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SPRING 2016

The quarterly magazine for volunteers

Walking on the wild side ALSO IN THIS ISSUE Unusual ways to raise money, bringing international experience to your meeting and the local heroes making guiding work PLUS News, ideas and your stories


Contents

News 4

What’s on, what’s new… … and what’s been happening in the guiding world

Welcome

COVER PICTURE: 1st Wetheral Brownies go wild on holiday (page 71)

Laura West’s role models inspired a body-confidence revolution

54 Guiding online New systems to make life easier

Inspiration

60 Who’s who?

14 An Activity Centre for all seasons

How to

A year of four guiding treasures

So this is it! My last welcome to you all as Chief Guide. It has been a tremendous five years, with a lot of change and a lot to celebrate – you can refresh your memory with a few of the highlights on page 28. I hope you all had a wonderful World Thinking Day last month. It’s always humbling and inspiring to remember that we are just a few of the 10 million members of Girl Guiding and Girl Scouting across the world, each with our own unique experiences and points of view. You can help girls of all ages put themselves in the shoes of their guiding sisters, whether they’re from the next town over or another continent altogether, using some of the suggested activities on page 44. And of course we are always looking to bring guiding to even more girls – on page 48, you’ll find some great stories from some of our newest and most innovative units. After all that, if you find a little time for yourself, have a look at the list of inspirational reads on page 39 – now I have a bit more time on my hands, there’s a stack of books at home I’m planning to tackle soon!

51 Role call!

18 Parent volunteers ‘It has been wonderful to see the Guides in action’

28 The last five years Our highlights from 2011 to now

32 ‘Being our Best’ is one The first steps towards 2020

39 Inspirational reading From Swallows to Mockingbird

43 Ahead of her time Friend of guiding, Beatrix Potter

44 Bring the world home Global adventure at your meeting

48 You get, you give Guiding has a lot to offer

52 Including everyone Two members’ stories

Meet the Trustees and Council

20 Fundraise outside the box New ways to bring in vital cash

27 Stretch every pound Make your money do more

36 Make the most of volunteer shops …and keep money in local guiding

40 Plan for success Prepare for an amazing 2020

46 Use your human resources Tap into local knowledge

56 Value your volunteers How do you say ‘thank you’?

30

58 Day in the life Public Relations Adviser Gillian

Tools for the job 24 Team players Getting the best from everyone

30 Local heroes The guiding staff members who make it all happen

HOW TO BUY This icon highlights items you can buy direct from guiding. To place an order or to find your nearest volunteer shop, call the Information Team on 0161 941 2237 – remember that when you buy locally, the profits stay in local guiding! Or buy online at www.girlguidingshop.co.uk, open 24 hours a day.

Your voice 62 Your photos, stories, letters and opinions

Activities 84 Things to make and do for all sections GUIDING MAGAZINE ONLINE Search for ‘magazine’ in the members’ area of www.girlguiding. org.uk to read the magazine online. You can also find Girlguiding on Facebook and Twitter.

Need guiding magazine on audio? Call 0161 941 2237 or email guiding@girlguiding.org.uk.

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News

What’s on, what’s new and what’s been happening in the guiding world

Gill hands over to a new Chief Guide

I have to start with a big thank you to everyone who has supported me over the last five years – wherever I go, volunteers and staff show the same guiding warmth, and I am full of appreciation and gratitude for all your work and energy. Thank you as well to everyone who has been part of the process to choose my successor, which includes many of the readers of this magazine. One of the biggest governance tasks over the last few years was finding a way for members to be more involved in the selection process, and I’m told that more than 800 people gave their feedback on the longlisted candidates in the first 24 hours alone. I’ve been so lucky, in the last five 4 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

years, to see so much of guiding – much more than most members ever will. I hope that you’ll continue to be proud of our work, and to stick up for it when necessary. It’s easy to be irritated or worried by change – and there has been a lot of it, I know – but we owe it to girls to adapt as times change and not become fossilised. Guiding, at its heart, is a wonderful thing, and we must look after it like a precious jewel. I have to admit that I am looking forward to a bit of a rest. I think it’s very easy, in guiding and life more generally, to get stuck in the same role for many years out of habit, but times like these remind me that we shouldn’t be afraid to look again and check that we’re making the most of our skills, and still enjoy what we do. I’m not the

same person I was five years ago, so I need to look for a new role that suits who I am now – and I’d advise everyone to do the same every once in a while. Moving into a different role gives you a chance to grow, and gives someone else the chance to grow into your role – someone who can bring a fresh pair of eyes to old challenges and spot new opportunities. One of the last big events I attended as Chief Guide was Spark, the Senior Section Spectacular launch event at Alexandra Palace over the World Thinking Day weekend. It was wonderful to see so many of our brilliant young members getting their moment in the spotlight and proudly celebrating not only this special anniversary year, but everything that guiding has given them. I hope they – and you all – have a year to remember!


News

It’s back! Get ready for the BIG GIG 2016

The dust has barely settled after the last BIG GIG, where thousands of girls danced and sang to the music of Ella Henderson and Nathan Sykes, and we’re already gearing up for the next one. On 2 July 2016 we’ll be heading back to the Wembley Arena for the latest of our huge guiding-only pop concerts. Sharon Lushiku, Leader in Training at Abbotsford Guides, says, ‘It was absolutely amazing to be celebrating such a fantastic Day of the Girl with 20,000 girls at the BIG GIG! It’s an important event because it’s just for girls and shows them just how much fun they can have – they can be themselves and be confident.

WORDS: Katie Hetherington, Helen Jefferies, Ellen Reid

A birthday celebration like no other

Get ready for The Senior Section Ball, the closing event for The Senior Section Spectacular as members of the section celebrate their 100th year. Members of The Senior Section chose the Ball from a selection of five possible finales to an action-packed year, which will take place at the Palace Hotel in Manchester on 22 October. Being exclusive to The Senior Section, the event will focus on their achievements and be a good opportunity for members to get to know young women in other units and celebrate. There are limited spaces, so

‘The most inspiring thing I heard from an act was when Gabrielle Aplin said we should celebrate International Day of the Girl every day – until there is a time when we don’t have to any more!’ If you’ve been to a previous BIG GIG, take note – the ticketing process has changed and is now completely online. All the details are at new. girlguiding.org.uk/big-gig, where we’ll announce each new act as it’s confirmed. You can even submit questions to the performers through the site, or request a shout-out for your unit at the event. See you there! See page 3 for how to order your BIG GIG merchandise.

make sure you get your tickets – you don’t want to miss this! Find out more and book your tickets at spectacular.girlguiding.org.uk, where you can find out about other Spectacular events in your Region. And don’t forget your Mission Spectacular badge (85p, order code 2365).

INFORM DBS: Hit, myth or maybe?

+

Girlguiding will accept DBS checks completed for another organisation. MYTH – As part of our Membership and Recruitment Policy, each individual who is in regulated activity must complete a DBS check (including rechecking) for Girlguiding to ensure we have a clear picture of their suitability. + You must have a Girlguiding DBS check done each year. MYTH – We are introducing rechecks every five years and the system will contact you when it’s your turn. Please wait until you’re contacted to prevent everyone trying to get checked at once! + DofE volunteers under 18 don’t need a DBS check. HIT – Neither do members of The Senior Section without a leadership role, or Young Leaders aged 14 to 18. For a full list of the roles that require a check search our website for ‘recruitment checks’. + DBS checks can be done only by your local District or Division ID Verifier. MYTH – Any Girlguiding ID Verifier can verify any member or potential member, except a member of their family. + Checks can’t be processed without a passport. MYTH – You’ll need one primary document (like a driving licence, passport or birth certificate) and two secondary documents (like a bill, bank statement or benefit statement). If you don’t have any primary documents, you can use five secondary ones instead – but either way, at least one must have your date of birth and another your current address. Find the full list of suitable documents by searching www. girlguiding.org.uk for ‘guidance for ID Verifiers’.

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News

Eat Happy!

We’re delighted to announce an exciting new Eat Happy partnership with Tesco, promoting healthy lifestyles to more girls and

Camp CEO 2016

Camp CEO gives 20 young women aged between 14 and 17 the chance to meet inspirational female leaders and take part in adventurous activities. Thanks to the support of the Freemasons’ Grand Charity, the camp will be three days of creative activities and interactive workshops. Girls will have a whole day with a female business leader, including mentoring to help them succeed. As success can be measured in many ways, the focus this year is on entrepreneurship, innovation and how to maintain a work-life balance. Girls will meet women with very different backgrounds who work in different industries. Camp CEO 2016 is the place for girls to discover strengths, set their own goals and get inspired! Interested? Candidates need to complete an online application form and submit a short video. Find out more at new.girlguiding. org.uk/opportunities.

Membership communications – the next step

When our survey closed in November 2015, hundreds of you had told us what great communications looked like for you – thank you! It took us a while to crunch all the data, but now we’re ready to test out some of your suggestions. To make sure people with a range of guiding roles and experience can be involved, we’re running a series of focus groups across the UK. If you’d like to join a focus group near you, or find out more about the review’s progress so far, go to www. girlguiding.org.uk/ membercommsreview.

Eat Happy

PANTONE giveaways 220 C Get great for events

PANTONE 2718 C Inspired by the article in the Winter issue of the magazine (page 32) to shout out about PANTONE 7677 C Girlguiding at local or national events? Every event is unique, but PANTONE 123 C people it is important that recognise Girlguiding, no matter wherePANTONE we happen to be. 7742 C We’ve sent Countries and Regions everything you need to PANTONE 158look C help your event great: pin badges, postcards and stickers to hand out, and foam boards that you can use to spread the Girls Can message. Our Marketing team is working on more items that you can take to events, and would love to hear about how you’d like to

A Safe Space

Each year we update our safeguarding guidance to make sure our volunteers can continue to provide the safe and welcoming environment girls love. We’re sending out the latest version of our A Safe Space leaflet with your membership card, which gives you access to several membership benefits and discounts, acts a handy reminder of your membership number and includes all the phone numbers you need in an emergency. Keep A Safe Space in your unit’s Emergency File and you’ll be ready for anything.

young women. Rainbows and Brownies can earn a free fun badge (left) by taking part in Tesco’s Farm to Fork Trail in-store or at their meeting to help them understand more about healthy eating and where their food comes from. Sign your unit up now at www.eathappyproject.com/ farm-to-fork to enjoy a fab activity and receive a badge for every girl. Keep your eye on the Girlguiding website for more information coming very soon too.

attract people to your stall. Send a message to the team at marketing@girlguiding.org.uk. If you’d like to take advantage of these items, please get in touch with your Country/Region Commissioner and let her know about the event you want to attend. Or check out the Girls Can items for sale – see page 3 for how to order. @

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GET ACTIVE, HAVE FUN, SAVE LIVES

HELP RAISE MONEY FOR OUR LIFE SAVING HEART RESEARCH AND YOUR UNIT Skipping is a great way for girls of different ages and abilities to have fun and get active.

Unit Leaders receive a free resources pack worth £30 containing everything they need to introduce skipping. Over 250,000 children took part in Jump Rope For Heart last year. Find out how your unit can also benefit at bhf.org.uk/jumprope

© British Heart Foundation, a registered charity in England and Wales (225971) and in Scotland (SC039426) G16SPR


News

INFORM

A right Royal birthday

Not only has HM Queen Elizabeth II been Patron of Girlguiding since 1952, she also joined the 1st Buckingham Palace Brownie Pack and Guide Company in 1937, and eventually became Chief Ranger of the British Empire. On 21 April the Queen will celebrate her 90th birthday, and you can mark the event too with special commemorative items, available for sale from 1 April from your local volunteer shop (or see page 3 for other ways to order). From elegant glassware to a luxurious tin full of delicious biscuits, there is something to suit every budget and taste. Don’t miss out on the regal badges!

Mental wellbeing and resilience

Our Peer Educators already work with thousands of girls a year, providing a safe space where they can discuss body image, healthy living and what makes a healthy relationship. From April 2016 they’ll have another string to their bow – a new resource on mental wellbeing and resilience. Through the Girls’ Attitudes Survey, girls told us that they were concerned about bullying, a shortage of female leaders, mental wellbeing and everyday sexism – and when we asked our Peer Educators which of these topics they most wanted to have an impact on, mental wellbeing was a clear winner. Emmeline Poole of 136th Liverpool

60-second interview

Senior Section (left) was one of the members of the Task and Finish Group which developed the resource in partnership with mental health experts. She says, ‘Mental wellbeing has had a big impact on my family so it’s an issue close to my heart, although it’s still considered a taboo subject by some. ‘It’s amazing to know that at 16 I’m having an impact at a national level, creating something that will be used all around the UK. It is a sensitive subject so we’re working closely with Young Minds and testing activities with units to make sure it’s as good as possible.’ To book a Peer Educator for your unit, see new.girlguiding.org.uk/ book-peer-educator. Young members aged between 14 and 25 who want to take these sessions to units can find out more at new.girlguiding.org.uk/ become-peer-educator.

We catch up with Michelle Persaud, Girlguiding’s Individual Giving Manager Q What is your job? A I look after supporter fundraising and getting more supporters for Girlguiding. I also try to make sure everyone knows we are a charity and that we need their support to give girls across the UK more opportunities. Q How long have you been doing the job? A It’s a completely new role and I’ve been here only a few months, but I’m really excited and looking forward to the challenge. Q How can people fundraise for Girlguiding? A We have lots of challenge events to choose from – smaller challenges like sponsored runs and bigger ones like skydiving or international treks. And we’re starting to enter the Tough Mudder event in 2016, so there’s something that everyone can get involved with. Q What’s been the biggest success so far? A A group of guiding supporters trekked up Machu Picchu in Peru (below) in 2015 and raised over £50,000, which is a lot more than we expected, so we were very happy. That’s the type of challenge that we want members to get involved with – something that they can really enjoy. Find out more about the challenge events we’re planning, and other ways to support Girlguiding, at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ challengeevents.

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News

Chief Guide gets a new Silver Fish

Since its creation in 1909, the Silver Fish has seen many transformations – from an award earned by Guides to the highest award given in guiding. It’s now awarded to a few very outstanding volunteers who have gone ‘above and beyond’ in their service to Girlguiding – holding a range of roles; nurturing, inspiring and motivating girls and adults; and strengthening the relationships between guiding in the UK and other countries. Gill Slocombe has certainly done all this and more in her guiding life,

Getting to know you

Girlguiding cares about what our members think and actively seeks their opinions on a range of topics. This is why last November we sent out a request via Commissioners to all Leaders, asking for their feedback on the gift items in the Guiding Essentials catalogue. As 100 per cent of profits from Trading goes back into Girlguiding, we wanted to discover what sort of products Leaders want to see, and encourage them to share ideas for future products and gifts. Last winter Marketing Officer Mia Churcher conducted focus groups with Guides around the UK to hear their thoughts about our products. Heather O’Halloran, Leader of 1st Caversham Park Guides, said, ‘I filled in the survey not thinking I would hear anything, but to my surprise I was asked if someone could visit my unit. Mia ran the whole evening and really kept the girls interested. It will be good to see the results.’

and especially in the last five years as Chief Guide. But she was still shocked to be awarded the last of the old Silver Fish as well as the first one featuring a new design at an event in Somerset in November. Gill says, ‘I feel both humbled and honoured to have been given this very special guiding award. I love doing all that I can to contribute to the success of our amazing organisation, and I get so much from volunteering. That said, I would love to see more of our volunteers rewarded and thanked – it’s certainly given me a burst of energy and made me feel good!’ The Silver Fish is just one of a range of awards created by Girlguiding to thank and recognise our incredible volunteers. To find out more about them and nominate a guiding hero in your area, search www.girlguiding.org.uk/ guidingmanual for ‘thanks and recognition’. The Guiding Essentials catalogue, chock full of uniform, useful items and guiding gifts, is delivered every autumn. If you have not yet received yours, please order one through our Sales and Information team on 0161 941 2237. Look out online or in your inbox for calls to get you and your girls involved in future consultations.

