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InTIMe21

Innovating Teaching Ideas and Methods for the

21st century

LESSON PLANS BOOKLET

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Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Italy (CC BY 2.0. it) June 2017

Graphic design and editing

Erika Carena, Samantha Farina for IIS Bodoni-Paravia/Torino-Italy Via Ponchielli 56, 10154 Torino, Italia

IIS. BODONI • PARAVIA

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s r o h t u A t e l k Boo

aching materials te e th d te u ib tr n Teachers who co

Austria

Christina Huber (English, Collaborative Writing/ICT) Sarah Kneale (English, Collaborative Writing/ICT) Carina Maier (English/ICT) Eva Schmotzer (English, ABC-Darium) Monika Schwendinger (Biology, Making Video Clips/ICT)

Denmark

Birthe Witt Jason

Finland

Timo Lehto (Physics and Chemistry) Tytti Lehtola (Swedish) Anna-Maija Lyyra (Biology and Geography) Tiina Stara (Mother language and Literature) Marjut Sulkakoski (Mathematics)

Italy

Erika Carena (Graphic design) Sergio Cerutti (Video making) Giulia Di Rienzo (Italian Literature) Samantha Farina (Graphic design) Piera Fratini (History of art) Basilio Sciacca (English)

Poland

Beata Budzik (History and Social Studies) Agata Kita (Geography and English) Emilia Tokarska (Mathematics and English)

Slovenia

Nataša Bogataj (Slovene and literature) Magdalena Kunc & Klavdija Stepančič (Chemistry, English) Ester Mrak (Geography, History) Božena Rudolf (English, German)

Spain

Philip John Lamble (Geography & History, Citizenship) Antonio Milán (Economy, Mathematics) Pablo Rivero (Spanish, Latin, Citizenship)

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InTIMe21

ods eas and Meth Id g in h c ea T Innovating

entury

for the 21st c

klet

o Lesson plans bo

Presentation

The main objective of this booklet is to offer the teachers of secondary students a series of activities to work with different positive values, their development and their goals and evaluation. The teaching material has been prepared by the seven schools participating in the Innovating Teaching Ideas and Methods for the 21st century (InTIMe21) project.

The participating organizations

The participating organizations are schools coming from all parts of the continent: North, South, Central and East Europe, which gives the group a great diversity concerning its different culture, history and society. It is not the first time the schools work together in a project. Some of the schools had already worked together in previous Comenius projects: “European Collaborative Learning” (2005), “International Dimension in Education” (2008), “Citizenship: Globally and locally” (2010) and “Schools offering equal chances to our generation to respect and engage in Environment non-violently” (2012). The collaboration in these and other projects gave the present group a great and practical experience to develop and debate ideas together.

The values of the activities

Creativity is always present as activities demand full participation of the students and freedom to develop their strategy. The methodology is based mainly in the development of their entrepreneurship. In this booklet, following teaching material represents creativity: Austria - Students are making short videos. Sustainability is also present in the activities. All participating schools have worked this aspect and it is their priority as can be seen in their past projects. Some of the activities deal with it. In this booklet, following teaching material represents sustainability: Denmark – Nature: Sustainable development; Sustainable living, Italy – Earth Day. Diversity is a main topic of some of the activities of the booklet. It has been practised already during the project from the beginning trough the teambuilding and peer education. In this booklet, following teaching material represents diversity: Spain – Similarities – “Rigs of Time”. Communication is followed in the activities. They need to reach agreement among the members of each team, work with collaborative learning and communicate to the rest of groups. In this booklet, following teaching material represents communication: Finland - Source criticism.Source criticism.

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Intercultural understanding focused in some activities which work with the cultural differences. The experience of the school students working together has improved the international dimension and help to prepare these activities. In this booklet, following teaching material represents Intercultural understanding: Poland – Inside Rio’s favelas, Slovenia – Multiculturalism and acculturation.

Goals and results

Goals are exposed in all activities and separated into deeper and superficial goals. They tell about what are the students being able to do and/or what skills they develop according per each activity. Results are considered through evaluation by questions to the students at the end of each activity. Jordi Ribas Vilas Emeritus project coordinator - Spain The methods used for the students’ work vary between project - Flipped Learning, Design Thinking and Cooperative Learning, with the inclusion of free Web 2.0 tools that are available for students on the Internet. In these methods the progression of the students’ work follow Blooms Taxonomy: Knowledge, Understanding, Application, Analysis, Assessment. The aim is that students acquire the so-called 21st century skills: Creativity, Communication, Critical Thinking and Collaboration. All processes are made as step-by-step process that are ready go to. Just think about the time slots that are fitting for your students in the activities as you plan your lessons. Have a good time! Birthe Witt Jason Project coordinator InTIMe21 - Denmark

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Austria

ASSE, 1220 LG E D A T S U E H S H A

delgasse.at

www.heusta

Vienna

Heustadelgasse is a secondary school with 970 pupils, aged between 10-18, and 95 teachers. It is located on the outskirts of Vienna, a rather safe and quiet area, which has been expanding fast over the last 15 years. Most of our students come from a middle-class background. In our school we treat each other with respect and tolerance towards our cultural diversity. Supporting every individual according to their abilities and creating a fruitful learning environment are primary goals of our school. Fostering critical thinking to guarantee democratic values and a responsible behaviour towards our environment are part of our everyday school life.The motto of Heustadelgasse Eduction in Motion is realised in various aspects: Introducing new teaching methods is a major aim of our school. Open learning and flipped classrooms are a part of our teaching concepts. Since 2010 Heustadelgasse has been a certified e-learning school and has a leading role among Austrian schools regarding IT skills. In recent years BYOD project classes with tablets/laptops from their first year on have been opened and apply Web 2.0 tools on a regular basis. Another successful project is our sports classes with additional lessons in athletics, rowing and judo. Parents, students and teachers are represented in a democratic school council and have regular meetings in which decisions concerning our school life are taken.

Photo: Maherita Spiluttini

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1. SUSTAINABILITY AND RESPONSIBILITY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS Headline and short text explanation

Working on a text using ABC-DARIUM

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://www.thinkglobalgreen.org/suzuki.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJJGuIZVfLM https://www.isb.bayern.de/download/7321/hv_severn_ suzuki.pdf

Students read (or listen to) a text of speech by Severn Suzuki and work on the text with the help of an ABC-Darium. There is also a youtube-video of the speech (see links below). Age group: 15-16.

Photo, illustration, infographic

https://www.google.at - Severn Suzuki with her child

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Pre-reading

a. Explaining some of the vocabulary that comes up in the text: stock market, starve, vanish, poverty… b. Talking briefly about the question of who is responsible for preserving our world for future generations. 2. Reading text (or listening to the text or watching the speech on youtube).

3. ABC-Darium

a. Every student gets two slips of paper (about 30x12 cm). b. Teacher arranges letters of the alphabet (made of wood or written on 26 pieces of paper about 15x15 cm) on the

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floor in the middle of the classroom / in the corridor /… with the letter A on top, followed by B below it etc. c. Students select two key terms from the text (words that seem important for them to understand the message of the text or are significant for the text in any other way – or simply words that they remember), write the words on the slips of paper and place the paper slips beside the corresponding letter of the alphabet (example: “world” next to “W”). d. Students stand in a circle around the alphabet. e. Teacher asks every student to explain why he/she chose these particular terms and what significance they have for the text / the topic / for them. There are several possibilities where to start: either with the words that start with “A”, with the most frequent words, with the student standing next to him/her in the circle…

4. Follow-up activities

a. Students are asked to write a summary of the text, using central terms from the ABC-Darium. b. The paper slips could be collected and arranged as a kind of poster and put on the wall. c. Teacher / students take pictures of the ABC-Darium and publish them on the school homepage, in a blog, …. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Students should learn some additional words and phrases. • Students should learn how to understand and analyse a text with the help of key words. • Students should see how rhetoric devices can be used in speeches. • Students should understand why we are responsible to preserve nature for following generations. • They should be able to see that we have to set priorities and learn to do without certain things. • They should be able to use powerful arguments in discussions about sustainability. • They should be able to change their lifestyle in a way that makes their carbon footprints smaller.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Who does Severn Suzuki address in her famous speech? • What does she ask from them and why?

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2. COLLABORATIVE WRITING INFORMATION TEXT EDGAR ALLAN POE Headline and short text explanation

This is a collaborative writing exercise, where students work together in groups of up to 10 people to write and edit an information text on any topic of interest to the lesson. In this particular case it is a text on Edgar Allan Poe, his life, work and anything else of interest. Approx. time needed: 1 lesson of 50 minutes

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

www.titanpad.com or www.piratepad.net https://www.poemuseum.org/who-was-edgar-allan-poe https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edgar_Allan_Poe https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/edgar-allan-poe

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Internet research: Students have got 15 minutes to read up on Edgar Allan Poe and note down anything of interest regarding his life and work. 2. Students create a titan pad and in groups of up to 10 people they write a text about the author (life, work, etc.) using the collaborative writing tool. They have got about 10 minutes to write the text. 3. They edit the text together (again on titan pad) and then export it as a Microsoft Word document. They should not use more than 5 – 10 minutes. 4. Print the text and hand it out to students.

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Objectives what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Learning about the writer Edgar Allan Poe. • Obtaining information. • Language skills. • Improving their text writing skills. • Summarising skills. • Acquiring new vocabulary. By working together to produce a text, students learn from each other. As they have to collaborate to fulfil the task, the task also boosts teamwork and team working skills. By having to write up their own text, they will learn and memorise more about the topic than when being presented with information by the teacher.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Name 5 pieces of information you have learned about Edgar Allan Poe.

3. “DEAR FUTURE GENERATIONS: SORRY” Headline and short text explainating

This is a lesson about environmental issues and the effect our behaviour will have on future generations. It is based on a Youtube clip (spoken word performance) by the artist Prince Ea. The lesson involves watching a clip, brainstorming and sharing ideas online and composing a text.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Clip “Dear Future Generations: Sorry”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRLJscAlk1M www.answergarden.ch www.padlet.com

Photo, illustration, infographic Prince Ea: American rapper, poet and environmentalist

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Watch Youtube clip “Dear Future Generations: Sorry” 2. While watching, students complete the lyrics (fill in the gaps). 3. Compare lyrics. 4. Students brainstorm ideas for the question “How do people nowadays harm the environment?”. They may use ideas from the clip, but you should also encourage them to think of additional aspects. 5. Students share their ideas on answergarden.com so that everybody can see the results of the brainstorming. 6. In pairs, students write their own letter to the future generation. Title of their letter is “Dear Future Generations: ___________” (So students may also choose another word/ phrase than “Sorry”). 7. Students share their letters on padlet.com. 8. Everybody can now read their classmates’ letters.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Students will • Acquire new vocabulary related to the topic “environmental issues”. • Practice writing skills (letter). • Practice using online tools for an academic purpose. • Become aware of how people nowadays harm the environment. • Reflect on their own behaviour and habits.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Was there a moment when you were unsure about what to do? • Did any ideas come up in the course of this lesson that you had not thought of before? • What 3 new words/phrases will you definitely remember?

