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Girton Development Newsletter of Girton College, Cambridge

newsletter Spring 2014


In this issue... Message from the Mistress The Mistress, Professor Susan J. Smith FBA writes.

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Our Financial Report A look at the financial health of the College.

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A Great Campaign Securing a sustainable future for the College. Editor Elizabeth Wade Deputy Editor Emma Cornwall

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Design www.cantellday.co.uk Photography Phil Mynott, Nick Gutteridge, Nigel Stead, Emma Cornwall, Elizabeth Wade, Tamsin Elbourn, Miriam Saxl Printer Labute Contact:

Old Friends A look at Girton's cultural collections and the events that took place in 2013 to celebrate them.

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Development Office Girton College FREEPOST ANG6880 Cambridge CB3 0YE

Alumni Events Reports on our alumni events, both sporting and social.

+44 (0)1223 766672/338901 development@girton.cam.ac.uk www.girton.cam.ac.uk Copyright in editorial matter and this collection as a whole: Girton College Cambridge Š 2014. Copyright in individual articles: Š March 2014 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be

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Donors to the College 2012-13 A list of those who have supported Girton in the last financial year.

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reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, without prior permission in writing of the publisher, nor be issued to the public or circulated in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published.

The Editor would like to thank many colleagues, and particularly Cherry Hopkins OBE, for their support in the production of the Development Newsletter.


Introduction

Message from the Mistress Professor Susan J. Smith FBA It has been another tremendous year for Girton. The successful run of Jessica Swale’s play ‘Blue Stockings’ at the Globe Theatre did much to raise our profile, bringing Girton's pivotal role in securing women’s access to higher education squarely into view. The myriad achievements of our remarkable alumni – in business, public service, science, music and the arts – testify to the many ways in which a Girton education continues to add value to peoples lives. And in College today, students from diverse backgrounds are determined to realise their potential, reflecting, in their profile and aspirations, the life-changing qualities of Girton's ongoing commitment to that foundational goal of widening participation. As an Old Girtonian, you do not need me to tell you that one of the most important factors shaping the educational experience of Girton’s students is the College Fellowship. Spanning nearly every subject taught in the University, our 59 Fellows, 14 ByeFellows and an engaged research-active Life Fellowship take a lead in delivering the wide range of teaching, social and support services that are bundled into a Cambridge education. You will not be surprised to learn that maintaining and supporting this Fellowship is an important strategic priority for the College. Indeed, I would like to take this opportunity to thank very many of you for helping Girton work towards that goal. One of our most successful fundraising areas in recent years has been our Teaching Support Fund. It has been heartening to see areas like Law, Classics, Economics, English and History increasingly underpinned by generous donations to the endowment. We have also been successful in securing, from other charitable sources, funds for Mathematics and Veterinary Medicine. There is still some way to go, but a glance at the remarkable profile and achievements – in both teaching and

research – of Girton’s inspiring Fellowship should be enough to demonstrate that these gifts are wellspent. Please do not hesitate to get in touch if you feel you can contribute. Another major boost this year has been the opening of Ash Court, which you can read about later on. This is the first step in a bold new plan (whose formulation is still in train) to maximise the contribution of the estate to Girton’s educational goals. A Cambridge degree is a complete residential experience, and the estate plays a central role in supporting scholarly excellence and promoting all-round personal development. Now that Ash Court is ‘on stream’, therefore, we turn our attention to the future for Wolfson Court, and especially to the important role this ‘second site’ has played in nurturing Girton’s postgraduate offer. Girton has become a major graduate as well as undergraduate College, and every aspect of this is an inspiration and a pleasure. We recognise that major building projects – whether new build or renovation – are rarely the most popular of our fundraising targets. Buildings are so costly that it is hard to feel you can make a difference, and the

Professor Susan J. Smith FBA lead time can be long. Notwithstanding your marvellous donations to the John Marks Sports Pavilion, the bulk of the funds for Ash Court were ultimately raised through loans and the sale of offsite houses. In similar vein we shall do everything we can to muster the funds required for the next phase of infrastructural development from our existing resources, as well as from trusts and foundations.

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Introduction

But please don’t make the mistake of thinking that such developments are not at the heart of our educational mission, or that your support for them is irrelevant. As this newsletter indicates, you can help make the most of Girton’s expansive estate in very many ways. And if you choose to make a donation to the general endowment you can still follow the lead of your predecessors and name some part of the estate to reflect that fact. Contact the Development Office for details. A Great Campaign is doing well: over £6 million has already been raised, and I extend heartfelt thanks to all who have contributed so far. However, there is something more than fundraising at the heart of this Campaign, and I wonder if you might support it? The Campaign is leading towards the 150th anniversary of Girton’s Foundation. Wouldn’t it be marvellous if we could say on that day – 16th October 2019 – that every

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Girtonian we know is a Member of A Great Campaign? Only Girton could achieve such a wild ambition. But the cost is not excessive, especially with the help of Gift Aid and spread over the full five years (about £6 a month, or 20p a day). Yet the impact will be staggering. I refer not just to financial sustainability (which will receive a huge boost) but also to the sense of community and solidarity that makes Girton the phenomenon that it is. A Girton blue stocking in Jessica Swale’s play, is given this wonderful line: ‘we don’t get buffeted by the wind; we change its course’. With your help that will remain Girton’s mantra and mission. There is one more thing you could do to help secure Girton’s future. In 2014, A Great Campaign turns to the question of legacies. The College is founded on bequests: on gifts too large for people to donate in their lifetime, but forming a modest proportion of their estate when they die. We hope, of course, that no

reader who joins the 1869 Society today becomes a legator by 2019; there is so much in the pipeline that we want you to enjoy! But if enough Girtonians are willing to remember their College in their wills, it will transform the ambitions and achievements of this unique institution. That is something we shall certainly celebrate in 2019, and on a regular basis as the Society grows. Whether or not you choose to join A Great Campaign or sign up to the 1869 Society, whether you give to the College in cash or kind, or whether you simply want to enjoy being part of a remarkable community and hearing about the goings on at Girton today, I welcome you to this Development Newsletter. I hope you find it an inspiring read, and trust that it will encourage you to come back and see us from time to time.


Financial Report

Our Financial Report This is the second of our new style financial reports to appear in the Development Newsletter. Our aim is to make our operations easier to understand, at a time when pressure on funding within the sector generally remains intense, Higher Education remains under scrutiny and the College must look to external sources to make up any funding shortfall and ensure long term financial health. Throughout its history Girton has struggled to balance its books, and many pressures on the income and expenditure account are recurrent themes. We continue to work to mitigate the challenges of the economic environment, public policy constraints on our income, the need to invest in new buildings while maintaining and depreciating the old, and the size of the endowment relative to our scale. Although the College has been successful in the last few years in pruning outgoings, recent results have nonetheless been affected by a period of relatively low returns on our endowment, the costs of providing a world class education and the need to grow the contribution from our conference business.

C Consolidated Income and Expenditure 2012-2013 £10,000,000

£8,000,000

£6,000,000

Academic fees represent around one third of our income and these, together with income from student rents and catering, are constrained by external influences. The College is thus dependent on other income sources to make up the shortfall. The turnover generated by conferences and events was around £780,000 during the year, around 7% lower than the previous year. This was in part a function of the introduction of continuous undergraduate tenancies which restrict room availability in Christmas and Easter vacations; however, it is expected that the higher standard of accommodation available at Ash Court will improve the overall return from the business going forward. Investment income earned on the endowment contributed £1.3 million to overall income during the year and donations contributed a further £1 million to income. Donations and bequests totalling £2.2 million were added to the endowment during the year. We remain extremely grateful for the support of alumni and friends who are among the most generous of any Cambridge college (on average 16% of our alumni are donors versus the Cambridge average of 12%).

£4,000,000

£2,000,000

Expenditure

£0 Expenditure

Income

Depreciation

Donation Income

Residences, Catering and Conferences Education

Investment Income Conferences & Events Academic Residences and Catering D

Income The College has five income streams: academic fees and charges, members’ residence and catering charges, the conference and events business, income from the endowment and investments, and donations. In the year to June 30th, 2013, our income was £8.7 million.

At £9.6 million expenditure was a little ahead of 2012. There was a small rise in staff costs during the period and the cost of providing scholarships and awards rose, reflecting the needs and achievements of the student body. Staff costs represent 60% of our expenditure (before depreciation) reflecting the labour intensive nature of both the academic and nonacademic elements of College activities. The College’s investment portfolio (which includes both endowment assets and long term investments) is managed to maximise long-term total returns while seeking to control the volatility of returns and safeguard the risk of declines in its value. The College’s gross investment portfolio stood at £52 million at June 30th, 2013. Our net portfolio excluding loans was £44 million.

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Financial Report

In order to achieve both reasonable stability in budgeting and a sound balance between near-term and longer-term spending priorities, the Investments Committee (with four external members drawn from our alumni) has adopted a spending rule: the amount budgeted for expenditure in the financial year beginning July 1st is 4% of the capital value of the portfolio averaged over the previous year. This overall spending rule also forms the basis for designing the return objective of the portfolio. In the year to June 30th, 2013 the portfolio returned 6.9% (2012: 2.9%) and the stronger performance has continued into Expenditure on Education 2004 – 2013

the current financial year given the portfolio’s current weighting towards equity markets where performance has improved. In September 2013, Girton was one of 18 Colleges in Cambridge to participate in a private placement which raised £150 million. Girton received £10 million, at favourable terms, and the funds are earmarked for the further development of College’s estate and tie into the exciting plans mentioned by the Mistress in her introduction. In the meantime the funds will be held in the College’s investment portfolio. Endowment Capital per Student Capital per Student 180000

4000000 135000

3000000

2000000

90000

1000000 45000

0 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

201 2011 1

2012

2013

A

0 2004

2005

2006

2007

Income Academic Fees and Charges

Girton College

Shortfall (Girton's Additional Expenditure on Education)

Cambridge Colleges Average

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014 F F/cast /cast

N

*From 2011 the Cambridge College Average includes an additional college

Academic fees and charges cover only 74% of the cost of educating our students. The endowment is therefore called upon to support the shortfall that the College faces in its core functions such as teaching posts, research fellowships and research expenses as well as scholarships, bursaries and student support of all kinds. Additionally the endowment supports all of the College’s precious facilities and collections.

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Girton is one of the largest Cambridge colleges when measured by its undergraduate body. It is also one of the younger Cambridge colleges, and these factors together result in a low endowment per student when compared to the college average. The forecast reflects performance to the end of December 2013, and the addition to the portfolio of the proceeds of sale of the graduate hostels following the completion of Ash Court.


Development

A Great Campaign In March 2012, the College launched its new and ambitious fundraising campaign to mark the 150th anniversary of the Foundation of the College in 2019. Our target of £50 million looks to raise funds through a mixture of donations and legacy pledges. To date we have raised just over £6 million and have been notified of a further £5.5 million of legacy pledges from alumni and supporters choosing to remember the College in their wills. Our target is ambitious but so are our plans; our aim is to secure a sustainable financial future for Girton. With your help, we can seize the opportunity to write a new chapter in this College’s inspiring story. What is it for? In 2012, our Campaign set out to underpin three important aspects of College life: financial sustainability, scholarly excellence and realising the potential of our buildings and grounds. With the completion of our new wing at Ash Court in summer 2013 (see page 16) we are now, for the time being at least, focusing our attention on fundraising to secure financial sustainability and underpin scholarly excellence. A Great Campaign for Financial Sustainability Girton is one of the largest of the Cambridge University colleges with a thriving community of almost 1,000 students, Fellows and staff. It is costly to run an institution which adds value to any degree, whilst supporting all-round personal development and encouraging students to reach their full potential during and beyond their time in Cambridge. The College’s endowment underpins everything that Girton seeks to achieve in this and other respects.

