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exhibit

David Cronenberg: Evolution, TIFF Bell Lightbox, Toronto Reich+Petch, Toronto

Photo by Tom Arban

Creepy yet cool, Reich+Petch’s design (in association with the TIFF Bell Lightbox Exhibitions team) for the “David Cronenberg: Evolution” exhibit encapsulates the surreal angst of the audacious Canadian film director, patriarch of the body-horror genre. The dark, tough look of the installation mirrors his cruel world of exploding heads (Scanners), car-accident victim masochist porn (Crash) and humanoid monsters (The Fly, Naked Lunch). - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -----------------------------------------The immersive, interactive exhibition offers artifacts, movie props, film clips, lobby cards and letters (“Saw The Fly— loved it,” Martin Scorsese writes) that aim, the design brief states, to “delight and frighten film enthusiasts and fans.” - -----------------------------------------At the exhibit’s centre, a large curvilinear installation represents Cronenberg’s brain. The edges display iconic props and artwork from his oeuvre flanked by vignettes and large images that put the objects in their context. At the centre, in the bowels of the brain, so to speak, visitors can view videos of Cronenberg interviews. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -----------------------------------------The exhibit’s crown jewels include the chamber, evoking a space capsule or diving bell decked out with sci-fi fins, where Jeff Goldblum metamorphoses into The Fly. - - - - - ------------------------------------------•

Photo by James Brittain Photography

Papier15 Art Fair, Montreal Architecturama, Montreal

Over an April weekend, 17,000 visitors viewed works on paper by 400 artists repped by 40 galleries across Canada. The artworks sprawled over three floors amid the expansive white walls and raw concrete floors of a former schmatte factory at Complexe de Gaspé in Montreal’s Mile End neighbourhood. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Given the large floor space and the temporary nature of the exhibit, the display system by Architecturama — the Montreal-based partnership of architects Sylvain Bilodeau and Nicolas Mathieu-Tremblay – had to be extremely economical. What could be cheaper than rolls of bond paper, magnets, rented post shores (steel posts for scaffolding) and red carpet? Paper, after all, was the theme of the fair; its fragile, ephemeral quality mirrored the short life of the show. The paper strips served as demising walls to divide exhibition booths. From a distance, the walls’ partial opacity would tantalize visitors with sneak peeks of booths farther away, encouraging a steady traffic flow. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The bond paper’s deployment in horizontal strips echoed the alignment of the strip windows wrapping the building. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------•

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9/10 2015 CANADIAN INTERIORS

15-09-17 12:44 PM

Canadian Interiors September October 2015  

Canadian Interiors is Canada’s leading magazine targeted at interior design professionals. Since its launch in 1964, the magazine is a must...

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