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2014

Table of Contents Planning Guide ...........................................................2-6 Fillable Planning Tools ..............................................7-9 Badges ............................................................................10 Possible Activities .................................................. 11-17 Parent Meeting Information ............................... 18-19 Cookie Rally Forms ............................................... 20-21

In this packet, you will find a wide range of resources designed to make planning your cookie rally as simple as can be. This year we have added a new resource to help you plan a Parent Cookie Education Meeting during your rally. We hope this resource helps you to plan a parent meeting to improve communication between girls, leaders and parents during the sale. However, there are some important items that are not included in the rally materials.

Additional items to keep in mind: • Cookies- for girls to sample at a Cookie Rally (see page 20 to order) • Recognition items that girls can earn during the sale- loaner sets available by request (see page 20) • Rally patches- to be picked up at your nearest Service Center (see page 20 to order) • Additional activity insurance, to cover any non-Girl Scouts who may be present at the rally- the form can be found at www.gswise.org If you have any questions or comments, call 800-565-4475


Planning Guide What is a Rally?

Where to Have Your Rally?

A rally is a kickoff event to showcase a Girl Scout program. Rallies are designed to help girls learn about and get excited for upcoming programs, such as the Girl Scout Cookie Program Activity. Rallies are a great time to share important information, teach new skills and have fun!

When selecting a location, consider the activities you want to do and the number of girls who may be attending. Also consider parking, accessibility, comfort and cost. Locations like school cafeterias, gyms, community centers and libraries may be a good fit.

Rallies include hands-on activities for girls and may include a special component for adults who attend. For example, while girls are doing activities, parents could meet in a separate room to discuss questions they may have about the Cookie Program Activity. Maybe you’d like to invite enthusiastic parents whose Girl Scout(s) had success last year to present during this time.

Why Have a Cookie Rally? • To provide a fun event for girls to experience a preview the of upcoming Girl Scout cookie program activities.

• • •

To teach girls the value of our Cookie Program Activity.

Who to Invite to Your Rally? Girl Scout troops in your service area; leaders or volunteers to help supervise stations; parents to get involved with their daughter and the program; and older Girl Scouts who may not want to participate in activities but rather lead sessions and games.

To build skills that will help girls be successful for the rest of their lives. To generate enthusiasm and support for the Cookie Program Activity among adults and girls alike!

When to Have Your Rally? • Choose a date that works best for you and your area. Most cookie rallies will take place during December, before the cookie program activity begins. You can have your rally earlier than that, if it works for your area. When selecting your cookie rally date, try to keep in mind:

• • •

The date girls can begin taking cookie orders: January 1, 2014. Dates of other service area and council events Dates of community events that may conflict (high school basketball games, holiday events, etc.).

The length of your event will vary depending on the number of activities you choose to include clude and the number of girls you predict will attend. An hour and a half is a time frame me that works well for many.

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Remind event participants that the rally is designed to energize Girl Scouts. Tag-alongs (young children who are outside of the target age-range for the event) can distract from the activities and from the girls’ experience at the cookie rally, so it is best if tag-alongs can stay at home or with a babysitter.


Planning Guide Below are some questions to help you brainstorm throughout your planning process. Many of the resources in the packet can help you answer these questions, too!

What is our purpose? Why are we doing this event? What do we hope to accomplish?

What should the event cost for participants?

What is our theme or event name?

See Event Budget Worksheet. (See page 8)

You can use the recognition theme (Change the World) or put your own twist on it! List some ideas that would interest the group you are targeting. Feel free to ask your troop members or other girls for their ideas, too!

Who will plan the rally? Leaders? Service team members? Girls? Committee?

How will we advertise? Newspaper, fliers, emails, correspondence with service units, and troops. Contact your service area manager or membership manager if you would like help inviting others.

Who will help with staffing? Parents? Service area members? Program aides to assist? Other volunteers?

What supplies and equipment do we need?

When should we have it? Morning, afternoon, evening? Saturday, Sunday, weekday? Is this a good time for volunteers? What conflicts might there be?

Program supplies, tables, chairs, flags, etc... (see materials listed for each activity and supplies list on page 9)

Where should we have it?

How will we be safe?