INFORM Do we need a registered charity number?

If you’re producing materials locally, be sure to use the correct logo (which you can generate at www.girlguiding.org.uk/opc) to show that it comes from your County or Division, not Girlguiding at a national level. In England and Wales, most of these won’t need a registered charity number – although each level and unit is a charity in its own right, they are excepted from registering unless they earn over £100,000 a year or have income from a property or endowment. In Scotland and Ulster, the situation is different – contact your Country office for more information. And if you need a certificate to prove your level’s charitable status, contact the Information Team on 0161 941 2237.

Adventure on

Planning summer camps and other outdoor adventures? Get a head start on your equipment/ to-do list by buying items from our Adventure range. Get comfortable on hard ground with the sit mat (£3.50, order code 2629), stay cosy with camp blankets for every section (£9) and pop things in the handy folding bag or stylish wash bag (£10 and £5, 2625 and 2630 respectively). We even have a selection of fun camp-related badges from 70p – see page 3 for different ways to order yours.

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WWF-UK, registered charity number 1081247 and registered in Scotland number SC039593. A company limited by guarantee number 4016725 © 1986 Panda symbol and ® “WWF” Registered Trademark of WWF-World Wide Fund For Nature (formerly World Wildlife Fund). wwf.org.uk


News

Heads up!

‘Being our Best’ is our plan for making guiding even better by 2020 – and it shapes everything we do. Here’s what you can expect to see from us between now and June. Girlguiding’s plan for 2020

EXCELLENCE We’ll repeat the success of last year’s Magic and Mayhem events at Blackland Farm, Foxlease and Waddow Hall in June – a giant sleepover with circus skills, magic and adventure for Rainbows and Brownies. One big addition for 2016 is the afterparty the following day, exclusively for members of The Senior Section. And it’s the busiest time of the year at our Activity Centres as we offer adventure and fun to guiding members, schools and other groups, and show even more non-members what Girlguiding has to offer. You’ll hear more about the Walking and Narrowboating schemes too.

ACCESS We’ll launch our Impact Report – looking at the progress we’ve already made on ‘Being our Best’ and encouraging more people to join or support us.

VOICE We’ll continue to take guiding on the road and prove that Girls Can do anything at a series of Pride events.

CAPACITY Our new seasonal Activity Centre staff will start work in March and April, increasing capacity at each centre and offering more girls residential experiences and adventurous activities. We’ll develop resources to help Leaders offer more flexible guiding, and start sending out a new pack to welcome parents of girls joining us. And we’ll share new advice on how long to keep documents and what happens when a unit has to close, as well as starting to use our new role descriptions.

Find out more about all our plans at new.girlguiding.org.uk/being-our-best.

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Inspiration

An Activity Centre for all seasons

Whatever the time of year, there’s always something happening at our Girlguiding Activity Centres. But it’s not just guiding visits and adventurous activities…

Spring Get married at Waddow Hall

The staff at Waddow Hall are experts when it comes to adventure – and there aren’t many adventures bigger than starting your life together! With magnificent reception rooms, breathtaking views and a sweeping staircase for those special photos, your big day will have the wow factor, whatever your budget. Adrian and Julie Berry (pictured right) knew exactly what they were looking for when planning their wedding in August 2015. Julie says, ‘Our vision was a traditional, vintage-themed ceremony during the daytime with a “festival” feel during the evening. ‘As soon as we entered Waddow Hall we knew we had found our perfect venue. It provided everything we were looking for: a stunning building in a magnificent setting with the opportunity to have a festival marquee in the grounds.’ The couple and their friends had free rein when it came to dressing the venue and booking entertainment, which included a caricature artist, magician, DJ and vintage ice-cream cart. Julie says, ‘Our friends helped us to make all the venue decorations, and seeing all our hard work come to fruition on the day added to the sense of

14 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

enjoyment for our guests. ‘The choice of menus offered for the wedding breakfast was perfect and we found the prices to be extremely reasonable. On the day we were very impressed with how seamlessly the meals were served to our guests. The food served was excellent and the waiting staff were very professional.’ Once the musicians and entertainments were packed away, guests made their way to the

accommodation on site – even the new bride and groom, who stayed at the ‘quaint and charming’ Rose Cottage. Julie continues, ‘We ended our wedding weekend with a fun finale – hurtling towards the river on grass sledges! We would like to extend our warmest thanks to all of the staff of Waddow Hall for supporting us to make our wedding weekend everything we hoped for.’ Just got engaged? Find out what we could offer you at www.girlguiding.org.uk/waddow.

‘As soon as we entered Waddow Hall we knew we had found our perfect venue’

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Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Summer Take the ICANDO London Explorer Challenge

With the long summer holiday approaching, now’s the time to plan a unit trip to London. ICANDO is the perfect base for a day (or more!) of sightseeing, shopping and, for Rainbows and Brownies, an extra-special badge. So what’s involved for wannabe London Explorers? We asked Customer Service and Programme Assistant Anette Thorup, who was involved in developing the challenge. ‘It can be hectic walking around London, and difficult to get a real understanding of where you are and the significance of the places you are passing. The ICANDO London Challenge gives you a route to follow, which you can start at whichever point you

Autumn Hold a birthday party at Blackland Farm

The rolling grassland and woody enclaves of our Activity Centre in Sussex are beautiful all year round, but especially in autumn, as the light and the leaves turn golden. There’s no better setting

www.girlguiding.org.uk/waddow.

want, and lots of suggestions for exploring the area further or taking a break before moving on. It’s a flexible way to see the sights, learn about London and about guiding, and have lots of fun! ‘But the best bit is that at the end of the three-hour challenge, you’ll have created your own London story through photos, videos and memories.’ Visit www.girlguiding.org.uk/icando to start planning your big city adventure.

for an action-packed, adventurefilled birthday! Instructor Nicholas Averre (left) already knows how much fun there is to be had at Blackland Farm, so it was top of the venue list for a Minions-inspired fifth birthday party for his twins, Thomas and Amélie.

He says, ‘We opted for bungee trampolining (below) and tunnel maze activities, which all the kids absolutely loved. Dave, our senior instructor, got very much into the theme, wearing a Minion onesie for the day, and his wife Gemma went above and beyond the call of duty by baking the most magnificent Minion cupcakes. They were both wonderful with the kids and made the day run smoothly, leaving my wife and me to organise food and socialise with the other parents. ‘Apparently the day was talked about at school for some time afterwards, so I think it was a great success. I’m pretty sure we’ll be holding another birthday there when they are a little older and can enjoy the other activities the farm has to offer.’ Birthday boys and girls should get online at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ blacklandfarm to find out more.

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13 May – 12 Jun For Will, going to Indonesia isn’t just another holiday with mum. It’s a new start, and the chance to ride an elephant called Oona. But then the tsunami hit. Michael Morpurgo’s epic novel live on stage this summer. YOUTH GROUPS £16.50 PER TICKET (Valid all weekday performances of Running Wild.1 free Leader for every 10 tickets booked*)

TO BOOK YOUTH GROUPS * CALL 0845 673 2151 (Mon-Fri 11am - 5pm) or for more information openairtheatre.com/education * Calls cost 2p per minute plus your telephone company’s access charge. Additional Leader tickets may need to be purchased to align with organisational policies. Please check with your youth group before booking. Information correct at the time of print. All tickets are subject to terms and conditions, including the Weather Policy, available at openairtheatre.com/terms


Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Winter Join us for Christmas dinner at Foxlease

Whether it’s a white Christmas this year, or a wet and windy one like the last, there’s a winter wonderland to be found at Foxlease. Throughout the season, you can enjoy a festive feast, mince pies and mulled wine in the heart of Hampshire’s beautiful New Forest. Hazel Nicholson and the rest of the Hampshire West County Lones Trefoil Guild booked the centre for their Christmas lunch – and had a very jolly time indeed. Hazel says, ‘The staff were very helpful and courteous. One of our ladies was taken ill during our visit and I was very impressed by the capable way in which the

staff coped with the incident. The meal was excellent – I don’t eat gluten and I was well catered for. My Guild enjoyed the day and it was a good start to the festive season.’

WORDS: Jessica Feehan

Adventure made easy Of course, if you’re after a more traditional Activity Centre visit, there’s a whole host of events for Leaders and girls to enjoy in 2016. + Wellies and Wristbands – our festival experience for Guides and members of The Senior Section – gets better every year! We’ll once again fill Foxlease and Waddow Hall with music and adventure from 26 to 29 August – see www.girlguiding.org.uk/ welliesandwristbands for how to get your tickets, or come as a volunteer. + Younger girls can join the circus for a weekend at Blackland Farm, Foxlease and Waddow Hall thanks to Magic and Mayhem on 11 and 12 June. To celebrate The Senior Section Centenary, this year’s event includes a special afterparty exclusively for

+

+

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members of The Senior Section. Everything you need to know is at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ magicandmayhem. Survival Extreme gives members of The Senior Section a taste of wilderness life. The more challenges they complete, the more points they can trade for luxuries like food, shelter and an upgrade from bivvy bag to bed! It’s happening on 8 to 10 April (Foxlease), 2 to 4 September (Blackland Farm) and 30 September to 2 October (Waddow Hall) – see each centre’s website for how to book. It’s an Olympic year, so Get Sporty with a carnival-themed day for girls from all sections. You can join in at Blackland Farm, ICANDO and Waddow Hall on 6 August, and Foxlease on 13 August. Over 18? Pack up your paddles and head to Blackland Farm for a chance to complete your BCU

It’s never too early to start thinking about Christmas 2016! Get ahead of the game and start your planning at www.girlguiding.org.uk/foxlease.

1 and 2 Star paddling qualifications (26 June and 3 to 4 September respectively).

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Inspiration

Parent volunteers

Suzanne McBride (main photo, left, and inset) is Leader at 1st Milton Guides in Cambridge. She says, ‘I was an Assistant Brownie Leader when I became aware that the Guide unit in a neighbouring village was full and had over 40 girls on the waiting list. Several local Leaders got together and agreed that we would open a new unit between us and recruit parents to run it with our support. ‘We knew that we would all struggle to find time to do admin, so when Anna came to our parents’ meeting I cheekily asked if she would do our accounts. Marvellously, she agreed! ‘The unit opened with 14 girls in February 2012, and grew to 24 by 18 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

September that year. We have a residential almost every term, and as an outdoor instructor (canoeing, kayaking and walking) I make sure our programme has lots of outdoor activities – and we rely on others, including parents, to bring in the craft skills! ‘We have had dressing-up nights in our local Emmaus community (learning about homelessness and upcycling clothes), night hikes, and camps by the sea. And girls have made their Promises on the London Eye, on a seal-watching boat trip, on a high ropes course, in canoes, and on sleepovers at midnight. ‘We encourage parents to pay online for subs and trips if they can, but when they hand in payments at Guides, I drop them off to Anna.

Volunteering with guiding doesn’t have to mean leading a unit – there are many ways to use your skills to give girls more

Similarly, if any of the Leaders have money to claim back, we pop the receipts through Anna’s door or email them to her and she magically sorts it out, very quickly and efficiently. ‘She also pays our annual subs and submits our accounts in record time, and manages our claims for Gift Aid. She has even acted as finance manager for several girls going on international trips with our County and Region, including counting and bagging up the pennies after bag packs and bake sales! ‘Anna’s support is absolutely vital. Without it, I’d have been really unwilling to take on the second unit – because I work full-time, have a family and would have found the


Inspiration

Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

‘The great thing about having a treasurer is that it lets me focus on what I enjoy – organising things for the girls’ SUZANNE, GUIDE LEADER

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

hassle of doing accounts just too much. ‘The great thing about having a Treasurer is that it lets me focus on what I enjoy – organising things for the girls – and uses skills which Anna has and I don’t.’ Anna White (main photo, right, and inset) is a proud Guide mum and 1st Milton Guides’ Unit Treasurer. She says, ‘My daughter Bethan absolutely loved her time at Brownies, enjoying the wonderful mix of outdoor fun, crafts, camping and community activities, and was very keen to continue in guiding. So we were pleased and grateful to Suzanne and the other Leaders when they suggested setting up a new Guide unit. ‘Suzanne organised a meeting for parents to gauge interest in a new Guide unit and attract some new helpers. The group was really friendly and enthusiastic, and had some fantastic ideas, so I knew that the unit would be great for our community and was keen to get involved. But I had no experience in guiding, didn’t feel confident in taking on a role during meetings, and, like most of us, only had limited time to offer. Since I had a background in accounting, Suzanne suggested the

straightforward and all online. This additional income has allowed us to buy extra camping equipment and resources for meetings, and also to subsidise some of the events we offer so that every Guide can take part. ‘The Unit Team is very supportive and inclusive. I am invited to all the meetings, and have even been encouraged to run a few Guide meetings. It has been wonderful to see the Guides in action! It also made me appreciate how much work Suzanne and the team of helpers put into each Guide meeting. ‘Although I have an accounting background, I don’t think that a Unit Treasurer needs any formal accounting qualifications; being comfortable with figures, organised and systematic is probably enough. There is also lots of useful information and advice available on the Girlguiding website, and other Guide Leaders and helpers are always happy to answer any queries. I really enjoy being part of our guiding team, and feel very proud to contribute in a small way to a fantastic Guide unit.’

Treasurer role, which seemed to fit perfectly. ‘I set aside about 45 minutes a week to record everything, check our online bank account, make payments, bank cash and cheques, and catch up with any Guide admin emails. Then a couple of times each term, I review the overall financial position and keep Suzanne up to date with any concerns or late payments. Once a year, I prepare a simple set of accounts and submit a Gift Aid claim. ‘We receive just over £400 a year by reclaiming Gift Aid on subscriptions and some fundraising income, and it has been absolutely ANNA, UNIT TREASURER invaluable. The process is pretty

‘It has been wonderful to see the Guides in action!’

It worked for me! Angela Milln, Deputy Chief Guide, says, ‘A few years ago, I came close to having to cancel a special trip because my Assistant Leader had a family emergency and had to back out at the last minute. A mum (who had never camped before but was brave enough to step in and come with us) saved the day – and giving up that one weekend made a huge difference to the girls.’

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 19


How to

Fundraise outside the box Build it ‘We try to keep costs as low as possible for parents, so we’ve tried a variety of fundraising ideas,’ says Angela Bamber, Leader at 3rd West Kilbride Brownies. ‘We’ve done sponsored silences and hand-knitting, but wanted to try something different.’ And with Seamill Beach on their doorstep, a sponsored sandcastle-build was free and easy to organise. ‘Between 42 girls and 10 helpers, we managed to build over 1,000 castles – parents were pretty glad they hadn’t sponsored per castle!’ laughs Angela. The mammoth construction effort raised more than £600, which subsidised the girls’ Brownie Holiday at Netherurd. Angela says, ‘Our main fundraising advice

20 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

would be to make it fun for the girls – they’ll be more enthusiastic and raise more money if they enjoy it too.’

Stitch it Like many members of guiding, Catriona Kitson (Assistant Leader at 1st Bristol West Senior Section) has a lot of pin badges. ‘I didn’t want them to go on my camp blanket in case they were damaged or lost,’ she says, ‘but I also didn’t want them to sit in a box somewhere.’ Her solution was to create a miniature camp blanket for the stuffed mascot of the 5th Bristol Brownies, where she’s also an Assistant Leader. ‘Once I had made one, many of my local guiding friends wanted one too, which got me thinking – maybe

Looking for a non-traditional fundraiser? Why not try one of these fun ideas?

this was a way to raise funds for our unit. I posted an advert on a Facebook group, and within a few days had over 100 orders.’ Each fleece blanket is made by hand – ‘no sewing machines involved!’ – and so far, they’ve brought in £300 for her unit. She says, ‘We used the money to buy a new tent and much-needed camping equipment. It was very satisfying to pick up the tent and use it for the first time.’ Fundraising ideas don’t have to be complex, says Catriona, who puts the blankets’ success down to being an original but simple idea, done well. ‘I am always surprised by how something like making bracelets or holding a quiz night can bring in a decent amount.’