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DEAR FUTURE

Dear Future Generations, I think I speak for the rest of us when I say, sorry, sorry we left you our mess of a planet. Sorry that we were too caught up in our own doings to do something. Sorry we listened to people who made excuses, to do nothing. I hope you forgive us, we just didn’t realize how special the earth was, like a marriage going wrong, we didn’t know what we had until it was gone. For example, I’m guessing you probably know what is the Amazon Desert, right? Well believe it or not, it was once called once called the Amazon ______________ , and there were billions of trees there, and all of them gorgeous and just um.. Oh, you don’t know much about trees, do you? Well let me tell you that trees are amazing, and I mean, we literally breath the air they are creating, and they clean up our ______________, our carbon, store and purify water, give us medicine that ______________ ours diseases, food that feeds us. Which is why I am so sorry, to tell you that, we burned them down. Cut them down with brutal machines, horrific, at a rate of 40 football fields every minute, that’s 50% of all the trees in the world all gone in the last 100 years. Why? For this. And that wouldn’t make me so sad, if there weren’t so many pictures of leaves on it. You know when I was a child, I read how the Native Americans had such ______________, for the planet that they felt responsible, for how they left the land for the next 7 generations. Which brings me great ______________, because most of us today, don’t even care about tomorrow. So I’m sorry, I’m sorry that we put ______________ above people,

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greed over need, the rule of gold above the golden rule. I’m sorry we used nature as a credit card with no spending limit. Over drafting animals to ______________, stealing your chance to ever see their uniqueness, or become friends with them. Sorry we poison the ocean so much that you can’t even swim in them. But most of all, I’m sorry about our mindset, cause we had the nerve to call this ______________ “Progress”. Hey Fox News, if you don’t think ______________ is a threat. I dare you to interview the thousands of homeless people in Bangladesh, see while you was in your penthouse nestled, their homes were literally washed away beneath their feet ______________ the rising sea levels, and Sarah Palin, you said that you love the smell of ______________, well I urge you to talk to the kids of Beijing who are forced to wear pollution masks just to go to school. You see you can ignore this, but the thing about truth is, it can be denied, not avoided. so I’m sorry future generation, I’m sorry that our footprints became a sinkhole and not a garden. I’m sorry that we paid so much attention to ISIS, and very little how fast the ice is melting in the arctic. I’m sorry we doomed you and I’m sorry we didn’t find another planet in time to move to. I am s... You know what, cut the beat, I’m not sorry. This future I do not accept it, because an error does not become a mistake, until you ______________ to correct it. We can redirect this, how? Let me suggest that if a farmer sees a tree that is unhealthy, they don’t look at the branches to diagnose it, they look at the root, so like that farmer, we must look at the root, and not to the branches of the government, not to the politicians run by corporations. We are the root, we are the foundation, this generation, it is up to us to take care of this planet. It is our only home, we must globally warm our hearts and change the climate of our souls and realize that we are not apart from nature, we are a part of nature.

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And to ______________ nature is to ______________ us, to save nature, is to save us. Because whatever you’re fighting for: Racism, poverty, feminism, gay rights, or any type of equality. It won’t matter in the least, because if we don’t all work together to save the environment, we will be equally ______________. Sorry. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRLJscAlk1M Dear Future Generations: Sorry (Prince Ea)

ANSWER KEY

rain forest pollution cures consideration sorrow profit extinction destruction climate change due to fossil fuels refuse betray x2 extinct

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4. DESCRIBE AND DRAW A MONSTER! Headline and short text explanation

A1 level. Students use all the chunks of a foreign language they know and write a text about a whacky monster.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

www.padlet.com

Photo, illustration, infographic

Our results: https://padlet.com/carinaelisabethmaier/ ourscarymonsters

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

For the teacher

1. They describe their monster to a partner. 2. Their partner has to draw it. 3. They take a picture of the drawing as soon as they are satisfied with it. 4. They upload it to a padlet wall where all the texts and drawings are collected.

For the students

1. Think about a monster that you want to describe. What does it look like? What can your monster do? (name, colours, hands, legs, hair, eyes, ears, body, knees, instruments 2. Open Microsoft Word on your tablet and write your monster text. Save the monster text (e.g. Monster_CarinaMaier) on your tablet. 3. Come to the teacher and show her your text. 4. Now find a partner. But don’t let your partner see the text! 5. Read your monster text to your partner. Your partner has to draw the monster. Are you not happy with the drawing? Tell your partner to draw the monster again! Are you happy with the drawing? Good!

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6. Take a picture of the drawing with your tablet. Put the picture under your text in the Microsoft word file. (Insert → Pictures) 7. Write text by [your name] and picture by [your partner’s name] under the text and the drawing. 8. Upload the file to: https://padlet.com/carinaelisabethmaier/ourscarymonsters Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Students will practise writing and using an electronic device for academic reasons. • Students use a text writing program and have to activate their knowledge about chunks of language they have learned. • They have to speak when they describe the monster to their partner. • They have to be critical and are allowed to suggest changes when their partner draws the monster.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What is important when you write something on a tablet? Can you give your classmates tips? • What is the most important aspect of verbs in the 3rd form? (The ‘s”)

5. STUDENTS ARE MAKING SHORT VIDEOS Headline and short text explanation

The aim is to reinforce the topic and the new terms they have learned recently and to develop their creativity.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://padlet.com/

Padlet is just the platform for collecting all the videos of the students. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nV8nNxcjpNI

For German speaking people → have a look at this video; it presents the idea of this lesson plan and will make you laugh.

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Groups of 3 or 4 get randomly generated. 2. Each group receives one word/term related to the topic learned in class recently. Students should not show their word to other groups. 3. If the students do not remember the meaning of their word/term, they have to look it up in their documents. 4. Preparation of the video: students have to explain their term without mentioning it. They can also do a little play or use other utensils. The video should not be longer than 4 minutes. 5. It is useful to use more rooms for the preparation so the groups will not disturb each other. 6. With their smartphones every group has to film their explanation. All videos are collected on padlet.com 7. When all videos are on padlet.com, the class can start to watch them. The aim is to guess the word/term that is explained in the videos of the other groups.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

This method can be used at the end of a topic and is open for nearly every subject. Students are once again forced to really revise the terms of the recent topic. Explaining something to others means to really understand it. Students can be as creative as they want. Every method to describe the word/ term is allowed, so if they like singing they can sing it, like writing, the can use words, if they like theatre they can act out a scene…Students will also see their own video, so this method is self-reflective: how do I explain? How do I speak? Which words do I use often? What am I doing with my hands/ my feet? How do we interact as a group when doing something creative?...

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Did I have the possibility to develop my creativity, to contribute my ideas to this video-group-project? • Am I able to explain a science term in a way my classmates can understand it?

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Denmark

ejskolen.dk

orsv www.sabro-k

abro, Aarhus

JSKOLEN S E V S R O K O R B A S

Sabro-Korsvejskolen is a primary- and secondary school in the outskirts of Aarhus, the second largest city in Denmark. The school has 660 students from the age of 6 to 16. The pedagogical staff consists of 55 teachers and 25 educators. Sabro Korsvejskolen has three basic values: Credibility, Respect and Commitment. Students, parents and staff work with an appreciative approach to communication and cooperation. Reciprocity is a key word. Diversity is seen as a resource and as a strength that helps to develop the understanding of equality and acceptance of the terms of a globalized society. The school has an international profile. Staff members, students and parents participate every year in receiving guests from partner schools from all over Europe, and the impact of networking and cooperating has a positive and valuable impact on the school. Sabro-Korsvejskolen is part of Eco-schools. The goal is, through recycling, teaching sustainable conduct and using renewable energy, to participate in obtaining a more sustainable environment. In Sabro-Korsvejskolen, the parents have influence on education and children’s everyday life through the existing democratic bodies, councils and committees that exist at the school. The cooperation with parents and local stakeholders is characterized by great professional commitment, flexibility and job satisfaction.

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1. TEAMBUILDING Headline and short text explanation

Icebreakers and teambuilding activities are useful, when a group has to get to know each other. Here are some examples:

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://icebreakerideas.com/team-building-icebreakers/ http://www.icebreakers.ws/category/team-building

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

Presentation of names: stand in a circle. Start anywhere.

Teacher: Say your name, and your favourite animal or favourite hero: First person: My name is Maria And my favourite animal is a Giraffe. Second person: Maria and Giraffe. My name is Laura, and my favourite hero is Superman. Third person: Maria Giraffe. Laura Superman. My name is Victor, and my hero is Harry Potter. And so on, till everyone has been presented. OR: say your name, and an adjective starting with the same letter as your name. First person: I am Marvellous Maria. Second person: Laughing Laura.

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Speed-dating:

Each person has a card with a number.. 1-2-3 or 4. And the cards have different colours. Music ready. Teacher: Now you have to get to know each other better. When the music plays, you walk around among each other...feel free to walk dancing… and when the music stops you approach the person closest to you, who has the same number on their card. You then ask each other: • Where do you come from? • What are your interests? • What sport do you like? • What is your favourite music? When the music starts again, you continue walking, and this time, when the music stops, you approach someone who has the same colour card as yourself, and ask the same questions. Next round, you approach someone who has an equal number, if you have a 2 or a 4, and if you have 1 or 3, you approach someone who has the same. Next round you approach someone who has a different colour than you have.

Same, different:

Stand together 4 and 4. Find something you all have in common, and something that you are the only one in the group who has. F.ex “we all wear glasses, but I am the only one who likes horse riding”. Sit in groups of 6. Put all the cards you have in a stack, with the number down. 1st person takes two cards. They will show fx 2 and 3. Then the person tells about her life when she was five years old. 2nd person do the same. 2nd round. Each person takes one card, and adds the number to the first one. Fx new card 4, and first card 5, then she tells about her age when she was 9 years old. What month were you born? Does it have an influence in which personality you have? Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Students learn to communicate and how to “break the ice”, when they are part of a group of new people. Helps self confidence, courage to communicate.

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A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Could you feel a difference in the spirit of the group after the exercises? • Can you see that your fears of what would happen were groundless?

2. DIVERSITY AND SIMILARITIES Headline and short text explanation

Across nationalities and cultures there are a diversities and similarities. What causes the diversities and what are the similarities?

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

A tale for two brains: https://youtu.be/3XjUFYxSxDk Gender differences Nature vs Culture debate: https://youtu.be/ld3UHKmwVZc

Photo, illustration, infographic

Patterns in narratives

According to Langdon Elsbree, a professor in literature, all narratives have 5 archetypal actions across cultures, nationalities, ages and development. 1. Establishing or consecrating a home. Putting down roots. Making commitments. Creating order out of chaos. 2. Engaging in a contest, or fighting a battle. Could also a battle within oneself, fighting the inner “tyrant”. 3. Taking a journey, Life as a journey, or an actual journey. 4. Enduring suffering, Confront and come to terms with our limitations, flaws and mistakes. Experiencing love and breaking affectional bonds.

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5. Pursuing consummation. Development as human being. Striving for “self-fullfillment”. (from Langdon Elsbree: The rituals of life)

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. See the videos: A tale for two brains. 2. Work in gender groups of 4 - 5 in each group: Boys and girls apart. The person closest to the door will take notes. You have 15 minutes to discuss: a. What does it mean to you to be a boy or a girl? b. Can you name five things related to culture, that you have in common because you are a boy/girl? c. Do you think that men and women have equal rights in your country? why or why not? d. Why do you think that there has been a difference to the men’s advance up to now? e. Differences in brains.. do you recognize any of the things claimed in “ A tale for two brains?” a. Each group will make a poster with the responses, and explain their points of view. 3. Working with literature: a. Introduce the Narrative Themes by L. Elsbree. b. In mixed groups, gender and nationality, the students come up with some of the stories or songs from their homeland, and decide to which narrative theme it belongs, and establish the similarities between narratives across nationalities and cultures. c. Elsbree made his research in the 1982. Are these themes still relevant, or has humanity changed radically, and new themes appears?

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

That different cultures have the same origin, and that there are more similarities between different peoples that differences.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Understanding humankind as all related, even if we have different colours and languages. We think and feel the same way. • What has working with patterns in narrative taught you? • Do you think that texts written nowadays also will fit into the model, or should we make a new model?

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3.NATURE: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT SUSTAINABLE LIVING Headline and short text explanation

With a focus on sustainability, how can we re-think the balance between nature and culture and the way we form our ecological future. Wind energy, sustainable agriculture and natural resources are also ”big business”.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://youtu.be/F-Wl3crN8eU (Children speak up) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqxENMKaeCU

(HOME)

http://www.homethemovie.org/en/education/home-education

(teaching materials for HOME)

http://www.earth2045.com/ (Earth 2045) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WfGMYdalClU (Man) https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-story-of-climate -change/id1052788959?mt=13

Book: “The story of climate change” https://www.dosomething.org/

Photo, illustration, infographic

DO SOMETHING! DO IT NOW! Tell others that climate change is important to you

We listen to what others talk about things, we think are important and others listen to us. So talk about what is happening on our planet. Your opinions are meaningful for others’ opinions. This is how change happens.