Will this location accommodate the number of girls we want to have? Will this location accommodate the activities we want to do? Is there a side room where parents could meet to discuss the Cookie Program Activity? Can we have food and beverages there? Is there a fee for rental? Fee for custodian? What are we responsible for in the building? Is it handicap accessible?

How can we ensure we have an appropriate level First Aider/CPR, good crisis management plan and emergency contact info/health info for all participants? Check out Safety Activity Checkpoints and Volunteer Essentials on our website www.gswise.org for more info.

How long will the event last? Consider time for: registration, how long each activity will take, will you include session rotations, transition time from one activity to the next, restroom breaks, etc.

How will we evaluate our rally? What should our event include? Do we want to include one activity from each skill area? How can we keep it fun and age appropriate? Will we showcase the new recognition items for girls to see? How can we incorporate a parent meeting into our rally? (See pages 18-19)

Evaluation forms for girl registrants? Adult registrants? Rally planning committee? Facilitators?

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Tips and Tricks Odds and Ends: • Feel free to get feedback from Girl

Time Management Tips: • Load-in of supplies and set-up at the facility should start approximately 90

Scouts about what activities sound most appealing to them.

minutes before the event and should be completed at least 30 minutes before the event is scheduled to begin.

Utilize adults or program aides at each station during the event to help out.

Participants often start arriving approximately 30 minutes before the event is scheduled to begin. This is a good time to begin check-in, so the event can start on time.

Don’t forget to double check Safety Activity Checkpoints for important safety guidelines.

Have a smooth process for participants to check in so their first impression is the best one possible! Determine your check-in process ahead of time and ask one or two people to run the process.

Cover the cost of your event. Complete the budgeting tool (found on page 8) and set the registration fee so that your service area/troop can break even, while keeping the cost manageable for girls. Money doesn’t always equal a better program, but at times it definitely does help!

As girls arrive, plan for a simple activity to be offered—such as songs or “icebreaker” games—while the participants wait for the event to begin. This is a great opportunity to use program aides to lead songs and ice breaker games!

Allow 5 to 10 minutes at the beginning of the event for late check-in, opening activities such as a flag ceremony and/or recitation of the Girl Scout Promise, introductions, and announcements.

Divide girls into small groups and rotate them through the sessions: 15-20 minutes per station works well.

If you’re using groups, be sure to decide how and when you will divide girls into groups—by age level, by troop, etc.

You may want to build in some time for a bathroom break or transition time between activities/moving from one station to the next.

Contact your local resource center to reserve a cookie rally take out box containing table cloths, cookie costumes, banners ...

Try to include one activity from each of the five skills areas.

Whenever possible, alternate hands-on activities with more stationary activities, such as presentations or craft projects.

Keep age-level in mind. If most of your activities are geared for younger girls, invite older girls to help at a station.

Allow 10 to 15 minutes at the end of the event for evaluations, final announcements, thank-yous and closing activities such as a flag ceremony or sharing of projects.

Aim to include a parent meeting during your cookie rally (see pages 18-19).

Allow approximately 45 minutes for clean-up and load-out of supplies after the event. Ask girls to help clean up as they go to cut down on clean-up time after the event. You may also want to ask individuals to volunteer for specific clean-up responsibilities ahead of time in order to be efficient.

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Planning Timeline Below you will find a suggested planning timeline and checklist to help make the process of planning your cookie rally a breeze!

8 to 10 Weeks Prior to the Event

4 to 5 Weeks Prior to the Event

Form a committee to plan the event. Possible members can include: a chairperson, treasurer, event registrar (accepts registrations), media coordinator, program aides/older girls, event recruiter (recruits event volunteers). Decide the responsibilities of each person in the group.

Select three possible dates that don’t interfere with religious or national holidays, community events, and activities that may impact participation, such as council-wide Girl Scout events. Will a rain/snow date be needed?

Review the event schedule and activities. Make a list of the materials that need to be purchased or borrowed. (supplies list template on page 9)

Decide on how the facility will be set up—chairs, tables, decorations, food, first aid station, parking. Brainstorm possible problems and implement changes. The is a great opportunity to involve any older girls or program aides to help run this event!

Make a list of tasks that can be completed by volunteers. Recruit program aides, leaders and parents to volunteer during the event.