How to Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

3rd West Kilbride Brownies take over the beach

Recycle it In Wiltshire, Sue Luffman’s 1st Mere Brownies started collecting mobile phones for recycling eight years ago. She says, ‘Since then we have expanded the scheme to include jewellery, stamps and coins – things that are easy to store and can be used in any condition.’ Two companies (Corporate Mobile Recycling and Recycling for Good Causes) collect the items free of charge every three months and send the unit a cheque within a few weeks – money that helps pay for girls’ to travel to Division and County events. Recycling not only makes money, it’s also a practical way to get the Brownies interested in reducing their waste and working towards interest badges such as Environment and World issues. The key to this type of fundraising is having a variety of accessible collection points – ‘we use the library, newsagent and a local business’ – and publicity. Sue says, ‘We put up posters in the library, shops and village hall, and put articles in the local magazine.’ Brownies also get a letter home each term with a reminder of the next collection date.

The unit has also had a lot of success when applying for local grants, from Lions Clubs, supermarkets, businesses and council area boards. Sue says, ‘Local organisations like to support guiding at a grassroots level, and there is usually somebody on the committee with a past connection to guiding. We’ve been awarded grants of anything from £50 to £2,500 – and we always make sure to send a thank-you note and photo.’ Find out more at www.cmrecycling.co.uk and www.recyclingforgoodcauses.org.

Climb it! Fiona Handy’s 1st Franche Guides from Worcestershire had a fundraising mountain to climb to pay for their trip to Switzerland – the £880 cost per girl was split equally between the unit, parents and girls themselves. Fiona says, ‘We’d gone into our local outdoor retailer to price up bags, when the staff suggested a Turn the page for more ideas

>>

1st Mere Brownies get collecting

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 21


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sponsored climb of Mount Snowdon (1,085m) on the store’s climbing wall.’ That wasn’t nearly enough of a challenge, says Fiona: ‘Our plan was to climb the height of the Jungfrau (4,158m)! The store let us have exclusive use of the climbing wall in exchange for a contribution to Mountain Rescue and lent us two trained instructors for the day for free.’ Over the course of a long day’s climbing, the girls collectively climbed around 3,800m. The day was a huge success, raising £760 in sponsorship (plus another £200 from the tombola stall outside) and another £170 for the Mountain Rescue teams working in Cumbria following December’s flooding. And it was great publicity too, as customers coming into the store could see girls climbing in uniform and speak to those on the ground about guiding.

Raise money while you shop

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WORDS: Helen Jefferies

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To raise their third of the cost, Guides baked cakes, walked dogs, held coffee mornings and packed bags. Fiona says it was important that the Guides were responsible for their own fundraising: ‘We wanted girls to understand that they’d have to work for the money – it doesn’t fall from the trees, and they shouldn’t just rely on the bank of mum and dad.’ Her other tip is to make the most of your contacts. ‘We have one Leader who’s great at getting raffle prizes from shops and businesses, and the mum of a former Guide manages the fish and chip shop, which catered for our quiz nights. And we knew that a local pub had a function room we could use because that’s where the Rainbows meet.’ The Guides’ impressive climbing feat has inspired some friendly local rivalry with other community groups. Fiona says, ‘The shop is setting up a climbing leader board so we can see how they compare!’

Already have an eBay account? Make Girlguiding one of your favourite charities – that way you can list unwanted items and choose how much of the selling price goes to guiding, and see other items that supporters are selling to raise money too. You can collect Gift Aid on your donation too, so it’s worth 25 per cent more! Go to charity.ebay.co.uk to find us. You can also choose to support local or national guiding at www.easyfundraising.org.uk – it’s teamed up with big online retailers including Argos, Tesco, the Trainline and many more. Once you’re logged in, carry on shopping, knowing that part of the sale price of anything you buy online is going to guiding, at no extra cost to you.

Watch the short video at www.easyfundraising.org.uk/ how-it-works.

Make your money go further

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If you’re not already claiming Gift Aid on your unit subs, see www.girlguiding.org.uk/giftaid for all the forms and advice you need to get started. And if a lack of money is stopping you from going abroad, welcoming girls with disabilities or becoming a Peer Educator (below), search www.girlguiding.org.uk for ‘internal grants’ and see which funds you could apply to for a grant. See page 27 for other tips on saving money and doing more with less, not forgetting to take advantage of partner discounts.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 23


Tools for the job

Team players Complementary skills

These members aren’t real, but you might recognise aspects of them in yourself or your Unit Team. Try our tips for getting the best out of everyone and making sure the whole team is supported and happy.

A warm welcome At Wednesday’s team meeting, when everyone was discussing the upcoming sportsthemed Brownie residential, new volunteer Wendy said precisely two words – ‘Hello’ and ‘Goodbye’. Her Leader Lorna feels sure that Wendy had mentioned studying sport and exercise at college, but there was so much to discuss that she didn’t get around to asking for her thoughts. And of course Cate had an awful lot to say and it’s sometimes hard to stop her. Then, at the next unit meeting, Lorna realises that she never actually properly introduced Wendy to everyone. So she asks Wendy if she would be happy to say a little about herself to the girls and the team. And that’s when they discover that she has a lot to offer if you take the time to encourage her out of her shell. Lorna’s next plan? A post-meeting pizza for some much-needed team bonding. 24 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Involved from the start The last thing Charlie remembers is the beautiful dragonfly flitting across the water’s surface and her rush to point it out to the girls. Now she’s sitting by the pond with weed in her hair and a puddle spreading around her. Lorna had done the risk assessment, but ‘untrammelled enthusiasm’ was one thing that wasn’t on her checklist. She knows that Charlie is a huge asset to the team – her ideas are innovative and her enthusiasm inspiring. She just needs to season her excitement with a little pinch of sense. Wanting to turn Charlie’s personal pond-dipping into a learning opportunity, Lorna

‘Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much’ HELEN KELLER, AUTHOR AND ACTIVIST

WORDS: Jane Yettram

We all have different qualities – and everyone can contribute to a great guiding team

Trish has been in guiding for 30 years and is well known as a fundraiser extraordinaire, having netted a fortune for the unit with bag-packing and bucket-shaking. So she’s a bit miffed when Nelly, who has a day job as a forensic technician, suggests she runs a CSI evening, charging friends and family £5 for tickets (‘I was raising money for this unit when you were in nappies, my girl,’ grumbles Trish). But when Lorna suggests Nelly and Trish sit down together so that Trish can share her fundraising experience and Nelly can contribute her CSI knowhow, Trish feels suitably respected. She’s even inspired to gain her Trainer Qualification – including the Module 4 specialism in fundraising. Find out more about becoming a Trainer by searching www.girlguiding.org.uk for ‘Trainers’ resources’.


Tools for the job Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

suggests she sits with the girls to check their bug-spotting cards – that dragonfly can definitely get a big tick. And she resolves to ask Charlie to help with the risk assessment for the next unit outing – hopefully, the heads-up about safety will balance nicely with her heartfelt passion for fun.

Time is short! Meera wishes there were more hours in a day. Shift work, wayward teenagers, and an elderly mum in hospital mean she’s constantly chasing her tail. Unit meetings are her refuge – two hours with nothing on her mind but making sure the Guides have fun. However, with Meera’s brain always on ‘hard disk full’, she usually forgets what’s planned for the meeting. And there’s no point calling her with a gentle reminder – Meera never has a moment to answer her phone. Before Meera rushes off at the end of the meeting, Lorna makes three simple suggestions: email communication so guiding info is always in Meera’s inbox for easy reference; delegating unit shopping to the new Leader in Training who sees all spending as retail therapy; and building a file of themed activities from back copies of guiding so Meera can just ‘grab and go’, leaving all of life’s hassles at the meeting place door.

How to Be a team leader The great new Leading and Managing People Toolkits for Girlguiding Trainers are packed with expert advice. But whatever your guiding role, these invaluable tips can help you get the best from your team. A well-motivated team brings the best guiding to girls. So a team leader should try to do all of the following. + Share your vision with your team. + Make sure that all members of the team know what their goals are. + Trust all your team members – allow them to be in control of their own tasks. + Create a supportive environment – focus on the positive. + Let team members experiment with new ideas and ways of working. + Allow time for breaks and reflection. + Care for the individual as well as the team as a whole. If you realise that a team member is struggling, make time to talk to them. + Ask team members what support they need. + Celebrate success and hard work – let your team members know that they are appreciated. + Be honest and open. Why not ask your local Training Coordinator or Commissioner to organise a training on this topic in your area?

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 25


How to Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Get value for money You’ve packed bags, claimed Gift Aid and made a splash at the sponsored swimathon. But how do you make sure that precious unit funds go as far as possible? ‘We always let people know that we are a charity and ask for discounts or better rates. Don’t ask, don’t get!’

‘Our District is small, so often we buy the materials in bulk, to share among the various groups.’

WORDS: With thanks to our Facebook fans and Youth Editors *Terms and conditions apply. Offer expires 31 December 2016.

‘If you build good relationships with girls’ families then there are usually some very good contacts to call on for favours or discounts.’

Spending wisely Cotswold Outdoor has a selection of great-value girls’ clothing, and will refund the difference if you find any item cheaper elsewhere. And to help units’ funds go even further, stores offer a discount* when you buy in bulk – and can advise Leaders and units on the best kit for the job. Nicola Graham, Regional Manager, London at Cotswold Outdoor says, ‘Sometimes it’s worth spending a little more to make sure you have the best experience in the outdoors – good-quality hiking boots (with the correct protection to keep them waterproof) will last much longer than cheaper ones. Our expert trained staff can help you find the best kit for whatever adventure you have planned with your unit – whether it’s

hiking, camping, or a once-in-alifetime adventure overseas. We’ve worked with guiding units around the UK to make sure they’re spending their money wisely – and of course, Girlguiding Leaders are entitled to a 15 per cent* discount on anything bought for girls, or 20 per cent* for personal shopping.’ This is just one of the discounts and special deals available from Girlguiding’s partners – see www.girlguiding.org.uk/benefits for more details.

‘I text parents to request their help collecting items, which really helps to keep the cost of activities down.’

Find our advice:

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+

on budgeting for the year ahead by searching www.girlguiding.org.uk/ guidingmanual for ‘managing unit funds’ on ensuring that members aren’t excluded from events at www.girlguiding.org.uk – just search for ‘low income’.

‘Photocopy just the sheets you need, rather than printing loads, to save ink.’

‘I work in a hotel and can readily get loads of newspapers for free – the girls love having newspaper challenge nights!’ ‘When we go swimming we ask the girls to bring along any membership cards – girls who have swimming lessons are often members – and then we don’t have to pay for their swim.’

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 27


Inspiration

The last five years

Doesn’t time fly! As Gill Slocombe comes to the end of her time as Chief Guide, take a look back over our highlights from the past five years

2011 Guiding is growing – we gained a new girl every hour in 2011. Thousands of you collected teabags to go into welcome bags for delegates at the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) World Conference in Edinburgh. And even more units across the UK joined in by working

on the World Guiding Goes Tartan activity pack. Also in the news: If you lived in Samoa or Tokelau, 30 December didn’t happen! The two nations moved from east of the International Date Line to west, to make trade with their neighbours less confusing.

2012 The world’s eyes were on the UK as the Olympics and Paralympics came to London – did you try the sporting, cultural and international challenges from On Your Marks, or cheer on the many guiding members who carried the Olympic flame, volunteered as Games Makers or performed for the world, like former Guide Nicola (page 52)? Our Patron HM The Queen had a year to celebrate too, jumping out

28 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

of a plane with James Bond as part of the Olympic opening ceremony and marking her Diamond Jubilee. Rainbows also had a special anniversary – it was 25 years since the first units opened. Also in the news: Despite dire warnings that the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider would destroy the universe, the elusive Higgs Boson was detected there for the first time in July 2012.

Big Birthday Challenge

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Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

2013 Early in the year Girlguiding dropped the ‘UK’, updated our strapline to ‘We Discover, We Grow’, and refreshed our branding to show that we are one united movement. Forget the Reading and Leeds Festivals – this year, the August Bank Holiday weekend was all about Wellies and Wristbands, our first-ever festival experience exclusively for guiding members. By partnering with other charities including AVA (Against

Violence and Abuse) and Plan UK, we created Girls in Action, challenging girls to make a difference to the lives of their peers in the UK and around the world. And hundreds of units helped to smash the world record for the longest string of bunting. Guides were inspired by Go For It! Be the Change, written by young members to encourage their peers to make a local difference. Following a lengthy consultation with thousands of our members, we launched our new Promise for all – although it no longer uses the word ‘God’, all members promise to develop (or think about) their beliefs, whether they’re part of a formal religion or not. Also in the news: The UN designated 2013 as the International Year of Quinoa.

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

2014 Happy birthday Brownies! Our biggest section celebrated its centenary, and units all over the UK completed challenges based on the events of the last 100 years. Rainbows gained a new Roundabout called All About Me, and we teamed up with Dove to help our Peer Educators launch Free Being Me, a body-confidence resource and badge (above). Fifteen years since the last Guide uniform was introduced, we worked with young designers and our members to create new items including a long-sleeved top and skirt. Girls told us that they didn’t have enough female role models, so we responded with the first Camp CEO event, pairing members of The Senior Section with top

business mentors. And units celebrated the Commonwealth Games coming to Scotland with the Ready, Steady, Glasgow! activity pack. We recruited a new Board of Trustees and made other changes to our governance structure too (see page 60). On 1 April, our offices were invaded by hordes of tiny Minifigs in guiding uniform (below). Also in the news: Malala Yousafzai shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Indian children’s rights campaigner Kailash Satyarthi.

2015 As the General Election loomed, we made sure that girls’ voices were at the front of politicians’ minds, through our Girls Matter campaign and its eight calls for action. And the Hear our Voice activity pack, developed with Parliament, helped girls understand how politics affects their lives. After almost two years of renovation work, Girlguiding’s London HQ was completed and we moved back in, leasing the back half to a hotel company to generate money for guiding. The year’s new event at the Activity Centres was Magic and Mayhem, a circus-themed weekend for Rainbows and Brownies, and we launched our new five-year plan, ‘Being our Best’. Also in the news: Time-travel fans celebrated ‘Back to the Future Day’ – the day that Marty McFly and Doc Brown travel to in Back to the Future Part II – and wondered how long they’d have to wait for their hoverboards, self-tying shoelaces and dehydrated pizza.

