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building were brick and for the main building a large part of the surface was glass. “This, together with a saw-tooth roof, supplied with windows facing the north, makes the place unusually bright within.” A note was made of steps taken to ensure the comfort of the workers: “A commendable feature of the plant is the attention that has been devoted to the comfort and well-being of the workmen...the roof was so arranged that no direct sunlight could enter to interfere with the work. “In addition to having cheerful and well-lighted shops, lavatories have been provided in the basement, installed with the latest improvements known in plumbing practice. White enamelled hand basins provided with hot and cold water have been put in, and at these nearly one hundred men may wash at one time. “There is also a large lunch and reading-room, well lighted and heated, 150 by 50 feet, generously provided with tables and chairs, lockers for the workmen’s clothes, and gas stoves for making tea or coffee during the noon hour. “Another feature in this connection is the exhaust ventilating system for carrying away all dust from the emery and bucking machines in the cleaning and polishing departments. This is no doubt a guarantee of better health on the part of those employed, and more efficient service, which attention to the comfort and well-being of the workmen could well be followed by many another industrial establishment.” This shop included a foundry along with a cleaning and polishing department where the rough castings were cut and then put through rumblers. Parts then went to the emory wheels to be trimmed, polished or buffed and sent for plating. The shop made lamps, valves and gas meters. During the writer’s visit there were about 2,000 gas meters in different stages of completion. “This department has a capacity of 350 meters a week, and from it has been supplied over 15,000 meters to one gas company alone in Canada.” The plant had a copper shop for the manufacturing goods such as copper tanks, ordinary kettles and tank www.canadianmetalworking.com

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kettles. There was also ornamental iron work done in the facility, forging iron lamps, iron grills for “bank and office counters,” as well as door and window grills. Highlighted by the hot and cold running water at the employees’ disposal, this is another plant that scored high in 1905. “While there are many larger manufacturing plants and industrial companies in Canada, there are many points in connection with the factory described that might serve as an example for others.”

Booth #1733 AUGUST 2015 | 29

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06cmw august2015 de  

Canadian Metalworking is one of Canada’s largest industrial magazines and also one of its oldest, publishing continuously since 1905. Canadi...

06cmw august2015 de  

Canadian Metalworking is one of Canada’s largest industrial magazines and also one of its oldest, publishing continuously since 1905. Canadi...