If any non-registered participants will be at your event, you will need to purchase additional activity insurance. You can find this form on our Web site at www.gswise.org

If a signed contract is required by your location, submit it to the local service center for approval by the council.

Confirm the location reservation. Who will open and close the facility? Is special equipment available on-site or will it need to be rented?

Check the event budget and make any needed changes.

Schedule your next committee meeting and decide what needs to be accomplished between now and then.

Make a list of possible facilities/locations. Reserve a facility for chosen date.

Plan the specific activities for the event. Will people with specific experience/skills or specialized training be needed? If the first choice is not available, what is the secondary plan? Will there need to be special arrangements for girls with special needs? Can you incorporate a parent meeting? If so, who can lead that portion of the event?

Plan a publicity strategy. How will this event be advertised? Will a flier be needed? If so, who will design, print and distribute the flier? Your membership manager can provide a flier template if needed.

Create a budget for the event — see pg. 20 for pricing.

Schedule your next committee meeting and decide what needs to be accomplished between now and then.

6 to 7 Weeks Prior to the Event ❒

Obtain a Certificate of Liability Insurance for the site and service providers naming Girl Scouts of Wisconsin Southeast as additionally insured. Contact the council Finance Department to obtain a Certificate of Liability Insurance for the contracted business, if requested. Develop a crisis management plan. Plan for an emergency (such as a tornado, snow storm, fire, etc.). How will participants be notified if the event is postponed? Who is responsible for bringing a first aid kit to the event? Will additional first aid supplies need to be purchased? What type of first aid certification is needed? Review Volunteer Essentials and safety activity check points on our website, www.gswise.org g g

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Planning Timeline (continued)

2 to 3 Weeks Prior to the Event

Day of Event

Confirm that all committee members have begun to finalize their responsibilities.

Buy any perishable supplies.

Collect registration forms (with emergency contact info) from all girls who plan to attend. Confirm final number of registrants.

Arrive early to set up for the event. Be prepared for some individuals who may arrive early to check-in.

Make final plans for event activities. Purchase any materials needed for event.

Develop a comprehensive check-in procedure.

Review the crisis management plan with all event volunteers.

Design an evaluation form for participants.

Check the event budget and make any needed changes.

Schedule your next committee meeting, if needed, and decide what needs to be accomplished between now and then. You should also schedule a wrap up meeting to go over evaluations, complete follow-up plans and celebrate a great event!

If members of the press are expected, assign someone to greet and escort them so that questions can be quickly and easily answered and the best story can be presented to the public.

Hand out check-in packets.

Have fun! Take photos of the participants during the activities and email them to your membership managers so we can see the fun you’re all having! Thank the volunteers, resource people and/or speakers.

1 Week Prior to the Event ❒

Send out confirmations to troops/leaders that have registered for event.

Confirm that all non-perishable materials needed for event have been purchased.

Notify all committee members, event volunteers or program partners of the final attendance numbers so that chairs can be set up correctly, supplies can be prepared, etc.

1 to 2 Weeks After the Event

Send out a press release for the event.

Make a check-in packet for all leaders that are attending. Include a welcome letter, an agenda, site map (if needed), attendance sheet, troop and adult evaluations and a pencil.

Make a plan to return borrowed take out box to your local Resource Center after your cookie rally.

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Meet with the committee members to review the participants’ evaluations, evaluate the event and make recommendations for improving future events.

Send thank-you notes to all donors, resource people and/or speakers, volunteers and facility staff.

Pay all outstanding bills. Create a final budget report and an event summary to file away for future reference.


Event Schedule Here are two possible schedule templates. The top one can be used for events where all participants complete the same activity at the same time. The bottom one can be used for events if girls will be rotating through stations.