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Climate change skeptics should not go unchallenged.

Don’t let comments like ” There is no global climate change” go unchallenged. Learn the facts and give a response!

One Step at a Time

You can make a difference and inspire people around you. Start one step at a time: recycle, sort your rubbish, eat less meat, avoid food waste, turn off the lights and computers. Ride you bike instead of getting a ride.

Consumer-power

As consumers we all decide if our money is going to promote polluting or sustainable energy sources. Find out how the things you buy are produced. Check the Net. ”Money talks”.

How much do you pollute?

Figure out what your personal CO 2 footprint is. Try to make it smaller. One step at a time. A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

This task takes its starting point in a film by the French artist Yann Arthus-Bertrand, who shows how we are destroying our own basis of life on Earth by plundering resources and extreme consumption. 1. Watch the film HOME, to be found on YouTube. 2. In groups of four, make a list of the problems the film talks about. For example, the use of pesticides in agriculture. 3. Share these list with the others in class and make a total list on the board. Each group chooses 10 points that they think are the biggest problems in relation to climate. Under each point, write the consequences. For example, the use of pesticides in agriculture has consequences for polluting the water table, bees die, foods contain unwanted chemicals that make us sick. Everyone in the group must write their own list including the consequences as notes. Use the Internet to find information. 4. When all the points have been discussed in the group, rotate two of the group members to other groups. Each group sends two members out and receives two new members from two different groups. Bring your notes with you so you can share ideas with the new groups. Discuss the ideas in the new groups. When you get new ideas, write them down on your personal notes. Then rotate one time more so that everyone has had a chance to discuss their ideas about consequences with many groups. Lastly, return to your home group and share your new

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ideas. Remember to take personal notes. 5. Discuss the film’s portrayal of mankind’s responsibility in relation to the climate changes we see on Eath. Do you agree with the answers the film provides? 6. Work alone. What can you do as an individual, a consumer and a future parent to improve some of the consequences you have noted? Make post-its with your solutions. 7. Post your post-its on the wall. Take a walk and find the best 5 ideas. Talk with the others in class as you go about. Lastly, each group should present their TOP 5 in a document with lovely lay-out. Print and post around the school and in the classroom. 8. Watch the advert, EARTH2045 three times. First, focus on both future scenarios at the same time, and then the left side and lastly the right side. Which side do you think is meant to be the scenario we can expect if we do nothing? 9. Writing tasks: write a story of your life in the year 2045. • How do you live? • Where do you live, what does it look like? • How is your home decorated? • Who are you, what do you do? • What is your family like? • Describe your day • What do you eat? • What kinds of exercise, entertainment, hobbies, etc. do you like? • Where do you go on holiday? • Is it a good life? Try to include as many everyday activities as you can. The paper must be handed in to your teacher as instructed. It should be at least 2000 words. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

After working with this unit you have: Gained a greater understanding of what climate change means. Got ideas about what you can do the make life more sustainable. Gained a greater understanding of what the consequences are of doing nothing.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Question for group discussion. • How has working with this unit led you to make decisions to change your own behaviour? • Which choices did you make?

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4. ARMCHAIR TRAVELLING IN CULTURAL CAPITALS Headline and short text explanation

You are going on a trip far away from your hometown. You are planning on being there for a week and you are going to prepare for your stay by surfing on the Internet. For each task you will need to find facts, photos and information on the Internet. Gather them into a presentations, for example by using ”Slides” in ”Google Docs” or ”Prezi”. Choose a country, a city or a region to visit.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.wikihow.com/Prepare-for-International-Travel http://www.travelzoo.com/blog/20-tips-before-traveling -internationally/

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Find a plane or train trip. Perhaps you prefer to sail? Make a print-screen of the picture of the ticket and time-schedule you made for you presentation. How much will this trip cost? 2. Pack your bags. Check the weather on the Internet and decide what you will need. Make a list of what you pack and take photos of your clothes, or find pictures on the Internet. 3. Now you need to find a place to stay while being a tourist in this city. Find a hotel, a Bed Breakfast or an Airbnb.

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You can afford to live well. In your presentation you will need to explain what criteria you used to make your choice together with the full price for 5 nights. 4. The next step is to decide what places to visit. Make a plan for each day, a dias for each day in your presentation. Remember to include photos of the sights, the museums, monuments, parks, etc., that you plan to visit. During these 5 days you MUST visit a building or monument built in the time period when your city was a cultural capital. In addition you must go shopping. Where? Find a shop or shopping center on the Internet. What are you going to buy? Is there a speciality from the city that you can take home as a souvenir? 5. How are you going to get from one place to another in the city? Will you rent a car at the airport, use public transportation like the Metro, trains and busses? Figure out what is the cheapest choice and explain this choice in your presentation. 6. You are also going to the theatre or a concert while you are in town. Surf the Internet to find what is typical and good here and who is playing. Include this in your presentation. Pictures help. 7. Of course you need to eat! Surf the Internet again and find out which restaurants you feel like eating at. Is there a food speciality that you would like to taste? Plan what you want to eat and where for each evening of your visit. Again, pictures are good... 8. The last slide in your presentation should be a list of resources of the websites you used to research your presentation. Lastly, the presentations should be handed in and presented as your teacher asks. Supplementary tasks

Write a report of your visit in your chosen city. Describe how you travel, check in to a hotel, walk about the city and look at the sights, shop and visit places you have selected in your presentation. Make it lively. Pretend a friend visits you from a foreign country. You want to show them around your own town and the region you know best. Go through the same steps as the previous task, but this time for your home town as a destination and with the important difference that you, as a native, has insider knowledge. Write up the task in English so your guest can understand you.

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Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

After working with this unit you have: Tried to get ready for a trip by using the Internet. Sorted and chosen relevant information. Worked with various forms of information from the Internet. Written a list of sources.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What skills have you gained in planning a trip? • What have you learned to note that you didn’t think about before? • Would you like to take the trip that you planned? • What did you learn about your own hometown?

5. DENMARK THROUGH OTHER’S EYES Headline and short text explaining

This lesson plan has been made with Denmark as example. But you as teacher can change it, and put your own country instead, and find some links to describe your place and cities. You have probably been travelling with your parents or your school, or wanting to, and imagining visiting big cities. Has it made you wonder what foreigners think about your own country? Millions of people visit Copenhagen every year. What do they see? Your assignment is that you have to write an essay. Imagine that you are visiting Denmark, and you see Copenhagen for the first time.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.visitcopenhagen.com/copenhagen-tourist http://www.visitdenmark.com/copenhagen

Photo, illustration, infographic

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps

1. Describe how you arrive in train, by plane, by bus, hitchhiking.. your choice. 2. You stay in an expensive hotel, a cheap hotel, you couch-surf, your choice. Describe! 3. Then you want to see the city and the Danes. What strikes you as different from where you come from? 4. What do you see in Denmark? Find some popular tourist attractions, and describe them 5. What do you think about the Danes? Your essay also has to be researched… find a hotel, transportation etc. in Copenhagen, and imagine that you also participated in some event...the Eurovision Song Contest, or The Copenhagen Marathon or?? 6. The essay has to be at least 500 words and remember links to the places, where you have found your information.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Knowledge of own capital. • Skills in planning a trip to another country. • Skills in writing in a foreign language, as it has to be written in English.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Having worked with your own capital as if you saw it with the eyes of a visitor, has it made you change your view of the city?

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Finland

i

aarenlukio.f

www.pietars

tarsaari

UKIO, Pie PIETARSAAREN L

Pietarsaaren lukio (Pietarsaari general secondary school) has got 125 pupils and 15 teachers. It is situated on the west coast of Finland, which is a strongly Swedish speaking area. The mission of our general secondary school is to provide nurturing and challenging environments that emphasize democratic values, cultural diversity and life-long learning. Students will be provided with opportunities to gain knowledge and to develop critical and creative thinking abilities in ethical and social issues. We also emphasize the fact that our students need to learn the principles and concepts of science, acquire the basic scientific reasoning and procedural skills, and understand the logic that makes science so successful. Regarding the students practical skills, the ability to use computer as a tool for calculations and data manipulations along with the interactive learning environments is considered crucial. Also students’ handicraft skills are considered important and students are given chance to develop them in nature science laboratories. We would like to support the growth of young people and stand for their well-being as well as to encourage them to do their best and to support their development, to become socialized and active citizens in the world which they will inherit.

Photo: Mika Lehtinen

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1. ACIDIFICATION OF WATER SYSTEMS Headline and short text explanation

Acidification of water systems is a global environment problem caused mostly by burning of fossil fuels. This is mostly caused by nitrogen and sulphur oxides that are produced by burning gasoline or other fossil fuels for example in cars or power plants. In this lesson, an experiment is made to make clear how sulphur oxide is produced and how and why it causes acidification of water.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.whoi.edu/OCB-OA/page.do?pid=112136 http://www.air-quality.org.uk/13.php

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

1. Draw illustration of the experiment. 2. Burn elemental sulphur in a scoop to produce sulphur dioxide (SO2). 3. Put burning sulphur in a scoop inside an erlenmeyer with water and bromthymol blue. 4. Put aluminum foil on the mouth of the erlenmeyer to gather sulphur dioxide inside the container. 5. Take the scoop out of the erlenmeyr and mix lightly to dissolve sulphur dioxide in water and watch how color of bromthymol blue switches from green or blue (indicating neutral) to yellow (indicating acidic). 6. Gather observations to the illustration.

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7. Theory part: Go through that all the fossil fuels include sulphur and that this same procedure occur always when fossil fuels are burnt. Also discuss about the damage that acid rains do for environment and possible ways to reduce sulphur dioxide pollution. 8. Discussion: what could we use instead of fossil fuels. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Objective of this lesson is to understand what causes acidification and how can pollution be reduced. • Laboratory working skills. • To rehearse theory of acidic and basic oxides and acid indicators and how it can be applied in practise.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Having seen this laboratory, has it changed your view of the use of the fossil fuels?

2. ARE YOU A GLOBAL CITIZEN? Headline and short text explanation

The theme leads the student to understand immigration and solidarity and to learn to communicate in Swedish on this topic.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://areena.yle.fi/1-3127441 http://myterominvandringen.se/

Photo, illustration, infographic

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Introduction: Watching a 16-minutes video on youth discussing immigration (Invandring, the first link above). 2. A short and playful test that shows if the student is a world citizen. 3. Studying a word list about immigration and solidarity by drawing pictures / a cartoon of the words. 4. Taking a look at an Internet website on myths about immigration (the second link), discussion in Swedish 5. Oral and written exercises on the topic.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

The students will learn vocabulary and increase their communication skills on the topic. They will learn about other young people’s opinions as well as discussing themselves. The deeper goal is to educate students about the reasons, the global reality and the attitudes both on immigration and solidarity. They will also reflect their own global citizenship.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

How would you describe the topic in your own words in Swedish?

3. BRING THE REAL WORLD INTO MY MATHEMATICS CLASSROOM Headline and short text explanation

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Estimating the surface area of a sphere - with a mandarin. Students are collaborating with other students on this project. The surface area of a sphere YouTube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fyvq-jIQKr8 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bbf3agEH_3M Link to GeoGebra (Download)

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students measure the diameters of mandarins (5-7) and estimate the area of each fruit (on paper). 2. Students make a matrix with diameter/radius (r) and area (A), and draw a function. 3. Students can find the formula for the surface area of a sphere with calculators (TiNspire) or study the connection between radius and area by GeoGebra.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Mathematics is all around us. Students notice how they are surrounded by Maths every day. This way students get more curious about mathematics and engaged with it. Deeper goal is to give an example of making formulas – more than only to use formulas.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What kind of learning is supported by this way of teaching? • Is it worth of the waste of time?

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4. SOURCE CRITICISM Headline and short text explanation

Internet makes it easy to publish content that looks confusingly journalism, but is not. “Fake news” live their golden times. Facebook and Google will help them get the clicks and money. How to learn to know what is reliable information and what is not?