2016 and the future By the time you read this, we’ll have our next Chief Guide! Thank you to everyone who submitted online comments on the shortlisted candidates. Look out for an introduction to the new Chief Guide in the next issue of guiding magazine.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 29


Tools for the job

Local heroes Tasha discovery centre W5. ‘Organising Crawford centrally means there’s less legwork started for Leaders – they just have to sort volunteering out their own forms,’ says Tasha. at Lorne ‘It’s a great place to live and work, House, a great place for my children to grow Girlguiding Ulster’s Activity up and a great place to visit,’ says Centre and HQ, as a young Dominic Miles (left), member. Now that she’s the Residential Warden Activities Coordinator, at Middlesex East everything she does helps campsite Northern Leaders to give girls more Heights. Dominic adventure. has a long history of She explains, ‘Day to day engaging children with the I run the outdoor activities at Lorne natural world (as an outdoor – taking bookings, training instructor, chalet host, teacher and instructors and planning events for Forest School leader), so this was just members. We encourage Leaders to the new challenge he had been come to our adventure days – it’s an looking for. affordable way for them to try out all ‘It had become apparent to me the activities we offer, so they can feel that children associate more closely more confident when booking for their units.’ When the team at Lorne heard that many Guides weren’t getting the chance to go away because their Leaders didn’t have the right licence or experience, LINDA GRANT Tasha developed the Snores and S’mores with computers and event. ‘More than 100 technology than they do with the Guides came to the first one, in 2015,’ natural world,’ he says. But working says Tasha, ‘and it was such a success at Northern Heights gives him an that we’re running two more like it in opportunity to welcome more young 2016, including a Brownie one, which people to the outdoors. had 157 girls signed up by the end of As live-in Warden, Dominic November. Leaders like it because checks that the dorm buildings are in they can just turn up – food and good order and works around the programme are all taken care of, and campsite, liaising with contractors Leaders can put their feet up (or, and welcoming people to do risk more likely, join in with the girls)!’ assessments. There are regular Tasha also organises events away task-force days and a working party from Lorne, including days at Belfast of volunteers who help maintain and Zoo or an activity day at science and develop the site. Dominic says, ‘I am

Administrators, Growing Guiding Champions, campsite wardens – hundreds of local guiding employees take the pressure off Leaders and enable them to give girls more

Hilde Oesterkloeft is Girlguiding Scotland’s Media and PR Officer. She says, ‘The questions I am most often asked are how to use our branding correctly and how to promote a great story in local press and on social media,’ but that’s only half the story. Her job also involves promoting all the brilliant things Girlguiding Scotland members get up to, supporting and training County Public Relations Advisers and creating marketing materials. Hilde says, ‘The best thing about my job is helping to give girls and young women a voice on issues they care about in the press and on blogs – it’s great to see them speaking out. I also love going along to events to help publicise all the fun and opportunities girls (and volunteers!) have through guiding.’ All this good publicity isn’t just a ‘nice-to-have’, Hilde says. It’s all about changing perceptions and showcasing the great work guiding does. ‘In that way I’m helping to recruit more volunteers and open up the world of guiding to even more girls and young women.’ 30 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

‘The office staff make guiding work better in Sheffield’


Tools for the job Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Tasha (the Grinch) and her colleagues at Lorne House go the extra mile for visitors

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

very lucky to work alongside them, and we are always looking out for more helpers!’ The weekends are the busiest times, with visitors from Guiding and Scouting, schools, and youth and community groups – and the site has continually developed to make sure it’s offering everyone a great outdoor experience. In November 2015 the site opened the doors of a brand-new dorm building called Fieldside, and in February 2016 it hosted a ‘Generating Genius’ weekend aimed at getting girls into Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths. Dominic says, ‘Currently visitors can use the fire circle amphitheatre, go on nature walks or minibeast hunts, try pond dipping and use our

orienteering maps and markers.’ And he and the site committee have plenty more planned for 2016 – an upgrade to the archery range and the development of an ‘activity field’ with a mixture of nature-based and more adventurous activities. At time of writing, Linda Grant, Sheffield County Commissioner, was in the process of recruiting an Office Manager. ‘We’ve had an Administrator at the Sheffield office for around 12 years, but we needed to expand the role to include the bookkeeping – the day-to-day banking and dealing with cheques for County events,’ she explains. The new Office Manager will be the public face of local guiding, help members with Join Us and Go! enquiries, and process long-service awards, taking the strain from members of the County team. ‘I’ve heard that several other County Commissioners are looking

to employ local administrators,’ says Linda, ‘and having one has really freed us up to visit and support our Leaders more – in fact, to do what we should be doing!’ It can be difficult to find volunteers who can commit regular hours each week to this type of job, so recruiting someone for this role makes perfect sense. Linda goes even further: ‘The office staff are such valued members of the team simply because they make guiding work better in Sheffield.’

Fancy joining the team?

Search for ‘current vacancies’ at www.girlguiding.org.uk for job opportunities at Girlguiding HQ, Trading, Activity Centres and Country and Region level. And see your local guiding site for vacancies near you.

‘Organising centrally means there’s less legwork for Leaders’ TASHA CRAWFORD

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 31


Inspiration

- is one

Girlguiding’s plan for 2020

32 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

This Capacity-themed issue of guiding marks one year since we launched ‘Being our Best’, our plan for the journey to 2020


Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Access Capacity Voice Excellence Capacity Access Capacity Voice Excellence

To build ‘Being our Best’ we consulted volunteers, parents, supporters, staff and, of course, girls. They told us that Girlguiding is doing great things, but that there is more we can do. Thanks to them we have a clear idea of where we want to be in 2020, and what we’ll do to make sure we get there.

Excellence In 2020, we will… offer girls the programme that they want and need, support our volunteers to be inspirational leaders and give them the resources for a great programme. How? + Reviewing and updating the activities and opportunities that we offer girls. + Building a clear framework of volunteer training and development to make sure roles are open to a broader range of people. + Finding better ways to listen to our volunteers. + Making it easier for volunteers to manage guiding accounts and finding new ways for them to bring in and manage money.

WORDS: Helen Jefferies, Ruth Stone

Access In 2020, we will… increase the number of girls and young women who want to join us AND be able to welcome them all. How? + Telling girls, parents and people who might volunteer how great Girlguiding is. + Finding out why some people feel Girlguiding is ‘not for them’ and helping to change their minds, and encouraging those who do join to stay for longer. + Taking our story directly to the people and communities who need to hear more from us, and welcoming girls from all backgrounds.

Bryony, Guide: ‘Guides is the most adventurous thing I have been a part of because it gives you so many new opportunities to meet people and see things you wouldn’t normally see, and it’s just an amazing experience.’

+

Making sure adventure is part of the fun for every girl in guiding. + Opening up international opportunities to even more of our young members. Check out a few more stories of our members embracing Excellence by sharing their knowledge with guiding in their area (page 24) and making sure girls get the best possible programme (page 44).

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Thanking our volunteers for all that they do, and making sure they feel appreciated. + Building the right partnerships to improve our offer for girls. + Building new partnerships in communities where guiding doesn’t currently have a presence. See page 18 for more about the difference flexible volunteering can make, and page 52 for a few ways our volunteers improve Access to guiding for everyone.

Dilruba, Guide: ‘I enjoy having the independence to choose our activities and make decisions by voting as a group. Everybody is included in Guides: everybody feels like they can share stories, contribute to the sessions and be involved. Nobody gets left out.’

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 33


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Registered Charity No. 1073816. A Company Limited by Guarantee Registered No. 3659373. Minimum costs apply. Price quoted per person.


Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Access Capacity Voice Excellence Capacity Access Capacity Voice Excellence

Voice In 2020, we will… be experts on what girls and young women in the UK think, ensure they have their say in guiding and beyond, and empower them to change the world around them. How? + Examining issues affecting girls’ lives and sharing our research more widely. + Inspiring even more of our members to take part in social action, and shouting about the positive difference girls are making. + Taking action for change based on what girls say they think and need, along

with partner organisations. Making sure that youth participation is central to our decision-making. + Empowering more girls to find their voice and create positive change in their communities. Meet two members giving girls a Voice by representing them on the international stage (page 51) and targeting local press and radio (page 58).

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Amanda, Brownie Leader: ‘I’m passionate about my Brownies getting involved in their local community – so I invited our local Parliamentary candidate to visit the unit. She spoke to the girls about experiences in her life and why she went into politics. She spoke about influential and powerful women, including Malala Yousafzai, Emmeline Pankhurst and the suffragettes, and Angela Merkel.’

Capacity

In 2020, we will… generate and manage our resources in a planned and professional way, employ the right staff with the right skills, and have efficient, fit-for-purpose processes, systems and structures. How? + Bringing in the money we need from a variety of reliable sources and developing new ways of generating income. + Managing our assets so they do more for our charity and our members. + Recruiting and training brilliant, skilled staff.

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The destination It’s an ambitious plan, but we think it’s worth it. With your continued support, and our research, systems and programmes, we can make sure that by 2020: + more girls in the UK aged 5 to 13 will be members of Girlguiding + more girls in guiding will say that the charity is making a positive difference to their lives, be involved in social action and say that they are consulted on what they do in their unit + more of the public would recommend Girlguiding to a girl they know. Read the full report, and find out how we’ll measure our progress, at new.girlguiding. org.uk/being-our-best.

This issue is full of ways to increase Getting better at using data to guiding’s Capacity – check out our make decisions and to measure articles on fundraising (page 20), our success. Growing Guiding (page 48) and Giving staff and volunteers the IT, using the skills in your area systems and infrastructure that (page 46), for a start! they need. Training and supporting our volunteers to be the best leaders Heather, Task and Finish Group member: and managers ‘I represent young members, which is important they can be. in a youth-led charity as we are going to take it Making sure our member forward in the future. It’s nice having an communications understanding of what’s to come, knowing that give volunteers the there will be a positive impact on the whole right information.

charity and that I’m involved in it.’

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 35


How to

Make the most of volunteer shops

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

Alison Jones, Leader with 2nd Monkspath Brownies, shares a few tips for running a successful volunteer shop

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How to Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

1) It’s not all about the money At the Solihull Guide shop you can pick up more than just badges, books and Brownie T-shirts – you also get the combined knowledge of the experienced volunteers who work there. ‘We describe it as a knowledge shop,’ smiles Alison (above). ‘It’s a great point of contact – Leaders come in for a chat and to talk over any problems they’re having, and sometimes there are more people chatting than buying!’ she says. It’s especially useful for new Leaders and, as the shop has its own permanent premises (pictured left), Leaders know they can come in to browse the full range before they buy. Alison says, ‘I love seeing Rainbows and Brownies come in to try on their uniform – they always look so pleased with it, and often want to go home in it rather than change back!’ The biggest sellers recently have been special badges like the one to mark HM The Queen becoming our longest-reigning monarch (inset left).

2) Think creatively The shop didn’t always have a permanent home – the previous District HQ didn’t have enough space to leave things on display, so items were locked away for most of the week and set up on tables each Saturday. When the District moved to its new home (a former dance studio) the renovation work included blocking off a section to create the shop, with its own shelving and storage. ‘Although,’ says Alison, ‘you always want more space than you have!’ You don’t need your own dance studio to set up a shop though – other volunteer shops operate from members’ spare rooms, cupboards or car boots.

3) You get so much back! It’s easy to talk about ‘putting money back into guiding’, but what does that actually mean? Alison explains, ‘When parents come in to buy uniform, I make a note of their daughter’s unit and how much they spend. Each July we tot up how much parents and Leaders from each unit have spent. Then we send the

‘Leaders come in for a chat and to talk over any problems they’re having, and sometimes there are more people chatting than buying!’ ALISON JONES, SHOP MANAGER AND BROWNIE LEADER

Leaders a 10 per cent voucher of the total that the unit spent, for them to spend on anything they like.’ The shop also gives grants to support girls going on international trips with guiding – last year the Solihull shop gave over £3,000 to girls. ‘We make a lot of grants to support girls on Regional or County trips,’ says Alison, ‘and members going on other trips can also apply.’ In 2015 the shop committee supported a Leader who was selected for a Guiding Overseas Linked with Development (GOLD) trip to Russia. ‘The GOLD team wanted to fundraise as much as possible for the girls they’d be visiting,’ says Alison. ‘So we were able to help them out with a grant towards the costs of the trip.’

4) Spread the word To promote the shop, Alison says, ‘We get Leaders to give out leaflets about the shop to parents and we have a website from which people can order items.’ But mostly the shop relies on word of mouth – ‘We’re pretty well-established, and I love seeing the same girls come back for new uniform when they move up a section,’ she smiles. Fifteen years ago Alison’s daughter volunteered at the shop each Saturday and when she couldn’t commit the time Alison took over, ‘at first just the odd day, then every week’. The recent addition of a few extra volunteers meant the shop could open on Monday evenings as well as Saturday mornings. Alison says, ‘Leaders love the Monday nights now and a lot of their husbands pop in with a shopping list after work!’

Take it further Alison says, ‘Although we’d like to have longer opening hours, we don’t have enough volunteers. And to be honest, most shops could do with more help.’ Whether you have badges to buy or a couple of hours to offer, the Store Locator at www.girlguidingshop.co.uk can help you find out if there’s a shop near you. And if there’s not, download Setting up and Running a Volunteer Shop – it includes advice on the type of shop your area might need, how to put together an eye-catching display and our FAQs. A printed version is also available from Trading – call our Sales and Information team on 0161 941 2237 and quote order code 6932.

Vital funds Of course, it’s not just local guiding that benefits from volunteer shops – 100 per cent of profits are reinvested into guiding, so we can continue to support more than half a million members while keeping subs as low as possible. Find out more about our funds at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ fundraising.

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Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Inspirational reading

‘I’ve enjoyed How the Girl Guides Won the War by Janie Hampton. It was really interesting to look at how the Guides helped our country and it makes Remembrance Day all the more special.’

WORDS: Katie Hetherington

‘The Girl Guiding Handbook from 1943 is a really interesting read and shows how empowering guiding has always been for women.’

‘Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll is one of my favourite books. I love the weird and wonderful characters, and that Alice accepts them and sees their best qualities.’ ‘Half the Sky by Nicholas Kristof, because reading about the effect of education on girls’ lives really emphasised to me the impact that I’m having on children’s lives.’

‘Peter and Wendy by J M Barrie. I never wanted to grow up and with Girlguiding I’m still able to do kiddie things with the Brownies and have as much fun as them.’ ‘To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. I read it at school and it made me so aware of the harm that prejudice can bring. It’s nice knowing that I’m part of an organisation as accepting as Girlguiding.’

Members of Girlguiding’s Facebook group share the books that inspire them, in guiding and life

‘The Swallows and Amazons series by Arthur Ransome instilled in me a love of adventure, camping and sailing. I pretty much knew how to sail just from the books before I finally set foot on a ship at university and set off across the Channel.’

‘My Brownie daughter is constantly inspired by Roald Dahl. Her favourite book is Matilda, which has taught her to be comfortable with who you are, to be confident, to challenge unfairness and above all to be kind.’

‘Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela – what an incredible leader, with a capacity to forgive that we could all learn from.’ ANGELA MILLN, DEPUTY CHIEF GUIDE

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 39


How to

Plan for success In the spirit of ‘Being our Best’, we asked a few members where they want to be in 2020, and what they’re doing now to make sure they get there

Katie Webber, Leader at 4th Porchester Guides, has seen for herself how guiding develops girls’ skills. She says, ‘I remember a group of girls doing their Baden-Powell Challenge who fundraised for a trip to Switzerland. Their time in Guides gave them the confidence to approach people and write letters to local charities and companies. Without guiding they’d never have been challenged to do that.’

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When it comes to her own development, Katie says, ‘Nottinghamshire held a County training weekend at Broneirion a couple of years ago. I enjoyed the chance to visit an Activity Centre and meet up with Leaders I knew and others I’d never met before. ‘Guiding gives the girls the chance to do what they want to do without peer pressure, and to be as grown up (or as childish!) as they want to be. Having the girls in Patrols provides the natural leaders the chance to show their skills, but also gives those who are a bit shy and quiet the chance to grow and shine. ‘I have certainly grown as a Leader and gained confidence in my own leadership skills. I know what I’m good at – and equally what I’m not good at!’

In 2020… I’d like to have finished my Leadership Qualification and have my own Rainbow or Brownie unit – it’s been my dream since I was seven years old! Lonie Milne is a member of Beckenham East District Rangers, Surrey, and Leader in Training at 3rd Upper Tooting Brownies. Her guiding ambitions for the next few years are about giving more girls the opportunity to achieve their potential in an environment full of friendship and fun. Lonie says, ‘It’s taken me longer than

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

In 2020… I would like to be giving girls an opportunity they might not have had otherwise – whether that’s representing the UK abroad, or just showing off doing cartwheels or dancing across the floor.