Why such a Great Campaign? In November 1867, author George Eliot (signing herself M.E. Lewes) wrote to Girton’s founder Emily Davies: a beginning made on a small scale, she urged would be a hindrance rather than a furtherance of the vision that would become Girton. An institution capable of transforming lives and changing the world needed ‘A Great Campaign’.

However, our endowment and investment assets together amount to less than half the Cambridge average when measured on a per student basis. This is partly a function of our history, since we are a relatively young College in Cambridge terms but have grown to be one of the largest in the second half of the 20th Century. However, to ensure a level playing field and attract the very best students we must be able to offer the best resources and the best opportunities. For this we urgently need your support in a number of areas, and several are highlighted below:

Unrestricted General Endowment Unrestricted gifts that boost the General Endowment Fund provide the College with the flexibility to direct the monies where they are most needed, and support our longer term plans. To date we have raised £4.2 million towards our total of £20 million for the unrestricted general endowment and in last year’s telephone campaign 55% of donations were directed towards this fund. Most of our major donors and the majority of those leaving a legacy also chose to donate to the unrestricted general endowment.

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Having served on the Investment Committee for over 10 years, I recognise the value of making an unrestricted gift to College which the Mistress and Fellows can use to fund the most pressing needs” Carol Bell (1977)

Personal Development Fund

Our priorities for the endowment include: attracting the best students regardless of background from within the UK and internationally; supporting young scholars to build their research careers; improving the infrastructure; keeping at the forefront of innovation in IT; building the many and varied collections (see pages 18 and 19); maintaining our heritage and improving the estate. Another area where we particularly value your help is in the provision of support to our students, be they undergraduate or graduate. Monies raised directly for student support eases pressure on the endowment to make up any funding shortfall in these areas: Undergraduate and Graduate Bursaries Donations towards our undergraduate bursaries enable us to offer support to students who are in financial need. A number of bursaries, such as the Emily Davies Bursaries, are made available on entry, to eligible undergraduates who might otherwise find taking up a place impossible. Bursaries are increasingly valuable given Girton’s commitment to

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widening participation and around one fifth of our undergraduates are reliant to some degree on a bursary. Girton has a lively graduate population of around 200 students and, as the Mistress notes, they form a central component of our vibrant academic community. Funding study and living expenses can be an inhibiting factor for many of those who wish to embark on a graduate course of study. Donations towards our various graduate bursaries enable us to offer support to as many of those students as possible on entry or during their time at the College. Even the very best graduates increasingly find obtaining funding challenging and highly competitive. Around one half of our graduates are reliant to some degree on a bursary. Academic Resources Fund Many undergraduate students need the help of our Academic Resources Fund at some point during their time at Girton to help buy textbooks, fund vital field trips or attend conferences; often the sums awarded to students are modest but they can and do make a difference at a crucial time in their lives.

We are a College that knows and takes an interest in every student and recognises the importance of supplementing excellent academic and pastoral support, with all round personal development. A donation to this Fund helps support a wide range of activities including the choir, music and those who represent their sport at a University level, and our numerous and thriving clubs and societies.

A Great Campaign for Scholarly Excellence Teaching Support Fund To date the Scholarly Excellence component of our Campaign has raised over £1 million and in previous years up to two thirds of funds raised in our telephone campaign have been donated to our Teaching Support Fund. These funds are vitally important; Girton’s education account has an annual shortfall of between £500,000 and £1 million, representing the difference between the funds received from student fees and the UK government and the necessary expenditure on College-based teaching. The Teaching Support Fund aims to endow Fellowships and therefore ensure that the education we provide for our students remains top-quality.


Development

Our Teaching Support Fund, which matches all donations on a 1:1 basis (thanks to the generosity of one of our leading donors), supports the teaching of our College-funded posts in Mathematics, Economics, English, History, Law and Modern and Medieval Languages. Other subjects also need your help – close to half of our undergraduates study Natural, Medical, Veterinary or Computer Sciences, or Engineering. To stay at the leading edge, our teaching offer must be flexible and generous. Every penny donated for Scholarly Excellence will be used to achieve this.

Ed Inns (far right) at the top of the Rockefeller Centre

Ed Inns is a second year PhD student, in 2013 he travelled to the United States and was supported by the Pillman Fund (one of our post graduate bursaries) and the Sidney and Marguerite Cody travel scholarship “Last summer I was invited to the New Jersey Centre for Biomaterials to take part in their international summer exchange research programme. I am two years into my PhD in Medical Materials which is focused on applying tissue-engineering techniques to blood transfusion. In particular, I am working as part of an interdisciplinary group of collaborators trying to develop a process of creating platelets for transfusion into platelet deficient patients. The international summer exchange programme takes graduate students from around the world and provides access to a research lab in New Jersey, in the United States. The prospect of broadening my research experience and hopefully discovering something new was only hampered by the need to fund my own transport. Fortunately, I was able to turn to Girton for assistance and was very grateful to receive funding from the Sidney and Marguerite Cody travel scholarship

and the Pillman Fund. This enabled me to travel to the US and spend two months in the research lab there. From a research perspective, the trip allowed me to trial equipment which was unavailable in our labs in Cambridge and to benefit from the diverse expertise of my fellow students. This led to avenues of investigation which might otherwise have been overlooked. Over the course of the trip I developed a tissue scaffold system and learnt a range of new tissue culture techniques. This line of research has since become one of the key tenets of my doctoral thesis. Looking at the trip from a personal perspective, it was enlightening to be immersed in the American way of life, I made many friends from around the world and was able to visit a number of interesting places on the east coast of the United States. Having always lived in the UK and studied for my undergraduate degree here I very much valued the experience of living abroad as one which will help inform my future career decisions. As I come to the end of my PhD I am increasingly looking at industrial opportunities here and in the US and I am very glad to have been able to travel as part of my studies."

Joining A Great Campaign Donate Directly We have made pleasing progress in the first two years of our Campaign and we are grateful to all of those who have been so generous to date. Please help us to maintain the momentum of the Campaign. Small gifts are every bit as important as large ones. Here are some examples of what could be achieved: If we can double the number of Friends of A Great Campaign that we currently have, we would add £1 million to the general endowment by the time that we reach our 150th anniversary. If 125 Girtonians gave just over £22 a month for three years we could literally double the size of our Academic Resources Fund or endow a further 4-6 student bursaries in perpetuity at a time when there is a rising need for student support. Gifts may take the form of lump sums, or can be given through regular donation. They can be received as cash, shares or financial instruments. Girton College is a charity, so giving is usually

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tax efficient. Donations are most effective when added to the unrestricted general endowment, though they may naturally also be directed to specific funds. Whether small or large, every gift is precious; every penny wisely spent. Donations can be made using the form with this Newsletter or online at www.girton.cam.ac.uk/giving. For more information about A Great Campaign or to talk about a specific fund or gift please contact our Development Office on +44 (0) 1223 766672. Leaving a Legacy Girton is quite literally built on bequests. For example, without the legacies of Jane Gamble, Lady Stanley of Alderley and Barbara Bodichon, today’s College would look and feel very different indeed. Legacies continue to play a key role; on average one third of donations each year are in the form of legacies. For more information on leaving a legacy to the College, please contact the

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Development Director on +44 (0) 1223 766672 or download our legacy brochure at www.girton.cam.ac.uk/legacy.

listed in the Development Newsletter (see page 28 to 34) and online each year (unless anonymity is requested).

Recognising your Generosity

We also celebrate and recognise your generosity in other ways:

Girton’s future depends on the success of A Great Campaign. So we must measure that success financially. But this is just the start. There are around 800 students in the College at any one time; yet Girton proper comprises more than 9,000 alumni and friends. This wider family is an important source of energy, identity and imagination that drives us forward. Joining a Great Campaign is about being part of the Girton community in every sense. To acknowledge your support, for the lifetime of A Great Campaign, we have established various ways of recognising and honouring our donors. For substantial gifts, donors’ names may be posted as inscriptions in a public area of the College, or they may choose to name Fellowships, scholarships, bursaries or prizes. All donors will be

• Individuals who donate £500, or who bring in conference business of £5,000, become Members of A Great Campaign. Members will receive an enamelled pin badge and will be invited to occasional special events including a biennial summer party (taking place this year on 21st June). The College is delighted that over 625 of our alumni and supporters are already Members of A Great Campaign; • Donors who give £500 or more will also be recorded on a donor board in Ash Court. • Alumni and supporters who pledge £10,000, or individuals who bring in conference business worth £100,000, will become Friends of A Great


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Campaign. Friends will receive a bronze lapel pin, and will be invited to the annual ceremony of the Commemoration of Benefactors and Foundation Dinner. • Donors who give £10,000 or more will also be recorded on a donor Board in the main College. The College is grateful to the more than 50 alumni and supporters who have already pledged £10,000 or more since the beginning of A Great Campaign. • Donors who pledge £100,000, or individuals who bring in conference business worth £1 million or more, will become Patrons of A Great Campaign. Patrons will receive a silver lapel pin, will be invited to the annual ceremony of the Commemoration of Benefactors and Foundation Dinner,

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and will also receive invitations to occasional special events hosted by the Mistress. • Donors who give £500,000 or more to Girton become eligible for election by the College Council to a Barbara Bodichon Foundation Fellowship. These Fellows are invited to a number of special events each year, are listed in the University Reporter, and will receive a gold lapel pin. • Anyone who indicates that they intend to leave a legacy to Girton becomes a member of the 1869 Society and the College is grateful to the very many alumni who have already indicated their intention to remember the College in their wills. The 1869 Society is named to recall the year of the College’s foundation,

and members and their partners are invited from time-to-time to events hosted by the Mistress to celebrate this fact and will receive a purple lapel pin. • Additionally donors to Girton who have given £250,000 are eligible to be nominated as members of the University Vice-Chancellor’s Circle. Donors who make gifts totalling £1 million or more are eligible to join the University Guild of Benefactors. Girton is extremely grateful to all of its donors and supporters. How ever you support A Great Campaign, whether by donating, leaving a legacy, or bringing in conference business, thank you for playing a vital role in securing the College’s future.


Development

Spotlight on Scholarly Excellence Dr Stuart Davis is an Official Fellow, a College Senior Teaching Officer in Spanish, and a Newton Trust Lecturer in the University’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese. His broad research interests are in contemporary Spanish literature and film and he is currently one of Girton’s Admissions Tutor as well as lead Director of Studies for Modern and Medieval Languages. The beginning of this academic year marked ten years since I arrived at Girton, freshly armed with a PhD for my first full-time lectureship. I last wrote for the Development Newsletter half that time ago, in 2008, since when there have been some changes (not least my appearance, to which I’m sure the photo testifies!). MML at Girton continues to thrive. Currently we have 26 undergraduates on the course, studying all the languages available in the Tripos and engaged not only in language acquisition and use but studying linguistics, film, history, philosophy, art, as well as great works of literature of course. In 2012 we bade farewell to our Bye-Fellow in French, Fionnùala Sinclair, and to Gabriele Natali, Language Teaching Officer in the Italian department, but were delighted to welcome Gabriele’s replacement Dr Claudia Domenici. Judith Drinkwater continues to provide sterling support in directing studies (as well as being Director of Studies for the new full Linguistics Tripos), and we currently enjoy the company of Amaleena Damlé in her final year as a Research Fellow in French. In 2011 I was delighted to be awarded promotion to Senior Lectureship in the inaugural year of the College’s career development scheme for College Teaching Officers. At the same time my first sole-authored monograph came into the world, Writing and Heritage in Contemporary Spain; work is now underway on the second! I was thrilled last year to be appointed to the Admissions Tutor role in College,

following in the footsteps of Sandra Fulton and Veronica Bennett who have moved on to other roles, as Senior Tutor and as Secretary to Council and Fellow for Communications respectively. I write half way through my first year in post, just after the main interview and admissions period which has been an exhilarating but enjoyable experience. Widening participation work was for me clearly an attractive aspect of the role. Although it was just over twenty years ago, I still remembering sitting in an office in my Sixth Form College’s library, discussing my options for university study. The Careers Advisor suggested that my GCSE grades made me a possible candidate for Oxford or Cambridge. Whilst flattered, my instant reaction was negative – there was no way that I would be good enough; I didn’t have the kind of extra-curricular activities they wanted; I would be the first in my family to go to university and Oxbridge was no place for the workingclass; didn’t it cost more to go there anyway? My parents shared my suspicions and the advisor declined to push the idea further. When I finally arrived at Girton ten years later I realised my foolishness, not that I wanted to rewrite the past and erase my time at Birmingham, but because I should have at least explored Oxford and Cambridge as possibilities and perhaps made an application instead of believing the stereotypes. Since those days the world of higher education has changed rapidly and for many reasons it is more important than ever to dispel those myths and continue Girton’s history as a pioneer in education equality.

