Issuu on Google+

St. George's College

Subject: 8th CHEMISTRY

Teacher's notes

Objectives

Class:

Vocabulary

Groups and Periods

Date: June 9th

Link and Learn

Prepared by

2009 1


8th Milton A ‐ Valence Electrons Name

Oral Intervention

Coin

Chocolate

Sergio  María Fernanda  Alejandra  Almendra  Anna Paula  Sandra E‐C  Maia  María Belén  Alfredo  Kinley  Arianne  Sandra M.   Fiorella  Rodrigo  Giulia  Jaime  Stefano  Bruno 

2


8th Milton Alpha ‐ Valence Electrons Name

Oral Intervention

Coin

Chocolate

Marcelo  Antonella  Paulo  Alejandro  Brenda  Diego  Gabriel  Valeria  Cristina  Giuliana  Joshua  María Gracia  Gonzalo N.  Paolo  Gonzalo R.  Giorgio  Nicolás  María Claudia 

3


Let's remember previous  learned concepts...

Wanna Play?

4


5


Columns are called Groups • Each vertical column of elements (from top to  bottom) on the periodic table is called a Group. • Elements in the same group often have similar  chemical and physical properties . • For this reason, a group is also called a family.

6


7


8


Classes of Elements • Elements are classified as metals, nonmetals, and  metalloids (poor metals), according to their properties. • The number of electrons (e‐) in the last energy level of an  atom is one characteristic that helps determine which  category an element belongs in. • The zigzag line in the table determines which elements  are metals, nonmetals and metalloids.

9


New knowledge beginning......

10


Grouping the Elements • The properties of the elements in a group are similar because  the atoms of the elements have the same number of electrons in  their outer energy level. • Atoms give, take or share electrons with other atoms in order to  have a complete set of electrons in their outer energy level. • Those elements are called reactive and can combine to form  compounds.

11


12


Group 1:  Alkali Metals  Group IA

• Group contains: Metals • Electrons in outer level: 1 • Reactivity: Very reactive • Shared properties: softness, silver color,  shininess, low density

• Alkali Metals are the most reactive metals  because their atoms can easily give away the one  outer­level electron. • Pure alkali metals are stored in oil, to keep them  from reacting with oxygen or water in the air. • Alkali metals are so reactive that in nature they’re  only found forming compounds with other  elements.

13


Lithium

Sodium

Potassium

Rubidium

Cesium

14


15


16


Group 2:  Alkali‐Earth Metals

 Group IIA

• Group contains: Metals • Electrons in outer level: 2 • Reactivity: Very reactive (but less than  Alkali Metals) • Shared properties: silver color, higher  densities than alkali metals.

• Atoms of alkali‐earth metals have 2 electrons in the  outer energy level, which makes it more difficult for  these atoms to give two electrons instead of just one.

17


Mg

Be

Ca

Sr

Ba

18


Groups 3 ‐ 12:  Transition Metals

 Groups B

• Group contains: Metals • Electrons in outer level: 1 or 2 • Reactivity: Less than Alkali‐Earth Metals • Shared properties: shininess, good  conductors of thermal energy and electric  current, higher densities and melting points  than elements from groups 1 and 2 (except  Hg).

• Groups 3 – 12 do not have individual names. Instead,  they’re all called transition metals. • These elements do not give away their electrons easily,  making them less reactive than groups 1 and 2.

19


20


Lanthanides and Actinides • Some transition metals from periods 6 and 7 appear in two  rows at the bottom of the periodic table to keep it from being too  wide. • The elements in each row tend to have similar properties. • Elements in the first row follow Lanthanum and are called  Lanthanides (shiny, reactive metals). • Elements in the second row follow Actinium, and are called  Actinides (radioactive or unstable) • Elements after Plutonium 94, are artificially made in  laboratories.

21


22


23


Group 13:  Boron Group  Group IIIA

• • • •

Group contains: One metalloid and 4 metals. Electrons in outer level: 3 Reactivity: Reactive Shared properties: solids at room temperature.

• Aluminum is the most common element of this  group, and the most abundant metal in the Earth’s  crust.

24


Al

B

In

Ga

Tl

25


Group 14:  Carbon Group  Group IVA

• • • •

Group contains: One nonmetal and 2 metals. Electrons in outer level: 4 Reactivity: Varies among the elements. Shared properties: solids at room temperature.

• Carbon can be found uncombined in nature, but can  also form a wide variety of compounds (carbohydrates,  fats, proteins, etc). • Germanium and Silicon are used to make computer  chips. • The Tin metal is a metal that is not very reactive, which  makes it useful to coat other metals to prevent them  from rusting.

