including gifts, are approved by the Board of Governors. Deaccessioning of major value collection items requires approval by the Province of Alberta.

NOTE 2

NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND DESCRIPTION OF ORGANIZATION The nature and business of the Institute is to provide public service through a human history museum, an art gallery, a library, and an archives. The organization is comprised of six work units, the functions of which are as follows: The President’s office carries out the functions of the overall administration of the Institute including human resources. Central services provides board services, accounting, budgeting and financial services, computer services, photography, purchasing, security and building services, volunteer services and carries other unallocated costs such as photocopier leases and communications. Collections makes recommendations on the purchase and acceptance of gifts of art and artifacts and the deaccessioning of collection items, stores and conserves collection items and makes the collection available for display to the public. Program and exhibit development plans, facilitates, coordinates and produces all aspects of the Institute’s activities for the public. Library and archives acquires, catalogues, preserves and makes available to the public and staff published and archival material relating to the history of southern Alberta and Western Canada. Glenbow enterprises is a division of the Institute responsible for private sector, individual donor and foundation fundraising, facility rentals, the museum shop, grant applications, commercial alliances, advertising and promotion campaigns and new business ventures. Glenbow enterprises also develops publishing programs which reflect the full range of research undertaken at the Institute. Publishing projects include catalogues, books, the Glenbow magazine, videos, research notes and multi-media technology.

NOTE 3

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND REPORTING PRACTICES These financial statements have been prepared by management in accordance with Canadian generally accepted accounting principles. a) Fund Accounting The Institute follows the restricted fund method of accounting for contributions. Loans and advances between the funds are recorded in each fund and are not eliminated in the fund totals on the balance sheet. i) Operating Fund The Operating Fund accounts for the organization’s administration activities, fundraising and the costs of maintaining and allowing public access to the collections. ii) Endowment Funds The Founding Fund contains the Devonian Foundation Gift and the Province of Alberta Gift: initially $5,000,000 each. The Devonian Foundation Gift is invested in marketable securities and interest bearing deposits. A portion of the investment income earned annually thereon is required by the Glenbow-Alberta Institute Amendment Act, 1996 to be reinvested in order to maintain the value of the Devonian Foundation Gift, increased by inflation. Investment income in excess of the annual inflation amount may be retained in the Fund or allocated to the Operating Fund at the discretion of the Board of Governors. The Province of Alberta Gift is also invested in marketable securities and interest bearing deposits. The Board of Governors has specified that an amount of investment income earned thereon must be retained in the Founding Fund (the “Fund”) in order to maintain the value of the Province of Alberta Gift, increased by inflation. The remaining investment income may be retained in the Fund or allocated to the Operating Fund at the Board’s discretion. The requirement of increasing the capital by inflation is monitored by comparing the initial value of the gift adjusted for the cumulative impact of inflation to the current market value of the Fund. The Legacy Fund was established by the Board of Governors and is invested in marketable securities and interest bearing deposits. The Board has specified that an amount of investment income earned thereon must be retained in the Legacy Fund (the “Fund”) in order to maintain the value of the Fund, increased by inflation. Any remaining unexpended investment income may be retained in the Fund or allocated to the Operating Fund at the Board’s discretion. The Collections Fund was established from the proceeds of a 1995 deaccessioning program for selected international collection items which are not part of the Institute’s core mandate. The net proceeds of the deaccessioned items were credited to the Collections Fund. Expenditures from the capital are restricted to the purchase of collection items. The Board has specified that an amount of investment income earned on the Collections Fund (the “Fund”) must be retained in the Fund in order to maintain the value of the Fund, increased by inflation. Any remaining unexpended investment income may be retained in the Fund or allocated to the Operating Fund at the discretion of the Board of Governors for “the care and maintenance of the collection.”