Name of event: Event date:

Event location:

Start time for load-in and set up:

Start time for check-in:

Start time for event:

Event schedule: Start time for opening activities: Start time for activity 1:

Activity title:

Start time for activity 2:

Activity title:

Start time for activity 3:

Activity title:

Start time for activity 4:

Activity title:

Start time for activity 5:

Activity title:

Start time for snack and break: Start time for closing activities: Time of parent meeting:

End time for event:

End time for clean up and load-out:

Name of event: Event date:

Event location:

Start time for load-in and set up:

Time: Opening Activities

Time:

Time:

Start time for event:

Time:

Time:

Time:

ALL

Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 4 Activity 5 Closing/ Evaluations

Start time for check-in:

Group 1

Group 5

Group 4

Group 3

Group 2

Group 2

Group 1

Group 5

Group 4

Group 3

Group 3

Group 2

Group 1

Group 5

Group 4

Group 4

Group 3

Group 2

Group 1

Group 5

Group 5

Group 4

Group 3

Group 2

Group 1

ALL

Time of parent meeting:

End time for event:

End time for clean up and load-out:

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Event Budget Tool Name of event Number of participants

Number of event staff/volunteers

Site:

First Aid Supplies

$

Rental

$

Insurance

$

Cleaning fee

$

Transportation

$

Keys

$ $

Equipment Rental

$

Admission fees Other:

$ TOTAL $

 

Food: Meals

$

Snacks/drinks

$

Other:

$ TOTAL $

 

Housekeeping: Soap

$

Paper towels

$

Toilet tissue

$

Trash bags

$

Plates/cups/utensils

$

Napkins

$ TOTAL $

 

Printing/Mailing: Fliers

$

Schedules

$

Confirmations

$

Site maps

$ TOTAL $

 Program Supplies: Crafts

$

Patches

$

Other:

$ TOTAL $

 

Misc: Thank-you gifts

$

Patches/pins/T-shirts

$

Folders/paper

$

Pencils, tape, etc.

$

Name tags

$

Other:

$ TOTAL $

A. TOTAL Projected Cost $ B. Number of

$

Paying Participants C. Projected Fee (A ÷ B) $

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Supplies List Item

Quantity

Purchase, Borrow, Order, etc.

e.g., take out box

One set

Request from Resource Center

Other notes about event set-up or materials: e.g., need power outlet in parent meeting room

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Badges Completing activities for badges and awards can help girls gain valuable leadership skills. Throughout the activities section of this packet, you will see pictures of badges to show which activity aligns with a requirement from that badge. If girls complete badge work during your rally, try to send them home with a slip of paper indicating what requirements they have completed so they can finish the rest at home or with their troop. For more details on requirements for any badges or awards, please refer to the age level Girl’s Guide to Girl Scouting.

Girl Scout Level

Badge Name Count it Up

Badge

Requirements that could be met with activities from this packet: Step 1—Find out what cookies cost Step 2—Learn about the different kinds of cookies Step 3—Set a sales goal

Talk it Up

Step 2—How cookie money can help others Step 3—Inspire Others!

Meet My Customers

Step 1—Find out where your customers are Step 2—Talk to some customers Step 3—Practice handling money Step 4—Role play customer relations Step 5—Thank your customers!

Give Back

Step 5– Tell your customers how they helped

Cookie CEO

Step 1—Set a group goal Step 2—Explore how a business works Step 4—Learn to make a good impression Step 5—Track your sales

Customer Insights

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Step 5—Listen for clues


Possible Activities Here is the part you’ve been waiting for! This section of the kit provides you possible activities you can include in your rally. Each activity listing includes suggested age-level, materials list and instructions. Please feel free to modify anything provided to suit the specific needs of your cookie rally. Please try to have at least one activity from each skill.

Business-Building Skills Goal Setting: Girl Scouts set cookie goals individually and with a team, then create a plan to reach these goals. They develop Cooperation and Team Building skills all along the way!

Start-Up Activity Name Tags Materials: “Change the World” name tags (pre-printed and hole punched) Yarn (pre-cut) Dark markers Table space for girls to lean on while writing Materials: Instructions: When girls or troops check-in, you may want to have each girl make a simple nametag. Color-coding nametags ahead of time can help you divide girls into groups. For example, you could have 15 nametags with blue dots, 15 with brown dots and 15 with green dots—then you’d have three groups with 15 girls in each. You could also ask each Daisy to pick up a blue nametag, each Brownie to pick up a brown nametag and each Junior to pick up a green nametag. Instructions: When girls or troops checkin, you may want to have each girl make a simple nametag. Remember you can also ask program aides or volunteers to lead songs or icebreakers while you’re waiting for everyone to get checked-in.