How to Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

I planned to work on my LQ, but I’m still doing it! My guiding groups are like a family to me because they always encourage me to carry on and keep pushing through, no matter how difficult something is.’ She explains, ‘Having a mild learning disability means I have to have support to do certain things. I’ve had help from my former Brownie Leader, Hannah Crane, who has seen me grow up and who is my role model. I’ve learned from the best!’ Outside of guiding, Lonie’s other plan for 2020 is to become a journalist, ‘and let me assure you I’m doing my absolute best to reach that goal, including double Media Studies this term at college,’ she says. ‘We’re doing coursework on community reporting, art and videomaking, and I’ve written articles, been interviewed on the radio and done work experience at Capital FM and as a Young Reporter on the Sutton Guardian.’

In 2020… I would like to have visited all the World Centres, have a degree in primary teaching and most importantly become a role model for younger girls.

Harriett Norris, a Young Leader at 2nd Kelso Brownies, Roxburghshire, has big plans for the next few years. ‘I have already visited Our Chalet, and I hope to visit Our Cabaña in Mexico next as it would be really interesting to see how guiding happens in the Americas.’ She’s also planning to visit Australia or New Zealand in the near future ‘and pop into a Girl Guide or Girl Scout unit there’. Harriett knows that her experience working with Brownies will come in useful when she starts applying to university – but it’s also helped in other ways. ‘Girlguiding has helped me believe in myself and has boosted my confidence, meaning I want to succeed and follow my dreams.’ And inspired by her hero, education and girls’ rights campaigner Malala Yousafzai, she wants to help girls feel braver. ‘It is so important to show the world that girls can be free and have a voice. Tackling stereotypes in everyday life is easier than it seems – just challenge the misogynistic comments and stand up for what you believe in.’

In 2020… I hope to return to Japan for the Girl Scouting of Japan centenary. South Holland Division International Adviser Lucy Charlesworth has never forgotten her last trip to Japan in 2010, to celebrate Girl Scouting’s 90th birthday. ‘I made so many friends on camp, and I am still in touch with the most amazing Japanese family today,’ she enthuses. Since her return, Lucy’s also taken on the role of Holbeach District Commissioner. She explains, ‘I want to help the Leaders to be able to help the girls. I have found that ensuring that Leaders feel supported means that more girls get more opportunities, including the chance to go overseas like I did.’

Find out more about our plan for getting to 2020, and checklists for each of our four themes, at new.girlguiding.org.uk/being-our-best.

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Welcome to the world of tomorrow Plenty of people have tried to predict the future, but which of these prophecies will we see come true in 2020?

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At the same time Japan announced that it would have put robots on the moon by 2015, and that they’d start work on an unmanned lunar base, to be completed by 2020. To mark 400 years since the Mayflower left Plymouth for the New World, plans are in place for a ship powered entirely by renewable energy to cross the Atlantic in 2020.

In 2010 it was reported that China was planning to extend its high-speed rail network through 17 other countries by 2020, starting with a line between Beijing and King’s Cross station, London.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 41


G

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Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

WORDS: Helen Jefferies PHOTO: The Beatrix Potter Society (www.beatrixpottersociety.org.uk)

Ahead of her time Peter Rabbit, Mrs Tiggy-Winkle and the Tailor of Gloucester’s helpful mice have been part of millions of people’s childhoods for more than 100 years. But Beatrix Potter’s love of nature inspired more than just her children’s stories. As well as filling her family’s London house with mice, rabbits, bats and guinea pigs, she collected fossils, produced beautiful sketches of beetles and was fascinated by mushrooms. In 1897 she tried to submit an illustrated paper on the reproduction of fungi to the Linnean Society (a natural history organisation) via her uncle – as a woman, she couldn’t submit or defend it herself. It was never published, and a century later the society apologised for the sexist way in which she had been treated. Beatrix (pictured right as a child) had always been a canny businesswoman – along with her brother, she painted and sold Christmas cards – but everything changed in 1902 with the publication and huge success of The Tale of Peter

Rabbit, adapted from a letter she had sent to a friend’s son. The following year saw the production of the Peter Rabbit doll – the first time a fictional character had been mass-produced in this way. Later on, books – and the many board games, wallpapers, figurines, blankets and tea-sets that were created based on her characters – meant that she had an independent income even after marrying solicitor William Heelis in 1913. In the 1920s she threw herself into being a landowner and conservationist, breeding awardwining sheep and preserving the fell-farming way of life, local crafts and land around her Lake District home – including welcoming local Guide troops to camp on her land. At her death in 1943, she left over 4,000 acres of land (and the cattle and sheep on them) to the National Trust, helping to create the Lake District National Park and ensuring that people could enjoy the landscape and wildlife she loved so much.

July 2016 marks the 150th birthday of Beatrix Potter, a much-loved writer and illustrator but also a keen scientist, conservationist and friend of guiding

Inspired by Beatrix? Brownies can create their own illustrated letters as part of the Artist, Communicator or Writer badges, or try other challenges as a Friend to animals or Science investigator. Guides can work for their Science or Animal active interest badges, or campaign for a cause they believe in – like conservation or ending unfair treatment of women – as part of Go For It! Be the change or Take action. One of the treasures of the Girlguiding archive is this illustration of Peter Rabbit meeting a Guide, which Beatrix drew in the Chorlton-cumHardy Company troop’s logbook. Now you can own it too, on a beautiful mug, presented in a keepsake tin (£10, order code 2248). Other gifts will be available too – order from your local volunteer shop.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 43


Inspiration

Bring the world home

International Guiding isn’t just for World Thinking Day, and it doesn’t have to be difficult or expensive

To celebrate World Thinking Day and mark the end of Caroline Davis’s five-year stint as Girlguiding’s International Commissioner, we sent out a checklist of suggested international experiences, from the simple to the ambitious. So where to start?

Bre

r a king b a

ri

ld cultur or

es

44 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

+

W

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Spectacular activity pack, which includes a section called ‘Explore the World’. Download it from spectacular.girlguiding. org.uk and give girls of all ages a chance to explore The Senior Section and the wider world.

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Rainbows understand that they are part of a global guiding family right from the start, and lets them try out some of the ways that girls like them celebrate around the world. ‘World’ is a key theme of any girl’s time in Brownies – she can work on the World cultures, World guiding and World traveller badges, and the World section of Brownie Adventures. Guides can get a better understanding of the issues their peers around the world face – lack of access to education, inequality and

poor nutrition – through Go For It! Breaking barriers. Their interest badges and GFI! Streets ahead also encourage them to start taking action on the issues they see locally or globally – try Community action, World cultures, World guiding or World issues. The Senior Section’s International octant of Look Wider is crammed with ideas – invite someone to come to your unit and share their experiences of travelling with guiding, fundraise to support guiding in another country, or learn (or teach) another language. 2016’s main event is of course The Senior Section Spectacular, and all sections are being invited to celebrate with the Mission

er

With a badge + Roundabout Festivals helps


Inspiration

Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

With a date

With a game + Celebrate the Rio Olympics

Take your inspiration from one of these awareness days coming soon. + 7 April – World Food Day + 15 May – International Day of Families + Late May – World Hunger Day + 5 June – World Environment Day + 8 June – World Oceans Day.

– dig out your old copies of On Your Marks, created for the London 2012 Olympic Games, which includes Brazilianinspired games and recipes. Or pick up a copy from www.girlguidingshop.co.uk – it’s just £1 (order code 6050)! The Activity Centres are running ‘Get Sporty’ events in August with a carnival feel too – you’ll find more details in Adventure Made Easy or at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ activity_centres.

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With a click +

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

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Find penpals through the WAGGGS website or Girlguiding’s Facebook page – or connect via webchat or Skype! Get a glimpse of guiding around the world and make

Follow this summer’s European Football Championships with the FA’s ‘We Can Play’ campaign, which is encouraging more girls to play football. Sign up for more information and find a club near you (England only) at www.fagirlsfootball. co.uk, and download posters and certificates from www.thefa.com/wecanplay.

With a plan for the future! + Applications have just

With a connection + This year’s World Thinking

Day theme is ‘Connect’. The WAGGGS activity pack helps girls from all sections to explore what it means to be connected to yourself, your friends, WAGGGS and the world. Explore the World Centres, your own learning styles and what it means to be a good team member, knowing that guiding members all over the world are trying the same challenges! Download the

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pack from www.wagggs.org/en/ resources. Invite a Peer Educator (above) to run a Free Being Me session, developed by WAGGGS to lead a worldwide body-confidence revolution. Find out more at new.girlguiding.org.uk/ book-peer-educator.

international guiding friends through www.facebook.com/ wagggs or www.twitter.com/ wagggs_world. Share your top international moment – big or small – on social media and use the hashtag #internationalguiding so everyone can find it! Remember the guidance in A Safe Cyberspace and our other advice on sharing girls’ stories or photos – search the Girlguiding website for ‘online community’ for more information.

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opened for the next World Scout Moot, in Iceland in July and August 2017. To join 6,000 campers and volunteers from 80 countries, or just to find out more, see new.girlguiding. org.uk/opportunities. Guiding Overseas Linked with Development (GOLD) is our biggest programme of international events – each year, teams of young members spend three weeks in one of eight countries to support the development of local guiding. We’ll select next year’s teams through an event called Go for GOLD in September. If you’re aged 17 to 30, head to new. girlguiding.org.uk/ opportunities to find out more.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 45


How to

Use your human resources

We can do so much when we work together. Are you making the most of the local support in your area? Can you match the queries below with the best person to contact, right? 1. I’ve found this non-guiding activity centre online. Can we book it for my Guide unit’s summer residential? 2. Why isn’t there any Growing Guiding training in our area? Everyone I’ve spoken to says that’s what we need! 3. My Brownie unit has planned to work on the Agility badge and Mission Spectacular this term. How should I adapt the activities so that our new girl (who has additional needs) can join in? 4. What size logo should I use on this recruitment stall banner? 5. My Guides pick the same Go For Its! all the time. How can I get them thinking more creatively?

7. We’ve sold so many tickets for our District talent show that we’re not sure how to marshal our audience. Can anyone help us out? 8. I’m concerned about my Young Leader – she’s told me in confidence about something very worrying that happened at school. How can I help her without losing her trust?

46 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

6. I’m really struggling to find the right evidence to complete my Leadership Qualification. Does anyone know if photos count?


How to Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

9. I have had a disagreement with my Unit Leader and now she is leaving me out of planning for the term. What can I do? 10. My Brownies have set their hearts on going dog-sledding this winter, but it’s not listed in the activities in The Guiding Manual. Can they do it, and what’s the ratio of girls to adults if so? 11. Our units do so much good guiding, but no one seems to know about it. Why don’t we ever get coverage in the local paper? 12. Does anyone have a good five-minute team-building game that’s suitable for Rainbows? I’m out of ideas for tonight’s meeting!

Answers a. There’s no one right answer, but you could use this as an opportunity to build links with your local Trefoil Guild. See page 75 for two examples of how Guild members have supported large guiding events.

b. You can tap into the collective knowledge of thousands of guiding members through social media – our official Facebook page has over 33,000 members, and we have more than 28,000 followers on Twitter, so someone is bound to be able to help!

e. Country/Region Trainer Coordinator – the more you tell them about the training you need or are interested in, the better they can focus training in the right area.

c. Probably – you’ll just need a Residential Adviser or Outdoor Activities Adviser to check it over before you book.

f. Our website has a lot of guidance and advice at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ includingall. An Adviser for Members with Additional Needs can also help.

g. Yes they do! You can discuss evidence with your Leadership Qualification Mentor – and if you don’t have one, a Leadership Qualification Coordinator.

h. Guide Section Adviser – and have a look online for Participation on a Plate (to help girls get involved in planning their programme) and Good guiding is… (to make sure you’re building in all of the Five Essentials and giving girls a balanced and varied programme).

i. Remember to refer to your A Safe Space leaflet for guidance on members’ safety and well-being. You can also call the Safeguarding Team at Girlguiding HQ for further support on 020 7834 6242 during office hours or 07508 032997 for out-of-hours emergencies.

k. Find out online – Search www. girlguiding.org.uk/guidingmanual for ‘best practice’ and follow the flowchart to decide whether it can be done safely in a guiding setting. Very few activities are prohibited. If you have any questions, contact activities@girlguiding.org.uk.

d. Start by speaking to your local Commissioner, who will aim to resolve the disagreement. If she can’t, she can help you escalate the issue.

j. Public Relations Adviser – they can help you write better press releases, get in contact with local newspapers, radio and TV, and show off how exciting and relevant guiding is in your area.

l. Try the Marketing Team at Girlguiding HQ at brandingmatters@girlguiding.org.uk, and take a look at the Identity Guidelines at www.girlguiding.org.uk/brand for advice on using our logos, colours and trademarks correctly and consistently.

What’s in a name? These roles may not exist in every area – or they may have slightly different names. Search Go! to find the best person near you, or contact your Commissioner. Answers: 1c, 2e, 3f, 4l, 5h, 6g, 7a, 8i, 9d, 10k, 11j, 12b.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 47


Inspiration

Growing Guiding – you get, you give Partner: Other youth programmes like NCS, vInspired or DofE You get: enthusiastic young volunteers You give: the chance to learn new skills and make a local difference Sulekha Harrish, 14, is a DofE volunteer with 3rd Southall Brownies (above). She says, ‘I’ve always wanted to be more involved in my local community and Girlguiding welcomes all volunteers so I decided to help with my local Brownie group. ‘Even though I’ve now completed enough volunteering hours to receive my Duke of Edinburgh’s Award, I’ve enjoyed working with the Brownies so much that I’ve decided to stay on. The

48 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

more I volunteer with the girls the more my passion to help them grows. It’s been a great learning experience as well as a lot of fun!’ The unit has the potential to make a real difference, Sulekha believes: ‘We encourage the girls to engage in the community and I want to help my group grow in confidence and develop a better understanding of the world around them.’ Wherever they are in the UK, girls deserve to reap the benefits of guiding – and Aanya, 10, is pretty clear about what they are. She says, ‘Girlguiding is a fun place to socialise more and it’s only girls so you don’t have to worry about anything – you can

Don’t underestimate how much guiding can achieve with the right partner

just be yourself. I’m most looking forward to our Brownie holiday! We are probably going to have a sleepover too.’

‘I’ve always wanted to be more involved in my local community’ SULEKHA HARRISH


Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

Partner: School You get: a ready-made pool of new recruits

You give: girls a chance to try out guiding in their own school The Mulberry Guide group (left) opened in Mulberry School in Tower Hamlets in September 2014. Since then they’ve experienced guiding festival Wellies and Wristbands, held a Disney-themed movie night, grown vegetables in the school’s community garden and plenty more. Leader and teacher at the school Holly Green says, ‘Shortly before I began working at the school, we were approached by Girlguiding and asked if we would be interested in starting a

group – our answer was an enthusiastic “yes”! The work that Girlguiding does dovetails perfectly with my work at Mulberry.’ The unit has been a real success – Guide Kulsum, 13, says, ‘I enjoy being able to get together every week and do different activities. I like earning badges by learning skills, making new friends and having new experiences, especially when we went to camp. It’s just so much fun!’ Holly adds, ‘We now have two sixth-form students about to begin training as Young Leaders to help us run our growing Guide group, and our recently established Senior Section.’

may be moved off the ward, or have X-rays or physiotherapy.’ That means that flexibility is key – ‘We give the girls a different-coloured necker depending on their age and offer them six to eight activities to choose from.’ The activities are put together with the help of other volunteers who can’t attend the daytime sessions themselves, and at the end girls get a badge and certificate. ‘We also chat to parents about how to sign their daughters up

for guiding outside the hospital, if possible,’ Wendy says. Although the idea had been around for some time, a collaboration with hospital Play Coordinator Jenne McDonald brought the unit to life. ‘She’s fantastic – she’s been so enthusiastic about what guiding offers girls, and is very appreciative of how organised and flexible our Leaders are,’ says Wendy. And for girls whose normal lives have been so disrupted, the chance to do something for themselves is a welcome relief, and a link to the world outside.