Our HE+ scheme (www.myheplus.com) with schools in the West Midlands has been running with great success for several years now, with the largest participation rate and greatest breadth of subjects of all the Cambridge Colleges participating in the scheme. It is a privilege to build on Sandra’s work in independently establishing a similar scheme with our Camden link area schools, the first talk to over 100 sixth formers taking place in early December 2013. A-level students from both areas will be coming to Girton for tours, activities and academic Masterclasses near Easter time. The Schools Liaison Assistant, Laura Parkin, and I continue to keep busy visiting schools and higher education events while also receiving visits from school groups and individuals; Laura and I are always on the lookout for new ventures and will be pleased to hear from alumni working in education or with a particular interest in our work.

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Girton Telethon 2013 Girton’s 13th annual telephone campaign took place over the Easter Vacation and an amazing 70% of Girtonians called made a gift, one of the highest telethon giving rates in the UK. Our enthusiastic team of 12 student callers spoke to over 600 alumni from around the world, sharing stories of their time at Girton and chatting about the College’s future plans. We raised a fantastic £150,000 for A Great Campaign thanks to the dedicated support of our alumni, many of whom contacted us to say how much they valued speaking to one of our current students and being involved with Girton in this way. Once again, a huge thank you! A Telethon Caller Talks The annual telethon is an invaluable way for present students to connect with past students and fellow students, as Cora Hardy (2009, MML) explains:

When I applied for the 2013 Telethon, the prospect of having to ask alumni for money seemed pretty daunting, especially for someone who even avoided calling for a takeaway if she could help it! Nevertheless, I’d heard there would be chocolate biscuits and I had a dissertation to write so the Telethon seemed like the perfect way to structure my time outside of term. What I hadn’t counted on was the warmth and fondness with which people thought of their alma mater.

Cora Hardy

Whether those we contacted were able to give or not, they had some fantastic stories about Girton ranging from memories of the Wolfie brunch to beds being moved out into corridors when male visitors were around, and climbing

through windows when the front gate was locked. It was inspiring to hear some of the things others had gone on to do after their time at Girton and I was even invited to stay with one lady who had, like me, been a linguist and now lived in Malaga. I felt I really grew in confidence during the Telethon and made some wonderful friends among the other callers. The whole experience really brought home how special it was to be a part of the Girton network and I can’t wait to take part in it again this year and learn more about the college in which I have now spent 5 years enduring the (sometimes painful!) early morning cycle ride into town.

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Ash Court Our new wing at Ash Court is now complete and has received a fantastic reaction from residents (in 2013-2014, mainly second and third year undergraduates) and visitors alike. The wing, which was officially opened in October 2013 by Lady Hale, the College Visitor and Deputy President of the Supreme Court, took 18 months to build and came in under budget at £8.5 million. Ash Court provides Girton College with fifty en-suite study bedrooms, including six wheelchair accessible rooms, six new kitchens and a laundry. In addition, Ash Court now acts as the sports and leisure hub for the College with new gym facilities, an erg room, changing rooms, and a rejuvenated swimming pool and squash court. Ash Court was designed by architects Allies and Morrison who are no strangers to the College having previously produced our prizewinning Library and

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Archive. The project underlines Girton’s historic commitment to providing excellent education set within facilities that offer a unique space for thought within Cambridge University. Although the facility is primarily for students, the provision of en-suite rooms to a hospitality standard also opens up a new, high-end conference market for the College, offering the possibility of additional revenues from the conference business during the summer. As the Mistress, Professor Susan J. Smith, commented at the opening event, “One of the marvellous achievements of the Ash Court development is that it carries a trace of our Victorian past into clean lines of an environmentally sustainable 21st Century”. Ash Court retains a key concept implemented by Girton College’s original architect, Alfred Waterhouse, who established the principle that it should be possible to walk from any part of the main College buildings to another without the need to venture outside.

Two key themes define Ash Court. Firstly, the design seeks to extend and reinforce Girton’s unique architectural language in a contemporary manner. Secondly, the project is one of the most energy efficient student accommodation buildings in the UK.

Boost our Business The new development of Ash Court has added significantly to our conference and events offering providing superb accommodation opportunities (when students are not in residence) for bed and breakfast guests, those attending weddings or private events, and for conference delegates. At any time of year the main College offers expansive grounds, plentiful free parking, fully licensed rooms for civil ceremonies and partnerships, and the perfect blend of historical and modern facilities. There has never been a better opportunity to return to College, or


Development

extend an invitation to your company or association to make Girton College your host venue for their next event. Specialising in the provision of day meetings, smaller residential meetings in the summer vacation, and bed and breakfast bookings, Wolfson Court is a quiet, modern venue offering a full range of facilities, close to the city centre but with all the advantages of on-site parking and easy access to transport links.

Lady Hale (the College Visitor), and the Mistress unveiling the Ash Court Stone at the Grand Opening

Helping us “boost our business” to the limits of our capacity – to your friends, colleagues and associates – helps us improve our income and ultimately support our endowment. For more information, contact our Conferences Office on +44 (0)1223 338975 or conferences@girton.cam.ac.uk

Sports Pavilion Ash Court was not the only building project completed in 2013. In June Girton welcomed, Fellows, alumni, staff and students to the official opening of the John Marks Pavilion. A lunch hosted by the Mistress and where attendees

heard from distinguished alumna, Professor Sarah Springman (1975), followed a ribbon cutting ceremony, and the day was rounded off with a friendly cricket match between ‘Fellows & Staff’ and ‘Alumni & Students’. The Pavilion was designed by Pleasance Hookham and Nix, and built by Cocksedge Building Contractors Ltd, and offers two changing rooms, an umpire’s changing room and a social space. Its construction was made possible almost entirely thanks to the warm generosity of Girton alumni, with over 800 contributing to the project.

L – R: The Mistress, Dr Marks and guest speaker, Professor Sarah Springman (1975), at the opening of the new Sports Pavilion

recognition of his support to the College and his role in the promotion of sport at all levels. Dr Marks, an English Trial Cap (Hockey) 1946-47, coached cricket and hockey at College and University level, and for many years he had responsibility for both the men's and women's Boat Races.

The Pavilion is named after Life Fellow and one of the first male Fellows admitted to Girton, Dr John Marks, in

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Girton Newsletter 17


Cultral Heritage

Old Friends You encounter works of art wherever you go in Girton – from the exquisite Vannuccio diptych, the Stanley Spencer Cookham paintings, the Winifred Nicholsons, the fine collection of Russian icons donated by Diana Lorch (Robinson 1940), the Pre-Raphaelite Munro busts, the Sentinel in Woodlands Court commissioned from Christine Fox in memory of Alison Fairlie (Fellow from 1944), the Girton Column recently commissioned from Paul de Monchaux as the public art associated with the new Ash Court building, and, of course, the People’s Portraits exhibition. Girton is rich in the diversity of its collections, whether they be works of art, antiquities, or the many fine collections in the College libraries and archive. This cultural heritage is one we owe initially to our founders, but thereafter to generations of benefactors and supporters. Members of Girton take pride in this tradition, and draw daily pleasure and inspiration from the added dimension that these collections offer us. Girton has a strong tradition of engagement with the arts and a generosity of vision. Barbara Leigh Smith Bodichon, herself a distinguished painter, as well as a social reformer and campaigner for women’s rights and education, was one of the early benefactors who set the whole thing going by attracting gifts and donations of books and works of art to Girton from contemporaries, such as Ruskin, Eliot and the Darwins. The various collections of antiquities and artefacts in the Lawrence Room (apart from the Girton site excavated finds) have been given to the College over the years, and many pieces are regarded as among the finest of their kind in the world. The College has also enjoyed many fruitful collaborations in the arts throughout its history. We have hosted the Kettle’s Yard resident Fellow in Art here on at least two occasions, and in 2013 we welcomed our own Girton College Artist in Residence, a post

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enabled once again by the generosity of benefactors past and present. We host the ever-expanding People’s Portraits collection, which we curate and exhibit in partnership with the Royal Society of Portrait Painters. Open to the public every day, its depiction of ordinary people from all walks of life chimes perfectly with Girton’s ethos of diversity and equal opportunity. For over 20 years the network of Friends organisations has given alumni an opportunity to focus their support on particular areas of College life. Although these groups are now being disbanded so as to streamline fundraising efforts, the College recognises that it should blow the trumpet on its many cultural assets, and is firmly committed to continue offering opportunities to showcase them and encourage access. What have in the past been the annual events for Friends of the Library, the Lawrence Room, the People's Portraits and the Gardens will therefore continue to take place under a revised heading, each one celebrating aspects of these core collections. These events will welcome alumni and other interested parties and will continue to take place over the September Alumni weekend. The last two years of the People’s Portraits receptions are a prime example of what we hope to offer in future. In 2012 Toby Wiggins presented his portrait of retired Dorset shepherd, Larry

Skeats. David Starkey was our speaker at the reception, and discussed the art and principles of portraiture, with particular reference to the Tudors. In 2013 John Walton presented his portrait of Stuart Thorne, tailor and bee-keeper, and he and Stuart described the process of painting and being painted, which, Stuart explained, was not unlike tailoring. Our speaker was the art critic, Martin Gayford, whose book Man with a Blue Scarf described his experience of being painted by Lucian Freud. The Library event in 2013 saw writer and Girtonian, Christina Koning, talking about her work, and in particular her most recent novel Variable Stars which looks at the life of the eighteenthcentury astronomer Caroline Herschel. Christina is an award-winning novelist and short story writer, and is currently the Royal Literary Fund Fellow at Newnham. Caroline Herschel was sister to Sir William Herschel, Astronomer to George III, and worked as his assistant, receiving a stipend from the King. Herschel discovered several comets, one of which bears her name, whilst the crater on the Moon C.Herschel is also named after her. She was awarded the gold medal from the Royal Astronomical Society in 1828 and made an Honorary member in 1835, alongside Mary Somerville – the first honorary women members. Her great niece, Lady Hamilton Gordon, whose sister Constance came up to Girton in 1874, gave the medal to