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.thenewsnerd.com/ http://dailybuzzlive.com/ http://empirenews.net/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fake_news_website

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Teacher shows one “fake news” from the Internet. S/He starts discussion with the students, asks what they think about it and doesn´t reveal at first that the news is fake. Many times the students don´t notice the Internet address and think that the news is “true”. This kind of warm up gives a kick off to the topic and motivates pupils to study. 2. Teacher gives a task to the students: • Google different words (e.g. the name of a celebrity + dating, side effects of medicines, Donald Trump, Therese Johaug + doping, Hillary Clinton, nuclear power, gender roles in school, Volkswagen, life in space.) • Look for the results and choose one source that is in your opinion totally reliable and one that is completely unreliable. • Make a segment to the paper. Place these two sources to the ends of the segment.

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• Place all the discovered sources to the segment depending on how reliable or unreliable they are. • Ponder, what makes sources reliable or unreliable. Write down at least 3 things. 3. Discussion together. 4. Making instructions together: How to identify fake news? • E.g. Do you know anything about the background of the publication? Can you find the names of the authors? Are they real people? What kind of stuff the site has previously published? Is the title of the story relevant? What kind of information and facts are used in this story? Are there any links to the sources? Has some other news site published a news on the same topic? Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Critical thinking. • Information retrieval. • Communication skills. • Writing skills. • Summarizing skills.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Do you know how to recognize a reliable and trustful source?

5. THE IMPORTANCE OF IDENTIFYING SPECIES Headline and short text explanation

When we can identify the most common species in nature, we can notice the changes in our environment.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/visiting-woods/ trees-woods-and-wildlife/british-trees/how-to-identify-trees/ http://www.birds.cornell.edu/AllAboutBirds/birding123/ identify/index_html https://plants.usda.gov/java/ http://www.mycokey.com/newMycoKeySite/MycoKey IdentQuick.html

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. The teacher presents different kind of ecosystems and some typical species in them. 2. The group is going to the wood, lake etc. where the students are looking for different species. 3. The students will define together different species and try to find which of them are typical for this special ecosystem.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• The students will learn to know some of the most common species in a certain ecosystem. • The students will use their different senses to define different species. • The students will understand the diversity of species. • Deeper goal is that the stundents will learn to see the changes in their environment, to follow organisms in different seasons. • The students will understand the importance to understand different food nets.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Do you understand how the different ecosystems look like and how they are changing?

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Italy

iparavia.it

www.bodon

I-PARAVIA, Torino N O D O B O T U IT T IS

The Bodoni Paravia school has a long historical tradition, which dates back from the 1900s. Well-rooted in the territory and, owing to its wide curricula, the school has a diverse target. The Bodoni-Paravia school has changed its headquarters over the years and is now in a building from the sixties, that houses two different institutions: the technical school, Istituto Bodoni, and the vocational school, Istituto Paravia. The current school premises are in the Barriera di Milano, a suburban district of Turin with a very strong presence of first and second generation immigrants. Due to a high percentage of foreigners and students with special needs partly arising from the socio-cultural disadvantage, the school traditionally adopts inclusive and competence-based teaching. Moreover, given the strong technological bias towards the field of multimedia and the wide range of labs, the Bodoni-Paravia Institute is traditionally attended by students wishing to work as graphic designers and photographers, two professions which have nowadays merged into a single one in the field of multimedia communications.

The present building of the Vocational and Technical State School Bodoni Paravia

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1. EARTH DAY Headline and short text explanation

Déjeuner sur l’herbe - 27th May 2016

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.earthdayitalia.org http://www.legambientepiemonte.it http://bodoniparavia.it/index.php/it/10-news/1462 -giornata-della-terra.html

Environment pollution problems at school. Problem solving lesson: the importance of knowing the consequence of wrong human behavior on the environment. A Cross-curricular project in collaboration with “Legambiente Italia”. Experiment in the school garden collecting and weighing butts. Use of ICT for the scientific survey and for the documentation of the project.

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Art and Science Lessons on environmental issues. What is the meaning of the Earth day? 2. Peer-to-peer session and video screening on the issue. 3. Classroom debating. 4. Project and production of a folder by the students (see the video on google drive: coming soon!)

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5. Students and volunteers from Legambiente display a white sheet to test air pollution in the city. 6. Analysis of the results (a month later). 7. Cleaning campaign in the garden and separate garbage collection. 8. Garden party eating red apples all together (see video and photo on google drive). 9. Video and photo documentation of all the steps. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Knowledge of some critical issues about the environment. • Soft skills: how to work in team through peer-to-peer approach, share ideas and solve problems. • Acquiring designing skills and concretely taking actions and making objects (folder and video) to attract interest in environmental issues in order to become aware of one’s social responsibility. • Experimenting a cross-curricular approach. • Becoming more deeply aware of ecological issues.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• After having seen the huge amount of butts and the deep grey colour of the hanged sheet, do you think your daily habit of wasting things has changed somehow? • What can you say about the negative effects of air and soil pollution. Please, answer by supporting your ideas through documents and examples.

2. SPEED GRAPHIC DATE ABOUT STEREOTYPES AND SIMILARITIES Headline and short text explanation

The activity aims at getting students to reflect about stereotypes and prejudices towards different nationalities or, more generally, what is considered to be different and distant. Students work in groups (six or seven people per group) sharing ideas, opinions and creating graphic material , like illustrated maps and infographics, on the issues they have tackled and the conclusions they have drawn. Although the activity is addressed to groups of

41


students from different nationalities on international exchange projects, it may as well be proposed to a multiethnic class in order to favour integration and mutual knowledge. Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.wordclouds.com http://www.ibrainstormapp.com https://www.canva.com

Photo, illustration, infographic SLOVENIA ARE SLOVENIAN PEOPLE HARDWORKING

BEER DRINKERS

OPEN-MINDED

AUSTRIA

ENVY

STEREOTYPES COFFEE THE TRUTH THE STEREOTYPE All Austrians drink a lot of coffee

Not everyone, but most of them like to drink coffee every now and then

BROWN HAIR THE TRUTH THE STEREOTYPE All

have brown hair

Austrians

Not all Austrians have brown hair, but a of the Austrians in our project do

CLASSICAL MUSIC THE TRUTH THE STEREOTYPE Austrians only listen to classical music

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

Adults listen to it more than the youth

Students work in team (International groups) 1. The first goal is to find prejudices (students will be given pictures and words to stimulate the work). They have to create a list of words. 2. www.wordclouds.com will be used to generate illu-

42


strations (one for each country). The illustrations will have the shape of the geographical map of the country and will be filled with words. 3. The illustrations are shared to the groups. 4. Brainstorming session on the prejudices found. The supporting app is www.ibrainstormapp.com. The goal is to write questions to ask in the next session (speed date). The questions will focus on finding the truth hidden behind the prejudices. 5. During the speed date session (30 minutes) the same questions will be asked to the students of the nation embodying a certain prejudice as well as to students of other nationalities. The aim of this activity is to find differences, similarities, or, in some cases, to “deconstruct” the mechanism underlying the creation of stereotypes. 6. Working group (1 hour): students will share the answers they got during the speed date. 7. Every group will work with the app www.canva.com designing an infographic for each country. 8. At the end the students will compare their thoughts before and after the activities with the support of the illustrations that they realized. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

The goal of the activity is to reflect on, and exchange views, the issues of prejudice and stereotype. Through a number of practical group activities, and by using the suggested applications, the students will be drawn to visualize images and ideas as well creating tools for summarizing and debating their work. Dialogue and debating will help find differences and similarities and will also help understand the mechanisms underlying the formation of prejudices towards other ways of living. Mental maps, questionnaires and recapitulatory infographics through which to reflect and debate will be available by the end of the activity.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What struck you most, and what didn’t you expect, on learning about different cultures? • What’s your opinion of similarities and differences in cultural issues after your experience?

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3. THE CITY I LIKE Headline and short text explanation

A media education project on urban explorations

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://www.facebook.com/TheCityIlike/ http://parcoartevivente.it/the-city-i-like/ http://www.museocinema.it/museo_e_scuola.php?id=299

The project is promoted by The National Museum of Cinema and PAV, Parco Arte Vivente, of Turin and is based on the concept of situationalist psycho-geography. The aim is to film the urban exploration of places around the city where people like to stay.

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

1. Project presentation at school before the supervisor of the Museo Nazionale del Cinema 2. Devising small-group tasks and activities and developing a project timeline 3. Screenplay and storyboard. 4. Video shooting. 5. Video editing and fine-tuning of the visuals and sound 6. Screening of the video for the class and the outer audience (award ceremony)

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Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Implement collective and participatory strategies that contribute to increasing environmental sustainability in a city undergoing transformation with audiovisual productions.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What is my relationship with population and the environment like? • How important is nature in my life? • How do I interact with each other towards the common quest for happiness and wellness?

4. NUTRITION AND “HEALTHY” DIET Headline and short text explanation

This teaching unit is aimed at getting students to reflect about how people with different eating habits come to terms with the concept of “healthy nutrition” formulated within the scientific realm. In other words, students are to discover how nutrition, as an aspect of human life where different discourses (scientific, cultural) intersect with each other, varies across cultures and social groups. Timing: two lessons of one and a half hour each plus independent group activity outside class Prerequisites: 1) basic notions of nutrition, 2) vocabulary and phraseology for sharing information as well as preparing a power point to give a presentation.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

It is the students’ task to find the most suitable and reliable internet sites, although the teacher will supervise the whole process of webquest.

Photo, illustration, infographic

45


A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students are divided into five groups of up to four or five people. Each group will have to find information online on the following themes: junk food; Mediterranean diet; non-Mediterranean diet ; veganism; macrobiotic diet. 2. Students discuss what they got from their web-quest to select and organize the information in the form of a data record o else. They can also talk about their likes and dislikes with respect to food and nutrition. 3. Each group formulates a set of questions on the topic they have been dealing with for a survey among school staff and school students (the aim is to examine how much the people interviewed know about what they are asked and what their eating habits are like). 4. (outside class) students carry out their survey. If they like they can also video their interviews. 5. Students give a power point or prezi presentation including both information from their web-quest and the outcomes of their interviews (in the form of a pie or a bar chart). 6. Focus group: the groups discuss and comment on their work and sharing views on the issue of healthy nutrition (possibly in relation to eco-sustainability).

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Deeper goals:

• Being able to use the second language in a suitable way for specific purposes (giving a presentation, giving a general account of an issue whatsoever as well as expressing one’s point of view on it). • Developing critical thinking.

Superficial goals:

• Being able to assess the quality of information online. • Expanding English vocabulary. A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

As a form of evaluation students will be asked to account for their role in the activity and to tell what in their opinion the most difficult aspect of the whole activity was. Moreover, students will be asked to give a general overview of the topic they have dealt with, trying at the same time to express a personal and critical view.

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5. IMMIGRATION Headline and short text explanation

The learning program “Emigration at the beginning of the 1900s” is addressed to a couple of senior classes of a professional and technical school with photography, graphics and communication as their core curriculum. The program takes as a topic mass migration to the USA over a period spanning the middle of the 1800s and the beginning of the 1900s. The included disciplines are Drawing and History of art, and Italian and History. This educational activity aims to promote the memory of the migratory experience to the USA - with a particular focus on the Ellis Island reality - in order to tell, by means of images, original records and multimedia, the stories of a number of people leaving their home country to look for better life conditions in a far-away and unknown country. It also contains a reference to the present situation, with the goal of improving the consciousness of the crucial moment of our history. The art history section of the teaching unit, focusing on two works by the American photographer Lewis Hine (1874-194) - “Climbing into the Land of Promise” (1905) -, has the aim of getting students to understand how the “social photography” intends to record individuals’ and communities’ ways of life and how they supported themselves. To figure out how to construct an image by which it becomes possible to convey our perspective of a particular situation is a subsequent goal. The iconographical materials are completed by short movie sequences relating to the same issue, such as “Nuovomondo” [“New World”], by Emanuele Crialese, “The Immigrant”, 1917, by Charlie Chaplin, and “The Immigrant”, by James Gray.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Movies About Immigration and Immigrants http://www.imdb.com/list/ls051658814/

LEWIS HINE - CLIMBING INTO THE LAND OF PROMISE ELLIS ISLAND - 1905

https://www.pinterest.com/benjamin_s/ny-immigration -station-1900-ellis-island/ N.Y. Immigration Station 1900 - Ellis island

Series of photographic documents of social conditions,

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1900. / L. W. Hine. / Unit I, Immigration. Ellis Island, scenes and personalities. Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

The structure of the learning program is dividedinto four stages: 1. Submission of the documents to the pupils, followed by a work of observation and analysis. 2. Boosting of knowledgeable competences through exercises and deeper research. 3. TASK in the shape of short paper. 4. Learning evaluation through evaluation grid of the TASK Improving the ability to analyse the new migratory phenomena with a critical plus a knowledgeable look. Fostering a better understanding of the multi-ethnic society which is taking shape around us these days. • When contextualizing this picture referring to the big season of social and documentary photography by the great American photographers at the beginning of the 1900s, can you identify the particular point of view of this photographer and social scientist? • Why do you think America was a “land of opportunity”?