28

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

The Library Fund was established from the proceeds of a 2002 deaccessioning program of selected items which were not part of the Institute’s core mandate, or were duplicates of items accessible in the local community. The net proceeds of the deaccessioned items were credited to the Library Fund. The Board has specified that an amount of investment income earned on the Library Fund (the “Fund”) must be retained in the fund in order to maintain the value of the fund, increased by inflation. Any remaining unexpended investment income may be retained in the fund or allocated to the Operating Fund at the discretion of the Board of Governors. iii) Designated Funds The Institute receives other funds which are designated for special use by donors or by the Board of Governors. It is the Institute’s policy to maintain these funds separately as Designated Funds. Transfers for capital asset acquisitions are made annually to the Operating Fund to the extent that Designated Funds have been expended on capital assets. Designated Funds include grants received from various government and private agencies to finance specific projects and proceeds from the sale of Glenbow-Alberta Institute publications. b) Revenue Recognition Restricted contributions related to general operations are recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund in the year in which the related expenses are incurred. All other restricted contributions are recorded directly to the appropriate restricted fund when received. Unrestricted contributions are recognized as revenue of the Operating Fund in the year received or receivable if the amount to be received can be reasonably estimated and collection is reasonably assured. Operating grants are recognized as revenue in the period when receivable. Operating grants received for a future period are deferred until that future period. Contributions to Endowment Funds are recognized as revenue in the Endowment Funds. Investment income earned on Endowment Fund resources is recognized in the Endowment Fund. Funds are transferred to the Operating Fund in accordance with terms approved by the Board. Other investment income is recognized as revenue of the Operating or Designated Funds when earned. Net revenues from the deaccessioning of collections items are forwarded to the Province of Alberta on receipt for deposit into a designated account for Glenbow Museum held collections which forms part of the Historic Resources Fund of Alberta Community Development. Revenues from the deaccessioning of library items are allocated to the Library Fund. Expenses of deaccessioning are paid from sale proceeds. c) Donated Services A substantial number of unpaid volunteers have made significant contributions of their time to the Institute’s programs. The value of this contributed time is not included in these financial statements, since objective measurement of valuation is indeterminable. d) Merchandise for Resale Merchandise for resale is recorded at the lower of cost or net realizable value. e) Capital Assets Furniture and equipment is recorded at cost and is amortized on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets, according to class: computer equipment 33.3%, vehicles and equipment 20%, major renovations 6.67% and furniture 10%. Leasehold improvements and travelling exhibitions are recorded at cost and are amortized over the expected lives of the improvements or exhibitions. f) Investments Investments are carried at the fair market value assigned at the date they are donated to the Institute and by the cost method for these investments purchased by the Institute. Portfolio investments which are effectively held to maturity or which have a reduction in market value which is considered temporary in nature are recorded at cost. g) Financial Instruments Accounts receivable and accrued interest, investments and accounts payable and accrued liabilities constitute financial instruments. Based on the available information, the carrying value of the Institute’s accounts receivable and accounts payable approximates fair value as at March 31, 2005. Investments are long-term in nature and are recorded at the lower of cost or market value, unless declines in market value are considered temporary. See Note 6 for fair value information pertaining to the investments. The Institute is exposed to risks arising from fluctuations in interest and foreign exchange rates. The Institutes does not use derivative instruments to reduce its exposure to interest and foreign exchange rate risk, but mitigates risk by ensuring that dates of bond maturity are staggered. h) Expenditure on Collection Items Costs of collection items acquired during the year are expensed through the work unit to which they relate. The expenditures on collection items in 2005 were $109,402 (2004 - $83,013) which were recorded within the Operating Fund. i) Impairment of Long-Lived Assets Effective April 1, 2004 the Institute adopted the recommendations of the CICA Handbook Section 3063 “Impairment of Long-Lived Assets.” Long-lived assets are tested for recoverability whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that their carrying amount may not be fully recoverable. An impairment loss is recognized when their carrying value exceeds the total undiscounted cash flows expected from their use and eventual disposition. The amount of impairment loss is determined as the excess of the carrying value of the assets over their fair value. The adoption of this policy had no impact on the current year’s financial statements.