Cultral Heritage

Top row: Girton apples; Life Fellow Dr Ruth Williams, with author Wendy Holden (1983) and the Mistress; Anglo-Saxon pots Middle row: Librarian Frances Gandy with author Christina Koning (1972); Lawrence Room artefacts; Dr Catherine Hills, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Cambridge and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries Bottom row: Honeysuckle walk; Stuart Thorne, tailor and bee-keeper by John Walton RP

the College, and we brought the medal to the talk for all to see. To add to the day’s packed programme of events, the Lawrence Room Committee welcomed Dr Catherine Hills, Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at Cambridge and Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries, to give a talk about the significance of decoration on early Anglo-Saxon pots. Dr Hills has worked extensively on the Spong Hill site in Norfolk where over 2,500 such pots have been excavated, and has recently published Spong Hill IX in the series of McDonald Institute Monographs. She wove into her talk references to the pots in Girton’s own Anglo-Saxon collection, which may, of course, be seen in the Lawrence Room, along with other finds excavated from the Girton site. The following day attendees gathered in the Stanley Library to hear author Wendy Holden (1983) speak about her passion

for horticulture, and her experiences restoring the gardens in her Derbyshire home back to their former Victorian glory. The support of the Friends over the years has made all the difference to the enhancement, conservation and deployment of our collections. Without that support we should not have been able to refurbish the Lawrence Room to a state-of-the-art museum – now open to the public and welcoming scholars and schoolchildren alike. Without it we would not have had the award-winning Duke Building, and the Library collections would have struggled to cope whenever new Tripos subjects were introduced. Without it we could not have undertaken the ambitious venture of People’s Portraits. Under the revised structure these areas of College life are now properly

underpinned by the College’s budgeting system, supported by our endowment, which of course still relies heavily on the support of alumni. That said, those alumni and supporters who wish to continue to donate directly to support our cultural heritage are most welcome to do so. Please do contact the Development Office if you wish to discuss donating to a specific aspect of College life rather than the endowment. Girton’s cultural heritage means a great deal to all our alumni and the College welcomes your continued support, involvement and, most of all, your friendship. We shall hope to welcome you at the next set of cultural events in 2014, which we are confident will be just as rich a cavalcade as those that have gone before. Frances Gandy, December 2013

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Girton Newsletter 19


Alumni Events

Alumni Events The College events programme continues to go from strength to strength and we were delighted to host around 1800 alumni and guests in the last academic year at a wide variety of events in College, in the UK and internationally and the trend continues into 2013/14. The summer holiday period witnessed a variety of events. From the residence of the Ambassador to the UK Mission to the United Nations in Geneva, to the Globe Theatre in London to watch Blue Stockings with around 90 members of the London Girton Association, each event was a unique opportunity for Girtonians to meet, renew friendships, and talk to representatives of the College. The renowned Chapel Choir also toured the US and Canada in late summer, visiting four cities, performing to a variety of audiences – including alumni – and spreading the spirit of Girton and Cambridge far and wide. In September we continued the regular programme of reunions welcoming back groups from 1983, 1984, 1988, 1989, 1993, 1994 and 2004. In a change to previous occasions several groups were invited back in consecutive years; this new format was well received and we plan to continue this pattern. The annual Roll of Alumni Weekend followed and was jam packed with talks, exhibitions, a preview of Ash Court, and a concert (for the talks see the report on pages 18 and 19). The Roll of Alumni Dinner was presided over by the Mistress and we welcomed reunion groups from 1953, 1973 and

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1978. Altogether in September over 500 alumni and guests attended an event which is a remarkable number. The start of Michaelmas Term saw the opening of Ash Court to great fanfare (see pages 16 and 17 for photographs and more) and the inaugural Economics Dinner. We were delighted that Girton Fellow, Professor of Economics & Organisation and Director of the MBA Programme at the Judge Business School, Professor Jochen Runde was the guest speaker and he entertained those present with a fascinating history of Economics and Girton and the people involved. A very special thank you as well to Elizabeth Werry (1955), the 1950s decade representative, for hosting a lively event for contemporaries in Dulwich in December. Sport and sporting occasions are still a strong feature in the Events Calendar with alumni vs students matches in cricket and football taking place (see pages 26 and 27). In addition the Infidel

The year of 1963 at their reunion lunch

Boat Club held its annual dinner at the Oxford and Cambridge Club, London. 2014 promises to be every bit as busy, please see the back cover for information about forthcoming events and do get in touch if you have any event suggestions.

The Chaplain Dr Malcolm Guite with Beatrice Hines (1972) and her son David, San Diego


Alumni Events

Dr Sabesan Sithamparanathan with Jayne McAllister (1981) and her husband Michael in Orlando, FL.

Life Fellow Cherry Hopkins chats to alumni at the Law and Finance Reception 2013

Karen Pierce (1978) with the Mistress in Geneva

Rachel Lomax (1963) speaks at the Law and Finance Reception 2013

Guests at the Law and Finance Reception 2013

Aileen McLeish (1976) with Jessica Swale

The Mistress and Blue Stockings playwright Jessica Swale at The Globe Theatre

Alumni representatives at the Students and Parents Dinner

Girtonians enjoying dessert with the Mistress and Development Director in Los Angeles, CA.

Dr Ruth Williams with Girtonians at the Mathematics Dinner

Girtonians at a reception ahead of seeing a performance of Blue Stockings

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Girton Newsletter 21


Alumni Events

Edinburgh L-R: Lindsay Morison (2008), Franceska Van Dijk (1983), Claire Nichols (2005)

Girton College Chapel Choir on tour in London, Ontario 2013

Edinburgh: L-R Christina PaulsonEllis (1958), Lady Atiyah (1949), The Mistress

Girtonians at the Wales Millenium Centre, Cardiff

Guests at the opening of the John Marks Sports Pavilion

By the Golden Gate Bridge: The Mistress and Development Director with Girtonians in San Francisco, CA.

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Alumni (top) and the Bursar, Debbie Lowther (bottom), at Manchester Art Gallery, 2013

Old Boys vs Students Football Match 2012


Prizes

Prizes Hammond Science Communication Prize 2013 The sixth annual Girton Hammond Science Communication Prize took place in February 2013 in front of a large and enthusiastic audience of students, Fellows and guests. This year the contestants were asked to present on the theme RESOLUTION. Their chosen topics included chiral resolution in drug development, the imaging of viruses, inflammation, cognitive bias and an explanation of why it is not possible to see your house from space. Participants were asked to present their ideas with a time limit of eight minutes, using a maximum of five slides, and with a target audience of educated sixth formers in mind. The use of props and other visual aids was encouraged: a football and a skipping rope were featured this year! The College was delighted that Dr Phil Hammond (1981), after whom the prize has been named, was able to attend the evening and lead the judging panel. The other judges were Professor Abigail Fowden,

Dr Phil Hammond (1981) with contestants and props.

Dr Liliana Janik, Dr Morag Hunter and Dr Ruth Warren. David Fischer (2011, Natural Sciences) won both the first prize and the audience prize for his presentation on

‘Subtomogram averaging – a closer look at viruses’. It was a very informative and entertaining evening where all the speakers were highly commended so many thanks to all those who were involved.

Jane Martin Prize for Poetry 2013 The College’s national poetry prize, the Jane Martin Poetry Prize, continues to go from strength to strength with over 2,000 poems entered for the prize in 2013. The prize was created by Sir Laurence Martin in memory of his daughter, who read Classics at Girton from 1978-1981, and derived great pleasure from writing poetry. The judges, who included Dame Gillian Beer, Dr Caroline Bergvall and Dr Edward Holberton, were faced with

a genuinely tough field. They chose London-based poet Jen Campbell as the winner for her poetry’s combination of energy and skilfulness, and its delight in spoken language. To hear Jen read three of the poems that made up her winning entry please see our website: www.girton.cam.ac.uk/janemartin-poetry-prize.

The Mistress with winner Jen Campbell

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Girton Newsletter 23


Prizes

Mountford Humanities and Arts Communication Prize The Mountford Humanities and Arts Communication Prize was established in 2012, thanks to the generosity of Girtonian Margaret Mountford (Gamble, 1970). The most recent competition took place in late November, 2013. This year’s theme ‘Translating the Object’ saw the entrants present to an audience of Fellows, students and the eponymous Dr Mountford. The brief requires the entrants to take ‘the specialist, esoteric and complex and make them accessible and engaging’, a key factor in good communications. This year topics ranged far and wide, from Viking boats, to microscopes and the many items in Windsor Castle. Students presented their chosen topic in a strict time limit of eight minutes and answered lively audience questioning thereafter. Congratulations go to Aleksander Musialam, a Classics undergraduate in his first year, who won the Judges’ Prize,

the Abstract prize and the Audience Prize for his talk on a Polish book, published in 1918, that he found in the College library. Congratulations also go to Suzanne Mesoy, a fourth year Biological Scientist, who jointly won the Judges’ prize and to Josie Teale, a third year law student and last year’s winner, who jointly won the Audience Prize. The winning abstract by Aleksander Musialam follows: ‘The object I have chosen does not come from a museum in a direct sense. I prefer to interpret it more broadly, as the House of Muses rather than a mere area with showcases and descriptions. It is a book called 24 Obrazki z Dziejów Polski (24 Images from the Polish History), published in 1918 in Lvov, that I accidentally found in the depths of the Extension of our library. Therefore I should translate it to the audience in both literary and metaphorical way. It is a

book for children, with big letters and numerous pictures, telling legendary stories from the past of my nation. I was truly moved reading it as I myself used to read books of this kind in primary school. However, some issues made me think more rationally about its exceptional value. In fact it was one of few Polish books printed before the Second World War I ever saw. It may be surprising for a British that such things in my country are literally inaccessible to an average citizen because of the grave damages we suffered in the last century. It also presents the image of Poland not anticipating the upcoming future, nor coping with traumas and ideological division that are present today. It has survived in Girton, which played a role of a time capsule letting me have an insight into the lost world. The world that remains intact in its microscale on shelves of the Extension wing in our library.’

Fellow in Archaeology and Anthropolgy, Dr Liliana Janik (L), with Margaret Mountford (centre) and contestants

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Sport

Sport and Girton Sport is an important part of Girton’s history and remains a strong feature of the College today. Many alumni remember their sporting endeavours and achievements fondly and developed strong and lasting bonds through sport while at College. The recent development of the sports facilities, now some of the best in Cambridge, provides us with an opportunity to offer more opportunities for alumni teams and events. Our established alumni teams – currently rugby, football, cricket and netball – are also in need of players. If you are not currently on their mailing lists and wish to be please contact alumni@girton.cam.ac.uk. The Girton Alumni Sports Association (GASA) is active in promoting sport among alumni, and between alumni and existing students, and also organises regular networking lunches

in central London. The Infidel Boat Club is Girton’s alumni boat club, the club endeavours to encourage networking between alumni who used to row, support GCBC and promote rowing more broadly. Again please contact alumni@girton.cam.ac.uk to be put in touch with either GASA or the Infidels or visit www.facebook.com/girtonsports. College sports clubs are always eager for support in all sorts of ways, be it in the form of donations or expertise. In particular, if you felt able to sponsor a team the Development Office would be delighted to help.

GCBC World Record Ergathon From noon on Saturday 11th until midday on Sunday 12th January, 2014, GCBC set a new Concept 2 Ultradistance Erg World Record. 23 rowing club members past and present joined forces in the new Sports Pavilion for a 24 hour Ergathon. The record was completed on one rowing machine, with the individuals taking part switching a total of 2,401 times to keep up the momentum. The ultimate achievement; 396,210 metres rowed, with an average split per 500 metres of 1 minute 49 seconds, a new world record. Apart from being a lot of fun and hard work, GCBC used the ergathon to raise money from alumni and supporters and

were also successful in securing a new sponsor in the process. All of this helps to cover GCBC’s day-to-day running costs and should allow the purchase of new equipment. Very many thanks to all of those who supported GCBC.