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Poland

www.splot.info

ddziałami O z h c y n z c łe o p ł Szkół S wym Sączu o N w o g ZSS “Splot” Zespó ie k s r a “Splot” im. Jana K i m y n z c y z ję u w D

ZSS “Splot” The Independent Middle and High School of Nowy Sącz. The easiest way to describe the world that surrounds us is to use the numbers to define it. While following that piece of advice the ZSS “Splot” might be hidden somewhere behind the figures like that: • 28 years since it was founded, • the second private school that was opened after 1989 in Poland, • three head teachers so far, • 687 alumni, • 139 students this school year, (aged 13-19) • 29 teachers. It is crucial to mention that ZSS “Splot“ was founded by parents and educators active in the Solidarity Movement. They had two goals in mind: to support innovative teachers and teaching methods that would work towards open and tolerant Europe, and to create an independent school that would put those teaching methods into practice. The present staff faces the 21st century problems with the same attitudes. We try to plan each school year in such a way so that we could mix educational, social and amusement elements together. For the last years our school has taken part in many international programs (Comenius, Erasmus Plus K2, the U.S. – Poland Parliamentary Youth Exchange Program). Each year we have student exchanges with two schools; Hakfar Hayarok school in TelAviv, Israel and Petershagen in Germany. Thanks to Charles Merrill, a great American philanthropist we can grant a scholarship to one of our students every year to give them a chance to study in Thomas Jefferson Boarding School in St. Louis, the USA. Teaching foreign languages has always been important to all of us. In 2015 we decided to open a new bilingual class in Mathematics and Geography in the lower secondary school to give teenagers a chance to boost their vocabulary and improve their speaking abilities. In 2016 we opened the first bilingual class in a high school.

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1. SHOULD PEOPLE IN POLAND CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN? Headline and short explanation

Last year while we, English teachers, were trying to prepare the Halloween event in our school, it turned out that some students and parents are against it. It must be emphasized here that we were trying to concentrate only on an origin of it and customs connected with it. We were not trying to include the religious part of that day. It made me wonder about the students’ approach to celebrating the Halloween.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Before the lesson, students were supposed to google and learn some information about the Halloween and its customs. http://www.internationalteflacademy.com/blog/bid/124122/ Top-13-Halloween-Celebrations-Around-The-World -While-Teaching-English/ http://www.skypeenglishclasses.com/learning-english-and -other-cultures-halloween/

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students tell their classmates what they have found out about Halloween from the readings, the Internet. Discussion • What is your own opinion on celebrating in Poland the holidays which are not of the Polish origin?

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• Why are people afraid of Halloween? Why are they for celebrating it in Poland? • What Polish holidays would you like to share with foreigners? Which ones are you proud of? 2. After gaining some arguments for and against, play “Six thinking hats”. 3. Write an essay: Pros and cons of celebrating Halloween in Poland. (250 words)

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Knowledge of customs connected with celebrating Halloween in English speaking countries. • Skills in taking part in a discussion. • Ability to justify an opinion. Making enough space for all possible answers but at the same time including the respect to each other’s opinion. • Skills in writing an essay in English.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Have having worked with that particular event and trying to find the pros and cons of celebrating foreign holidays in your country changed you attitudes to that particular holiday? • What did it teach you?

2. INSIDE RIO’S FAVELAS Headline and short explanation

Inside Rio’s favelas, the city’s neglected neighbourhoods.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3BRTlHFpBU

Socratic seminar guidline

http://www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/uploadedFiles/schools/ paintbranchhs/signature/Socraticseminarguidelines018.pdf

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Photo, illustration, infographic

Photo: dany13/Flick. Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0).

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students before the lesson have to watch the movie about Rio. As a ticket (to take part in the lesson) they bring a picture drawn after watching the movie. Those without the ticket watch the discussion but they can not take part in it. Their task is to watch the discussion and draw a map of people participating in the lesson. After lesson they have to sum up the discussion. 2. Before the lesson starts, the teacher has to remind or set with the students the core rules they need to follow. 3. The teacher starts the lesson with an opening question: “Can anyone change it?” 4. Students take part in the discussion following all the rules from the guideline. 5. As a summery students are asked to write an essay “Can we eliminate poverty from the Earth?”

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Students become aware of the situation of many Brazilian cities and favelas. • They learn how to justify their opinions using the movie to support them. • They are able to listen to other opinion and take them in. • Students learn the vocabulary and hone their communication skills.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• How can you change the world? • Can a citizen change the neighbourhood?

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3. CAN WE FEED THE GROWING POPULATION? Headline and short explanation

Can we really feed the growing population of the world? Scored discussion. The world agriculture and demography. Revision lesson.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.johnzola.com/JohnZola.com/Teaching_Strategies _files/Scored%20DiscArticle.pdf

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students are told ahead the topic of the lesson. They have a week to prepare themselves. The teacher has to divide them into two groups – for and against. The task is to prepare enough arguments to support their opinions. The groups should not be bigger than 6 people. In case of having a bigger class it is advised to divide it into more groups. Usually the members of the second group during the discussion of the first one are responsible for scoring. Each student anonymously gives points to the assigned student during the discussion. After lesson both points (given by the teacher and a student) are taken into account. 2. Scored discussion uses the fish bowled format – the students have chance to see each other. 3. The discussion lasts up to 20 minutes.

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4. Conclusions after the discussion. Giving marks. 5. Assigning a writing task after the discussion. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• They are able to gather and analyze data from different sources. • Ability to discuss the problem without dominating and giving space for each student to present an opinion. • Gaining the knowledge/vocabulary connected with the topic. • As a lesson is thought to be a revision done after the world demography and agriculture lessons, the main aim is to help students both to see and understand the connection between those two topics and gives them chance to revise for the test.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Has participating in the discussion and the arguments used by your opponents changed your point of view? • How much has it taught you?

4. SHOULD WE STILL ACCEPT SYRIAN REFUGEES IN EUROPE? Headline and short explanation

Should we still accept Syrian refugees in Europe (different point of view)? – Carousel Brainstorming. Topic: Identity and belonging - Syrian refugees in Europe. This strategy introduces Carousel Brainstorming, also known as Rotating Review, and offers suggestions to implement this technique in your classroom for brainstorming about new topics or reviewing learned information...

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.morganswonderland.com/images/Programs/ EFT/carousel_writing.pdf https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvOnXh3NN9w

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

Carousel Brainstorming (also known as Rotating Review) provides scaffolding for new information to be learned or existing information to be reviewed through movement, conversation, and reflection. Carousel Brainstorming is a cooperative learning activity that can be used both to discover and discuss background knowledge prior to studying a new topic, as well as for review of content already learned. This technique allows for small group discussion, followed by whole-class reflection. While taking part in Carousel Brainstorming, small groups of students rotate around the classroom, stopping at various “stations” for a designated period of time (usually 1-2 minutes). At each station, students activate their prior knowledge of a topic or concept and share their ideas with their small group. Each group posts their ideas at each station for all groups to read. 1. Choose several major concepts that are new to your students. Write question at the top of a piece of chart paper, and tape the paper to the wall. 2. Divide your class into groups of three or four and assign each group a different colour marker with which they will write their responses on the chart paper. Assign each group to a particular “station” or piece of chart paper. 3. Give groups 1-2 minutes to discuss the question noted on the piece of chart paper among their group members and then write down everything they know or have learned about the topic on that particular piece of chart paper (using their assigned colour marker). After the allotted 1-2 minutes, each group should rotate to the next station where they will read the question and what others have written about it, discuss it with their group, and add new information. Students can also write questions about things that other groups wrote (existing answers/notes about the question).

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Continue this process until each group is back to their original station. 4. Wrap up the brainstorming session by having a discussion about the topics on each piece of chart paper and reading/discussing what each group wrote, answering questions as you go. 5. Have your students organize the information from the brainstorming session by using a graphic organizer, writing a summary, or doing a gallery walk, recording useful information. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• They are able to gather and analyze data from different sources. • Ability to discuss the problem without dominating and giving space for each student to present an opinion. • Gaining the knowledge/vocabulary connected with the topic. • The main aim of this lesson is to help students both to see and understand the problem from different points of view and gives them chance to revise for the test.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Make a Prediction

I predict that… What if… I bet that… I think that… I expect… Since [fill in the detail] happened, then I believe the next thing that is going to happen is… Reading this part makes me think [fill in the detail] is about to happen… A possible solution to… A better solution to… I believe a new and unusual use for [fill in the detail] would be [fill in the detail]…

Ask a Question

Why did… ? Who did… ? What does [fill in the detail] mean… ? What would happen if… ? Is there a better solution to… ? How many ways can you… ? How effective are… ? What would result… ? What is the relationship between… ? Which is more important… ? How would you test … ? What fallacies or inconsistencies did you find in? This reminds me of… This part is like… This is similar to… Some differences are… I also [name something in the text that has also happened to you]… I never [name something in the text that has never happened to you]… This character makes me think of… This setting reminds me of…

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Propose an alternative to… Oh, I get it… Now I understand… This makes sense now… I think this means… I agree with you. This probably means… At first I thought [fill in the detail], but now I think… What seems likely is… The facts are… The opinion is… An alternative to [fill in the detail] is… Another solution is…

Clarify Something

This is good because… This is hard because… This is confusing because… What if… I like the part where… My favorite part so far is… I think that… When you compare [fill in the detail] with [fill in the detail], you… Another point of view is… Another important thought is… It taught you?

5. CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE Headline and short explanation

Civil disobedience–If people don’t obey the law, you won’t have a decent society.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Short movie. Introduction

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gugnXTN6-D4

Believing game

http://scholarworks.umass.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article =1004&context=eng_faculty_pubs

Photo, illustration, infographic

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. The teacher introduces the believing game. As you have probably noticed whenever we consider controversial issues such as an anti-terrorist legislation and its effects on civil freedom they quickly instead of a discussion become an argument. We argue eagerly, support our own opinions; we listen to counterarguments mainly to find flaws and, when we do, we interrupt and attack. We are more interested in proving our rights rather than considering seriously another viewpoint. The idea behind the believing game is to suspend judgment and promote thinking instead, to open oneself to the strengths and values of a perspective with which one does not agree in party or even completely. The believing game is the first step in a critical thinking process. 2. It can be useful to ask students to write a short paragraph as an initial record of their thinking on the issue to be considered-in this case, civil disobedience. For example: Do you believe it has ever been right, as a matter of conscience, to deliberately break a law that you regard as unjust? 3. Ask students to read or listen to the viewpoint they are to believe (in this case, the excerpt from “Civil Disobedience”). They need to work hard at believing as much as they can. If, what is likely, they disagree with Thoreau, they should ask themselves: What does he see that I don’t? How could this argument possibly be right? What can I agree with? They should try to suppress the inclination to disagree. 4. Divide the class into small discussion groups to work for 10-15 minutes. Students are to make only statements that support Thoreau. They find and speak things that they honestly connect with him. They can ask themselves such questions as: “What’s interesting or helpful about the view? What would you notice if you believed this view? If it was true? In what sense or under what conditions might this idea be true?” Tell students they should not make any negative or even challenging statements. An acceptable comment might be: “Going to church is very important for me. If it was against the law to practice my religion, I think I would do it anyway, even secretly.” Unacceptable would be: “I think it makes more sense to try to change a law instead of breaking it.” 5. When discussion flags - and it may hapten after a short time the students play the believing game - the teacher

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can interrupt and ask that they now work at formulating questions in the believing mode. These must aim at clarification and invite fuller understanding and acceptance. Perhaps other members of the group can answer them. They must not be loaded, rhetorical questions. An acceptable one might be: “Can someone give me an example of an unjust law that ought to be broken”? Or, “I have a problem with what Thoreau calls ‘being an agent of injustice to another.’ Can anyone tell me what he means?” Unacceptable would be: “Isn’t Thoreau just blaming the government? Don’t we elect the government?” 6. Students try to answer questions: What success did they have? What problems? How did they deal with them? To what extent did the experience feel authentic? What did they notice about other students’ statements and questions? Did the experience affect their point of view, even if only slightly? How? Or why not? Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

The debate develops skills of making some reasonable arguments, a sense of the strength and worth of a position not one’s own; a movement, however, slight, in one’s own position; a desire to go on thinking. Entering into and really experiencing unfamiliar or irritating points of view takes time and effort. But it invites listening, instead of arguing; it fosters empathy rather than antagonisms. It encourages understanding that can be competing truths, each of which has some value.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What does the student feel and see? • Am I sure I understand? • What values underlie this view? • Which do I acknowledge as valid, as important? • How can this point of view possibly be right?

