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21 April 2008

Suggestions for Using the Tool Kit Follow-Up to Commission on the Status of Women 51 “Eliminate discrimination and violence against the girl child.” Purpose: • Increase knowledge and awareness about promises made to girls at the 51st meeting of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) in 2007. • Motivate women and girls to address these promises by becoming catalysts for change. • Prepare for the review of progress made on ending discrimination and violence against girls to be held by the CSW in 2010. Audiences: • Adolescent girls and boys in various settings. • Women’s and men’s groups. • Faith-based groups, youth groups, school classes, political organizations. Suggested Group Process: 1. Introduce yourself and ask those present to introduce themselves. 2. Introduce some of the key players at the United Nations. ¾ The UN is a group of 192 nations founded to: o Establish conditions of justice and respect for all peoples; o Practice tolerance and to live together with one another as good neighbors; o Unite our strength to maintain international peace and security; o Promote the economic and social development of all peoples. ¾ NGOs serve as a voice for the citizens of the world to: o Represent the members of their organization; o Monitor government discussions, decisions and actions; o Collaborate with the UN Secretariat to deliver relief aid, health and education programs, etc; o Organize world citizens to remind governments to keep their promises to the people of the world. ¾ The Working Group on Girls and its International Network for Girls is a consortium of NGOs that seek to: o Ensure that national governments implement commitments to girls; o Advocate for the ongoing inclusion and development of girls’ rights in the work of the United Nation system; o Promote the active participation of girls as agents of change in their own lives, families, communities and societies. 3. Introduce the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). (Information can be found in the Indicator Cards page 2.) 4. Read the Summary of Agreed Conclusions on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination and Violence against Girls (referenced below) and identify the promises made to girls by the Commission in their Agreed Conclusions and discuss their implications.


April 18, 2008

¾ The document contains an analysis of the priority theme and the concrete recommendations for governments, institutions and civil society stakeholders to be implemented at the international, national, regional and local levels. ¾ It provides background information for your discussion of the indicators. 5. Work through each of the indicator cards. The questions can be used in many ways: ¾ As a starting point for discussion about girls’ rights. ¾ As research questions for individual or group projects. ¾ As interview questions to be used with government officials. ¾ As questions for country-focused case studies. ¾ Indicators can be used across the curriculum in a variety of settings including classes considering social justice, global issues, social studies, statistics and economics and in both formal and non-formal educational settings. Outcome: ¾ Tell us what you accomplished. Please send us your answers the eight (8) questions on the first page of the Indicator Cards. ¾ Send your answers to wggcsw51@gmail.com ¾ Your answers will become part of a report from the Working Group on Girls to the Commission on the Status of Women. This year we have focused on the themes of education and financing for gender equality. We plan to develop indicators and repeat the process for the themes of protection and health in the near future and we hope you will join us as we examine those important issues. Thank you very much for your willingness to participate and thank you, too, for all you do every single day to ensure that girls everywhere enjoy all of their human rights! Copies of all these materials are available on our website www.girlsrights.org. Additional Resources: ¾ Birth Registration: www.unicef.org/protection/index_birthregistration.html ¾ Girls’ Education: www.ungei.org/ ¾ Financing: http://www.unicef.org/sowc04/sowc04_right_thing.html ¾ UNICEF - Information by Country: www.unicef.org/infobycountry/index.html ¾ Youth Version of the Report of The Expert Group Meeting on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination and Violence against the Girl Child http://www.unicef.org/voy/takeaction/takeaction_3131.html ¾ Child Marriage: http://www.pbs.org/now/shows/341/index.html

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Indicator Cards (Education & Financing for Girls) REPORT FORM After working through each of the indicator cards, please answer the following eight questions and e-mail your responses to wggcsw51@gmail.com. Your input will be incorporated into the global report to be prepared by the NGO Committee on UNICEF – Working Group on Girls. 1. In what setting did you use this Indicator Cards tool? (group discussion, informal consultation, public meeting, individual meeting, school, church group, organization, etc.)

2. Please describe the members of the group that worked on your project. (number of participants, age, gender, position, affiliation, etc.)

3. In what country do you reside?

4. What are the three main areas in which you think your country has made progress on education for girls?

5. What are the three main challenges that remain, in order to achieve equal opportunities in education for the girls in your country?