Blues Honours Book The opening of the Sports Pavilion in 2013, saw the completion of another significant project, the Blues Honours book. The brainchild of Dr John Marks, the four year project was undertaken by Dr Marks and the Development Office, with particular support from Tamsin Elbourn and Peter Sparks. Especially hand bound in leather shaded pantone 557C (the appropriate shade of light blue), the book lists every Girtonian since 1880 who has received a full or half Blue in a sport and all of those who have played sport at an international level since 1903. The lists were compiled from a variety of sources and over 500 alumni were contacted to verify and improve the accuracy of the information. The 1957 matriculants scored particularly highly with 23 of them being awarded Blues, closely followed by the 1964 matriculants who received 21 Blues between them. The Blues Book is on display in the Archive. Our aim is to keep the book updated as each cohort of Blues and half Blues build on the successes of the 1000 names already contained within its pages.

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Girton Newsletter 25


Sport

Old Boys versus Students Cricket Match 16 June, 2013 – students won by around 66 runs On a day that ended in glorious bright sunshine, another great day’s cricket took place in the tranquil grounds of Girton College, Cambridge. Having padded up in the splendid new Girton sports pavilion completed only 3 days before, the Girton undergrads batted first and it quickly became apparent to the Old Boys that this was going to be a tough game, with 4 Blues /University 2nd team players in their lineup. Girton’s opening batsmen set about the OB opening bowlers Tiggy Bee & Tom Hargreaves (both 1999 vintage) with some venom. With the first bowling change came the first breakthrough, Girton’s no 2 bat being caught by David Tysoe (2008) off the bowling of last year’s Old Boys hero Stephen Antill (2006). After the first 10 overs, the run rate was ticking along at 7 an over, and at this stage the Girton team were looking at posting a big score. Soon however, the OBs started to find a bit of line and length, a couple of wickets fell, and things started to steady. Hargreaves finished his 8 over spell with style and then two more left handed bowlers Rohit Trivedi (2001) and Tim Earl (1985) took over, Earl clean bowling Girton’s classy opening batsman for 43 (sorry, had to get that in!). Martin Clark (1986) kept wicket brilliantly throughout, and

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OBs captain Ali Welch (2005) commanded his troops valiantly with imaginative fielding placements, a steady change of bowlers, and rousing team speeches whenever a Girton wicket fell. Owing to a couple of late no-shows, Girton were in danger of running out of batsmen, but they saw through their 40 overs with a commanding score of 213-6. After a delicious tea (good job whoever organised that), the OBs openers Welch and Rob Myers (1987) went into bat. The undergrads got off to a flyer, with a first ball duck for a disappointed Welch. In went Clark who, along with Myers, started to put a few runs on the board. Runs accumulation was slow in the face

of pacey and very accurate bowling from the two Cambridge 2nd XI opening bowlers. With a challenging required run rate of 5.5 an over, it wasn’t long before the OBs started to fall behind, and this pressure told, with wickets falling steadily. There was a brief glimmer of hope for the OBs with a swashbuckling 50 from Earl including a glorious six (that one’s for you, Hacking), but ultimately the Girton total proved too much for the OBs who were all out for 147 (ish). Not quite the exciting finish of last year, perhaps, but still a really enjoyable game played in lovely grounds - and even the weather was kind to us. Tim Earl (1985)


Sport

Old Boys versus Students Football Match 30 November, 2013 – the first Old Boys win for some time Beautiful pitches and a bracing autumnal day greeted the players for the annual Old Boys Football Match which took place on the last weekend of November 2013. A brave few supporters, including staunch ally of College sport Dr John Marks, huddled on the side line and cheered on the two teams in what was a spirited match. The Old Boys defence was strong and

they triumphed with a final score of “3.5 to nil”, the first victory for the alumni team in a number years! The match was followed by an afternoon tea in the bar and a trophy presentation. Very many thanks to both the alumni and the student captains, Chris Kingcombe (2007) and Joe Pennell (2012), for their fantastic efforts and thank you to all the players and supporters.

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Girton Newsletter 27


Donors

Donors to the College 2012-13 The College is extremely grateful to all the following for their support. Donors from 1 July 2012 – 30 June 2013 are listed below; donors from July 2013 will be listed next year. In addition to those listed below, our thanks also go to all donors who wish to remain anonymous. * This year we have listed donors by matriculation year, and have additionally shown the “participation rate” for each year – which is the percentage of living addressable alumni making a gift within the year. Names in italic type indicate a legacy. Mrs B Pepper (Siddons) Dr J Robinson (Callow) Dr J Trusted (Turner) Dr R van't Hoff (Cooper)

Class of 1924 Mrs A Maddox (McLaren) Class of 1932 Mrs V Garner (Clague) Miss M Shaw

Class of 1944 Mrs P Broomhead (Wagstaff) Mrs M Child (Bond) Mrs P Gilbert (Philp) Miss J Knight Mrs B Norman (Welch) Mrs M Pinsent (Bowen) Miss O Searles Mrs B Sloman (Pilkington-Rogers) Mrs V Williams (Grubb)

Class of 1933 Mrs D Bramwell (Bradford) Class of 1934 Miss J Macaulay Class of 1935 Miss E Chadwick Miss J Mangold Mrs J Westwood (Murrant)

Class of 1945 Mrs A Bassett (James) Miss M Chevallier Lady Elliott (O Butler) Mrs M Hill (Bell) Mrs J Humphreys (Bosomworth) Mrs C Kerr (Fillmore) Mrs H Kingsley Brown (Sears) Mrs J Mothersill (Brock) Mrs A Page (Savory) Mrs D Sykes (White)

Class of 1936 Anonymous Mrs M Tyndall (Blench) Class of 1937 Miss D Scott Class of 1938 Miss K Auty Miss M Cox

Class of 1946 Mrs B Dixon (Stone) Mrs L Grant (Belton) Mrs W Hunt (Hunt) Miss S Lightburne Mrs M Presland (Rising)

Class of 1939 Mrs J Abraham (Cole) Dr M Metcalfe (Davies) Class of 1940 Mrs S Brooks (Foster-Smith) Dr M Brown Lady D Hopkin (Whitaker) Mrs R Winegarten (Aarons) Class of 1941 Mrs J Sears (Tulley) Mrs S Seddon (Proudlock-Dunbar) Class of 1942 Mrs P Churchill (Harwood) Mrs C Critchley (Harding) Mrs M Cundall (Pritchard) Miss M Evans Mrs A Finch (Dickson) Mrs I Goodwin (Simon) Mrs A Sinnhuber (Daubercies) Class of 1943 Dr R Brooke (Clark) and Professor C Brooke Miss R Cooper Mrs Z Freeth (Dickson) Mrs C Heptonstall (Smith) Dr M Lyon Mrs A Nowell (Giles)

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Class of 1947 Mrs N Ball (Hulton) Mrs B Barnett (Hurlock) Mrs M Broadbent (Muir) Mrs R Collins (Mottershead) Mrs M Conn (Sumner) Miss J Dannatt Mrs R Felton (Holt) Professor H Francis (Wright) Dr J Hockaday (Fitzsimons) Mrs J Jolowicz (Stanley) Dr P Talalay (Samuels) Dr M Thomas (Hern) Mrs P Wilson (Knight) Class of 1948 Dr S Beare (Reed) Dr J Brady Miss P Bruce Mrs R Buckley (Williams) Lady Chilver (C Grigson) Dr I Ferguson (McLaren) Mrs J Goddard To' Puan C Lau-Gunn (Gunn)

Mrs S Lock (Walker) Mrs P Marsh (Holland) and Mr D Marsh Mrs D Mayes (Law) Mrs M Morgan (Bryant) Dr M Rendel Mrs M Ross-Bell (Hungerford) Mrs J Statham (Lansdown) Mrs S Tyler (Morris) Class of 1949 Lady Atiyah (L Brown) and Sir Michael Atiyah Mrs A Atkinson (Barrett) Mrs M Bryan (Grant) Mrs E Bullock (Pomeroy) Mrs J Cartwright (Edmonds) Miss J Harington Mrs J Hewlett (Williams) Mrs M Hodgkinson (Wass) Mrs R Howell (Griffin) Miss G Lloyd Dr J Lloyd-Thomas (Baron) Lady Mellon (P Hartley) and Sir James Mellon Mrs M Milkman (Friedenthal) Professor V Minogue (Hallett) Dr J Orrell (Kemp) Dr V Pearson (Mercer) Baroness P Perry (Welch) Mrs R Preston (Tuson) Dr M Snook (Butler) Mrs B Stacey (Smith) Dr V van der Lande Class of 1950 Participation Rate: 21% * The Hon Mrs J Alchin (Hankey) Mrs M Betteridge (Johnston) Dr A Chapman (Peter) Mrs R Dams (Bailey) Mrs D Dennis (Hinnels) Mrs D Henwood (Schroeder) Mrs M Holloway (Copple) Miss S Lesley Mrs M Owen (Baron) Mrs J Schofield (Plowman) Mrs S Stanley (Wright) Mrs J Towle (Barbour) Mrs S Turner (Davis) Dr P Watney (Lachelin) Class of 1951 Participation Rate: 27% * Anonymous Dr R Bailey Mrs R Bennett (Appleton) Lady Chandler (L Buxton) Miss C Crump Mrs D Darke (Meyer) Mrs A Graham (Burton) Dr M Howatson (Craven)


Donors

Mrs J Lyon (Hill-Smith) Mrs M Macey (Denton) Ms S Marsden (Marsden-Smedley) Mrs A Oldroyd (Holloway) Mrs G Scales (Grimsey) Mrs R Smart (Armstrong) Miss B Stephenson Mrs P Ward (Nobes) Mrs H Wright (Mingins) Dr E Wyatt Class of 1952 Participation Rate: 30% * Anonymous Dr M Bull (Huse) Miss J Butler Mrs A Carey (Patrick) Mrs J Foord (Greenacre) Ms M Gilbert Miss R Hadden Mrs R Harris (Barry) Mrs J Hurst (Kohner) Mrs A Linklater-Betley (Linklater) Mrs B Marshall (Golding) Mrs M Mitchell (Allen) Mrs S Neish (Smith) Mrs J Roskill (Cooke) Mrs P Ross (Davies) Mrs J Saunders (Todd) Mrs N Schaffer (Thomas) Mrs C Skinner (Wheatley) Mrs P Souter (Baker) Mrs I Wiener (Pollak) Mrs J Wood (Felton) Mrs J Wynne Willson (Calvert) Class of 1953 Participation Rate: 28% * Anonymous Mrs S Alderson (Heard) Mrs A Attree (Chapman) Dr M Barnes (Sampson) Mrs B Bishop (Baker) The Revd L Brown Mrs E Cooper (Gray) Miss G Curnow Dr E Dobie (Marcus) Mrs K Larkin (Gibson) and Mr M Larkin Mrs J Marshallsay (Hall-Smith) Mrs P Maryfield (Cowgill) Mrs J Ogborn (MacKereth) Mrs B Plummer (Lobb) Lady Reid (M Kier) Mrs J Round (Baum) Mrs J Shipley (Leeman) Mrs R Thorpe (Garton) Mrs R Wintle (Frye) Mrs C Wood (Osler) Class of 1954 Participation Rate: 26% * Mrs A Burley (Snow) Mrs V Carroll (Jordan) The Rev H Catton (Middleton) Dr M Corley (Doddridge) Dr M Cox (Whichelow) Mrs L Dixon (Moffatt) Mrs E Fenwick (Roberts) Mrs A Franklin (Glossop) Mrs R Goring (Blake) Mrs J Jordan (Hogbin) Mrs D Lees-Jones (Nayler) Miss M McNulty Lady Nicholls (J Thomas) Mrs H Silk (Wallace) Mrs D Stallard (Randall)