Decision Making: Girl Scouts help decide how the team will spend their cookie money, furthering Critical Thinking and Problem Solving skills that will help in many aspects of life. Money Management: Girl Scouts take cookie orders, handle customers’ money and gain valuable and Practical Life Skills around financial literacy. People Skills: Girl Scouts learn how to talk to, listen to and work with all kinds of people while selling cookies. These experiences help them to develop Healthy Relationships and Conflict Resolution skills they can use throughout their lives. Business Ethics: Girl Scouts are honest and responsible at every step of the cookie sale. Their business ethics reinforce the Positive Values they are developing as Girl Scouts.

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Goal Setting Dress for Success

Go on a Cookie Walk

Goal Hanger

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Materials: • One solid color T-shirt per girl (you could request that each girl bring one to the event • or include in the cost of the event) • Fabric markers • Cardboard to stick between the layers of the T-shirt so marker ink doesn’t bleed through

Materials: • Sheets of colored paper (rectangles, squares or circles all work just fine) • Several printed sheets that say “Change the World” • Several printed sheets with pictures of cookies • Music player such as CD player or MP3 player with speakers • Outlet and power cord for your music device • Small prizes for girls who share great ideas (optional)

Materials: • Door hanger template (available on pg. 23) • Scissors • Markers (or any writing utensil)

Instructions: Have each girl decide on a cookie goal. This can be a number of boxes, the number of customers she’d like to reach—or better yet—an activity she’d like to do with her troop using their cookie proceeds. A good way to start is “I’m selling Girl Scout Cookies to...” Have each girl write her goal on her T-shirt and decorate it. She could also draw a picture of her favorite cookie or a picture that represents her goal. Words of Wisdom: “Dress for Success” is a great activity for girls to express themselves and show off their personality in their T-shirt design. Encourage them to personalize the T-shirt with their favorite colors, their handwriting or their favorite cookie.

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Instructions: Tape colored pages, cookie pages and “Change the World” pages on the floor in a circle. Turn on some music and have girls walk around the circle. When the music stops, if a girl lands on “Change the World” she should share one of her cookie sale goals with the group and talk about why that goal is important to her. If she lands on a cookie, she can tell the group a fun fact about that cookie like what it is called or an ingredient from it. Words of Wisdom: Goals can be a number of boxes she’d like to sell, a number of customers she’d like to meet, a number of COCO cards to send or anything else she hopes to accomplish during the sale. Remember, Daisies may need to hear some sample goals before the activity starts so they have an idea to get them started.

Instructions: Give each girl a door hanger to cut out and decorate. Each girl can write her first name, troop number, and goal on it along with how to contact her to buy cookies. This is a great resource to leave on neighbors’ doors when they are not home. If you need to fill more time, give girls blank sheets of paper to create their own door hanger designs! Words of Wisdom: This activity can be a great way to share your troop’s goals too! Make a troop poster and take a group photo! When posting about cookie sales on the internet, be sure to always follow council guidelines about web-based sales.


Goal Setting

Decision Making

“Like” Social Media Style

What Goes Around...

Four Corners

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Requirements can be met for this badge:

Requirements can be met for this badge:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Materials: • Paper • Markers or crayons • Pens or pencils • Digital camera • Sign up sheet for emailing photo

Materials: • None!

Materials: • Scenario note cards • Masking tape or an object to mark off each corner

Instructions: In today’s society, communication with family and friends through social media is huge part of every day life. In this activity, girls will make a poster and personalize it. Their posters should display their cookie goal, what recognition they would like to earn, and say “ I want to Change the World by…” Have each girl hold their poster and have an adult or PA take their picture. Make sure to have an email address for each parent/girl so you can send their photo to them. When cookie sales kick off, girls (13 and older) or parents can post the picture on their favorite social media site for friends and family to see! Words of Wisdom: This activity can be a great way to share your troop’s goals too! Make a troop poster and take a group photo! When posting about cookie sales on the internet, be sure to always follow council guidelines about web-based sales.

Instructions: This game is played with a group sitting in a circle—volunteers too! The first person gives the rest of the group a positive selling practice. For example, “I only go up to houses with lights on,” “I sold lots of cookies at my church,” etc. Keep going around the circle with each person sharing something that hasn’t already been said. Don’t stop when you get back to the first person—see how many times you can go around. A person can pass their turn, but if others still have ideas keep going until the positive ideas run out.