Museum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow Glenbow

29

NOTE 4

GOVERNMENT GRANTS

NOTE 7

Grants and donations receivable include the following provincial government grant:

Province of Alberta - Centennial Legancies grant in support of the Mavericks gallery

RECEIVABLE IN < 12 MONTHS

RECEIVABLE AFTER > 12 MONTHS

$ 1,210,805

$ 2,840,637

COST

2005 ACCUMULATED AMORTIZATION $

NET BOOK VALUE

2004 NET BOOK VALUE

4,616,326

$ 1,624,517

$ 1,080,939

Furniture and equipment

$ 6,240,843

Leasehold improvements

3,350,307

2,005,881

1,344,426

1,522,249

654,369

431,034

223,335

196,090

7,053,241

$ 3,192,278

$ 2,799,278

$

Provincial government grants

345,682

$

85,750

Grants from the corporate sector

431,603

331,181

Other

139,110

180,913

$ 2,274,777

$ 2,032,503

2005

2004

DEFERRED REVENUE – LONG TERM Corporate sector support for exhibitions and programming

$

ICAP funding for upgrade and renewal of storage space Province of Alberta – Centennial Legacies grant in support of the Mavericks gallery

Provincial government grants for the construction of the Blackfoot gallery Other

NOTE 6

INVESTMENTS

2005 MARKET VALUE

Founding Fund Devonian Foundation Gift

116,661

MARKET VALUE

COST

COST

7,871,173

$ 6,164,988

5,407,054

7,904,101

6,190,778

15,645,524

11,563,730

15,775,274

12,355,766

Legacy Fund

6,346,368

6,051,584

6,454,905

6,405,946

Collections Fund

5,084,844

4,848,973

5,271,846

5,243,157

Library Fund

1,337,00

1,249,015

1,308,920

1,276,406

Designated Fund

128,461

116,577

119,260

113,259

$ 28,542,197

$ 23,829,879

$ 28,930,205

$ 25,394,534

Common and preferred stocks

17,639,723

13,371,172

18,074,788

15,087,098

Bonds, debentures and mortgages

10,101,100

9,658,023

9,978,402

9,432,033

709,071

708,381

776,367

774,755

92,303

92,303

100,648

100,648

$ 28,542,197

$ 23,829,879

$ 28,930,205

$ 25,394,534

Province of Alberta Gift

$

266,663

662,481

718,260

2,123,032

1,030,000

76,666

23,465

181,463

213,963

11,250

42,200

$ 3,171,553

$ 2,294,551

2004 NOTE 9

CHANGES IN OPERATING FUND BALANCE Changes in the Operating Fund balances were comprised of:

$

294,827

62,565

Fees and grants in support of travelling exhibitions $ 10,245,519

$

1,139,832

Calgary Foundation – support for First Nations school programs Development costs of travelling exhibitions

2004

1,295,817

Grants from foundations

NOTE 8

CAPITAL ASSETS

2005

Federal government grants

Canadian Heritage through the Canadian Arts and Heritage Sustainability Program approved a grant of $167,000 in fiscal year 2004. A supplemental amount of $53,850 was approved in fiscal year 2005. $58,250 of the total funding of $220,850 was recognized as fundraising revenue in the year ending March 31, 2004. The remaining funds of $162,600 are included in fundraising revenues of $3,099,725 in 2005.

NOTE 5

DEFERRED REVENUE – CURRENT

8,329,875

$ 6,156,676

7,315,649

$

2005 INVESTED IN CAPITAL ASSETS

Beginning of year balance

$ 2,799,278

UNRESTRICTED $

2004 TOTAL

TOTAL

(965,043)

$ 1,834,235

$ 1,832,358

Net revenue

(854,329)

876,301

21,972

1,877

Invested in capital assets

1,247,329

(1,247,329)

$ 3,192,278

$ (1,336,071)

$ 1,856,207

$ 1,834,235

NOTE 10 FUNDRAISING

Cash and short-term deposits Accrued interest receivable

30

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Fundraising revenues of $3,099,725 include cash donations to the Institute and do not include donations of art, artifacts and archival material to the collections which are owned by the Province of Alberta. The approximate dollar amount of the tax receipts issued by the Institute for items donated to the collection in 2005 amounted to $281,097 (2004 - $7,209,949). Tax receipts for amounts greater than $1,000 are supported by independent appraisals.