6. Have you created any projects to respond to these challenges? Please describe.

7. Were you inspired to approach your government and establish a positive relationship to work together to respond to these challenges? (local or national government, Ministry of Education, Representatives for women, Representatives for children, etc.)

8. What was the main outcome of your experience using this Indicator Cards tool?


Dear Friends, We are grateful for your interest in participating with the Working Group on Girls (WGG) in its project to help implement the commitments made by governments at the 51st session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW). You will find attached all of the materials you need to begin a local discussion which we hope will lead to action to end discrimination and violence against girls. The “Summary of Agreed Conclusions on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination and Violence against Girls” and the “Indicator Cards: Education and Financing for Girls” are educational tools intended to help increase knowledge, awareness and implementation of the agreed conclusions of the 2007 meeting of the CSW. Use of these materials with youth and adult groups—in classrooms and faith-based settings—will assist citizens young and old to assess and monitor progress toward eliminating discrimination and violence against girls in their own countries. You will also find attached suggestions for using this toolkit with those affiliated with your NGO. We hope all who use them will act as agents of change and advocates for girls in their communities. We promise to incorporate your responses into a report to be prepared by the WGG for the CSW. Materials are currently available in English and Spanish on our website www.girlsrights.org. We hope to make the documents available in other languages as well. If you are able to translate these tools into additional languages, we will be happy to post them. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or suggestions at WGGCSW51@gmail.com. We hope to receive your responses by September 15, 2008 and we thank you for your continued support of our common efforts—“promoting the rights of girls in all areas and stages of their lives, advancing the rights and status of girls and assisting them to develop their full potential as women.” Peace,

The Working Group on Girls


NGO Committee on UNICEF

WORKING GROUP ON GIRLS

Summary of Agreed Conclusions on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination and Violence Against Girls based upon the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women report on the 51st Session, Document E/CN.6/2007/9

This is not an official document of the United Nations


51st Session of the Commission on the Status of Women Summary of Agreed Conclusions The 51st Session of the Commission on the Status of Women meeting in New York, February 26 to March 9, 2007, focused on ending all forms of discrimination and violence against girls. The report of the Commission included a set of “Agreed Conclusions” which serves to assist governments in their efforts to ensure girls’ rights. What follows is a summary of those “Agreed Conclusions”. The Commission reaffirms its support of previously written documents that support the rights of girls such as: ƒ The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action ƒ The Convention on the Rights of the Child ƒ The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women The full and effective implementation of all previously agreed upon resolutions relating to girls is needed to ensure full human rights for women and girls. The Commission also reaffirms its support of the outcomes of conferences such as: ƒ The 2002 and 2005 World Summits on Children ƒ The World Conference on Human Rights ƒ The World Summit for Social Development The full and effective implementation of the outcomes from these and similar conferences is integral to achieving the Millennium Development Goals, which are an essential element in improving the situation of girls and ensuring their human rights. Due to this, the Commission stresses that achieving the Millennium Development Goals by 2015 must be a global effort. UN member states that belong to the Commission on the Status of Women are convinced that empowering girls is the key to breaking the cycles of discrimination and violence. The empowerment of girls requires the active support and engagement of their parents, legal guardians, families, boys and men, as well as the wider community. Members also note that the difficult conditions that exist in many developing countries have resulted in the acceleration of poverty, and that women and girls are among those most affected. Investing in the development of girls is one of the best ways to end poverty. Government Leadership Governments are urged to adopt, without reservation, the following: ƒ The Convention on the Rights of the Child ƒ The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women ƒ The Convention against Transnational Organized Crime Governments should also ratify and ensure the full implementation of International Labour Organization Conventions 138 and 182 which protect child workers. Governments need to exercise leadership to end all forms of violence and discrimination against girls and to support the advocacy efforts of those who seek to protect girls’ rights at the local, national, regional and international levels. Governments should abolish all laws, regulations, policies, practices and customs that discriminate against women or girls. Governments should strengthen laws which prevent all