Mrs F Strong (Ranger) Ms M Swanwick (Richardson) Mrs D Woolley (McGrath) Class of 1955 Participation Rate: 32% * Anonymous Mrs A Alexander (Coulton) Mrs J Anstice (Williams) Mrs P Bainbridge (Lawrence) Mrs J Barker (Cotton) Mrs J Cardell Lawe (Cardell) Mrs R Edwards (Moore) Mrs D Geliot (Stebbing) Mrs M Goodrich (Bennett) Mrs G Graham (Kerr) Dr B Hammerton (Mann) Dame Rosalyn Higgins (Cohen) Mrs S Holmans (Edge) Mrs B Isaac (Miller) Mrs C McLean (Lithgow) Miss G Minter Mrs G Parr (Loft) Mrs A Preston (Walmsley) Mrs J Rodden (Wilkins) Mrs M Ross (Wilkinson) and Mr N Ross Dr B Thomson (Bland) Mrs D Thorp (Galbraith) Mrs S Threlfall (Jackson) Mrs C Vigars (Walton) Dr J Wade (Marlar) Dr V Warrior Mrs E Werry Mrs D York (MacDonald) Class of 1956 Participation Rate: 21% * Mrs J Barrett (Fountain) Mrs M Bright (Abel) Mrs M Clarkson (Lightburne) Dr J Davies (Dadds) Mme W Hellegouarc'h (Thomas) Dr G Jondorf (Moore) Mrs M Pedlar-Perks (Tillett) Mrs M Poole (Smith) Dr M Rossiter Dr F Simpson (Zuill) Mrs M Thorpe (Perry) Mrs R Treves Brown (Harding) Ms M Vincent Miss A Willan Mrs J Zass-Ogilvie (Poole) Class of 1957 Participation Rate: 17% * Anonymous Professor J Ashworth Mrs M Davies (Owen) Mrs G du Charme (Brown) Mrs A Goosey (Alexander) Mrs J Hull (Mee) Mrs J Kenrick (Greaves) Mrs V Roberts (Chapman) Dr P Turner (Watson) Dr E Vinestock (Morrison) Mrs P White (Eardley) Mrs V Wood-Robinson (Ginman) Mrs P Youngman (Coates) Class of 1958 Participation Rate: 31% * Anonymous Dr H Bewes (Bryant) Lady Brooke (B Kalaugher) and Sir Henry Brooke Mrs E Cary (Simon) Mrs P Dauris (Butterworth)

Miss M Dyson Mrs A Eccles (Chib) The Revd Canon R Edwards (Phillips) Lady Gass (E Acland-Hood) Mrs H Greenstock (Fellowes) Miss C Haworth Mrs D Hobden (Hutchings) Mrs A Holland (Telling) Dr G Lachelin Dr J Lloyd (Muir-Smith) Mrs K Norman (Redwood) Mrs J Pardey (Stoker) Mrs S Pigott (Megaw) Professor F Rhoads (Secker) and Dr G Rhoads Dr J Rizvi (Clarke) Mrs R Ross (Fincher) Mrs C Stewart (Custance) Mrs B Stocks (Martin) Mrs G Victory (Ebrahimzadeh) Class of 1959 Participation Rate: 20% * Anonymous Mrs D Boatman (Coles) Mrs E Bridger (Bewes) Mrs J Butcher (Walker) Dr A Deveson (Richards) Lady English (J Milne) Mrs A Foat (Goldup) Mrs E Guest (Cuthbert) Mrs C Hopkins (Busbridge) Mrs K Lawther (Cameron) Mrs B MacKenzie Ross (Horgan) Mrs A Montgomery (Hurrell) Mrs M Morgan (Stallard-Penoyre) Dr D Mull (Sipe) Mrs J Paine (Smith) Miss D St George Bond Professor S Szuchet Mrs D Turner (Greenaway) Class of 1960 Participation Rate: 22% * Anonymous Mrs D Bickley (Hurn) Dr D Devlin Mrs M Field (Chisholm) Mrs B Gardner (Brennan) Dr H Hamblin (Peel) Dr V Haynes Mckay (Haynes) Mrs J Herriott (MacLean) Dr A McDonald (Lamming) Mrs D Nicholson (Hilton) Mrs V Offord (Wheatley) Mrs E Siddall (Stone) Professor M Strathern (Evans) Mrs S Thomson (Dowty) Mrs J Thorpe (Oakley) Dr M Walmsley Dr R Warren (Copping) Mrs M Woodall (Evans) Class of 1961 Participation Rate: 21% * Anonymous Mrs C Brack (Cashin) Mrs K Brind (Williams) Dr A Conyers (Williams) Mrs S Cox (Crombie) Mrs J de Swiet (Hawkins) Mrs E Fleet (Sainsbury) Miss B Nevill Professor C Nyamweru (Washbourn) Mrs M Poole-Wilson (Gemmell) Mrs F Price (Hough) Dr S Raban (Brown)

Spring 2014

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Girton Newsletter 29


Donors

Ms A Robertson Mrs L Scott-Joynt (White) Mrs R Sjolin (Brooking) Mrs S Smith (Tyndall) Mrs J Stancomb (Cooper) Mrs J Standage (Ward) Dr A Thompson Dr T Toms (Peregrine-Jones) Mrs S Wilson (Waller) Class of 1962 Participation Rate: 20% * Anonymous Mrs R Binney (Chanter) Mrs D Bond (MacFarlane) Mrs N Brooker (Brooke) Mrs P Downes (Sterry) and Mr P Downes Ms S Gaukroger Mrs P Glanville (Fox-Robinson) Miss H Greig Dr J HailĂŠ (Bramley) Dr N Houldershaw (Dixon) Ms J McAdoo (Hibbert) Dr R Morley (Doling) Dr V Raman (Srinivasan) Mrs B Salmon (Shaw) Miss H Strouts Mrs J Towson (Cato) Mrs J Way (Whitehead) Dr R Williams Class of 1963 Participation Rate: 8% * Lady Atkinson (J Mandeville) Dr E Burroughs (Clyma) Mrs P Cooper (Lilley) Mrs S Hill (Gleeson-White) Mrs J Orton (Sturgess) Mrs M Stoney (Wild) Dr P Taylor (Francis) Class of 1964 Participation Rate: 11% * Anonymous Mrs C Ansorge (Broadbelt) Mrs C Beasley-Murray (Griffiths) Mrs R Canning (Harris) Miss D Crowder Dr S Hollingshead-Fox (Hollingshead) Ms V Horsler (Sheen) Mrs J McManus (Edwards) Mrs R Oliver (Armitstead) Dr R Osmond (Beck) Mrs C Thorp (Kenyon) Ms S Vernon (Schapiro) Class of 1965 Participation Rate: 12% * Anonymous Dr D Challis (Pennington) Mrs P Eaton (Mills) Ms J Gardiner Mrs G Henchley (Cassels) Mrs J Houghton (Rumsey) Dr J Mallison (Hallowes) Mrs M Picton (Jones) Mrs P Sharp (Monach) Professor V van Heyningen (Daniel) Dr M Whalley (Bramley) Class of 1966 Participation Rate: 17% * Anonymous Dr L Bacon (Rayner) Dr E Capewell (Aldridge)

30 Girton Newsletter

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Spring 2014

Miss M Clark Miss F Corrie Mrs L Curgenven (Charlton) Mrs H Davies (Waters) Professor A Finch Mrs S Forster (Hawley) Mrs B Hird (Holden) Miss M Leeson Dr A Lishman Mrs A Nussey Dr R Smith (Loewenthal) Professor A Stent Class of 1967 Participation Rate: 14% * Anonymous Dr B Castleton (Smith) Dr P Chadwick Mrs L Chesneau (Jacot) Mrs K Coleman (MacKenzie) Dr D Cunningham (Yeates) Miss M Day Dr E Emerson Mrs F Johnson (Lewis) Mrs W McKenzie (Diggins) Mrs G Mintah (Quansah) Mrs B Moran (Jones) Mrs A Rowe (Helliwell) Mrs B Walker (Fogg) and Mr W Walker Miss E Wimett Class of 1968 Participation Rate: 23% * Anonymous Dr G Ball (Harte) Dr L Braddock Dr R Carter (Rayner) Mrs V Challacombe (Brousson) Mrs H Chown (Benians) Mrs L Cox (Page) Ms J Crimmin Dr C Crocker (Tombs) Dr J Cross Miss S Cubitt Mrs D Derome-Asen (Derome) Dr H Falk Ms H Goy (Corke) Mrs S Gray (Francis) Professor R Jenkins (McDougall) Ms E Klingaman Mrs D Knight (Watson) Ms J Mercer (Clarke) Ms S Minter Dr M Mott (Smith) Mrs S Penfold (Marshall) Professor H Ritvo Dr F Smith (Rankin) Mrs H Swallow (Symes) Class of 1969 Participation Rate: 15% * Miss S Blacker (Brenton) Ms G Chester Professor M Fowler Dr A Griffin (Ryder) Mrs S Hinkley (Booth) Dr G Monsell (Thomas) Professor E Nesbitt Mrs Z Powers (Jones) Mrs R Sheldon (Martin) Dr B Taylor (Slimming) Mrs K Ward (Mee) Mrs S Watson (Head) Dr C Weber (Howe) Mrs M Winfield (Richards) Ms C Wright

Class of 1970 Participation Rate: 11% * Mrs C Avery Jones (Bobbett) Lady Burnell-Nugent (M Woods) Mrs B Coulson (Chambers) Professor A Dowling Ms E Guppy Mrs S Hargreaves Miss E Howie Miss P Mander Dr A Marlow (Sheppard) Dr J Melia (Gibson) Dr M Mountford (Gamble) Ms J Nockolds Dr R Siddals Class of 1971 Participation Rate: 14% * Ms A Bazin Mrs Z Bennett (Humphries-Bennett) Dr H Caldwell (Burtenshaw) Mrs V Chiesa (Wilkie) Dr F Clifton-Hadley (Christian) Dr A Cobby Miss L Fluker The Revd C Hetherington (Bourne) Dr S Heywood Miss K Kirby Mrs J McKnight (Ruddle) Miss J Palmer Mrs H Papworth (Garson) Dr H Taylor Mrs J Tierney (Briggs) Mrs G Waters (Cutmore) Mrs R West (Sykes) Class of 1972 Participation Rate: 15% * Ms J Andrews Mrs H Asbury (Jephcott) Mrs J Bell (Spurgin) Miss A Brown Dr F Campbell Dr S Davies Dr A Edmonds Miss G Edwards Mrs S Gaulter (Wright) Ms J Hanna Ms A Hey Ms B Hines (Fejtek) Mrs E Hope (Bentley) Dr J Kinder (Stott) Dr J Moyes (Paul) and Mr J Moyes Dr A Overzee (Hunt) Mrs C Pitt (Thomas) Ms V Platt Mrs D Reynolds (Bevin) Mrs C Turner (Ogle) Mrs R Whatmore (Robertson) Class of 1973 Participation Rate: 16% * Anonymous Mrs A Bamforth (Burgess) Mrs G Bargery (Hetherington) Mrs K Berry (Corfield) Mrs C Borrill (Pateras) Dr M Davies Ms A Donnelly (Elborn) Ms L Duffin Dr L Dumbreck (Devlin) Mrs M Gildea (Brierley) Mrs H Gray (Swan) Mrs J Kitchen (Woods) Mrs V Knight (Hammerton) Dr T Madej


