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JAY LEMAN Urban Planning Portfolio


TABLE OF CONTENTS RESUME.............................................................................................3 UC EXPLORATION 4-11 ANALYSIS MAPPING......................................................................4 IMAGEABILITY MAPPING..............................................................5 FIGURE GROUND STUDY.............................................................6 EMPHASIS COMPARISONS..........................................................7 THEMATIC MAPPING: UC GREEN ............................................8 UC GREEN TYPOLOGIES..............................................................9 CAMPUS GREEN INVESTIGATION ...................................10-11 OVER-THE-RHINE EXPLORATION

12-17

COMMUNITY IMPRESSIONS........................................................12 IMAGES AND SENSES ..................................................................13 HISTORY.............................................................................................14 DESIGN ANALYSIS..........................................................................15 DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION..................................................16-17 SITE ANALYSIS..........................................................................18-19 VISUAL ART.................................................................................20-21 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT.......................................................22 WRITING SAMPLE............................................................................23 REFLECTION......................................................................................24

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RESUME

Jay Leman |

lemangj@mail.uc.edu | 224-250-3839 115 Calhoun Street Unit 3, Cincinnati OH, 45219

Linked-In: www.linkedin.com/in/jay-l-a59199127 Honors Porfolio: jayleman.weebly.com

Experience

Bearcat Buddies Tutor, Cincinnati, OH Sep 2018-present Tutoring one-on-one reading and english at Hays-Porter and Taylor Elementary School Weekly mentoring for academic and social success Counseling of vocabulary, pronunciation, reading comprehension, and writing

Personal Statement

Ma-Ka-Ja-Wan Scout Reservation Counselor, Pearson, WI June 2019 - Aug 2019 As an Urban Planning student at DAAP, I have developed a vision to channel my interests in design, environmental sustainability, LGBTQ+ Designed lesson plans for and instructed art and justice, and racial justice towards a career of impact. I plan on using pottery classes Managed the upkeep and use of an electric kiln urban design for social justice: to create neighborhood advantage Arranged campsites, built fires, and managed forest and sustainability.

Education

Bachelor of Urban Planning, The University of Cincinnati Aug 2018-May 2022 GPA: 4.00/4.00 Darwin T. Turner scholarship, Cincinnatus scholarship, National Outreach award, Buxbaum Workum scholarship University Honors Program, Dean’s List 2018-19 Urban Design Certificate Deerfield High School, Deerfield, IL Aug 2014-May 2018 GPA: 3.78/4.00 Illinois State Scholar, DHS Honors Society AP Coursework: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, AB Calculus, Psychology, US History, Environmental Science, Studio Drawing, English Language and Composition, English Literature

Cafe de Oro Barista, Riverwoods IL April 2018- Aug 2018 Maintained professional and welcoming communication with customers Prepared and served beverages and food items in accordance with health code Caregiver at Daycare center, Bannockburn, IL Aug 2017-June 2018 Supervised children ages infant to 5 at North Shore Unitarian Church Provided food, sanitary, and recreational services

Technical Experience

Advanced: Microsoft Office Intermediate: Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator, SketchUp, ArcGIS Basic: AutoCAD, RStudio

Interests

Oil painting, mixed media art, sustainability in planning, urban agriculture, wild edibles foraging

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UC EXPLORATION: ANALYSIS MAPPING

FIGURE GROUND

PATHWAYS

A building footprint map that explores the ages of buildings on campus in three growth periods: 1800-1949, 1950-1999, 2000-present

A pedestrian and vehicle pathway map that explores the accessibility and activity of campus through indication of stairs, ramps, and traffic flow levels.

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IMAGEABILITY MAPPING Based on Kevin Lynch’s The Image of the City An impression of major and minor elements of distinction: Nodes- focus points in travel Landmarks- external points of reference or destination Edges- distinctions of border or boundary Pathways- routes of movement Districts- general areas of commonality

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FIGURE GROUND STUDY A map of the University of Cincinnati Main Campus, using ArcMap. This figure ground map illuminates the conditions of pathways, topopgraphy, buildings, and trees on campus and around it.