forms of discrimination and violence against girls, and put in place adequate national and local systems to monitor compliance with these laws and policies. Governments should develop programmes to educate judges, lawyers, prosecutors and persons who work with victims of violence and discrimination. In addition, crimes against girls must be investigated. Offenders must be punished and protection must be provided to the victims. Records of births, deaths and marriages must be created and maintained. Laws and regulations concerning the minimum legal age of marriage need to be reviewed, possibly revised, and strictly enforced. Lastly, governments need to be sure that the resources needed to end all forms of discrimination and violence against girls are included in local and national budgets. Governments and United Nations agencies have a primary responsibility in the fight against all forms of discrimination, exploitation and violence against girls. However, the Commission also invites international financial institutions, members of civil society, including non-governmental organizations and private businesses, to take specific steps to ensure the rights of girls. Education is Key Education and training is another area that needs attention. Efforts to meet the target of eliminating gender inequality in primary and secondary education by 2015 must be increased. Barriers must be identified and strategies developed in collaboration with parents, legal guardians, teachers and community leaders, to ensure the accelerated achievement of equality in enrolment and completion of schooling at all educational levels for all girls. Governments and citizens must ensure that all children, particularly girls, without discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity or disability, have equal access to quality primary education. It is important to recognize the role of both formal and non-formal education in the achievement of poverty eradication and other development goals. Educational and job skills programmes should be developed for girls who cannot attend school. Girls’ access to training that enables them to develop their leadership capacities must be ensured so that they can participate fully in their societies. An important step in improving education for girls is identifying and addressing the reasons that girls fail to attend school or complete their education. Measures must be taken to address the root causes of these problems through the collection and analysis of disaggregated data. An increase in access and ability for girls to complete their education can be accomplished by: ƒ Providing special incentives, where appropriate, including financial payments and nutrition programmes to girls and their families ƒ Reviewing and revising school curricula, educational and training materials, and teachertraining programmes to promote gender-sensitive education ƒ Encouraging and supporting girls’ and boys’ interests in non-traditional fields and occupations ƒ Providing safe and supportive school environments for girls by taking steps to end sexual harassment at school and recruiting more female teachers ƒ Investing in public infrastructure projects and quality public services including transport, water, sanitation and sustainable energy


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Educating people about non-gender division of labour and the importance of shared family responsibility for work in the home

Intensifying efforts to implement the International Plan of Action for the United Nations Literacy Decade and integrating those efforts in the Education for All process can help to end illiteracy among women and girls. More developed countries should provide resources and technical assistance upon request to developing countries so they can strengthen their capacity to provide equal access to education and monitor progress in closing the gap between girls’ and boys’ education. Peace and Nonviolence Education The rights of girls must be fully integrated into all peace and nonviolence education. This should be provided from the primary level on as a way of instructing girls and boys in the prevention, resolution and management of conflicts at the interpersonal, community, national and international levels. Information and Communications Technology (ICT) All countries should promote and support girls’ increased access to ICT and they should work to overcome the “digital divide” among regions, genders, and social groups. Poverty One of the areas that must be addressed is improving the situation of girls living in poverty, without enough food, water and sanitation facilities, with no access to basic health-care services, shelter, education, participation and protection. This can be done through: ƒ Reducing social and economic inequalities ƒ Ending poverty ƒ Improving participation between different community groups ƒ Integrating a gender perspective in all development programmes and policies ƒ Providing support to developing countries ƒ Assessing the impact of globalization on girls Health Girls have a right to the highest attainable standard of health. Special attention should be paid to the following: adequate nutrition for girls; the effects of communicable diseases, sexual, and reproductive health; the special needs of adolescents, including raising awareness about eating disorders; prenatal and post-natal care, including measures to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV. National legislation must be developed and implemented prohibiting harmful customary or traditional practices, particularly female genital mutilation, that are violations of the human rights and fundamental freedoms of girls and women. It is essential that young women and men have access to information and education that will enable them to develop the life skills required to reduce their vulnerability to HIV infection and reproductive ill health. This should be done in full partnership with young persons, parents, families, educators and health-care providers, and should include the following: ƒ Young women, including adolescent girls, should be given information to help them understand their sexual and reproductive health in order to increase their ability to protect themselves from HIV infection, sexually transmitted infections, and unwanted pregnancy. ƒ The underlying and root causes of feminization of HIV/AIDS need to be addressed.