‘Two students are about to begin training as Young Leaders’ HOLLY GREEN

Partner: Hospital You get: to stretch yourself You give: a welcome bit of normality to girls having a tough time Wendy Houston, Ulster Development Worker and Leader at 1st Kircubbin Guides, also coordinates holiday guiding sessions for girls aged 4 to 14 at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast. During the Easter and summer holidays, four experienced Leaders run three days of guiding activities for as many girls as are on the unit at the time – usually between eight and ten. ‘But we don’t know our final numbers until the morning we arrive,’ says Wendy, ‘since the girls

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

+ +

Look out for news about Lead in to Guiding – our new resource for welcoming new Young Leaders without previous guiding experience – from your Country or Region. For more ideas on Growing Guiding in your area, including how to open a new unit, adapting guiding to welcome even more members and the Growing Guiding Challenge, go to www.girlguiding.org.uk/growingguiding. And share your ideas and successes on social media – find us at www.twitter.com/growingguiding.

‘The hospital staff are so enthusiastic about what guiding offers girls’ WENDY HOUSTON, DEVELOPMENT WORKER

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Tools for the job Voice Excellence Access Capacity Access Capacity Voice Excellence

Role call! Laura West’s inspirational role models help girls to be happy in their own skin

She is now standing as the UK candidate for the World Association of Girl Guides and Girl Scouts (WAGGGS) Europe Committee, to be elected at the European Guide

‘I remember going abseiling with pig shower caps over the top of our helmets’

WORDS: Caroline Roberts

Laura (below and far right) was formerly Chair of 4CaST, which supported guiding’s peer-education programme, and in 2014 she featured on the Independent’s ‘Happy List’ for her work to promote positive body image. ‘There were so many absolutely amazing people on that list that I wondered how I got on it,’ says the Assistant Leader with 1st Frampton Cotterell Guides in South Gloucestershire. ‘So often you think the kind of thing you do in guiding is what everyone does, but when a national newspaper recognises what you do, you realise it’s special.’

and Scout Conference in Oslo this June. If voted on to the committee, which makes decisions and sets priorities for WAGGGS in the Region, she hopes to help ensure that girls’ and young women’s voices are heard and that education programmes focus on what’s relevant to them today. Laura’s guiding role model is Catherine Roberts, her own Guide Leader (left). ‘If it weren’t for her, I don’t think I’d still be as involved in guiding as I am. I was a Young Leader with her, and did my Leadership Qualification with the Brownie unit she set up. Catherine just made everything fun, and Guide camp was the best thing on earth. Her hats changed according to her mood – her camp name is Piglet, so she had lots of pig hats. I remember going abseiling with pig shower caps over the top of our helmets. It didn’t matter what you looked like, or what you were capable of at school, you could just be yourself, and that’s the

message I took away from my time with her.’ Her second role model is author Elizabeth Kesses (left), who she met at a roundtable event on girls’ attitudes organised by Girlguiding. Elizabeth penned The Ugly Little Girl, a trilogy of fairy tales designed to build body confidence and help girls through the tough times of adolescence. ‘She used her own childhood experience, of feeling that she never looked good enough,

to produce something positive which helps others get on board with the body confidence revolution,’ says Laura. ‘She’s very down to earth and just wants to help everyone be the best they can be.’ guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 51


Inspiration

Including everyone We’re doing our best to make sure that all girls can enjoy guiding

‘At Guides I definitely felt that I could be myself. It was a place to learn but not strict like school,’ says Nicola Miles-Wildin, a former member of 35th Cheltenham (Salem) Guides, who played Miranda in the Paralympics Opening Ceremony. At three-and-a-half years old Nicola (pictured top right) was diagnosed with juvenile chronic arthritis, which limits how far she can walk and has 52 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

led to double knee and hip replacements. She continues, ‘I suppose in a sense I wasn’t disabled at Guides. I never felt like my impairment was an issue – everything was made accessible to me, and I was encouraged to try, just like the other Guides were. In fact I think I loved it so much because I wasn’t singled out for being different, like I was at

school. I was treated exactly the same as everyone else.’ Working towards the Entertainer badge helped fuel Nicola’s love for drama. Now she runs her own theatre company, Twocan, in Gloucestershire, and performs across the UK. She was also involved in Jacqueline Wilson’s


Inspiration

Voice Excellence Voice Access Excellence Capacity Access Capacity

WORDS: Ellen Reid NICOLA PHOTO: jorge@studiocano.co.uk

new book Katy (inspired by the classic novel What Katy Did), providing the author with detailed information about what it was like growing up with a disability. ‘I cried when I saw the book was dedicated to me,’ Nicola explains. ‘You really see Katy’s journey and witness her confidence grow.’ Caroline Daboo, 23, is a member of The Senior Section and part of Team Spectacular. A Girlguiding member since the age of seven, she was diagnosed with steroid-induced myopathy (muscle weakness) in 2010. ‘The best thing I’ve ever done in guiding is learn to believe in myself,’ Caroline says. ‘Guiding has taken me abroad with my wheelchair in tow and given me so many opportunities, but the best things it has given me are the people and the

attitudes. Being accepted and encouraged in guiding by anyone and everyone, from Rainbows to Trefoil Guild, made me realise that I was still a valuable member of society and that I still had the choice to make my life what I wanted it to be.’ To make sure that every girl has the same exciting experience in guiding, we are working with experts in inclusion to improve the guidance and resources we offer. Many Leaders already use the information at www.girlguiding.org.uk/includingall to adapt our programme and activities, and take advantage of inclusive risk assessments (searchable on our website) to ensure that all unit members can enjoy guiding to the full. ‘My advice to guiding groups would be to treat all girls the same and encourage them to come out of their shells,’ says Nicola. ‘Not all disabled people know what they can and can’t do physically, so help them explore that without making it a massive issue. Let them develop their opinions but also challenge them. Girlguiding needs to be a place where girls and young women become the confident leaders of tomorrow.’

‘I loved it so much because I wasn’t singled out for being different, like I was at school. I was treated exactly the same as everyone else’

Further assistance We offer a range of Girlguiding publications in different formats, including large-print versions that can be purchased through Trading. These include Becoming a Brownie, Brownie Adventures, the Brownie Badge Book and the G File. We can also produce publications in Braille or as text-only electronic documents that can be read with software like Daisy, or on-screen at a size that suits. These are produced on request – please contact the Information Team on 0800 169 5901.

Adventure for everyone Girlguiding’s Activity Centres are offering ‘Sporting Barrier’ theme days for all sections later this year. Activities will include visually impaired football (played with a smaller ball that makes a sound as it moves), wheelchair fencing and archery. It’s a great opportunity to experience the range of activities available to people with additional needs – and is sure to spark some great ideas for inclusive games in the meeting place. Sporting Barriers will take place on 17 September at Blackland Farm, Foxlease, and ICANDO, and on 24 September at Waddow Hall. Look out for more information at www. girlguiding.org.uk/activity_ centres.

NICOLA MILES-WILDIN

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Tools for the job

Guiding online We’re making progress on some new digital tools that will free up your time (to spend with girls) and your energy (to give those girls more)

When we set out our digital vision – to make sure that our impact on the lives of girls and young women in real life is mirrored online – we also started working on some new digital tools to give everyone in Girlguiding the best possible experience. The most important of these is a new website and membership system. During 2015 we planned, tested and asked for your feedback, and this year we’re ready to make even more progress.

Getting it right After we launched the testing version of our new website at new. girlguiding.org.uk, hundreds of you emailed your comments, told us about bugs and came to testing days. Since then we have been learning from your feedback and reviewing our progress to understand what we need to do next.

An important part of this review was to make sure that the Content Management System (or CMS – that’s the framework behind our website) can provide all the online features that you told us you need to feel happy and supported in your volunteer role. It became clear that we needed to develop a better CMS so that we can build a better website. We are now working with a new digital agency and are on track to launch something new this summer. It’s true that the project has taken longer than we expected, but we are all determined to get it right. Now that we’ve reassessed, we can be more confident that we’re building the digital tools to help you, and to realise our

‘Our list of demands was long! I’d collected suggestions from over 100 Guide Leaders’ GILL ARMSTRONG

ambitions as a charity. Now we can be sure that our work fits into ‘Being our Best’ and supports everything we’re doing to make sure guiding can thrive now and into the future.

Systems that work for you We have come a long way since Go! (Girlguiding’s first membership system for recording all members) was launched, in a world before iPads 54 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

and 4G phones. We’ve never stopped listening to members and adding new features based on what you told us you needed – for example, adding the ability to record Guides who are helping at Rainbow or Brownie units, or pre-filling the Starting leaflet with all the information about when and where your unit meets. But we are now reaching the limits of the existing system so it’s time to look for something that is easier to use and better at supporting our volunteers. This won’t happen overnight – we consulted many groups during 2015, and will continue speaking to members throughout the process to make sure we understand what you really need. Don’t worry, we won’t forget anything we have already learned, or any of the suggestions you have sent in. Gill Armstrong is one of the members we spoke to at a weekendlong session in September 2015. The Guide and Senior Section Leader and District Commissioner says, ‘Our list of demands was long! I’d collected suggestions from over 100 Guide Leaders, and over the weekend we worked through many of them. Between us we held a range of guiding roles and represented all parts of the UK.’ It’s important that members take part, says Gill, as ‘we are the ones dealing with membership issues on a daily basis.’ Providing you with an updated membership system will take time (more than a year in fact) and input from all parts of guiding – so nothing


Tools for the job Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

will change straight away. The first stage is to introduce a system that does the same as our current ones – but better – and make sure it works before adding new features.

A work in progress Inevitably technology will move on, and our volunteers’ needs will carry on evolving – so the launch of our new website, and membership system upgrade, will be just the start. We’ll continue to work with you to make sure that our systems make your role easier, not more complicated. We’ll do our best to keep you up to date with developments on both of these projects, but if you’d like to be the first to hear (or are interested in being more involved in our testing and consultation), sign up to join the Digital Champions mailing list at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ digitalchampions.

In the meantime… Our help files are regularly updated – if you have a question about any of our membership systems, see if we’ve answered it already. + Files for Go! are in the Download Help Files area of Go! and at www.girlguiding. org.uk/gohelp. + We share advice in the Help Area of Join Us and at www. girlguiding.org.uk/joinushelp. + For the most up-to-date information about Subscriptions, see www.girlguiding.org.uk/subs. + Find help files for Disclosure system users and information about recruitment and rechecking by searching our website for ‘membership and recruitment’.

Still stuck? Contact your local Commissioner or County Coordinator for each system for more support or training, or contact the HQ team using the details below. + Join Us and Go! – membershipsystems@ girlguiding.org.uk or 0800 999 2016 + Recruitment and Disclosures – disclosures@ girlguiding.org.uk or 020 7592 1822 + Subscriptions – subscriptions@girlguiding.org. uk or 0800 999 2016. You can also submit your suggestions for new features or improvements to Go! or Join Us, as always, to membershipsystems suggestions@ girlguiding.org.uk.

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How to

Value your volunteers We want to make sure our members know how much we value their hard work. But how do other charities do it?

+ Kath Bromilow (right) is National Office Manager at Volunteer Police Cadets, a relatively new organisation that supports 9,000 police cadets and

56 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

their 1,800 leaders in forces across the UK. Kath says, ‘We’ve had a national team only for the last three years so things are growing and developing rapidly. We’re already seeing some brilliant sharing between forces, which may develop into a more formal buddying system – pairing forces whose cadet units are thriving with others which are struggling.’ Leaders support the cadets (aged 13 to 18) to take on a lot of social action – running community clean-ups, giving

advice on crime prevention, managing crowds at big events like the Great North Run and providing first aid. The key thing, Kath says, is to make them all feel part of the wider policing family. ‘Most local forces hold presentation and awards events for cadets and leaders, and in some areas they’re beginning to combine these events with awards for police officers.’ Cadets and volunteers are nominated to attend national police conferences or memorial services, and are eligible for the Lord Ferrers Award for volunteers in policing. Plenty of guiding Counties do this too – holding events to celebrate volunteers’ long service, publicly present


How to

WORDS: Helen Jefferies

Voice Excellence Access Capacity Voice Excellence Access Capacity

awards and hear reports from members’ international adventures. The recruitment process is being made more accessible as well – in the last year, Police Community Support Officer vacancies have been opened up to cadets. Kath says, ‘Our volunteers have already committed so much, so this is a sign of how much we appreciate what they’ve given.’ + Helen Timbrell, one of Girlguiding’s trustees, is also Volunteering and Community Involvement Director at the National Trust. She says, ‘What I really value is a personal thank you. It might just be an email or a card, but something authentic lets me know I’ve made a difference.’ And she’s not the only one – National Trust’s research showed that volunteers most appreciated a regular thank you from their local manager. Need to drop someone a thank you note in guiding? You could send a Girls Can card – pick up a pack of six from www.girlguidingshop.co.uk for £3.75 (order code 8821). Local teams also organise celebration and thank-you events to give volunteers a chance to catch their breath at the end of a busy season. Helen continues, ‘Many of our volunteers also tell us they value access to our experts, and learning about the place where they volunteer – so our talks, demonstrations and visits to other properties are really well received.’ Could you offer training and development for your volunteers to show your appreciation? Contact your Training Coordinator for more information. Nationally, the Trust has a series of long-service awards that start from five years. ‘We have many volunteers with over 50 years’ service,’ Helen says. ‘At the Trust’s discretion, volunteers who give more than 50 hours a year may also receive a Volunteer Card, offering free access to Trust properties.’ Has someone in your area passed a big guiding milestone? Find out more about our Long Service Awards at www.girlguiding.org.uk/guidingmanual – just search for ‘recognition’. The general public is not always aware of just how much is done by

National Trust volunteers – a little like in guiding – so whether it’s a story for local press or part of the Trust’s internal communications, volunteers are kept front and centre. And of course Facebook and Twitter (both TONY GIBNEY, ST JOHN AMBULANCE nationally and at individual properties) are easy ways to share volunteers’ awarded to members who have great work far endangered their own lives in and wide. attempting to save a life. But when Talk to your local PR Adviser about it comes to more informal, getting a higher profile for guiding day-to-day thanks, Tony says, ‘the stories in your area. important thing is to tailor the + St John Ambulance was founded to thanks to the individual and make teach first aid to nineteenth-century it more personal’. industrial workers. Today it has 2,500 leaders working with Cadets and other Be creative young people. The organisation’s When thanking the volunteers in structure will sound your area, Angela Milln, Deputy familiar to anyone in Chief Guide, has this advice: guiding – Tony ‘Try not to be too predictable. Gibney, the A gift – however small – that has Volunteer Engagement been chosen with that specific Manager, explains: ‘Local person’s interest in mind will say units are grouped into Areas, which it better.’ Is there someone in make up Districts and then Regions your area who could do with a – and each one has its own way of little extra appreciation? thanking and recognising its volunteers.’ Check out the Some hold a religious carol service at the affordable gifts at end of the year, while others plan a www.girlguidingshop. black-tie awards evening. co.uk. The national ‘People Recognition Procedure’ applies to volunteers and members of staff, who can be named ‘Star of the Month’, celebrated in the Chief Guide Gill Slocombe was newsletter, receive team awards and recently awarded not one but even be nominated to become a two Silver Fish awards. Read member of the Order of St John. And more about it (and how you can each volunteering milestone is marked recognise the outstanding too – with certificates and pin badges for volunteers in your area) on those people giving more than 500 page 11. hours each year and recognition awards at 3, 6, 9 and 12 years. A series of occasional awards (like guiding’s Laurel or Guiding Star awards – search The Guiding Manual for ‘recognition’ to find out more) also exists to reward unusual courage – for example the Life Saving Medal of the Order (Gold, Silver or Bronze), which can be

‘The important thing is to tailor the thanks to the individual and make it more personal’

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Inspiration

Day in the life 7am Monday morning. I help my two children get up and to school by 8.40am. This involves the five-yearold having a strop about something and the 11-year-old taking ages in the bathroom! I have a really supportive husband. He makes the brews when I’m up late doing emails, entertains the kids when I’m at guiding events, carries all my heavy banners and is my idea sounding board. I wouldn’t be able to do any of my guiding without his support! 9am I head back home to check my guiding emails. I’m a Public Relations Adviser for North West England and a Guide Leader in Bamber Bridge, Lancashire, so I get a lot of emails! At this time between Wednesday and Friday I can be found at Royal Preston Hospital, where I work as a radiographer. I treat 58 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Public Relations Adviser Gillian Clarkson loves telling people about the wonderful opportunities Girlguiding offers

patients with cancer, which can be quite harrowing, so guiding is my light relief after work. 10am I have a meeting with the Region Manager to discuss PR. First up is Christmas Countdown, our social media campaign for December. We have a virtual advent calendar on the Region’s social media page and website. Behind each door is a story from each County about an event or project. We also talk about promoting upcoming events. In April we’ll be holding an outdoor adventure weekend for Guides called ‘Off the grid’. And then for International Day of the Girl in October our Region will run three science-themed events.