The University of Cincinnati

Text

0

0.05

Âą

0.1

0.2

0.3

Miles 0.4

LEGEND lakes and ponds building pavement polygons sidewalk tree canopy topography contour

Jay Leman Sept. 2018 COMP GRAPH PLAN

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EMPHASIS COMPARISONS

The University of Cincinnati

The two maps made in AutoCAD contrast in emphasising pathways and buildings, in inverted black and white colors. The use of white as the background in the first image allows the black building footprints to appear as the greatest focal point. The pathways, on the other hand, serve to enhance the significance of the dark buildings themselves rather than becoming an emphasis.

In the second map, thin white lines against a black background emphasize the importance of the pathways. The white building footprints become the empty space, though still stand out as the only large areas of distinction.

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THEMATIC MAPPING: UC GREEN

UC GREEN

GREEN SPACE

at the University of Cincinnati

KEY Grass Tree Canopy Commons Park Athletic

KEY

grass athletic field court yard park & garden

100 0

300

500 ft

200

leman comp graph plan

There are three main types of green spaces on the UC campus that each create their own variety of interactions, uses, and benefits Commons, Parks, and Athletic Fields

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UC GREEN TYPOLOGY

Athletic fields: Nippert Stadium

UC Campus: Green

Commons: Schneider Quad

Parks: Zimmer roof-top garden

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CAMPUS GREEN INVESTIGATION

Campus Green, a park with open space and winding pathways, creates three types of interactions: Sigma-Sigma Commons carries heavy pedestrian traffic, and offers event and recreation space The hammock park and sandy seating spaces elicit a variety of casual interactions or alone time Deep into the pathways of Campus Green, there is a high density of trees and an aura of seclusion and peace

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CAMPUS GREEN INVESTIGATION

Using SketchUp, I created a 3D model of campus with the green space categories, Commons, Parks, and Athletic Fields, to visually explain the opportunties that green spaces offer for social interactions. The green spaces on campus are not only valuable for various human activities, but also for improved ecological services including drainage, and for improved health and well-being of students and staff.

UC should consider working towards a wider range of biodiversity in Campus Green, by planting native prairie and forest landscaping. This would benefit wildlife, improve soil, water, and air conditions on campus, and offer resources as a park with developed ecology.

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OVER-THE-RHINE EXPLORATION: COMMUNITY IMPRESSIONS For a group project on a Cincinnati neighborhood, we explored the streets of OTR and reflecte on the kind of community it was and is becoming.

Postcards

Group Impression map

Individual sketches in pen based on photos taken on site. Color theme added on photoshop. Mine is pictured bottom left.

Based on our intial understandings of the neighborhood I designed points of emphasis, drew buildings, and editied using Photoshop.

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IMAGES AND SENSES

Experiencing Change in OTR: Building Life

Edges Pathways

KEY Dilapidated (vacant) Boarded up, painted (vacant) Revitalized (historic) Modern Construction

Initial Imageability

Group Imageability

Sensibility

Map displaying understandings of major and minor nodes, landmarks, edges, pathways, and districts.

Individual imagability maps combined as a group map to most accurately depicts OTR through these measures.

Map based on my sensory experience of changing buildings in OTR, using chalk pastels and Photoshop.

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HISTORY A Brief History of Over-The-Rhine: Demographic Changes The Miami and Erie

CANAL is completed

19 00

18 00

Construction of

MEMORIAL HALL

ited land to the city to be made into

1831

1918

1852 AKE LAW is passed

The last Cincinnati Industrial

populations migrate to Cincinnati for

1875 1876

1919 PROHIBITION From

1960 to 1980, 84% CENTRAL 1923 PARKWAY is of the White completed population in OTR moved 1929 The GREAT DEPRESSION away begins