Appropriate measures must be taken to provide a supportive and socially inclusive environment for girls infected with, and affected by, HIV/AIDS. This includes: ƒ Providing appropriate psychosocial support ƒ Ensuring their enrolment in school ƒ Providing equal access to shelter, nutrition, health and social services ƒ Reducing the prices of antiretroviral drugs available to girls ƒ Addressing the needs of girls heading households including protection, access to financial resources, access to health care and support services, and opportunities to continue their education Strategies to End Discrimination and Violence Ending discrimination and violence against girls will require deep changes in society. These changes need to be supported through the development of strategies to eliminate gender stereotypes and foster the positive portrayal of women and girls. This requires actions including: ƒ The development and implementation of appropriate laws and programmes. ƒ Awareness campaigns to address stereotypical attitudes and behaviours that contribute to discrimination and violence against girls ƒ The inclusion of males, females, parents, teachers, religious and traditional leaders, and educational and media institutions in the work to eliminate of all forms of discrimination and violence against girls and the promotion of girls empowerment ƒ Ensuring that all people are educated about girls’ rights and their responsibility to respect the rights of others by integrating girls’ rights into curricula at all levels ƒ Encouraging men and boys to speak out strongly against all forms of discrimination and violence against women and girls ƒ Punishing perpetrators of discrimination and violence ƒ Promoting non-discriminatory treatment of girls and boys in the family and eliminating son preference ƒ Encouraging the active participation of boys, from an early age, in the elimination of discrimination and violence against girls The Role of Men and Boys Men and boys should be encouraged and supported to take an active part in the prevention and elimination of all forms of violence and steps should be taken to: ƒ Encourage increased understanding among men and boys of how violence harms girls, boys, women and men and undermines gender equality ƒ Review, strengthen or adopt legislation or policies to eradicate child pornography, including the prosecution of those who sexually exploit or abuse children ƒ Strengthen partnerships involving governments, civil society, the media, business sectors and other relevant actors to eliminate child pornography ƒ Ensure that the implementation of relevant resolutions and recommendations contained in the United Nations study on violence against children and the study on all forms of violence against women includes explicit attention to girls at all levels ƒ Increase education and training of teachers and health service providers in identifying the acts of violence against girls and ensure that they also take action to eradicate all forms of violence against girls, including traditional practices that are harmful to the health of girls Employment The International Labour Organization’s requirements for the employment of girls and boys must be respected and effectively enforced. Girls who are employed need to have equal access to decent work, equal payment, protection from economic exploitation, discrimination, sexual harassment, and violence in the workplace.


Girls should be aware of their rights and have access to formal and non-formal education, skills development, and vocational training. Gender-sensitive measures to eliminate the worst forms of child labour must be created and enforced. Conflict and Post-Conflict Situations Special measures to protect girls affected by armed conflict and post-conflict situations must be taken. Girls must be protected from gender-based violence, sexually transmitted diseases, abduction, forced labour, sexual exploitation, torture, and rape. Peacekeeping forces, police, humanitarian workers and civilian personnel in armed conflict and post-conflict situations must be trained to respect the rights of girls. The specific needs of girls must be addressed in all aspects of preventing recruitment of children into armed forces and facilitating their release and reintegration into society. Sufficient attention needs to be given to girls in action plans addressing violations and abuses against children in armed conflict. Measures need to be taken to ensure that the specific needs of girls affected by armed conflict and natural disasters are taken into account in the delivery of humanitarian assistance. Violence against Girls All forms of violence against girls must be condemned. This includes: physical, mental, psychological and sexual violence, torture, child abuse and exploitation, hostage-taking, domestic violence, trafficking in or sale of children or their organs, paedophilia, child prostitution, child pornography, child sex tourism, gang-related violence and harmful traditional practices in all settings. Laws must be strengthened and policies and programmes must be developed to prevent, prosecute and punish all cases of violence against girls. Age-appropriate and gender-sensitive services to girls subjected to all forms of gender-based violence need to be created. Advocacy and rights-based awareness-raising programmes directed at eliminating all forms of violence and discrimination against girls need to be strengthened. Measures must be taken to protect girls in juvenile detention facilities from all forms of physical, psychological or sexual violence and abuse. Detention or incarceration of girls should be used only as a measure of last resort and only for the shortest appropriate period of time. Migration Awareness must be built around the risks encountered by girls in the context of migration, and gender-sensitive migration policies and training programmes need to be developed to ensure the delivery of proper and professional interventions for girl migrants who are subjected to abuse and violence. The human rights and fundamental freedoms of girl migrants must be promoted and protected regardless of their immigration status. Trafficking of Girls Appropriate measures must be taken to ensure that all efforts aimed at combating trafficking in persons are gender and child-sensitive. When girls are in situations that put them in danger of exploitation, all appropriate measures to remove them from harm and protect them without delay must be employed.