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Slovenia

ish/ .si/category/engl www.gim-idrija

rija

A VEGE IDRIJA, Id IJ R JU A IJ Z A N IM G

Gimnazija Jurija Vege is situated in Idrija, a small town of 7000 inhabitants. In Idrija and a nearby town Spodnja Idrija there are two large corporations, employing the majority of the population living in Idrija and its surroundings. The students who attend our school are aged 15-19. They attend three different programs – grammar school, technical secondary school (mechanical engineering) and vocational school (mechatronics). The school has a long tradition as it was the first non-classical high school in Slovenia to use the Slovenian language as the prime language, in which the teachers would conduct their lessons. In 2008 the school was completely renovated and a new gym was constructed.  So now there is top-quality technical equipment in every classroom, a laboratory for conducting experiments and an enlarged kitchen and dining room ensuring the students have the possibility of getting a warm meal. The school building lies outside the town center in a peaceful environment, which provides students with the conditions needed for intensive work. The school is spacious enough for all students to take their lessons in at the same time. The school library is well-stocked with scientific and technical literature and is a pleasant place to study, read and do research. We recognize that each student is an individual, with individual needs, potentials and expectations. We therefore emphasize the social, emotional, physical and intellectual development of each student. Jurij Vega Grammar School Idrija seeks to create a friendly and stimulating learning atmosphere.

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1. ANALYSIS OF LITERARY TEXT USING “THE SIX THINKING HATS” METHOD Headline and short explanation

After reading the play students are grouped randomly. Using questions which cover different points of view, they discuss the text. This method can be used to analyse any text, movie, etc.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.debonogroup.com/six_thinking_hats.php http://johnkapeleris.com/blog/?p=418

Photo, illustration, infographic

The Six Thinking Hats

Photo: The de Bono Group.

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students read the text at home. 2. Every student explains his understanding of the text and how he experienced it. 3. Teacher gives instructions for group work. Students are grouped into six groups by being given pieces of paper with six different types of questions. Students with the same question form a group. 4. Students discuss questions, try to find answers and make notes in their notebooks. 5. Group-reporting. These are samples of questions for analysis of Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet.

White hat – Facts

• Analyse the text structure and write it down. • Explore the personal circumstances in which the text was created. • Analyse the information about the publishing of the text and its genre. • Define the literary space of the text and Shakespeare’s creative period. • Determine the narrative space and time and present literary characters. • Write themes and motifs which are subject to this text.

Red hat – Feelings

Shakespeare’s tragedy expresses the emotionality of literary characters and also raises emotions in the reader. • Think about how you felt while reading the play. Try to write down the feelings and emotions. • Try to find the part of the tragedy that is emotionally strongest and present it. • Describe the feelings of individual characters and explain them. • Which character do you think best considers his feelings and acts on them? Justify by using examples from the text.Justify by using examples from the text.

Black hat – Judgement

Tragedy simply calls for judgement and opinion. • Be the judge to all main characters. • Outline the character that you think requires the tou-

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ghest and unrelenting judge. Be the judge to that person. • What could the characters have done differently and why didn’t they? • Evaluate the actions of characters from moral and ethical point of view taking into account the responsibility to other people.

Yellow hat – Positivity

• Which positive things can you extract from the content of the tragedy? In your opinion, which event in the text brought a positive turnaround? Comment and justify. • What knowledge have you gained having read this Shakespeare’s tragedy? • Where in the text can you find positive messages for you or for the society? • Which character is the most optimistic in the play? • Is the perpetrator’s discovery positive or negative for the whole story? Justify.

Green hat – New ideas

• What would have happened if Claudius had failed with the murder? • What would have happened if Hamlet hadn’t killed Ophelia’s father? • What would have happened if Ophelia hadn’t died? • Could Hamlet investigate the murder in a different way? How? • Try to actualize the motive of the murder of self-interest. Put it in a contemporary context with other “players”. Is it acceptable nowadays? Justify your answer.

Blue hat – Thinking

• What kind of thinking did this text lead you to? • Which new questions arose from it? • Which questions could you find the answers to and which not? • Which values have been exposed, highlighted in the text? • Which of your beliefs and your values did the acts of the main character provoke? • Which of your beliefs and values might have been changed or consolidated under the influence of the text? • Could Hamlet’s acts be interpreted in several ways?

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Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Developing reading skills and the skill of interpreting a literary work. • Communicating in the mother tongue and reporting. • Working in team, sharing ideas. • Awareness that each problem can be seen from different points of view and that your perspective is only one of many possible ones.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Have all students expressed their feelings about literary work? • Do your group questions correspond to your daily point of view on life and reality? If not, was it hard for you to change your point of view? • Did all group members think the same way? Did you have trouble finding answers? How did you achieve consensus?

2. FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT AND SELF-EVALUATION Headline and short explanation

Contemporary approaches emphasize the active engagement of students in their own learning, learner responsibility, metacognitive skills and a dialogical, collaborative model of teaching and learning.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://kennslumidstod.hi.is/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/ assessment-matters-self-assessment-and-peer-assessment.pdf https://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormative Assessment.html

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

1. Before each unit the teacher points out the aims of the lesson. • An alternative is you let the students have a look at a unit and work out the aims themselves or the students set the aims they want to achieve and plan activities. 2. Before and after each unit students reflect on their learning answering the self-evaluation questions. See appendix 1. 3. The students discuss their answers in pairs and give feedback. Each student must identify two things the partner did well and one specific suggestion for improvement. When doing this they can also ask the teacher for help or guidance. 4. After the summative assessment or the pre-test students engage themselves in a self-analysis of their results. 5. Students identify which learning targets they mastered on the test and which learning aims they did not master. 6. Students then select the target areas requiring their

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attention and create a learning goal and plan of action to address their gaps. Students are welcome to partner with others who are still trying to master those same learning targets. 7. In their plan of action, students identify their own learning exercises or activities that will help them master the content and ultimately ‘prove’ their readiness to master the aims. In doing this they follow the self-evaluation questions. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Self-evaluation builds on a natural tendency to check out the progress of one’s own learning. • If a student can identify his/her learning progress, this motivates further learning. • Self-assessment promotes learner responsibility and independence. • Students can help each other to make sense of the gaps in their learning and understanding and to get a more sophisticated grasp of the learning process.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Has working in this way improved your learning ability? • Can you identify your strengths and weaknesses easier?

Appendix 1 Self-evaluation

1. What can I and what do I know so far? 2. What are my particular strengths and weaknesses? 3. What can I do about this? Develop a plan of action. 4. What do I have to pay attention to (e.g. time management, difficult structures/content)? 5. How can I check if my approach has helped me to improve myself? 6. What other decisions do I make and how do I control my progress?

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3. ANTACIDS Headline and short explanation

Collaborative teaching – English and Chemistry.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Article in English The instructions for experiments Comparison of the results https://drive.go o g l e.c om/drive/fol d ers/0B_u6zhf _ u i 5 B f j BWO H g y R l N nT j h x W W J C W Ux N b 2 tc3Y1REZ4TWphT2lrUnd2c1hYSjFMRDg?usp=sharing

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Reading the article in English, answering the questions and discussion (Eng); 2. Translating the instructions for experiments from English to Slovenian – group work (Eng, Chem); 3. Composing the translations (Eng, Chem);

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4. Performing the experiment on the basis of the translated instructions (Chem); 5. Comparison of the results and drawing conclusions (Chem).

Teaching methods

• Discussion, • Text analysis, • Vocabulary work, • Group work, • Performing experiments, • Team teaching. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Common goals

• Cooperation in order to solve the problem; • Acting responsibly to your peers / tasks; • Using the ICT for collecting, saving and presenting the information; • Showing initiative in finding solution.

Goals Chemistry

The students • Develop the skill of researching and experimenting; • Get used to the right choice of suitable and safe equipment; • Judge the reliability of results; • Develop the skill of making argumentative conclusions; • Study the importance of acids and basis in everyday life; • Develop critical thinking by solving an authentic problem.

Goals English

The students • Develop professional literacy – the ability to understand and discuss chemistry in English; • Develop the skill of translating from English into Slovenian; • Develop reading skills. A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What is the cause of the burning feeling in the stomach? • What can we do to help ourselves? • Compare different antacids that you can buy at the chemist's.

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4. MULTICULTURALISM AND ACCULTURATION Headline and short explanation

Multiculturalism and acculturation in the novel (Un)arranged Marriage by Bali Rai Discussing multiculturalism and acculturation in the novel (Un)arranged Marriage. Students read the novel at home. Then two teachers (of English language and sociology) are simultaneously present in class, the lesson lasts 90 minutes.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://study.com/academy/lesson/acculturation-definition -theory-examples.html https://unarrangedmarriage.wordpress.com/chapter -summaries/

Photo, illustration, infographic

(Un)arranged Marriage by Bali Rai.

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

Prior to the lesson

The teacher first shortly introduces students to the author and the novel. Students have to read the novel in English for their homework. The teacher emphasizes that students should only use dictionaries to look up the words that are important for understanding the plot. 1. Evoking knowledge. Students fill in the chart (KWL technique) and write down what they already know about the Punjab region and Sikhism. 2. Introduction of the Punjab region and Sikhism - introducing the topic on the basis of the Power Point presentation (sociology teacher). 3. Giving instructions for group work. Dividing students into groups: students are given pieces of paper in 5 different colours with a number on them (from 1 to 6, because there are 30 students in class). Students with the same coloured pieces of paper form a group. Giving instructions for work: students carefully read the extract from the novel and answer the questions in written form in their notebooks. 4. Group work: Both teachers are present in class, they monitor students. If students have questions connected with the task, they advise them, help them. Students develop reading skills and the skill of interpreting a literary work in English, get an insight into prejudice about other cultures in order to avoid them, communicate orally, understand the terms acculturation and multiculturalism in connection with the novel. 5. Forming new groups and instructions for further work. The teacher gives instructions for forming new groups: students who have the piece of paper with the same number now form a group. In the newly formed groups there are 5 students (each studied a different extract in the previous groups). Each student reports about the work they had done in the first group, shortly summarizes the extract they had read and comments on the answers. Other group members can ask questions, they agree or disagree with the answers. 6. Group work, both teachers are in class, they monitor the groups and listen. Students communicate in English. 7. Reflection. Students summarize the main points in written form, they can also write a reflection on any of the topics that the student has found interesting / provoking etc.

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Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Objectives

• Students develop reading skills and the skill of interpreting a literary work in English. • Students get an insight into prejudice about other cultures in order to avoid them. • Students communicate orally and report in English.

Aims

• Students understand a novel and discuss it with peers. • Students can interpret events from a different culture and explain them.