Instructions: This game is a great option for an ice breaker and a good way to practice active listening skills. During this activity, the station leader will use the scenario note cards, reading the scenario followed by four possible solutions. Point to each corner as the choice is read out loud. Once all the choices are read, each girl will indicate which option she thinks is best by walking to that corner. It’s great to discuss their answers, too.

Activity for this Girl Scout Level:

Instructions: Since younger girls might struggle with this, have them brainstorm people they might sell to. They can be specific with names of people they know, or generic such as “teachers.” Words of Wisdom: A way to extend this activity is to problem-solve specific struggles the girls have had. Maybe they tried a booth sale location that didn’t work out. See if girls can give ideas to each other to help overcome their struggles.

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Decision Making

Money Management

COCO Craze

Dollar and Cents

Girl Scout Hearts

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Materials: • Laptop • Projector • Power cord

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Materials: • Cookie boxes (you can use the boxes your sample cookies are in) • Play money

Materials: • Cookie boxes (you can use the boxes your sample cookies are in) • Play money

Instructions: Have girls either break into pairs or work as small groups. Practice buying an item and making change. Ensure all girls have a turn playing the customer and the seller. Depending on the age level you may want to use different combinations of prices or monetary amounts. For older girls, do multiple items and ask them to add up the total and then make change for the amount that is given to them.

Instructions: Have a conversation with girls about ways they can give back in their communities. What needs do they see that can be addressed? What are things that could be improved with their help? Not every idea needs to have a financial component. Write all the ideas inside a heart on the poster board.

Instructions: COCO is the Cookie Command Center—a web tool that makes it easy for girls, parents and leaders to manage the sale and reach their goals. COCO allows girls to set and track goals, watch their recognitions pile up, create a business plan based on the five key skills, use electronic marketing tools and more! Show girls this awesome new resource by giving them a virtual tour of the COCO website. Show girls how they can cheer on their troop members and create their very own “executive summary.” COCO is a great tool to help each and every girl feel empowered to make her own choices and manage her own sales. Girls may begin sending COCO cards to potential customers on January 1, 2014, asking them to buy cookies. Words of Wisdom: Be sure to talk about the Girl Scout Internet Safety Pledge (which can be found on the GSUSA website) and remind them they should always work with a trusted adult when going online. If you’re working with older girls during this activity, you can invite some volunteers from the group to come up to the computer and practice using the various features of the COCO site.

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Words of Wisdom: If girls are struggling, brainstorm some ways to improve, such as carrying a pocket calculator, creating a “cheat sheet” with cookie prices, etc.

Words of Wisdom: It is part of the Girl Scout way to help others in need and try to better the world around us. Sometimes girls only think about what they want out of their troop’s cookie proceeds. It’s great to remind them that they could use some of their proceeds to do a Take Action project or to earn an award. See what the girls come up with!


People Skills A “Riddle” Inspiration

First Impression Fashion

Tough Cookies

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Materials: • Riddles • Inspirational phrases (large print) • Inspirational phrases cards (for each girl)

Materials: • Girl Scout uniform/apparel • Cards for the announcer to describe what girls are wearing and why (optional) • Girl volunteers to act as models • A stage, or some kind of tape/carpet to designate one • Poster (optional—for do’s and don’ts list) • Markers (optional—for do’s and don’ts list)

Materials: • Mock booth sale (table, cash box, cookies, table cloth, posters, etc.) • Persons to role play customers

Instructions: Read the riddles out loud and see if they can guess which riddle describes which cookie. After they’ve matched each cookie to it’s description, have them practice the inspired phrases they can use with customers to promote their product. Words of Wisdom: Have girls pair up and use this as a role playing opportunity as well. One girl being the customer and another giving her sales pitch. Submitted by: Troop 21, Janesville, IA

Instructions: Set up or designate a stage and runway for your “models.” Ask an older girl(s) or an adult to announce the outfits as they come down the run way. Have girl volunteers showcase outfits that would be appropriate to wear while selling cookies. These outfits could include nice jeans/pants and a Girl Scout shirt or a full Girl Scout uniform. Ask the “audience” for their input and compile a list of wardrobe do’s and don’ts. (Please keep in mind families that may be on a tighter budget).