APPALACHIAN and BLACK EXPOSITION is held

German STREET NAMES are removed

begins in Ohio

1868

industrial jobs

Bellevue

The construction of

1950 I-75 displaces black residents into OTR

1960 MR. SPOONS and

INCLINE is

bluegrass performers entertain

constructed

at Appalachian bars

MUSIC HALL is

1878

7 killed and 19 injured in Elm and Wade

completed

1884

The Berner Courthouse

RIOT

EXPLOSION

FINDLAY MARKET is renovated

SECTION 8

1984 1994

hysteria runs rampant

The

Many neighborhoods become

plan is introduced

WWI begins,

By the 1859 The horse-drawn 1850’s, over STREET60% of OTR CAR is introduced residents were WASHINGTON 1861 German PARK opens immigrants

JOURNAL is published

A new URBAN DEVELOPMENT

1917 ANTI-GERMAN

FINDLAY MARKET

Der Deutsche Pionier-Verein

1908

is completed

Ignatz designs 1841 Franz ST. MARY’S church

General James Findlay gives his inher-

1980

1973

Stanley

“BUDDY” GRAY is murdered

By 2000, OTR was 19.4% White and 76.9% Black

RESOURCE CENTER is created

The OTR

1996

20 00 2001

The murder of Timothy Thomas sparks a

RACE RIOT

The current gentrication of OTR OTR is named the MOST 2009 DANGEROUS US is neighborhood to live in replacing Renovation and expansion of the Black WASHINGTON 2012 population with a PARK is completed new demographic.

3CDC begins LAND BANKING property in OTR

2005

2016

The Cincinnati Bell Connector

STREETCAR

is opened for use

1974

Group timeline: A snapshot history of OTR through the lense of four defining demographic groups that shaped the culture and history of the neighborhood. I researched historical events and trends, created the theme and visual narrative, and designed the layout using inDesign.

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DESIGN ANALYSIS: VINE STREET

Legend Buildings

OTR FIGURE GROUND

Tree Cover OTR Neighborhood

AXONOMETRIC

0

0.05

0.1

0.2

0.3 Miles

¯

Vine Street is characterized as a busy,pedestrian oriented commercial district with colorful italianate architecture and murals.

ELEVATION

Programs used: Sketchup, arcGIS, Autocad, Photoshop,and Illustrator

13’ 4’ 10’

20’

10’ 4’ 13’ SECTION

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DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION: FINDLAY MARKET EXISTING CONDITIONS:

FOCUS BLOCK PLAN 400’x330’

Design Guideline Windows facing inward to Findlay Market must have landscape boxes. Open ground space along the street wall should have landscaping elements. This strip can also be used for store signage. The vision is to create continuous active frontages in a green and lively marketplace. Building Envelope Ground-floor retail and a double-loaded apartment complex can be built on this lot. The roof can be used for a garden or patio to maximize green community space and stormwater management. The building(s) must fit the neighborhood character (mixed-use, italiante style).

PROPOSED DESIGN GUIDELINE

CURRENT ELEVATION

PROPOSED BUILDING ENVELOPE CURRENT STREET SECTION

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DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION: FINDLAY MARKET

PROPOSED SECTION

FOCUS AREA AND OTHER APPLICABLE STREETS IN OTR Convert Elm into a twoway street with bump-out intersections to make the streetscape more accessible to bikers and pedestrians. Side-street parking serves as dual parking and bioswales for better drainage, a greener street, and slower, safer traffic. Convert the streets bordering Findlay Market into a permeable,

PROPOSED ELM STREET PLAN AXONOMETRIC

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SITE ANALYSIS This greenfield site is in Middletown, OH and was purchased by Fischer Homes for future development. The site offers assets that should be preserved, including a long-standing tree corridor around a stream that benefits the soil, air, and water on site. Invasive plants can be replaced with native landscaping

Photo of Ebhart’s Run taken on site.

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SITE ANALYSIS The conditions of the site also offer assets that pertain to development. Development options are diverse: The site is zoned BC-H, mixed-use core, BC-R, lower denisty mixed-use, and R-4, single family residential. The tree canopy and topopgraphy around the stream can be utlilized as a permanent view, barrier, park or natural area, and for ecological services such as drainage and carbon sinks.

Group model of the site including topopgraphy, buildings, roads, and tree canopy at 1�:200’. I planned the scale and sizing, traced and cut topography layers with bristol board, glued, painted, and assembled the model, and drew the roads.