Developed competences

• Communication in the mother tongue • Communication in foreign languages • Social and civic competences A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• Have all the students taken part in the group discussions? • Have they all expressed their views on multiculturalism and acculturation? • Can they see the link to the world they live in?

QUESTIONS FOR GROUPS GROUP 1 (p.119 – 121)

Read the extract carefully, analyse it and answer the following questions: 1. Make a short summary of the extract. You will later present it to your schoolmates. 2. How did Manny feel when he came to India? 3. Why did Manny's father use to say that India is the best country in the world? 4. Comment on Harry's attitude to the Indian people and Manny's reaction to Harry's views.

GROUP 2 (Chapter 8, p.63 – 68)

Read the extract carefully, analyse it and answer the following questions: 1. Make a short summary of the extract. You will later present it to your schoolmates. 2. Define what gurudwara is. What meaning does it have? 3. Explain what acculturation is, use the example of Manny's father. 4. How did Manny feel about his father and his affiliation to the Punjab culture? 5. Compare a traditional family that Manny's father is trying to preserve and a family that developed in the pluralistic western society.

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GROUP 3 (p.86 – 88, 50-51)

Read the extract carefully, analyse it and answer the following questions: 1. Make a short summary of the extract. You will later present it to your schoolmates. 2. Define multiculturalism in Leicester as you can see it in the extract. 3. What did Punjab immigrants substitute "initiation" with? 4. Explain what acculturation is with the example of: A) Manny; b) Harry.

GROUP 4 (p.14 – 16, 27 – 29)

Read the extract carefully, analyse it and answer the following questions: 1. Make a short summary of the extract. You will later present it to your schoolmates. 2. What is Manny's attitude to the other family members?

3. How does Manny experience the Punjab values that his father is trying to educate him about? 4. Compare the prevailing family relations in Punjab families with the prevailing relations in British families.

GROUP 5 (p.17 – 20, 39 – 40)

Read the extract carefully, analyse it and answer the following questions: 1. Make a short summary of the extract. You will later present it to your schoolmates. 2. What environment does Manny's friend Ady come from? 3. Why doesn't Manny's family accept Ady and even opposes to Manny's and Ady's friendship? 4. Comment on Ady's and Manny's action from the second part of the extract. Why did they violate the formal norms?

5. SYRIAN CONFLICT Headline and short explanation

A geography lesson class, for secondary school students. Geography of Asia; conflict area-case study.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-14703856 http://edition.cnn.com/specials/middleeast/syrian-refugees/ index.html http://edition.cnn.com/2016/09/30/middleeast/un-aleppo -condemnation/ http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-17258397 http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-37525655 http://edition.cnn.com/specials/middleeast/syria

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps

First lesson hour:        

https://listovnik.sio.si/user/sspemrak/sirija

1. Students form 5 groups. Each group has to study facts about Syrian conflict at home very precisely. a. 3 groups act as "reporters" b. 1 group acts as "interviewers" c. 1 group acts as "evaluators" 2. The teacher discusses with students... a. topics which reporters want to explain (key words about Syria) and how they will present them (»brain storming«), time is limited to 15 minutes, b. the assignments the interviewers have, c. the specific things evaluators should pay attention to (evaluation criteria). 3. At the end of the first lesson the teacher and the students should discuss the learning goals and the criteria for success. This is a lesson in which the teaches and students are partners in learning a new topic!

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The second lesson hour

1. The first group of students, reporters, present the Syrian conflict. Each group member presents one or two topics. 2. Interviewers ask reporters different questions about the Syrian war. 3. Evaluators give the general score to the group and explain the score. 4. And the same scenario goes for the second and the third group... Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Students improve their transversal skills such as working in teams, sharing ideas, researching different internet sources and reading them critically. Students are able to work on their rhetoric skills and are able to evaluate the work of their classmates. There are several formative assessment methods used in this class: making presentation’s scenario, peer assessment which helps to create a learning community in the classroom. Students are involved in criteria and goal setting, etc. Goals are: to learn about the Syrian conflict, to be able to discuss it, to understand a very complicated refugee situation, to feel sympathy for the poor and wounded in the war, to develop awareness, of what is going on in the world.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

• What is your prediction for the future in Syria? • Will the new American president interfere in the Syrian situation more than Barack Obama? • Is Russia becoming the new/old/ world power with its deep involvement in the Syrian war?      

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Spain

/en

www.j23.f je.edu

e - CE Joan XXIII g it v ll e B s e ït u s Je rcelona)) a (B t a g e r b lo L e L’Hospitalet d

The school Joan XXIII is in Bellvitge, a quarter in L'Hospitalet town. It has got some 1600 students and 150 teachers, from kindergarten and Primary studies until Secondary, Gymnasium, Vocational and Technical studies. The Secondary school hosts about 700 students (12-18). The school mission is to promote an innovative, committed and personalized educational training based upon social promotion and quality criteria. Â Thus promoting: nets of cooperation and learning; capacity for innovation against new challenges; team building with the criteria of respect and solidarity; and commitment to sustainability and environment. We want strengthen: Education considering the emotional intelligence, international standing, European Citizenship, foreign languages. Sustainability, Creativity and Innovation. ICT is considered as a tool to improve learning. All Secondary students have and use a personal laptop during lessons and for their work time. The staff provides an individual attention to students, as in learning process, as in personal growing up. It is involved in Jesuits Education, net with 8 schools in Catalonia. Joan XXIII is participating in an ambitious project to innovate education, Horizon 2020.

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1. SIMILARITIES -“RIGS OF THE TIME” Headline and short explanation

Activity prepared for the last day of the Students meeting in Vienna (Nov/Dec 2016), within the theme of “Similarities” shared by the students related to A Common Europe of Cultural Diversity. “Rigs” means. Students will come up with their own ideas for a song (very loosely) based on this traditional English song.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

For more information on the song

https://mainlynorfolk.info/shirley.collins/songs/rigsofthetime. html

“Traditional” version of song (Tim Hague)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drMrlmZWcMc

Jon Boden’s version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRQm__vrZT8

Sandy Denny version

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFkYLGQnUOg

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Introduction to the subculture “folk music”. Explain my background, possibly having done short demonstration of Morris. 2. Students discuss questions on this topic in their different countries.

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• Is there a strong tradition of folk music in your country? • Is it popular with your generation? • What kind of people perform this music? • What kind of people listen to this music? • How strong is folk music (and dance) as part of a national identity? • To what extent are the answers to these questions similar in your different countries? • How do you feel personally about folk music and dance? 3. Explain to the students that they are going to see how a song can develop over time with the example of the song, The Rigs of the Time. Use the “election was rigged” illustration to explain/elicit/discuss the meaning of the word “rigs”. 4. Play the traditional version of the song. Students discuss the original setting for the song and what gives them this information. (The references to prices in the song show that it is old. The reference to the “French war” in some versions 4. indicates that it probably started out around the time of the Napoleonic Wars.) 5. Focus on the chorus of the song, which is perhaps timeless (except for one change necessary in lyrics - students can be asked for suggestions - change “boys” to “friends”. 6. Discuss the relevance of the complaints of this song to the present day. Explain that students are going to try and update the song to make it more relevant to the present day. Give examples of how this has been done in the past (see Martin Carthy version on Mainly Norfolk website). 7. National groups write their versions of the song. They can refer to events in their country or use the list “What pushes my buttons” for inspiration. They can also produce versions on the app Garage Band. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Students will be able to see what their contemporaries from the other countries consider to be issues that annoy them and discover to what extent these are similar or different. • They will gain some insight into how music can be used as a form of protest and how “folk songs” develop over the years.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

How did the issues expressed in the verses that the different national groups wrote compare to your own?

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SANDY DENNY SINGS RIGS OF THE TIME It's of an old butcher, I must bring him in. Charges four pence a pound, and thinks it no sin. Puts his thumb on the scale which makes it go down, And swears it's good weight yet it lacks half a pound. All sing… Chorus (after each verse): Honesty 's all out of fashion These are the rigs of the time Time, me boys, These are the rigs of the time Now it's next to the baker, I must bring him in. Charges tuppence a loaf and he thinks it no sin. When he do bring it in, is not bigger than your fist, And the top of the loaf is all covered in yeast All sing… Now it's next to the landlord, well I must bring him in. Charges tuppence a pint and he thinks it no sin. When he do bring it in, now the measure it is short And the top of the pot it is all covered in froth. All sing… Now the best of all plans that comes to me mind Is to set them all off in a high gale of wind And when they go up, oh, the cloud it will burst And the biggest old rascal come tumbling down first Singing...

Rigs of the Time - starter questions 1. Is there a strong tradition of folk music in your country? 2. Is it popular with your generation? 3. Which generation is it most popular with? 4. What kind of people perform this music? 5. What kind of people listen to this music? 6. How strong is folk music (and dance) as part of a national identity? 7. To what extent are the answers to these questions similar in your different countries? 8. How do you feel personally about folk music and dance?

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RIGS OF THE TIME TRADITIONAL VERSION No wonder that butter’s a shilling a pound, Seeing the rich farmers' daughters how they ride up and down If you ask them the reason they'll say, “Oh alas! There's a French war, and the cows have no grass.” Chorus (after each verse): Singing, honesty's all out of fashion These are the rigs of the time, Time, my boys These are the rigs of the time. O the next is the landlord, I must bring him in, He charges four pence a pint and he thinks it no sin. When he do bring it in, the measure is short: The top of the pot is popped off with the froth. And here's to the butcher, I must bring him in, Charges four pence a pound and yet thinks it no sin. Slaps his thumb on the scales and makes it go down He declares it's full weight yet it lacks half a pound. And here's to the baker, I must bring him in, Charges a ha'penny a loaf and yet thinks it no sin. When he do bring it in, it's no bigger than your fist And the top of the loaf has popped off with the yeast. Now here's to the tailor who skims with our clothes, And here's to the cobbler who pinches our toes, Our belly's all empty, our bodies are bare, No wonder we've reason to curse and to swear. Now the very best plan that I can find Is to puff them all off in a high gale of wind And when they get up, the cloud it will burst, And the biggest old rascal come tumbling down first.

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2. THE COST OF A TETRABRIK MILK CONTAINER Headline and short explanation

Estimating the surface area of tetrabrik milk container. And try to estimate the production cost.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

The surface area of YouTuba rectangular prism https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pcjnz26pnwY https://www.geogebra.org/download

Photo, illustration, infographic

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A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Students measure the dimensions of different tetra briks. 2. They study the flat development of this rectangular prism. They check with the calculations of geometry the volume of that body. 3. They check by filling the liquid container and comparing it with a measure of a bottle. Finally they calculate the cost of the material needed to manufacture it and study the manufacturing process. 4. They calculate the percentage of cost that the packaging on the price of the product. 5. They have to propose another shapes for a 1 liter brick  and checking the cost. 6. Finally, we discuss the ecological image of the use of this type of packaging on the environment and its corresponding ecological footprint. Discussion on alternatives with less impact on the environment such as returnable containers.

Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

• Using maths to start debate on social real issues. • Dominate procedures in cost calculations and be able to use in real cases. • Realize about connections between maths and many live topics. • Realize about our consumption habits and environmental impact.

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Outcomes that can be evaluated

• Every calculated results. • Al procedures. • Projected designed on 1 l. brick. • Correction on Well expressed and well argued opinions on the environmental impact and proposals to save on packaging.

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3. QUALITY OF LIVE IN EUROPE

(ECONOMY-GEOGRAPHY-SOCIOLOGY EUROPEAN CITIZENSHIP-CLIL)

Headline and short explanation

Vienna named world's top city for quality of life: Using a Study examining socioeconomic conditions places Austrian capital at apex of index while London, Paris and New York fail to make top 35. This lesson plan is about learning concepts on the live standards in Europe. In this case it’s useful to know the host city of the project.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/feb/23/vienna -named-worlds-top-city-for-quality-of-life https://www.mercer.com/our-thinking/mercer-melbourne -global-pension-index.html https://www.theguardian.com/world/europe-news http://www.worldbank.org/en/country/eu

Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Warmer Reading the article and Answer the questions. Then, discuss your answers: • What factors do you think make a city a good place to live?