International cooperation and coordination to strengthen and improve the fight against trafficking in persons is needed. This includes the protection, assistance, rehabilitation and reintegration of victims and the prosecution and punishment of offenders. Governments need to actively support girls who are vulnerable to all forms of discrimination and violence through: ƒ The allocation of appropriate financial resources ƒ Targeted, innovative programmes that address the needs of girls who have difficulties accessing services and programmes Girls’ Empowerment Governments need to promote people-centered sustainable development through the provision of both basic and lifelong education, including literacy and training, healthcare for all girls and women, and securing girls’ economic independence, particularly when girls head households. Girls’ empowerment must be facilitated through developing and adequately funding safe and supportive spaces, promoting mentoring and networking among women leaders and girls at all levels, peer education programmes, life-skills programmes, and other gender-sensitive youthfriendly services. It is important for girls to have the opportunities to meet and interact with peers and develop leadership capacities and networking opportunities. Girls should have the right to express themselves freely and their views should be taken into account in all matters affecting them. Girls, including girls with special needs, and their representative organizations, should be included in decision-making processes by identifying their own needs, and in developing, planning, implementing and assessing policies and programmes to meet these needs. Implementation of Commitments National research, monitoring and evaluation of the progress in eliminating all forms of discrimination and violence against girls must be strengthened, with special attention paid to disseminate lessons learned and good practices. Regular surveys should be conducted on the situation and needs of girls at national and local levels to identify groups at high risk for discrimination and violence. All data collected should be disaggregated by age, education, marital status, geographical location, income and other relevant factors. Reports need to be continuously written on internationally agreed indicators related to girls as contained in the Millennium Development Goals. Governments should also support the development of additional indicators to more effectively measure progress in eliminating all forms of discrimination and violence against girls. The Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, as well as the other human rights treaty bodies, are encouraged to invite State Parties to ensure that their reports explicitly address the situation of girls. It is important to mobilize and distribute all necessary resources to realize the goals, strategic objectives and actions set out in such documents as the Beijing Platform for Action and the Cairo Plan of Action with regard to the elimination of all forms of discrimination and violence against girls.


All organizations of the United Nations system are called on to mainstream a gender perspective and to pursue gender equality in their planning and programmes. They are also asked to state specific country-level goals and targets related to gender equality in their national development strategies. All States, multilateral financial and development institutions are asked to support the entities of the United Nations system, especially its funds and programmes so that they may effectively address all forms of discrimination and violence against girls.

If you would like to read the official and complete version of this document, The United Nations Commission on the Status of Women Report on the 51st Session, Document E/CN.6/2007/9, please access the following websites: http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/csw/csw51/OfficialDocuments.html or http://daccessdds.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N07/282/48/PDF/N0728248.pdf?OpenElement


Working Group on Girls of the NGO Committee on UNICEF UNICEF House 3 UN Plaza, H-1142 New York, NY 10017 USA Tel: 212-326-7713 www.girlsrights.org

This item has been reproduced with generous support from UNICEF

Text printed on recycled paper


NGO Committee on UNICEF WORKING GROUP ON GIRLS

Indicator Cards (Education & Financing for Girls) based upon Agreed Conclusions on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination and Violence Against the Girl Child from the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women report on the 51st Session (Document E/2007/27, E/CN.6/2007/9)


REPORT FORM After reviewing this booklet, please answer the following eight questions and e-mail your responses to WGGCSW51@gmail.com. Your input will be incorporated into the global report to be prepared by the NGO Committee on UNICEF – Working Group on Girls. 1. In what setting did you use this Indicator Cards tool? (group discussion, informal consultation, public meeting, individual meeting, school, church group, organization, etc.) 2. Please describe the members of the group that worked on your project. (number of participants, age, gender, position, affiliation, etc.) 3. In what country do you reside? 4. What are the three main areas in which you think your country has made progress on education for girls? 5. What are the three main challenges that remain, in order to achieve equal opportunities in education for the girls in your country? 6. Have you created any projects to respond to these challenges? Please describe. 7. Were you inspired to approach your government and establish a positive relationship to work together to respond to these challenges? (local or national government, Ministry of Education, Representatives for women, Representatives for children, etc.) 8. What was the main outcome of your experience using this Indicator Cards tool?