We want to show girls the kinds of jobs women can do in science. Today we’re picking the winners of a recent competition in which we asked girls to tell us who inspires them. Most of the entries are drawings with glitter so we get completely covered! 1pm I return home and eat lunch while getting on with some PR work. My role as Adviser includes developing PR strategy for the Region, promotion and social media coverage of County and Region events, as well as supporting and training the 17 County PR Advisers. I was particularly proud of the PR work I did for the Big Brownie Birthday event in 2014 at Chester Zoo. We appeared on CBBC’s


Inspiration Voice Excellence Access Capacity Access Capacity Voice Excellence

‘If we can make a difference to one girl, then guiding is working’ Newsround, and had three radio interviews and lots of newspaper coverage. I believe our PR and our amazing events led to a large rise in the number of girls applying for Brownies. PR is so important. Without it we would not be able to grow guiding and recruit new girls and Leaders. PR helps change people’s perceptions of what Girlguiding does and shows them the varied and exciting opportunities it offers. It also helps to retain Leaders. I was involved in a campaign where we placed adverts for new Leaders on buses. It was in a particular area that was struggling with Leader recruitment. I got lots of positive feedback from existing Leaders saying it gave them a feeling of worth – they felt recognised and valuable. 3pm I pick my son up from school and we have 20 minutes at the park before

heading to swimming lessons at 4pm. I watch him swim, paying full attention (well, 80 per cent) as I proofread the Region’s International Challenge. 4.30pm I pick up my daughter from science club and fly past the supermarket to grab sweets for tonight’s Guide meeting. We have tea as a family – I cook and eat while making a sample Christmas bauble craft activity to take to Guides.

6.30pm I love going to unit meetings and seeing the girls’ faces and their smiles. There are girls in this unit who started as Rainbows and I’ve seen them grow and their confidence develop. I think that if we can make a difference to one girl by providing her the space to do this, then guiding is working. 9.30pm Home and time for a brew and a sit down after making packed lunches for tomorrow – phew!

Gillian’s guiding life + Gillian joined the 1st Galston Brownies in Ayrshire,

WORDS: Kate Durrant

+

Scotland, in 1986. She went on to be a Guide and then a Young Leader with her old Brownie unit. For Gillian, guiding is a family affair. She says, ‘My mum was a Leader in my unit when I was a Guide and I came back to guiding as a Leader in 2009, when I took my daughter to Rainbows and they asked if I wanted to help out. My daughter (pictured right) has flourished in Rainbows, Brownies and Guides. I love the friendships I’ve made and the fact that if I need anything I have a guiding family to call on.’

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Tools for the job

Who’s who?

Factfile: Board of Trustees WHAT does it do? Trustees agreed our ‘Being our Best’ plan for 2015 to 2020 and make sure that Girlguiding’s money and resources are used in the best way to deliver it. They ensure that Girlguiding is run according to

Factfile: Council WHAT does it do? Member representatives from all Countries and Regions can engage with national Girlguiding. Council members bring their own views but also consult locally to bring views of more members to the table. WHEN does it meet? At Girlguiding’s AGM, to receive a report from the Trustees and exchange views on top level policy

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Girlguiding’s Board of Trustees and new-look Council put members at the centre of national decision-making. Meet some of the new recruits…

Charity Commission regulations and our Royal Charter and bye-laws, and that decisions are informed by members’ views. WHEN does it meet? Four times a year. WHO are the trustees? The Chief Guide, Deputy Chief Guide

and Treasurer, plus ten Girlguiding members and two non-members. Trustees serve for three years, with a possible second term. HOW are they selected? Anyone aged 18+ can apply – vacancies are advertised through our website and e-newsletters.

and strategy. Between AGMs, it acts as a consultative body. WHO are the Council members? + Each Country and Region elects four members (up to half can be in The Senior Section age group). British Guides in Foreign Countries elects one member. + Up to nine members (who needn’t be Girlguiding members but must be 18 or over) are appointed by the Nominations and Governance Committee after open application.

+

Ex-officio members: the Chief Guide, Deputy Chief Guide, Treasurer, Chief Commissioners, International Commissioner, Branches Adviser, and Chairman of the Trefoil Guild. + Vice Presidents (non-voting) who serve for ten years. HOW are they selected? + A mix of election, selection and through their ex-officio role.


Tools for the job Voice Excellence Access Capacity Access Capacity Voice Excellence

Laura Fearn, Council member A Peer Educator and Young Leader with 4th Denham Guides, 17-year-old Laura is studying for A-levels as well as working on her Leadership Qualification. And she’s excited about being on Girlguiding’s Council. ‘Girlguiding has offered me amazing opportunities and yet, to many of my contemporaries, it’s not “cool”,’ she explains. ‘I’d love to change this outdated perception.’ It’s also essential that girls’ are listened to. ‘Shaping the organisation to be even more relevant to girls and young women today is imperative,’ Laura says. ‘For example, Free Being Me is an amazing global initiative that can make a real difference to many young women. Girlguiding has the power to reach a huge population and drive significant change.’

WORDS: Jane Yettram

Alex Hunter, Council member For A-level student Alex, 17, attending an international camp four years ago opened up many opportunities. ‘Getting involved in one guiding activity catapults you into another,’ she explains. ‘For example I attended the 23rd World Scout Jamboree in Japan and I’m on a Girlguiding Ulster PR and communications forum.’ Now, Alex is on Girlguiding’s Council. ‘At the induction meeting, I had to keep pinching myself – I’d actually spoken to the Chief Guide!’ she smiles. Alex will put forward the ideas of young Ulster members and hopes to promote Girlguiding through social media. She says, ‘It has the power to communicate with everyone, regardless of age, race, religion or background, and show what Girlguiding can do for every girl.’

Della Salway, Trustee Financial services professional Della has been a Leader for 35 years and has lots of national guiding experience, including leading the implementation of Go! and serving as International Commissioner. ‘But my grassroots experience will keep young members and volunteers at the front of my mind when making decisions on Girlguiding’s direction,’ she says. ‘As part of the Excellence strand of “Being our Best”, I want to work on how we can support volunteers to ensure that all young members have a quality experience. It’s also important to work effectively with our professional partners, using their technical expertise and additional capacity to support the work of lead volunteers, essential in our very special, volunteer-led charity.’

Margaret Donald, Trustee This is the first national guiding role for Margaret, an Edinburgh Guide Leader. ‘I thought applying was a bit of a long shot!’ she smiles. ‘Guiding has such a large impact on so many people’s lives, being involved at a strategic level will be really rewarding.’ The Edinburgh International Festival Finance Manager is keen to promote the Access strand of ‘Being our Best’. ‘When I tell people I volunteer with Girlguiding, they say how interesting it sounds, how they would never think to do something like that, and how much they enjoyed being a Brownie. If we could tap into this vast potential group of volunteers, it would help bring guiding to more girls.’

Carole Graham, Trustee Carole, who has been in guiding since she was 11, finishes her five-year term as Girlguiding Ulster’s Chief Commissioner this March. ‘But even when taking on other guiding roles I’ve always remained a Leader with Brownies, Guides and The Senior Section in my local village,’ says Carole. ‘I enjoy these roles and they allow me to understand the changing needs of girls and what they want from weekly unit meetings.’ As a Trustee, Carole – who is company secretary of a farmers’ cooperative – hopes to make a real difference. ‘I believe passionately in extending the offer to girls in “hard to reach” and rural areas and I want to make sure we have good processes in place to support our hard-working volunteers.’

Robert Cox, Trustee Girlguiding’s new Treasurer – an experienced finance director across many industries – loved his Scouting life as a boy. And he has no shortage of keen Girlguiding members in his life – his three sisters and older daughter were Brownies and Guides too, and his younger daughter is still in Brownies, having started in Rainbows. ‘I’ve seen at first hand the benefits Girlguiding has, bringing confidence, a sense of responsibility and fun to girls,’ says Robert. ‘When I saw the Treasurer vacancy I jumped at the chance to apply. It is a great opportunity to use my skills and give my time to help Girlguiding so others benefit as my family has done.’ guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 61


Your voice

Your letters, photos, stories, opinions... We want to hear from you! Simply email your contributions to yourvoice@girlguiding.org.uk, or write to Your Voice, guiding magazine, 17–19 Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1W 0PT*

‘Going on camp with Guides is one of my favourite childhood memories’ ELEANOR GREEN, 20, ROLLS-ROYCE APPRENTICE

‘I first joined guiding when I became a member of 1st Mickleover Rainbows. Going on camp with Guides is

‘It was cool, fun, awesome and tiring. When can we do it again?’ GUIDES AND SENIOR SECTION MEMBERS AND EMMA TREADWELL, LEADER, 1st CALMORE RAINBOWS, AND HAMPSHIRE WEST SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ADVISER Emma: ‘I helped organise a science and history event in London for the County’s Guides and members of The Senior Section. The girls had to get around the capital on public transport, finding as many sciencerelated blue plaques as they could in six hours.’ Girls: ‘It was cool, fun, awesome and tiring. When can we do it again?’ Emma: ‘We prepared a booklet with information about each of the people named in the plaques and maps of where they were. The girls learned about great

community projects and as a Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) ambassador I am given time during work to support them. Rolls-Royce even got involved at the Derbyshire County camp Peak, running a STEM activity tent. ‘Being a STEM ambassador is about making sure young people get the chance to see all the various possibilities before deciding on a career. When I was younger I loved doing my hair and learning to cook, but I was always interested in chemistry kits and science experiments too, which made following a career in STEM an obvious choice.’ Rolls-Royce has created a series of activities to help Brownies complete their Science investigator badge – download it from www.girlguiding.org.uk/brownies.

scientists including Charles Darwin and Elizabeth Garrett Anderson, Britain’s first female doctor. ‘We also went to the Royal Observatory in Greenwich for a show at the planetarium and we slept at the National Maritime Museum.’ Girls: ‘I enjoyed where we got to sleep – upstairs on a giant world map!’ Emma: ‘The girls learned about science and history, while burning lots of energy and having fun with their friends. I just hope that every unit in the County has been inspired to incorporate science into their programme this year, and that the girls realise it can be fun!’

Are you a star? Every issue we’ll be giving two star prizes for contributions to ‘Your voice’ – one for a great photo, the other for a great story. Two lucky contributors will each receive a £20 gift voucher to spend on guiding merchandise at local volunteer shops/depots and at Trading Service (mail order only).

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ALICIA AND SALLY PHOTO: Maxine Jones WORDS: Kate Durrant, Katie Hetherington, Helen Jefferies, Ellen Reid

one of my favourite childhood memories – washing our hair in buckets, singing hilarious camp songs and, of course, the super-delicious menu – I still don’t know how my Leader made camp food so tasty! ‘Teamwork, time-keeping and responsibility for your work and safety are skills I developed at Guides, and now use every day. I am a Manufacturing Engineering Apprentice and I work with Computer Aided Design (CAD) software that allows me to create 3D technical engineering drawings. ‘I always try to help out at any Guide and Scout camps and events. Rolls-Royce is extremely supportive of local


Your voice

‘The lolly-stick mouth organ made some unusual noises!’ SUSAN JAMES, LEADER, HANNAH, 8, AND IMOGEN, 9, 1st NORTHBROOK BROWNIES

* We love to hear from members but are sorry that, owing to the high volume of emails and letters we receive, not all contributions can be used. We are unable to reply to everybody individually or to return photographs.

Susan: ‘Eighteen girls and their Leaders from 1st and 4th Northbrook Brownies used a Mad Science-themed holiday to conduct messy experiments and earn their Science investigator badges. ‘To start the week off we submerged eggs in different liquids (milk, juice, vinegar, coffee and water) and left them for four days. Other experiments included floating chalk pictures and lemon clocks – we even made a weather station. ‘A highlight of the week was a

‘We tried out activities ranging from making paper aeroplanes to programming robots’ ALICIA, 16 (RIGHT), AND SALLY, 15 (LEFT), 1st ONGAR SENIOR SECTION

visit from Emma, a Leader with 2nd Shottermill Brownies, who thrilled us with water rockets, vapour clouds in a bottle, and shaving foam rainclouds. Other visitors from the University of Sussex taught the girls about the solar system with inflatable planets (above), and we got to make our own spectrometers. ‘Even the Leaders learned something new. And the eggs? Apart from a distinct smell, most of them hadn’t been affected by the liquids, except the ones in vinegar. The shells had gone soft, which made the

eggs bounce – this proved fascinating until they were bounced a little too hard!’ Hannah (second from left): ‘My favourite activity was making the lolly-stick mouth organ. It made some unusual noises!’ Imogen (fourth from right): ‘I really liked the holiday. Science is a bit more fun now.’ See if your local college or university offers outreach activities – they can run fun experiments and workshops and explain the theories behind them.

Alicia: ‘I heard about Inspire 24 [Girlguiding Anglia’s science and technology event] through my Leader after telling her that I was interested in a career in engineering. I thought that it sounded like a great experience.’ Sally: ‘The best part of the day was meeting the “Stemettes” (women working in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) and seeing how diverse all their jobs were.’ Alicia: ‘During the day we tried out activities ranging from making

paper aeroplanes to programming robots! I was particularly interested in the computer programming activity, which has inspired me to learn how to code.’ Sally: ‘Our overnight project was helping give an island energy that was effective and renewable as well as environmentally friendly. We decided to use solar power as our main source of energy and then had back-ups for storage like wind turbines, geothermal sources and hydro-electric power.’ Alicia: ‘We created paper windmills to represent the wind farms we were going to build and a paper box to represent the back-up generator.’ Sally: ‘This event made me realise how much STEM is actually involved in most careers and it has influenced me to look further into careers around STEM. I have also talked to my teachers at school and we are working on expanding our connections with STEM careers.’