NOTE 11 PENSION OBLIGATIONS The Institute has a defined contribution plan which is available to all full-time and permanent part-time employees. Under the terms of the plan, the Institute matches contributions of up to 5% of employee earnings. In 2005, the Institute contributed $204,508 (2004 - $218,587) in connection with the plan.

NOTE 12 DONATED SERVICES The Glenbow Centre is leased to The City of Calgary by the Province of Alberta for a nominal amount of one dollar per year. The City of Calgary, in turn, subleases it to the Institute for the same amount per year. Fair market value of the rental has not been determined. The City of Calgary also provides janitorial, maintenance and utility services for the Glenbow Centre at no cost to the Institute. The value of the services as determined by The City of Calgary was $1,478,338 for the year ended March 31, 2005 (2004 - $1,483,398). This amount has not been included in the Operating Fund statement.

Museum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW 2004/05 Glenbow Glenbow

31

Current and Upcoming Exhibitions Board of Governors

Board of Governors Board Chair Ian Bourne Vice-Chair Gail O’Brien Treasurer Herb H. Snowdon, C.A. Governors Terry Allen Alex Archila Mary Ann Cormack Lauchlan Currie Joanne Cuthbertson Rod Green Robert Herdman Edmond Lee A. Webster Macdonald Jr., Q.C. Jean Merriman Hon. Judge William Pepler Christopher J. Robb Michael P. Robinson (President and CEO) Past Chair Randal L. Oliver Corporate Secretary Marion Shill Assistant Corporate Secretary Christine Chin Past Chairs Eric L. Harvie,* O.C., C.D., Q.C., 1954-1966 The Hon. Mr. Justice N.D. McDermid,* Q.C., 1966-1969 James C. Mahaffy,* 1969-1970 W. Donald C. MacKenzie,* 1970-1974 The Hon. Douglas S. Harkness,* O.C., 1974-1977 Jane T. Edwards, 1977-1980 D. Edwin Lewis,* C.D., Q.C., 1980-1984 E. David D. Tavender, Q.C., 1984-1988 Catherine M. Evamy, 1988-1991 Frederick F. Abbott, 1991-1994 J. Sherrold Moore, 1994-1997 Robert G. Peters, 1997-2000 A. Webster Macdonald, Jr. Q.C., 2000-2002 Randal L. Oliver 2002-2004 * deceased

32

Glenbow GlenbowMuseum Museum FINANCIAL ANNUAL REPORT REVIEW2004/05 2004/05

Fellows Robert M. Borden Duncan F. Cameron N. Glenn Cameron George Crawford, Q.C. Jane T. Edwards Catherine M. Evamy Robert R. Janes, Ph.D. The Hon. E. Peter Lougheed, P.C., C.C., Q.C. Joy Harvie Maclaren John E. Poole E. David D. Tavender, Q.C.

Voices of Southeast Asia

Art of the Ancient Mediterranean World

July 1, 2005 to September 25, 2005

June 30, 2006 to June 10, 2007

Embark on a remarkable journey of Southeast Asian culture! Let the rich culture of Vietnam colour your senses. Hear the personal stories of Southeast Asian immigrants who left their homeland to begin new lives in Canada, and examine the contemporary works of first generation Asian-Canadian artists. Glenbow welcomes you to experience the vibrant traditions of this region's peoples.

Trace the rise and fall of Egyptian, Greek, and Roman civilizations and learn how they influenced one another in history, archaeology, folklore, religion, culture, and more. This exhibition will feature over 200 objects and artifacts spanning a 5,000 year history. From prehistoric Egyptian earthenware to a fresco painting from Pompeii, it will trace the development of ancient Mediterranean civilization and its cultural connections.