Donors

Mrs N Miller (Thomas) Dr A Owen Mrs A Stainsby (Sutton) Dr S Tilby (Wharton) Ms P Wade (Wellburn) Mrs J Wrobel (Wakefield) Class of 1974 Participation Rate: 14% * Anonymous Mrs H Baker (Sharrock) Dr J Clayton (Gardner) Dr S Dyson Miss D Farley Miss J Fuller Mrs F Hallworth (Whiston) Dr D Lamb Mrs B Makinson (Boulter) Mrs P Marr (Swanney) Mrs R Mifsud (Moore) Mrs F Morris (Milner) Ms M Morris Dr C Morrison (Page) Dr E Oakes (Jacques) Miss N Powell Miss A Rhodes Dr M Trusted Dr R Whaley Mrs A Whipp (Smith) Class of 1975 Participation Rate: 14% * Ms F Anderson (Wells-Thorpe) Miss F Boyers Dr J Coates (Whatley) Mrs A Davidson (Jones) Professor F Doyle Mrs S Finlay (Perry) Ms J Hayball Dr M Jubb Ms J Mann Mrs S Mead (Chan) Mrs C Mitchell (Teall) Mrs S Palmer (Hull) Her Honour Judge I Parry Dr R Rayner (Talbot) Mrs J Robertson (Dowie) Professor S Springman Miss A Stebbing Dr G Tozer-Hotchkiss (Tozer) Dr P Tyrrell Ms F Werge Class of 1976 Participation Rate: 14% * Anonymous Dr H Benbow Mrs J Bettley-Smith (Naylor) Ms K Brookfield Ms J Ferrans Mrs A Jenkinson (Sims) Mrs E Jones (Dando) Miss M Knowles Mrs S Maunder (McVicar) Dr B Mensch and Mr M Evans Mrs S Morgan (Richardson) Ms H Morrison Mrs R Reid (Aston) Dr A Roberts Dr C Robinson (Murphy) Dr Y Roe Mrs M Rutterford (Williamson) Mrs J Smallwood (Smith) Miss E Wade

Class of 1977 Participation Rate: 17% * Mrs S Ballingall (Sampson) Dr C Bell Mrs C Bromhead (Smith) Dr C Brown Dr B Burin Mrs J Collyer (Kiwana) Mrs A Coulton (McWatters) Dr C Davis Dr R Dyer (Snelling) Ms C Egan Mrs A Glanvill (Howe) Miss A Griffiths Mrs K Hewitt Mrs S Lee (Lim) Miss J Main Thompson Mrs H Neville-Towle (Duguid) Mrs C Oram (Hughes) Dr L Pillidge (Robinson) Professor S Rowland-Jones Mrs S Shaw (Everett) Mrs P Somervell (Holt) Professor H Thomas Mrs L Turner (Gemmell) Mrs G White (Lupton) Ms S Woodall Mrs G Woon (Doubleday) Class of 1978 Participation Rate: 17% * Mrs C Addis (Dewar) Mrs R Anderson (Naish) and Mr J Anderson Mrs C Bailey (Crick) and Mr D Bailey Dr A Beckham (Roberts) Dr P Boston Mrs S Conolly (Ruch) Ms J Elton Mrs N Fielding (Creedy) Dr M Fink Mrs A Francis (Fairbairn) Mrs J George (Peterson) Mrs A Higgs (Beynon) Ms B Hill Ms K Knight Mrs A MacFarlane (Bigelow) Mrs A Masters (Elms Neale) Dr J Mitchell (Stebbing) Ms S O'Mahony (Bigg) Dr J Risdall Mrs S Routledge (Blythe) Dr I Shaw Mrs S Shrimpton (Lightfoot) Dr N Simmonds Dr A Streetly Ms S Tate Miss A Weitzel Class of 1979 Participation Rate: 20% * Anonymous Mrs J Barwick-Nesbit (Nicholson) Dr P Child (Skeggs) Mrs K Clay (Swift) Mrs J Clough (Richardson) Mr D Conway-Jones Mrs J Edis (Askew) Mr J Ford Dr A Gemmill Dr P Gibson Mr K Grocott Dr S Hales Ms C Hanks (Boag) Ms S Hewin Mrs P Howell Evans (Woodhouse)

Miss L Jerram Ms E Lee Mrs M Lewis (Wallington) Mr J Longstaff Mrs A Lowe (Alexander) Dr J Martin (Hewitt) Miss T Nicholls Mrs R Payne (Francis) Professor M Power Mrs M Sheil (Simpson) Professor A Taylor (Rosser) Mrs S Waller (Skelland) Dr G Warner Mrs F Weston (Simpson) Dr N Wilkinson (Nanji) Dr C Young Class of 1980 Participation Rate: 14% * Mrs H Blackburn (Egan) Dr R Bliss Mrs J Burridge (Saner) Mr I Craggs Mr J Doyle Dr M Fewtrell Ms S Gill Dr A Henderson Dr N Land Dr I Laurenson Mr J Lewis Mrs M Marsh (Scopes) Dr K Marwick Mr C Milne Mrs K Pugh (Burton) Mr D Recaldin Mrs B Shah (Pandey) Ms P Treacy Dr C Vize Mrs H Wilderspin (Chatters) Class of 1981 Participation Rate: 9% * Dr C Beveridge Mr D Branson Mrs T Cowen (Castling) Ms C Edwards Mr N Harvey Mr A Lane Mr S Moralee Ms M O'Brien Mr C Rigg Ms F Smith Mrs R Stileman (Cremer) Mr N Wells Mrs A Whitaker (Rundle) Class of 1982 Participation Rate: 14% * Dr P Ahlberg Mr R Beardshall Mr D Bishop Mr D Bullinger Professor J Cassell Ms L Davy Mr S Hood Dr H Hooley (Spooner) Mrs K Ip (Jopson) Mr P Jackson Miss A Lea Miss S Leong Ms G McDonald (House) The Revd Canon C Methuen Mr S Namasivayam Mrs K Peissel (Lynn) Dr C Proudman Miss M Quinn

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Girton Newsletter 31


Donors

Mrs J Raffle (Lobell) Ms L Simpson Mr A Simpson

Dr E Wang Dr J Wilkinson Ms T Woodeson

Class of 1983 Participation Rate: 9% * Anonymous Mr S Bell Mr C Gibbs Mr L Hoegh Mrs A House (McNiff) Professor M Lindsay Mrs F Napier (King) Mrs C Orchard (Brind) Mr A Persianis Mr J Pike Mrs R Rawnsley (Schofield) Dr K Steward Mrs C Suckling (Keal) Ms F Van Dijk Mr D Wittmann

Class of 1987 Participation Rate: 6% * Anonymous Mr R Bayall (Buaal) Miss R Bright-Thomas Mr T Britton Mr S Close Dr L Fallon Mr K Galloway Mr P Groombridge Mr R Toone

Class of 1984 Participation Rate: 11% * Mrs T Bradley (Jennings) Mr P Cameron Ms L Cattermole Watkins (Cattermole) Dr T Crickmore (Bartram) Ms E Drew Professor M Gale Mr S Hacking Mr P Hagan Mr A Jackson Mr W Jeffels Mrs D Morrison (Restall) Dr L Power Dr M Probyn (Dickinson) Dr I Smith Mr P Williams Mr J Young Class of 1985 Participation Rate: 11% * Mrs S Bankes (Thorniley) Dr C Bradley Mrs H Butler (Penfold) Dr M Cara (Blake) Dr D Cara Mrs K Collins (Scrivener) Mrs P Considine Ms M Hackett Mr M Hanson Dr R Hyde Mrs A King Ms P Roberts Dr D Smith Mrs E Strachan (Hill) Miss S Williams Mr C Woodford Ms R Yard

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Class of 1989 Participation Rate: 9% * Anonymous Dr D Bell Mr P Brabin Miss J Buck Mrs R Cowin (Clark) Dr N Finnie Mr D Henderson Mr J Howling Ms S Jones (Griffith) Mr M Khalid Mr F Kinsella Mr S Marsden Mrs C Seward (Stanley) Ms R Teale Class of 1990 Participation Rate: 8% * Anonymous Mr S Beale Mr M Hallett Mrs G McPherson (Hunter) Ms B Mielniczek (Miller) Miss V Milner Mr J Moffett Mr R Owen Mr D Poppleton Mr A Silverbeck Mrs J Treutenaere (Amos) Ms E Wagner Dr H Wong

Class of 1986 Participation Rate: 10% * Anonymous Mrs S Croft (White) Mr J Downes Mr R Evison Mr G Freeman Mr S Haywood-Ward Ms C Liassides Mr K Mann Mr R Rayward Dr N Storer Mrs K Stormont Dr S Tam Mr S Walker

32 Girton Newsletter

Class of 1988 Participation Rate: 10% * Anonymous Ms C Bardon (Heslop) Dr A Cogan Mr G Collier Mr A Craigie Mr H Davies Dr A Gillespie Mr M Hutt Dr J Malt Mr R Moss Mrs A Orsi (Knight) Dr J Rippin Mr J Short Mr J Taylor Mr A Tyrer Ms A Young

Class of 1991 Participation Rate: 7% * Anonymous Mr S Bradley Mr J Creighton Mr R Goodhead Dr S Hayward

Spring 2014

Mr P James Mrs P Martin (Hall) Dr D Ramm Mr A Redfern Mr J Rouse Mr T Southern Mr J Speirs Class of 1992 Participation Rate: 10% * Dr S Aguilar Mr D Batchelor Mr R Bradford Mrs N Budd (Hill) Mr T Burkinshaw Mrs J Dumbelton (Ainsworth) Mr J Geston Mr A Hartshorne Professor H Koh Mrs N Lancaster (Swift) Mr J Marsh Mr A McCready Mr A Poulson Dr B von Meier-Ince (von Meier) Dr C Warwick Dr S Wilkins (Inman) Ms A Wilson and Mr C Hernรกndez-Roy Class of 1993 Participation Rate: 10% * Mr G Arnold Mr A Barnes Mr W Collins Dr A Curry Dr V Dimitrov Mr I Furlonger Ms T Jinachitra Ms R Kerr Mrs A Lancaster (Mills) Dr J Nowell Mr J O'Sullivan Mr W Potten Miss S Relf Mr N Sartain Mr S Seiguer Mr H Stokes Mrs A Tobin Mr G Williams Class of 1994 Participation Rate: 7% * Dr R Albardiaz Dr G Bradbury Dr T Courtney Miss N Hollingsworth Mr C Hulatt Mr S Lodh Mr P Mason Ms C Maugham (Hibbitt) Mr L McLernon Mr G Menzies Dr J Midgley Dr J Pamment Mr E Pugh Mrs A Thomas (Disbury) Class of 1995 Participation Rate: 10% * Mr T Boughton Ms R Briggs Mr S Davidson Mr A Every Dr A Hall Dr A Heyne-Chatzilamprou (Heyne) Mrs L Hobbs (Howard) Miss A Jacobs


Donors

Mr L John Dr L Lamb (Baker) Mr T Massingham Mr N Parker Mr P Ryland Miss L Shackleton Dr L Shaw Mr R Steiner Dr A Thurrell

Mr J Gilberthorpe Mrs S Holt (Merrigan) Ms K Kennedy (Laver) Dr A Mumtaz Mr G Redman Mrs C Smith (Thomas) Mr C Stewart Mr J Vali Mr J Woolf

Class of 1996 Participation Rate: 10% * Mr L Altman Miss C Chan Mr M Cobley Mr E Cyster Ms Y Erden Miss A Gee Professor I Ghosh Mr P Glover Miss L James Mrs A Keen (Neale) Dr C Mulcare Dr J Ranasinghe Mrs B Richards (Goodridge) Ms C Roberts Mr R Smith Dr J Warren Dr L Wilson-Shaw (Jackson)