Instructions: Have girls take turns as customers approaching the booth and as Girl Scouts behind the booth. Role play what to say as a “sales pitch” or hook to grab customers’ attention. Have girls demonstrate good cookie booth etiquette from polite language to a neat table to prompt customer service. Remind them that it is okay to say “Let me get my leader” if they don’t have an answer. Also let them know it is their cookie sale, so they should take charge as much as possible. For Daisies, you may want to pair them up with older girls or have older girls model correct behavior and have Daisies point out what is good about the older girls’ presentation.

Words of Wisdom: This activity can be done with small groups or as a whole group activity at the beginning or end of your rally. The size of your service unit may dictate which is best. As you noticed in the materials list, this would be a great opportunity to bring in a Mobile Market (remember, you will need a volunteer to run this station) and offer clothing pieces and accessories families can buy that day to sell in. Submitted by: Marilyn Askelson

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Business Ethics Good Manners

Meet and Greet

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Activity for these Girl Scout Levels:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Requirements can be met for these badges:

Materials: • Card stock (1/4 of a sheet per girl) • Pencils/pens/markers

Materials: • An adult volunteer to role play with the girls • Optional: a mock door for girls to knock on to role play

Instructions: Thank you notes can help increase sales, bring a smile to someone’s face and are a good idea overall! Have girls practice what they might write. A good starting place is their first name, and the customers order, this way it also acts as a receipt. They might want to include information about how to order more cookies or a sentence about what they plan to do with the proceeds their troop earns. Keep safety in mind—girls shouldn’t share their last name or personal al contact information.

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Instructions: It seems obvious, but have the girls practice going face-to-face and greet people at their homes! Nine out of ten consumers will buy Girl Scout Cookies if you just ask. Have an adult volunteer role-play with the girls what to do when a customer says no, what to do if a customer invites you inside , and don’t forget to go over your Girl Scout safety tips!


Girl Scout Cadettes, Seniors and Ambassadors: You can play a much larger role in cookie sales than you may think. You have already learned the five skills, so lets apply them creatively. Take some time to think about our theme for the year,

Take Action—Make a Difference! No matter what path you choose after school—continuing your education or getting a job—you’ll find that your cookie sales experience will put you a step ahead. Make a list of potential job requirements that you meet as a result of your experience selling cookies. For example, most employers look for people who are organized selfstarting and good at communicating. Use the space below to record ways you have demonstrated these abilities as part of the cookie sale.

What can YOU do to change the world?

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Parent Cookie Education Meeting Girl Scout parents play a key role in their daughter’s Cookie Program Activity success. It is imperative that the leaders, girls and parents have open communication during the Cookie Program Activity. Having a parent meeting at the cookie rally is a great way to start. A parent meeting is a great opportunity to share important information about the Cookie Program Activity. The meeting can be about 20 minutes, to share key points and answer questions. Here are a few ideas of what the meeting could look like.

Materials/Set-up • • • • • •

Small room or area separate from girls’ activities Sign-in sheet—be sure to capture parent name, girl name and troop number Slips of paper for prize drawing—must be present at end of meeting to win Tables and chairs, possibly set in a large circle or small groupings Samples of money envelopes, sale materials, cookie goal charts, if available Computer, projector, power cord and outlet, if available

Outline for Meeting - (5 minutes) Show video 5 Skills for the Girl Scout Cookie Program, found at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_rNJ-7FmR4E - (3 minutes) Present the five skills that girls are learning through the cookie sale. Be clear about what the five skills are—and why they matter. • Goal Setting: Girl Scouts set cookie goals individually and with a team, then create a plan to reach them. They develop Cooperation and Team Building skills all along the way! • Decision Making: Girl Scouts help decide how the team will spend their cookie money, furthering Critical Thinking and Problem Solving skills that will help in many aspects of life. • Money Management: Girl Scouts take cookie orders, handle customers’ money and gain valuable and Practical Life Skills around financial literacy. • People Skills: Girl Scouts learn how to talk to, listen to and work with all kinds of people while selling cookies. These experiences help them to develop Healthy Relationships and Conflict Resolution skills they can use throughout their lives. • Business Ethics: Girl Scouts are honest and responsible at every step of the cookie sale. Their business ethics reinforce the Positive Values they are developing as Girl Scouts. - (5 minutes) Have a conversation about what troops may be planning to do with their cookie proceeds. Talking about these possibilities can help p excite parents p about what their daughters will accomplish. Some examples:

• • • • •

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Pay for next year’s membership dues Purchase badges and awards Plan a trip Attend events, camp, etc. Complete a Take Action project


Parent Cookie Education Meeting - (5 minutes) Present COCO Web site • COCO is the Cookie Command Center, that lets girls set and track goals, cheer on their troop members, create a business plan, and customize an “executive summary” • COCO also allows troop leaders to track troop sales and communicate with families electronically • Demonstrate how to set goals on COCO • Demonstrate how to send out COCO cards - (5 minutes) Discuss expectations for the parents, girls and leaders. If you have parents and leaders from many troops, you may need to speak about general expectations. If you are able to, the group could break into small groups by troop to discuss specific plans. • Inventory management—how will your troop manage inventory?

Communication weekly—send emails, text or call about inventory. The goal is to manage inventory down to zero to maximize troop proceeds potential.

• •

Turn in money when picking up more cookies from troop leader.

Key Dates of the 2014 Cookie Program Activity:

Exchange for another variety instead of adding to your inventory whenever possible.

COCO e-cards begin Order taking begins Girls sell cookie directly Cookie booth sales begin 1st Troop ACH payment Cookie sale recognition period ends

January 1 January 1 Janaury 26 January 26 February 15 March 11

Thank parents for their involvement and save time to answer any additional questions at the end.

Remember, if you do not know the answer you can tell them you will find out the answer and get back to them. For more information on holding a parent meeting during your rally or at a troop meeting, contact cookies.

Additional Resources: ABC Bakers Web site: www.ABCSmartCookies.com • Includes a wide range of information about cookie sales and products • Features COCO, a new portal to help leaders and girls communicate and track their goals Girl Scouts of the USA Cookies Web site: www.GirlScoutCookies.org Girl Scouts of Wisconsin Southeast Web site: www.gswise.org

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Cookie Rally Order Form Form must be completed and returned to the council at least 3 weeks prior to the rally. Please fill out all fields to the best of your ability. Thank you!

Cookie Rally organizer: Phone:

Service Area#: Email:

Rally date and time: Rally location (name and address): Following numbers will be used to order patches and sample cookies to share during your rally. Approx. # of girls attending: Approx. # of adults/volunteers attending: Cookie order: $1 per package, order must be in full cases (12 packages = 1 case) Caramel deLites

Penut Butter Sandwich

Thin Mints

Thanks-A-Lot

Shortbread

Penut Butter Patties

Cranberry Citrus Crisp

Lemonades

Service Center at which I would like to pick up cookie rally patches: (You will receive a call when you can pick up) Will you be holding a Parent Meeting during your cookie rally? ❒ Yes

❒ No

Name of person conducting Cookie training for troops: Date of training: Do you want to reserve the cookie rally take out box? ❒ Yes ❒ No Service Center at which I would like to pick up the cookie rally take out box? Pick up date: Return date:

Send form to:

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Girl Scouts of Wisconsin Southeast 131 S 69th Street Milwaukee, WI 53214 Fax: 414-476-5958 Email: cookies@gswise.org (Subject: Cookie Rally)


2014 Rally Evaluation Thank you for hosting a rally! We want to make next year’s kit even better and with your feedback, we can!

Cookie Rally organizer:

Service Area#:

Address: Phone:

City:

State:

Zip:

Email:

Number of girls in attendance at the Cookie Rally

1. Were the suggested activities suitable for the grades specified?

❒ Yes

❒ No

If no, why? 2. What was the most helpful feature/section of the Rally Packet? Why?

3. What was the least helpful feature/section of the Rally Packet? Why?

4. Were the packets distributed at an appropriate time?

❒ Yes

❒ No

If no, why?

Additional suggestions for improvement:

Did you use any activities that weren’t provided in this packet? Share them with us!

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2014 Cookie Rally Guide