26


C

Si

Ge

Sn

Pb

27


Group 15:  Nitrogen Group  Group VA

• Group contains: Two nonmetals, two metalloids  and one metal. • Electrons in outer level: 5 • Reactivity: Varies among the elements. • Shared properties: solids at room temperature  (except N).

• Nitrogen, which is a gas at room temperature, makes  up about 80% of the air you breathe. • Nitrogen from air can be reacted with Hydrogen to  make ammonia for fertilizers. • Although Nitrogen is not very reactive, Phosphorus is  extremely reactive (to the point that it can only be  found forming compounds in nature).

28


N

P

Sb

As

Bi

29


Group 16:  Oxygen Group  Group VIA

• Group contains: Three nonmetals, one metalloid  and one metal. • Electrons in outer level: 6 • Reactivity: Reactive. • Shared properties: solids at room temperature  (except O).

• Oxygen makes up about 20% of air, and it is necessary  for substances to burn, and to living organisms to  obtain energy. • Sulfur is another common element of this group, found  as a yellow solid in nature.

30


O

S

Se

Te

Po

31


Group 17:  Halogens Group  Group VIIA

• Group contains: Three nonmetals, one metalloid  and one metal. • Electrons in outer level: 7 • Reactivity: Reactive. • Shared properties: poor conductors of electric  current, violent reaction with alkali metals to form  salts, never in uncombined form in nature.

• Halogens are very reactive nonmetals because their  atoms need to gain only one electron to have a complete  set of electrons in the outer energy level. • Usually reacting with metals to obtain that missing  electron, producing a salt. • Halogens have similar chemical properties but very  different physical properties.

32


F

Cl

Br

I

33


Group 18:  Noble Gases  Group VIIIA

• Group contains: Nonmetals. • Electrons in outer level: 8 (except Helium, with  only 2). • Reactivity: Non‐Reactive. • Shared properties: Colorless, odorless gases at  room temperature.

• Noble Gases are unreactive nonmetals because their  atoms have a complete set of electrons in their outer  energy level. • Under normal conditions they do not react with other  elements. • This non‐reactivity makes them useful (light bulbs last  longer when filled with Argon).

34


He

Ne

Ar

Kr

Xe

Rn

35


Hydrogen

• Electrons in outer level: 1. • Reactivity: Reactive. • Shared properties: Colorless, odorless gas at room  temperature, low density, explosive reactions with  oxygen.

• Hydrogen’s properties do not match any single group,  so it is set apart from the other elements in the table. • Hydrogen is above group 1 because atoms of the alkali  metals also have only one electron in their outer  energy level. • Its physical properties are more like those of  nonmetals than those of metals. So Hydrogen makes a  group of its own.

36


37


Resources Used Slide  (Group)

Resource 

Description 

Origin 

G1 ‐ 2

Image 

Milton

 http://bit.ly/Q7ggk 

G1 ‐ 3

Image 

Milton

 http://bit.ly/18LkW6 

G1 ‐ 4  Image   G1 ‐ 7

Images

G1 ‐ 9  Image 

IS Units and Prefixes   http://tinyurl.com/c9d69c Mendeleev 

http://bit.ly/Pkbmw http://bit.ly/rSgUf 

Groups Periods

http://bit.ly/pa98a http://bit.ly/pa98a

G1 ‐ 10 G1 ‐ 12  G1 ‐ 14 

38


Teacher's Notes This class has been designed to cover the topics of Groups and  Periods from Monday June 8th till Friday June 12th. For further knowledge about this topic:  1. Conduct a thorough search under the topic: Groups and Periods  on the Web, books and magazines. 2. If findings are not specific, ask your teacher for suggestions.

BACK 39


Objectives • Identify and describe the characteristics of Groups and  Periods in the periodic table. • Describe the members of the main groups and periods in  the periodic table.

Note: All, or most, of the objectives will be covered during class time,  however the student must be responsible for those objectives not covered or concluded.

BACK 40


Vocabulary • • • • •

Element:  Atomic Number: Atomic Mass: Group: Period:

Note: Most of the vocabulary words will be covered during class time,  however the student must be responsible for those words not covered or concluded.

BACK 41


Link and Learn You can visit the following websites to improve your understanding  on the present topic: • • • • •

http://www.chem1.com/acad/webtext/atoms/atpt‐6.html#SIZE http://www.dayah.com/periodic/ http://science‐learning2009.wikispaces.com http://learningandscience.blogspot.com http://libraryatstgeorge.blogspot.com

BACK 42


Prepared by

Gerardo LAZARO Science Lead Teacher Email: glazaro@sanjorge.edu.pe Wiki: http://science‐learning.wikispaces.com Blog: http://learningandscience.blogspot.com Twitter: http://twitter.com/glazaro

BACK 43


44


8th Chemistry - Groups 1 to 18