Class of 1999 Participation Rate: 13% * Dr E Almond (Robinson) Miss K Bingham Miss L Bullock Mrs S Callas (Hedley Lewis) Dr B Coffin Miss T Collier Mr J Cooper-Colliander (Cooper) Mr D Emmens Mr J Forbes Mrs A Hami (Kaler) Dr N Jennings Mr P Marshall Mr J Morgan Mrs R Morris (Bowes) Ms N Mukhtar Dr R Orr Mrs B Orton Mr E Owles Mr Y Ponnighaus Mr H Rowntree Miss N Rump Dr K Smith Mrs H Underwood (Keeble) Mr G Williams

Class of 1997 Participation Rate: 17% * Miss L Allen Miss J Anderson Mr J Anthony-Edwards (Anthony) Mr P Beer Miss M Bingham-Walker Mr E Buckley Dr E Butterworth Mr C Cheung Mr A Chisholm Ms E Cox Mr M Cullingford Mrs C Finburgh (Pearson) Mrs C Gruffudd Jones (Mulliss) Mr R Hakes Mr P Hall Dr J Hawes and Mrs C Hawes (Slevin) Dr L Hulatt Ms U Khalid Miss E Marks Miss K Moorhouse Mr T Murphy Mrs K Nelson (Duffin) Mr S Nelson Miss E Reynolds Mr N Robinson Mr P Rutland Dr J Schonfield Dr M Shaw-Champion Mr M Sidhom Miss J Smith Mr C Vickers Miss L Walker Dr B Whittle (Sims) Class of 1998 Participation Rate: 9% * Miss P Barclay Mr R Bryan Miss F Bryson Ms E Cartwright Miss K Clark Mr P Cornmell Mr G Dobson Mrs H Francis (Barnes)

Class of 2000 Participation Rate: 10% * Anonymous Mrs S Bradnum (Degge) Mr S Costello Mr I Deacon Dr M Dries Dr C Duckworth Miss S Feeney Miss K Fulcher Mr D Grier Mr R Karia Mr A Mohamedbhai Captain T O'Neill Mr J Panchaud Mrs K Seed (Butlin) Ms S Shafiq Mr D Smith Mr T Sneddon Mrs A Speicher (Pepple) Mr B Speight Mr T Wey Class of 2001 Participation Rate: 13% * Anonymous Miss K Balls Miss N Bell Miss Z Best Miss S Brien Mr A Butler Miss B Cain Mr D Cash Ms V Chatterton Miss S Daniell Miss R Dyer Mr T Elliott Mr P Hempsall Mr U Inamete

Mr J Kwong Miss H Lloyd Ms V Marx Mr J Mather Mr J Meenowa Ms R Moore Ms E Navasargian Dr A Owen Dr J Randall-Carrick (Randall) Miss A Sharma Ms E St. Matthew-Daniel Dr D Stretton (Marshall) Mrs R Walker (Clements) Mr R Wright Class of 2002 Participation Rate: 13% * Anonymous Mr A Addis Ms S Ahmed Mr J Andrews Mr J Beeson Miss G Bryce Miss K Charles Miss H Craik Dr V Dekou Mr A Drysdale Dr G Gnanakumaran Mr R Griffiths Miss L Hare Mr J Hogg Mrs P Hook (Tudor) Mr T Houlton Miss K Irving Dr H James Mr P Morgan Miss N Osborn Ms A Outhwaite Mrs A Pacitti (Riddoch) Dr K Ponomareva Mr M Schneider Mr O Shave Miss S Stewart Mr J Turner Mr S West Mr T Yates Class of 2003 Participation Rate: 9% * Anonymous Mr W Armstrong Mr S Clark Mr A Darnton Miss A Goddard Mr H Johnson Miss L Julve Mr A Kumar Mr S Lam Mrs C Murrells (Clifton) Miss S Pankaj Dr L Pechey Mr J Rees Mrs S Saeed (Adam) Mr S Shah Miss A Standing Mr B Stimmler Mr M White Class of 2004 Participation Rate: 8% * Mr M Birmingham Mr S Burdus Mr M Crabb Mr D Deitz Mr P Dower Mr R Durkin

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Girton Newsletter 33


Donors

Miss R Fahy Mr V Handa Mr N Jones Miss R Laidlaw Mr A Leung Miss E Lowe Mrs W Lung (Dong) and Mr R Lung (2003) Miss K McDonnell Miss V Moss Mr S Murray Miss R Powell Mr S Rattan Class of 2005 Participation Rate: 12% * Anonymous Mr J Anderson Miss S Baker Mr P Brett Miss N de Pointis Brighty Mr C Donnelly Mr M Eaton Mr T Fitch Mr M Gosling Mr J Lee Mr E Livingston Miss D Luo Miss J MacDonald Miss N Martin Miss K Morton Mr S Mutter Mrs J Naseman (Bromage) Miss C Nichols Mr A Paul Miss S Potter Miss K Scotter Miss J Sheard (Gulliver) Mr R Stutt Mr M Thompson Ms H Walker Mr W Walters

Class of 2011 Mr R Bhopal Fellows, staff and supporters1 Anonymous Dr I Adams Lord Baldwin Dr D Barden Ms I Barker Professor G Beer (Thomas) Miss V Bennett Mr D Berman and Mrs D Berman Dr A Blair Mr T Blake Mr P Briggs Mr B Brown Mrs J Campbell (Collings) Miss C Chibnall Miss J Chibnall Ms M Chibnall Mrs A Crabbe Ms C Cuthbert Mr J Cuthbert Dr B Davies Mr A Dawson Mr E Dickson Miss T Elbourn Ms J Elliott Mrs A Falconer Mrs A Fort Mr R Gautrey Mr P Glassberg Mr P Gregory-Hood Mr A Guest Mr J Hall Mr E Hamilton Mrs T Hamilton Mr I Harrison Mrs P Hill Mrs J Johnson Dr S Law and Dr T Law Mr N Lomax Ms D Lowther Professor M Maekawa (Nakanishi) Ms F Malaree Dr J Marks Sir Laurence Martin Ms P Martin Dr K McCracken Mr C Michell Mr N Peacock Ms J Raikes Mrs V Rees Ms J Reynolds Mrs F Robertson Mr N Robertson

Class of 2007 Participation Rate: 8% * Anonymous Mr N Caldwell Miss W Chan Miss E Cooper Mr J Drake Mr S Hayes Mr T Ithell Ms K Judge Mr C Kingcombe Miss S Miller Miss J Nutter Ms P Olivari Miss R Smith

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Class of 2008 Participation Rate: 4% * Miss H Ayoob Mr C Bermejo-Suarez Mr E Button Miss N Coan Mr K Inamura Miss R Singer Mr J Surry Mr J Wong Class of 2009 Miss C Puertas Calvo Mr M Udoff

Class of 2006 Participation Rate: 8% * Miss R Anthony Mr S Antill Mr C Bauermeister Mr M Beevor Mr C Cameron Mr S Cowen Miss J Harries Miss S Hawkins Mr J Hosier Miss D Margolis Mr H Onslow Dr M Sweeney Mr D Swift Miss R Tandy Mr Y Xu Mr M Ye

34 Girton Newsletter

Miss A Tedder Mr O Timmis Mr M Vroobel Mr A Young

Spring 2014

Mr C Roper Professor J Runde Mr C Scott Mrs L Scott Mr D Shelley Mr A Smith Mrs P Smith Mrs M Steedman Mr J Thomason Dr J Thompson Professor P Tod Mrs J Varney Mr S Venn Mr J Wade Mr M Walton Ms J Wilkinson Mr H B K Williams Mr P Wilson Mr S Wyborn Ms A Yondorf Organisations AstraZeneca BP plc Cambridge Local Girton Association Cambridge University Press Goldman Sachs London Girton Association Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited Portland CSO Trading Limited Robert Barr Charitable Trust Slaughter and May The Dow Chemical Foundation Yaxham and District Women's Institute 1

Who are not also alumni


Meet the Team Our Development Director, Elizabeth Wade, is an Old Girtonian herself (1976) and is responsible for the College's Development Campaign, long term fundraising strategy, major gift and legacy fundraising and all aspects of College alumni relations and development. Liz would be happy to hear from you if you have any comments regarding the College’s development plans and events, if you would like to know more about A Great Campaign or if you are thinking about leaving a legacy to the College. Liz can be contacted at e.wade@girton.cam.ac.uk or on +44 (0)1223 339893. Our Alumni Officer, Emma Cornwall, oversees the College’s alumni events and communications, as well as supporting the hardworking volunteers involved with Girton’s various alumni associations. Contact Emma if you want to find out more about any of our alumni relations activities: she is always very pleased to hear from you. Emma can be reached on e.cornwall@girton.cam.ac.uk or +44 (0)1223 338901.

Hannah James (h.james@girton.cam.ac.uk, +44 (0)1223 764935) is our Development Officer and manages the busy administrative hub of the office. She has responsibility for background research for development campaigns and alumni events and maintenance of our alumni database. Hannah is also responsible for all aspects of gift administration. Our Development and Alumni Events Officer, Tamsin Elbourn, is responsible for the organisation of Development Office events and providing administrative support to the Development Director. Tamsin also spearheads Girton’s telephone campaign, so please contact her if you have any queries about this at t.elbourn@girton.cam.ac.uk or on +44 (0)1223 765685. Sophie Comiskey (s.comiskey@girton.cam.ac.uk, +44 (0)1223 764935) is our Development Assistant and is the newest member of the team. She provides administrative support to the Development Office including help with events, gift processing and database management.

Elizabeth Wade

Emma Cornwall

Tamsin Elbourn

Sophie Comiskey

Hannah James


Events Calendar 2014 Details of all events are available by emailing development@girton.cam.ac.uk or by visiting the Alumni and Supporters section of the College’s website www.girton.cam.ac.uk

Friday 14 March

Saturday 21 June

College Ball

Benefactors Garden Party by invitation

Girton College

Girton College

Friday 28 March MA Dinner

Wednesday 25 June

Girton College

Artist in Residence Exhibition Judge Business School, Cambridge

Saturday 29 March MA Congregation

Saturday 20 September

Senate House, Cambridge

Alumni Reunion Dinner

Monday 31 March

for those who matriculated in 2004 Girton College

Alumni and Supporters Event Singapore

Saturday 20 September Alumni Reunion Dinner

Wednesday 2 April Alumni and Supporters Event Kuala Lumpur

for those who matriculated in 1998,1999, 2000 Girton College

Saturday 27 September

Sunday 6 April

Annual Library talk

Alumni and Supporters Event

Girton College

Hong Kong

Saturday 27 September

Friday 2 May

Annual Lawrence Room talk

College Gardens Walk

Girton College

Girton College

Saturday 27 September

Saturday 3 May

Annual People’s Portraits Reception

1869 Society Celebration for legacy donors

Girton College

Girton College

Saturday 27 September Roll of Alumni Dinner

Saturday 3 May Girton College

Including reunions for those who matriculated in 1954 1964 1974 1979 and 1980 Girton College

Thursday 8 May

Sunday 28 September

Concert – Echoes of Venice

Jane Martin Poetry Prize Event

Annual Gardens talk

Girton College

Girton College

Thursday 22 May

Saturday 18 October

Alumni Formal Hall Girton College

Saturday 14 June May Bumps Marquee Cambridge

Sunday 15 June (TBC) Alumni Cricket Match

Commemoration of Benefactors and Foundation Dinner by invitation Girton College

Thursday 30 October Alumni Formal Hall Girton College

Saturday 29 November

Girton College

GASA Alumni Sports Matches and Dinner

Tuesday 17 June

Girton College

May Week Concert Cambridge

GIRTON COLLEGE CAMBRIDGE

Development Office Girton College FREEPOST ANG6880 Cambridge CB3 0YE +44 (0)1223 766672/338901 development@girton.cam.ac.uk www.girton.cam.ac.uk


Spring 2014 Development Newsletter