This Indicator Cards booklet is intended for use as a tool to help increase knowledge, awareness, and implementation of the official Agreed Conclusions regarding the elimination of discrimination and violence against girls worldwide. These conclusions were agreed upon by all member states of the 51st Commission on the Status of Women which took place at the United Nations in New York City in 2007. This booklet may also be accessed at our website, www.girlsrights.org. We hope that by using these Indicator Cards in consultations and discussion groups, you will be assisted in assessing and monitoring the progress in your country and also be inspired to become an agent for change by establishing positive partnerships and assisting your government by working side by side to achieve the goals of elimination of discrimination and violence against girls. Brief History of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) Throughout its 61 years of existence, the CSW has consistently promoted the advancement of women. The CSW is a functional commission of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). Every year, representatives of Member States gather at United Nations headquarters in New York to evaluate progress on gender equality, identify challenges, set global standards and formulate policies to promote gender equality and advancement of women's rights in political, economic, civil, social and educational fields. The CSW also works to promote development and peace, monitor the implementation of measures for the advancement of women, review and appraise progress made, and identify emerging issues affecting equality between women and men. The principal output of the CSW is the Agreed Conclusions on priority themes set for each year. Agreed Conclusions contain an analysis of the priority theme of concern and a set of concrete recommendations for Governments, institutions, civil society and other relevant stakeholders to be implemented at the international, national, regional and local levels. The final report is submitted to ECOSOC for adoption. The CSW has been instrumental in expanding the recognition of women’s rights and shaping global policies ensuring that the work of the UN incorporates a gender perspective in all areas. It continues to play a critical role by bringing together governments, UN entities, NGOs, and other organizations to promote women’s rights and advance gender equality worldwide.


GENERAL REGISTRY QUESTIONS

1. Create, where not currently in place, and maintain birth, death and marriage data registries with full national coverage Ä Are all of the girls in your nation registered at birth?

Yes/No

Ä Does your country register all deaths?

Yes/No

Ä Are all marriages in your nation registered?

Yes/No

Ä Does registration for marriage require a legal minimum age?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) taking steps to create national registries that will provide this information?

Yes/No (1) E/CN.6/2007/9, A13(j), A14.16(c)

EDUCATIONAL REGISTRY QUESTIONS

2. Collect data disaggregated by sex and age on educational dropout rates and research the causes of discontinued education Ä Are all of your country’s students registered by age?

Yes/No

Ä Are all of your country’s students registered by gender?

Yes/No

Ä Does your country keep track of educational dropout rates?

Yes/No

Ä Does your country monitor the reasons that girls discontinue their education?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) beginning to track this information?

Yes/No (2) E/CN.6/2007/9, A14.2.(b)


EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

3. Ensure that all girls, without discrimination, have access to free, compulsory primary education of good quality, and improve/expand girls’ education at all levels; Introduce special measures to improve enrolment and retention for girls at all levels Ä Does your nation require that all girls attend primary school? Yes/No Ä Does your country provide free primary education to all girls? Yes/No Ä Does your country provide incentives or sanctions that encourage families to send their daughters to school?

Yes/No

Ä Does your nation encourage pregnant adolescents, young mothers, and impoverished girls to continue their education?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) looking for ways to ensure that all girls receive primary and secondary education? Yes/No (3) E/CN.6/2007/9, A14.2(c),(e)

EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

4. Identify constraints and gaps and develop appropriate strategies to ensure gender equality, accelerated achievement of equality in enrolment, and completion of schooling at all levels for all girls Ä Has your country achieved gender equality in enrolment at primary, secondary, and post-secondary education levels?

Yes/No

Ä Has your country achieved gender equality in completion of primary, secondary, and post-secondary education levels?

Yes/No

Ä Does your country offer non-formal education or livelihood training programmes for girls who are not in school?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) taking actions to identify constraints and ensure that all girls are enrolled in and complete school?