Petra: Lost City of Stone Honourary Appointments Duncan F. Cameron, F.M.A., Director Emeritus Dr. Hugh A. Dempsey, Chief Curator Emeritus Premier Ralph Klein, Curator Emeritus of Blackfoot Ethnology Joy Harvie Maclaren, Curator Emeritus of Blackfoot Ethnology Dr. Marmie P. Hess, O.C., LL.D., Curator Emeritus of Inuit Collections Ewa Smithwick, Conservator Emeritus Associate Curators/ Researchers Dr. Geoffrey Simmins, Associate Curator of Art Elizabeth Jamieson, Associate Curator of Cultural History Chuck Stormes, Associate Curator of Cultural History Dr. Margaret Hanna, Associate Curator of Ethnology Tom Blackweasel, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Doreen Blackweasel, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Andy Black Water, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Jenny Bruised Head, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Louise Crop Eared Wolf, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Charlie Crow Chief, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Rosie Day Rider, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Earl Old Person, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Allan Pard, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Jerry Potts, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Pat Provost, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Pete Standing Alone, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Jim Swag, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Donna Weaselchild, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Frank Weasel Head, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Clarence Wolfleg, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Herman Yellow Old Woman, Associate Curator of Blackfoot Ethnology Dr. Marmie P. Hess, O.C., LL.D, Associate Researcher Honourary Governors David Claydon Stan Davison Maureen G. Eberts Jane T. Edwards Catherine M. Evamy Anne Fraser Linda M. Hohol Joy Harvie Maclaren E. David D. Tavender Q.C.

October 29, 2005 to February 20, 2006 Deep within the deserts of Jordan lays the ancient city of Petra. Through a narrow gorge it emerges into view, revealing awe-inspiring monuments cut into the surrounding cliffs. What is this astonishing city? Who built it and why? Discover the forgotten city of Petra lost to the outside world for centuries. Growing as a popular tourist destination, Petra served as a location in the 1989 feature film, Indiana Jones and the Lost Crusade. Explore this impressive ancient city and its people with over 200 objects, including colossal stone sculptures and architectural elements travelling from Jordan for the first time.

Variations: Fifty Years of Canadian Art

Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta

March 18 to June 4, 2006

Glenbow Museum’s New Permanent Gallery Celebrating Alberta’s Story Opening February 2007

Glenbow Museum will present an exciting art exhibition which will include two exhibits: Edwin Holgate: Canadian Painter travelling from the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, and Art and Society in Canada 1913-1950, travelling from the National Gallery of Canada. Best known for his nude portraits, Edwin Holgate was one of the most respected artists of the human figure and joined the Group of Seven in 1931. Holgate and his contemporaries left a lasting impression on the era of Canadian modern art. Text: Tanis Booth Design: Kaija Dirkson Printing: Sundog Printing Limited

Founder Eric Harvie O.C., C.D., Q.C.

The province of Alberta was shaped by ambitious, adventurous, and entrepreneurial people. The pioneer spirit, rooted from Alberta’s earliest residents, lives on today. In a city that’s grown to world-class proportions, we will bring to light the spirited personalities that have shaped and continue to define our province. Our new permanent 30,000 square foot gallery will present the stories of how Alberta became what it is today – unique, individualistic, and proud.

Check out these new online resources! Niisitapiisini: Our Way of Life

Mavericks: An Incorrigible History of Alberta

www.glenbow.org/blackfoot

www.glenbow.org/mavericks

This innovative educational website in Blackfoot, English, and French for students in grades 4, 5 and 6 explores the stories of the Blackfoot people in their own words. The site’s activities are designed to engage learners as they discover the complexity and uniqueness of Blackfoot history and culture.

Students in grades 4, 5, 6, and 7 can access this online learning resource to learn about our province through the lives of 40 mavericks who have contributed to Alberta’s history. With over 500 artifacts, maps, archival documents, and historic photographs from Glenbow’s diverse collections, this bilingual website in English and French shares the stories of our unique province.

Glenbow Museum

ANNUAL REPORT 2004/05

Above image: Architectural relief with head of Dushares-Dionysus, Petra, ca. 1st century A.D. Department of Antiquities, Amman, Jordan. Photograph by: Peter John Gates.

130 – 9th Avenue S.E., Calgary, Alberta 403·268·4100 www.glenbow.org


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