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• Which of these cities corresponds best with your idea of a great place to live? 2. Key concepts on the text 3. Comprehension check Answer the questions without referring back to the article. • What is the full name of the survey? • What factors does the survey examine? • Who uses the results of this survey and for what purpose? • Why do US cities rank poorly in the survey? • Which capital city fell dramatically in the 2015 rankings and why? • What common factor links the worst-ranked cities in the world? • What is Vienna’s USP? • What other factors helped to place Vienna at the top of the list? 4. Discussion Look at the list of the top 30 cities. Talk about one of these cities – one that you have visited, lived in or worked in. Would you recommend it as a place to live or work? Why? Why not? If you have no experience of any of the cities, which one would you most like to visit and why? 5. Webquest about Austria and Vienna (If the host country is another you can change this one by another one). 6. Extension: A General English task Research one of the other cities in the top 30 list and present your findings. Try to convince the other students that it is the best city to live in. B. Business English task Your company plans to open a new office abroad. Your boss has asked you to compare three of the cities from the top 30 list and produce a report recommending where the new office should be and why. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Trying to learn the factors that affects to citizens live standard and Social Sciences methodology to study it: • How was made the 18th Mercer Quality of Life study. • Social and economic conditions, health, education, housing and the environment. • Big companies to assess where they should locate and how much they should pay staff. • Due to issues around personal safety and crime. • Paris, because of the city’s vulnerability to terrorist attacks.

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• They are all suffering from wars or political unrest. • Its geographical location at the centre of Europe and that it is becoming the gateway to Eastern European countries. • Safety, public transport, affordable rents, high level of public utilities, good recreational facilities, high GDP, quality of life, large number of students making it a young and lively place to live. A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Questions to check the Learning outcomes

Teacher can test if students can use the appeared concepts, and the general knowledge on The host City of each meeting in the project.

4. WATER VULNERABILITY

GEOGRAPHY-ECOLOGY-ETHICS: CITIZENSHIP (RIGHTS & RESPONSIBILITIES)

Headline and short explanation

Water is a fundamental right for every person in the world, yet many people are without access to the water they need. This is a project designed to help learners become active and engaged global citizens by taking informed, responsible and meaningful action.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

Sources and lesson plan

http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/water-week   https://vimeo.com/90007035 https://vimeo.com/54276341 https://vimeo.com/65137753

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Photo, illustration, infographic

Photo: Oxfam International.

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps�

1. Activity 1 (5 mins). What does water vulnerable mean? Show slides 2 and 3 which introduce learners to the idea of being water vulnerable. Allow time for discussion and for learners to ask questions. Note that new information will appear on most slides when you click. The blue circle on the bottom left-hand corner indicates that the slide is complete. 2. Activity 2 (35-55 mins). What are the symptoms and causes of water vulnerability? Show slides 4 to 17 which help learners identify causes and symptoms of water vulnerability. Allow time for discussion and questions. 3. Give pairs of learners A3 copies of the Water vulnerability tree on page 4. Explain that the issue they will

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be thinking about is water vulnerability, and ask them to write this on the trunk. Explain that the branches represent the symptoms of water vulnerability, such as having to travel a long way to collect water. Ask learners to fill in as many different symptoms as they can. 4. Explain that the roots of the tree represent the causes of water vulnerability. Ask learners to fill these in, for example by writing ‘Drought’ or ‘Climate Change’. Examples of causes and symptoms are provided on page 5. 4. Ask learners to add other causes and symptoms of water vulnerability if they can and then rotate learners around the classroom to view others’ work. Use their observations as the basis of discussion about the links between causes and symptoms. 5. Extension If time allows, you might like to show learners some or all of the five Causes and Symptoms film clips. Activity 3 (10-15 mins) Responding to water vulnerability Show slides 18 to 21 which provide some information about possible short and long-term solutions to water vulnerability. Ask learners to draw fruit shapes onto their water vulnerability trees and write down some possible solutions on these. For example, for ‘Drought’ they could write ‘Build irrigation systems to bring water in from elsewhere’. For ‘Climate Change’ they could write ‘Campaign to reduce carbon emissions’ and so on. Examples of responses are provided on page 6. As before, ask learners to display their water vulnerability trees for the rest of the class to see and then rotate around the classroom. Facilitate further discussion about the different solutions, highlighting which responses are short term and which are long-term. Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Learning objectives

• Geography knowledge, climate and dry zones on the planet. Ecology - Climatic change Causes and Global and local effects. • Students have to Recognise that access to safe, clean water is a basic human right. • Be aware that many people are denied this right, making them water vulnerable. Name some of the symptoms and causes of water vulnerability. • Make links between some of these symptoms and causes. Identify short and long-term solutions to water vulnerability.

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A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Learning outcomes that Teacher can test

• Can students recognised water as a basic human right? • Do they know How many people in the world have this right still denied and don’t have access to safe, clean water? • How many times is that the number of people living in their country? Think about possible actions and evaluate the results. In example: • Organise and present a Water Week assembly. • Write a message and send it to your local Journal. • Hold a fundraiser at your school, such as a sponsored water walk. • Design and display posters to raise awareness about water vulnerability. • Organise a stall at your school or community event to raise awareness. • Share what you have learned with friends and family. • Hold a debate about the importance of water. • Make a ‘Water can Change Lives’ video to share with others. This could include an explanation of how you would deal with water issues if you were in charge.

5. COMPARING YOUNG LIVES, IS EVERYONE EQUAL? (MATHS-GEOGRAPHY-ECONOMY) Headline and short explanation

A multidisciplinary lesson on Geography and Economy using some Math procedures by exploring how inequality and poverty affect the lives of young people in different parts of the world.

Links to sites on the Internet, related to the theme

http://happyplanetindex.org/ http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/infographic/ 2016/10/02/infographic-poverty-and-shared-prosperity -2016-taking-on-inequality http://databank.worldbank.org/data/home.aspx http://www.oxfam.org.uk/education/resources/more-or-less -equal-maths

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Photo, illustration, infographic

A lesson plan, in the form of “steps”

1. Measuring well-being Use the slideshow to briefly introduce learners to the Young Lives project.   Show the world map on slide 5. Ask learners if they can locate the UK and the four Young Lives countries on the

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world map. Click forward on the slide to reveal the locations of these countries. 2. Explain that these are some examples of the indicators which are used by governments around the world to measure the “well-being” of people in their country. Explanations of the indicators are provided in the slide notes.   Ask learners whether they think that these indicators are the best way to measure “well-being”. Do you think that other types of data should be collected to measure how “well” people are doing? 3. Ask them some questions about the data, such as: • What is the life expectancy for people in Peru? • What percentage of the population in Ethiopia has access to electricity? • What is the difference between the number of internet users per 100 people in the UK compared to the number in India? • Which country has the lowest life expectancy. 4. Ask learners to work in pairs to create their own questions about the data. Allow time for learners to share their questions and to try and answer the questions of others. 5. Picturing data into diagrams  by representing the world as a village of just 100 people.   Discuss other ways in which the data could be presented, for example by using a bar or pie chart.   Ask learners to use other indicators expressed as percentages from the Measuring well-being table to create their own infographics. If they have indicators expressed as decimals, ask them to first round their numbers to the nearest whole number. 6. Comparing and Discussing the anwswers • Did any of the statements surprise you? If so, which statements and why? • Do you think it makes people react differently if data is described in a different way? Explain your answer. • Why might people want to describe data in different ways? • What other statements could you calculate using the data in the Measuring well-being table?   Ask learners to use the data in the Measuring well-being table to generate their own set of statements. Allow time at the end of the activity for learners to discuss any similarities and differences they noticed between the countries in terms of the different development indica-

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tors. You could ask the following questions: • What similarities and differences are there in the development data for these countries? • Which development indicators vary the most between these countries? • What do you think are the reasons for these inequalities? Objectives: what do we expect the student will learn from this. Superficial goals and deeper goals

Learning objectives

A question to evaluate the process and the learned knowledge/ understanding

Learning outcomes that Teacher can test

• To know some ways in which well-being is quantitatively measured. • To interpret data, and represent and describe it in different ways. • To understand that per cent (%) relates to the ‘number of parts per hundred’.

• Learners can interpret a set of data measuring well-being? • Learners can ask and answer questions, and generate statements about a set of data?   • Learners can use infographics to represent percentage data? • Learners have got   their own opinion about global young inequality?

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InTIMe21

ods for the eas and Meth

eaching Id

Innovating T

lesson Summary of our

Country

Name of the lesson plan

Methodology

ABC-Darium

8

2. Collaborative

English but can be used for any subject

Collaborative Writing ICT

10

3. “Dear Future

English

Brainstorming Collaborative Writing ICT

11

4. Describe and

English but can be used for any foreign language

Collaborative Writing ICT

16

5. Students are

making short videos

Biology but can be used for any subject

Group work Creation of short videos (creativity, e-learning)

17

1. Team Building

Civil education

Collaborative Learning

20

2. Diversity and

Civil education Sociology

Problem Based Learning

22

3. Nature:

Geography Sociology

Flipped Learning Cross-curricular

24

4. Armchair Travelling in cultural capitals

Geography Sociology Civil education

Flipped Learning

27

5. Denmark through

Geography Sociology Civil education

Cross-curricular

29

1. Acidification of

Chemistry

Experimental learning

32

writing

draw a monster!

similarities

Sustainable development Sustainable living

others’ eyes

Finland

School subject(s)

English but can be used for any subject

Generations: Sorry”

Denmark

plans

1. Sustainability

and responsibility for future generations

Austria

21st century

water systems

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Country

Name of the lesson plan

2. Are you a

Civil education Swedish

3. Bring the real world into my mathematics classroom

Mathematics

4. Source criticism

Mother language media education

global citizen?

Finland

School subject(s)

Methodology

Peer learning

33

Problem Based Learning in The context of Flipped Learning

34

Phenomenon based learning

36

Practical learning Informal learning Experimental learning Peer learning

37

Peer to peer methodology Cross-curricular competences based lesson A best practice based on creativity

40

History of Art Media education Civil education

Cross curricular lesson based on creativity

44

4. Nutrition

English Cultural studies Food awareness

Survey methodology Cooperative learning

45

5. ​Immigration

History History of art Literature

Lesson based on CLIL Methodology

47

5. The importance

Biology

1. Earth Day

Civil education Science

2. Speed graphic

Civil education Graphic design

3. The City I like

of identifying species

date about stereotypes and similarities

Italy

and “Healthy” diet

Problem based learning

1. Should people in

English mother language religious

Six thinking hats by E. de Bono

50

2.Inside Rio’s

Geography English

Socratic seminar

51

3. Can we feed

Geography

Scored discussion

53

Poland celebrate Halloween?

Poland

41

Favelas

the growing population?

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Country

Name of the lesson plan

School subject(s)

4. Should we still

Civil education accept Syrian English refugees in Europe?

Poland

5. Civil disobedience

Civil education English

1. Analysis of

Slovenian literary text using language “The Six Thinking Hats” method

Peer learning based on group work and discussion Group work discussion critical thinking

54 57 61

64

English Chemistry

Collaborative learning

67

English and acculturation Sociology

Cross-curricular activity based on group work and class discussion

69

Group work Presentation creativity Using ICT Critical thinking

72

Cross-curricular

76

Peer Education Civil education

3. Antacids 4. Multiculturalism

5. Syrian conflict

geography (history, sociology, civil education)

1.“Rigs of the time”

English

2. The cost of a

Mathematics Business Economy

Problem Based Learning in The context of Flipped Learning

80

3. Quality of live

European Citizenship (CLIL)

Collaborative learning

82

4. Water

Geography Ecology Ethics

Cross-curricular activity based on group work and class discussion

84

5. Comparing

Mathematics Geography Economy

Cross-curricular

87

tetrabrick milk container

Spain

Peer learning based on group work and discussion

Meta-cognitive approach Cooperative learning

2. Formative

Assesment and Self - Evaluation

Slovenia

Methodology

in Europe

vulnerability

young lives

94

InTime21 - LESSON PLANS  

A collection of lesson plans for different subjects created by a group of teachers, cooperating on innovating teaching methods for the 21st...