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VISUAL ART

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VISUAL ART

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COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Urban planning chalk art for CliftonFest

Documenting plant species for Preserve Burnett Woods

Native landscaping for a community garden in Evanston, IL

International Climate Change Strike with Fossil Free UC

Canvassing and rallying with the Aftab Pureval Campaign

Tutoring reading and writing with Bearcat Buddies

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WRITING SAMPLE: Historical Preservation in SoHo essay excerpt The SoHo Cast-Iron Historic District resides in lower Manhattan, New York, and originally contained about 26 blocks with 500 buildings, although the 2010 zoning extension added about 10 blocks and 135 buildings to the district. The name “SoHo” stands for South-of-HoustonStreet and originates from a nickname invented by the artist community that illegally moved into the area beginning in the 1960’s, and played a key role in transforming SoHo into the upscale shopping attraction it is today. The area that is now known as SoHo underwent a tremendous metamorphoses from an industrial waste-land, to a thriving art enclave, to an upscale shopping district, in what is now known as the original and quintessential example of artist-led gentrification in the United States. Prior to the revitalization of SoHo, this section of land experienced several distinct shifts in uses and character that collectively shaped its historical significance. Indigenous peoples including the Lenape are the earliest known inhabitants of this area and its surrounding land. The Dutch colonized the area of New York in the 1620’s and cleared the land for farming. In the 1660’s, the land was bought by Augustine Herrman, an affluent trader of fur, enslaved people, indigo, and tobacco. A significant portion of the farmland was given to emancipated black people when freed from work under the West India Company. This area became the site of the first free black Manhattan settlements, and retained this demographic for approximately 200 years. The land remained rural during the 18th century, and about four forts were located here during the American Revolution. This area, inherited by Nicholas Bayard, was divided and sold at the turn of the 19th century, encouraging the shift to commercial use. In 1809, Broadway was paved, as prominent, white residents moved onto North Broadway. The eighth ward, which includes the area that is now SoHo, experienced rapid development between 1815 to 1825. Around 30 of the Federal Period houses built in this era remain, only two of which resemble Greek Revival architecture styles.

Between 1850 and 1900, the district shifted to a period of entertainment, business, and manufacturing. The smaller retail on Broadway was replaced with large commercial buildings, including Lord & Taylor, Tiffany & Co, constructed with castiron, marble, and brownstone. Hotels and theatres followed. The 1857 Haughwout building, which is now SoHo’s earliest full cast-iron facade still standing, and the Arnold Constable & Co building are prominent large cast-iron and masonry commercial buildings that remain in the urban fabric today. The St. Nicolas Hotel, at 521-523 Broadway, is the only remaining hotel from this era. Daniel D. Badger and James Bogardus were most responsible for the innovation and popularization of cast-iron architecture in New York. The cast-iron storefronts they manufactured during this period were often adorned with marble details in the Italianate style. Behind the bright lights of Broadway, smaller streets including Crosby, Mercer, and Greene, made up a different kind of entertainment center: a red-light district. During the 1860’s, the stigma and perceived danger of the brothels and the entrance of cast-iron factories and warehouses pushed out the resident population and land-use. The shift to smaller industry including metal, glass, furniture, and books, amounted to large factories and stores by the 1880’s and 90’s. The district became a textile and dry-goods trade center that hosted large companies, such as Mills & Gibb, W. G. Hitchcock & Co, in cast-iron industrial buildings, the majority of which were built in the 1870’s. The growth and prominence of the area died out beginning in the 1900’s. As the needs of industry shifted to horizontal integration, these cast-iron structures made for vertical integration were left to light industry, which filled in as industry with more money left. During the decline of industry post-World War Two, the district deteriorated into an area marked with sweatshops, vacancy, and fires. It was known to surrounding areas as “The Waste Land of New York” and to firefighters as “Hell’s Hundred Acres.” ...

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REFLECTION Urban planning is about designing for people and our world. Planning therefore, must be as interdisciplinary as it can be. It must be adaptive, innovative, connected, and empathetic to the people it serves. Every community is different, and every plan needs the empowerment of the community to design the most sustainable and successful version of their future.

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