Yes/No

(4) E/CN.6/2007/9, A14.2(d),(e)


EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

5. Promote gender-sensitive, empowering educational and training processes & teaching materials by reviewing and revising school curricula, formal and non-formal educational and training materials Ä Are the educational methods and materials used for children both gender-sensitive and empowering?

Yes/No

Ä Does your nation train teachers to use teaching methods that are non-stereotypical and gender-sensitive?

Yes/No

Ä Is your government ( ) or organization ( ) reviewing and revising school curricula, educational materials, and training methods to ensure that they are gender-sensitive and empowering?

Yes/No (5) E/CN.6/2007/9, A14.2(f)

EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

6. Ensure safe and supportive school environments for girls and girlfriendly school premises by working to eliminate discrimination and violence against girls Ä Do learning environments support the needs of girls? (for example, nutrition programmes and sanitation facilities)

Yes/No

Ä Are the places where girls learn safe? (for example, properly lit buildings, school transport on safe routes, measures discouraging sexual harassment)

Yes/No

Ä Do girls have a safe place to go if they feel they are in danger while at school?

Yes/No

Ä Are your nation’s teachers being trained to promote and protect the rights of girls?

Yes/No

Ä If ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to make schools safer and more supportive for girls?

Yes/No

(6) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.2(g)


EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

7. Ensure girls’ access to training that enables them to develop skills, capacities and expertise to exercise leadership, including training and special programmes necessary to become actors in public life; Encourage and support girls’ and boys’ interest and involvement in non-traditional fields and occupations Ä Is there training available for girls to develop the skills they need to become leaders as adults?

Yes/No

Ä If ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to provide leadership training?

Yes/No

Ä Do your educational programmes promote girls’ and boys’ interests in non-traditional fields and occupations? Yes/No Ä If ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to promote interest in non-traditional fields?

Yes/No (7) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.2(i),(f)

EDUCATION FOR GIRLS

8. Promote increased access of girls to information and communications technology, particularly girls living in poverty or in rural areas, to overcome the digital divide among countries & regions Ä Are girls given increased opportunities to learn skills in information and communication technology?

Yes/No

Ä Is there promotion of this technology for girls who live in poverty, rural areas, or disadvantaged situations?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to promote increased access of girls to information and communications technology?

Yes/No (8) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.2(m)


PARTICIPATION OF GIRLS

9. Respect and promote the rights of girls to express themselves freely, taking the views of girls into account in all matters affecting them; Involve girls in decision-making processes as full partners in identifying their own needs Ä Are girls given opportunities to express themselves freely in matters that affect them?

Yes/No

Ä Are girls able to identify their own needs, and is this taken into account in decision-making processes?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to promote increased opportunity for girls to identify their needs, express themselves, and become involved in decision-making processes?

Yes/No

(9) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.14(a),(b)

FINANCING FOR GIRLS

10. Give explicit attention to girls in budget processes at all levels, including resource allocation and expenditure reviews, to ensure sufficient resources for elimination of all forms of discrimination and violence against girls Ä Do your nation’s budgets – including national, regional, provincial and urban budgets -specifically mention, allocate, and review budgeted money for girls?

Yes/No

Ä Is the money budgeted for girls sufficient for elimination of discrimination and violence against girls?

Yes/No

Ä Where you circled ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working toward the allocation of money specifically for girls at all levels in government budgets?

Yes/No (10) E/CN.6/2007/9,A13(l)


FINANCING FOR GIRLS

11. Assess the impact of economic policies on girls and give explicit attention to girls in all development policies, programmes, and poverty eradication strategies Ä Does your government or organization assess how effectively girl’s rights are being protected in response to the economic funds your country has allocated for their well-being? Yes/No Ä Do the economic policies, development policies, programmes, and poverty eradication strategies in your country give explicit attention to girls? Yes/No Ä If ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) working to assess economic policies regarding the rights and well-being of girls and explicitally mention girls in policies, programmes, and poverty eradication strategies?

Yes/No

(11) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.1(d)

FINANCING FOR GIRLS

12. Ensure that the delivery of humanitarian assistance includes the specific needs of girls Ä Are girls in your country allocated enough of the humanitarian aid budget to ensure their needs are met?

Yes/No

Ä If ‘No’, is your government ( ) or organization ( ) creating measures to monitor and ensure that girls receive their share of humanitarian aid?

Yes/No (12) E/CN.6/2007/9,A14.8

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