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Teach English in Austria whilst gaining a certification! The English Teacher Training College and its associated Bilingual Classroom Initiative (ABCi) is an Austrian based not-for-profit organisation. As a College, we provide heavily subsidised TEFL courses for individuals who are interested in a career teaching English as a second language and, as a charity outreach, we give free English lessons to over 80,000 Austrian children every year.

WHAT WE PROVIDE: Practical 12-16 week TEFL-YL Course including: ➡ Trinity College London CertTESOL course component and certification (Beginner course only) ➡ Red Cross First Aid training and certification ➡ Over 30 hours of observed and assessed feedback, including video feedback, feedback from senior tutors, feedback from peers and observing a more experienced teacher.

Are you organising personalised hoodies, T-shirts or badges for your group? The Girlguiding bespoke service is an easy and simple way to get your designs brand-checked and put on merchandise. The best part is that 100% of profits go back into guiding!

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PHASELS WOOD ACTIVITY CENTRE There’s so much to do...

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hertfordshire county scout council, phasels wood activity centre, rucklers lane, kings langley, herts. wd4 9na Tel +44(0)1442 252851 Email: info@phaselswood.org.uk www.phaselswood.org.uk Charity No. 302606 VAT Reg No. 761 4558 19


Your voice

‘We have a fabulous group of girls who are all full of enthusiasm’

charities at Failsworth Carnival. ‘Our design also includes bees, as we have been saving pennies to pay for CAROLINE BLACK, LEADER AT 16th NORTH EAST beehives in Africa. MANCHESTER BROWNIES The Brownies have collected donations for local food banks, ‘Our taken part in the Snowy Owl, shoe box appeal to Emma Barrie, saw the appeal for send toys to Syrian 100 units to design a spot for the refugees, and joined Blue Peter cape and to our surprise, the British Heart we were selected. At our meeting Foundation’s Skipathon. we discussed with the girls the work we ‘The girls who were picked to go on had done in the community. Each girl Blue Peter were so excited – seeing The created her own design for a spot, and Vamps up close was an added bonus! we combined all the ideas into one. They enjoyed seeing how the ‘We put pictures of a carnival float programme was put together and were on it as we decorate a float with 17th shocked at the size of the studio. They North East Manchester Brownies and were very excited about the prospect of Guides every year to raise funds for local breaking a world record and seeing

‘The buzz I get from social action is indescribable’

EMILY SOLLOWAY, 17, YOUNG LEADER AT 1st SHENLEY RAINBOWS AND #IWILL AMBASSADOR ‘I was chosen to be an ambassador for the #iwill campaign because of my efforts volunteering in guiding, at care homes, and as a swimming teacher for young children with learning difficulties. ‘My role as an #iwill ambassador involves encouraging young people to get involved in social action in the community. My aim at the moment is to travel around local Brownie units and encourage them to move up to Guides – a lot of girls drop out after Brownies and so don’t become Young Leaders with other sections. ‘Young Leaders are so important, especially in Rainbow and Brownie units, as they set a good example to the girls and become role models. Every unit should have women from a range of generations. ‘The buzz I get from social action is indescribable. After every Rainbow meeting, every session I do in a care home and every swimming

themselves and the spot on TV. ‘The girls are always keen to join in community projects and see the results of their fundraising and donations. We have a fabulous group of girls who are all full of enthusiasm.’

lesson I provide, I feel honoured to have this opportunity to work with the people I do and make a difference to their lives. ‘It can be hard to impress this on girls as young as Rainbows, but by bringing in Guides to do activities, and through the Rainbow Jigsaw, we are teaching them to be independent-thinking, caring and kind.’ Emily is one of 50 new #iwill Ambassadors – and one of six from guiding. They aim to make social action a part of life for as many 10- to 20-year-olds around the UK as possible by the year 2020. Find out more at www.iwill.org.uk.

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Your voice

‘I believe that everyone should have the opportunity to learn first aid’ STEPH KEMP, 1st LEFTWICH FARM BROWNIES, REGISTERED NURSE AND GIRLGUIDING 1st RESPONSE COORDINATOR AND TRAINER, CHESHIRE FOREST

crafts and taught the children first aid. ‘Back at home, some of my Brownies had been working on their World cultures badge and I was able to find penpals for them from among the school children in Cambodia. ‘I believe that everyone should have the opportunity to learn first aid, and thankfully Girlguiding provides this with the 1st Response training. I feel proud that I have been able to pass on some of my knowledge and skills to other corners of our world.’ Find out more about our first aid qualification – search www.girlguiding.org.uk for ‘1st Response’.

‘I took part in my first international Girlguiding trip to The Gambia last year. I helped to teach female health and first aid skills to women and girls from the village of Gunjar. As a result of the first aid training, someone has already saved the life of a person who was choking. ‘Later, my daughter Lucy invited me to join her volunteering with children in Cambodia. With the resources I took with me, we played games, made

‘I know that if I put my mind to something, I can do it’ SUSAN HOLT, LEADER AT 1st BISHOPS CANNINGS BROWNIES, WILTSHIRE ‘I’d always wanted to visit Machu Picchu, so when I got the email asking for people to sign up for a Charity Challenge to Peru, I thought: why not?

66 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

‘I started fundraising straight away. One of the most successful events was a beetle drive (a simple game in which people roll dice and race to draw a beetle), which added £400 to my total. I charged £20 entry per team and took donations for tea and coffee, and it was a lot less work than, say, writing and running a quiz. ‘The Brownies loved being involved with a couple of bagpacking days – we split the money 50:50 between the unit and my total. I also negotiated a discount with a DJ and ran discos for the Rainbows and Brownies in the Division. The

key thing is to spread your fundraising efforts out across different audiences – I didn’t target just Brownie parents, but my friends, colleagues and the wider community too. ‘I’ll never forget arriving at Dead Woman’s Pass – even though I had to dig deep to make the last climb, and walk down again in a hailstorm. And after four days’ slog it was incredible to arrive together at the Sun Gate and see Machu Picchu – the photos don’t give a sense of just how huge it is. ‘The challenge has really changed my attitude – now I’m back, I’m feeling a lot more adventurous and I know that if I put my mind to something, I can do it. So I’ve signed up for a local 10k and a half marathon to keep up my fitness!’ Join our team of supporters cycling from Vietnam to Cambodia, or find another Charity Challenge closer to home at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ challengeevents.


Your voice

‘In true guiding fashion, friendships began to form’ HOLLY REDING, LEADER IN TRAINING AT 23rd NORWICH GUIDES, ALICE, 17, 6th UPMINSTER (ST LAURENCE) GUIDES, AND KAYLEIGH, 15, 3rd BRICKHILL GUIDES, BEDFORD

The views were so epic that our pictures looked like they should be on postcards’ EMMA, 19, AND MEGAN, 17, WEST YORKSHIRE SOUTH (WAKEFIELD) SENIOR SECTION

Holly (front row, far left): ‘In July 2014, I went on an international adventure to Canada with two other Leaders and 12 young guiding members. ‘I was a bit worried because the girls didn’t really know one another, but our gang of girls became solid friends and, a year on, all the girls from the trip and our Canadian friends met at Girlguiding HQ in London. ‘Together we have grown a personal guiding family, both here in the UK and abroad, and I will continue to stay in touch with my new friends.’ Alice (centre, wearing purple hoodie): ‘I think we bonded so well because of our common interest in guiding. Not to mention we were all caught up in the hype of the camp, which made it even better.’ Kayleigh (centre, blue shirt): ‘It was easy to become friends with the Canadian girls, we just found ourselves talking about anything and everything. Meeting up in London was great. We have formed friendships that have stayed with us ever since – and always will.’ Search www.girlguiding.org.uk for ‘travelling abroad’.

like they should be on postcards.’ Megan (front row, second from right): ‘We climbed 800 metres of the Great Wall. We got to see the Forbidden City, Tomb of Yu, the Summer Palace and the Temple of Heaven, and we ate local delicacies like chicken feet. ‘It was exhausting but definitely something we can tick off the bucket list. We made some great friends and it was a phenomenal 10 days.’

Emma (back row, second from right): ‘In August, 11 ladies in purple shirts and I started our 7,033-mile journey to Beijing. We had no idea what we had let ourselves in for as we began the Great Wall of China Challenge. We faced Chinese thunderstorms, freakish bugs and temperatures nearing 40 degrees! ‘However, the climb was definitely worth it. We took in the vast sight of the mountains and the wall that wove in between them. The views were so epic that our pictures looked

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Africa

Asia

Eastern

Europe

Latin America & the

South

Caribbean

Pacific

Group Trips Volunteer Overseas

www.kibblestone.org 01785 813407

Projects Abroad held my hand throughout all the planning and came up with an incredible and challenging programme for our 2 weeks in Nepal.

www.projects-abroad-groups.co.uk groups@projects-abroad.co.uk Tel: 01903 708316

Lesley Ashton, LEADER, GIRLGUIDING SLOUGH

Kibblestone Internaitional International Scout Camp, Camp, Oulton, Oulton, Stone, Stone, Staffordshire, ST15 8UJ

scouts.org.uk/sac

A massive 15% discount throughout 2015

© 2014 The Scout Association, Registered charity numbers: 306101 (England and Wales) and SC038437 (Scotland).

SCOUT ACTIVITY CENTRES Come and join us at our National Events – Fundays, Gilwell24, Wintercamp, Scarefest and Intense – all members of Girlguiding are welcome too! scouts.org.uk/sacevents Did you know? You can also book various programmes and training courses which may also cover part of your badge requirements. See our Programme, Training and Event Guide for more information: scouts.org.uk/sacguides sac@scouts.org.uk scouts.org.uk/sac Telephone: 0845 300 2549 /ScoutActivityCentres @ScoutCentres


Your voice

‘The girls snuggled into their sleeping bags with torches and a book of their choice’

‘My superhero power would be the power of speed or rocket boosters on my wheelchair!’

ELAINE COOK, LEADER, AND TILLY, 8, 1st NESTON JOINT RAINBOW AND BROWNIE UNITS, CHESHIRE Elaine: ‘We had a sleepover in our local library with 60 Brownies from the County. I got the idea when I read about a tourist getting locked in a bookshop overnight. Lots of people commented on how magical that would be. ‘Also, our unit had made manifestos on how to run Brownies as part of Girls Matter: Hear our Voice. They asked for more sleepovers, and the library seemed like the perfect venue!’ Tilly (pictured top, reading): ‘I like it that we get to help choose what the unit does. We did a scavenger hunt around the library and held our own book club where we talked about books we like. We also made bookmarks, book covers and a giant book sculpture.’ Elaine: ‘At the end the girls snuggled into their sleeping bags with torches and a book of their choice. They had a wonderful time.’ Tilly: ‘At bedtime it was like the giggling was catching. Other Brownies would giggle and then we would giggle. It took us ages to get to sleep!’ Fancy a sleepover or holiday? Search www.girlguiding. org.uk for ‘going away’.

STAR PHOTO

JESSICA, 10, MILLIE, 7, TEGAN, 9, CAITLIN AND CHLOE, BOTH 10, ALL 1st TOFTWOOD BROWNIES, NORFOLK

Jessica (large photo, left): ‘We became superheroes for the day in October. I dressed as Wonderwoman, made power cuffs and wrote my own comic strip called Superhero Brownie Leaders save the day. If I could choose a superhero power it would be the ability to save nature, both animals and habitats, as too much is being destroyed.’

Millie (large photo, right): ‘We had to choose a cape and mask and “fly” over the city. I was Batgirl. My superhero power would be the power of speed or rocket boosters on my wheelchair!’ Tegan (flying, top): ‘When I saw the Leaders dressed up in their capes and masks I wondered what was going on!’

Caitlin (flying, bottom): ‘We talked about real-life superheroes like doctors and firefighters, and our teachers, parents and Brownie Leaders who give up their time for us!’ Chloe (large photo, centre): ‘I was Thor. At the end we got a badge – it was awesome.’

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Celebrate Girlguiding events in style! Torch keyring (batteries not supplied)

T-shirt 2931 to 2936

2357

£10

£5

Badge 2358

85p

Hoodie Bag 2356

2973 to 2978

£18

£10

Travel mug

Bag

2355

Hoodie

£10

2359 to 2363

2911

£3

£20

Badge 2913

£1

The Girlguiding Bespoke Service is an easy and simple way to get your designs brandchecked and put on merchandise. The best part is that 100% of profits go back into guiding! To find out more, search for ‘personalised merchandise’ at www.girlguiding.org.uk.

Call 0161 941 2237 to find your nearest volunteer shop or to order from our Guiding Essentials catalogue. For further details, see the catalogue or visit www.girlguidingshop.co.uk.


Your voice

‘I already feel more prepared’ JULIA HALL, LEADER, AND SARAH AND EMILY, 15, 14th MACCLESFIELD SENIOR SECTION

Julia (far right): ‘We’re always looking for fun and different activities, and learning basic car care – such as how to change a tyre, check the pressure and oil, and add washer fluid – seemed like a great Independent Living activity.

‘In wild November weather, the Brownies tried shepherding for themselves’

‘Having been rescued by the RAC a couple of times, I thought we’d see if it could help. It all tied up very well as the RAC Patrol of the Year, Ben Wilson, is based near us in the Manchester area. ‘The girls were a little sceptical at first, but they came along, despite the damp weather. ‘Ben explained things really clearly, gave a few demonstrations and then let them have a go. He answered all their questions – on good cars for new drivers, things to look out for when buying a car, driving economically, and what to think about before you set out. We all learned something, even those of us who’ve been driving for 20 years!’ Sarah (second from right): ‘I learned loads about cars, things that I hadn’t really considered before, like topping up oil or checking that your tyres are safe. All really useful information for when I learn to drive. I already feel more prepared.’ Emily: ‘I learned vital skills that I will need to know in the coming years as I get a car and maintain it. It was a fantastic experience.’

STAR STORY

JANICE BROWN, LEADER, AMELIA, 9, AND SAFFRON, 8, 1st WETHERAL BROWNIES, CUMBRIA Janice: ‘Our winter sleepover was inspired by the Friend to animals badge, so 29 of us travelled to South Lakes Safari Zoo to learn about endangered species. They enjoyed feeding the penguins and giraffes, and avoiding over-enthusiastic emus and lemurs! ‘After overnighting at a school in Shap and feasting on award-winning fish and chips, the Brownies met two female shepherds, Katy and Henrietta (Henry) Cropper, who taught them about working animals. ‘The Brownies had followed Henry on Countryfile as the youngest-ever competitor on One Man and His Dog, so they were

thrilled to see a demonstration by Henry’s dog Lad, and also to see Katy (the first woman to win the competition) working a brace of dogs. ‘Then, in wild November weather, the Brownies tried shepherding for themselves. They learned that a shepherd needs to have a passion for the job and really to love her dog, curbing its natural instinct to kill and building a useful partnership.’ Amelia: ‘You didn’t have to shout loudly at the sheepdog, but you did have to say the commands in the right way and then Lad did everything you wanted him to.’ Saffron (left): ‘I was really surprised and happy when Lad obeyed my commands – he even lay down for me and we rounded up some sheep. This was my first sleepover with Brownies and I can’t wait for the next one!’

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Discover a world of adventure at Girlguiding’s Activity Centres

Guiding events

Camps and holidays

Leader training

Leisure breaks Find a wide range of accommodation – from fully catered rooms and selfcatering lodges to tented villages and campsites.

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We are open to everyone. Bring your friends and family or visit with another group.

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72

Activity Centres

Registered charity number 306016.


Your voice

‘This just shows what people with learning disabilities can do’ KATIE SMITH, LEADER, 7th KENILWORTH (ST BARNABAS) GUIDES, WARWICKSHIRE ‘I won a silver medal for kayaking at the 2015 Special Olympics in Los Angeles.

‘I have Down’s syndrome and this just shows what people with learning disabilities can do. I started kayaking in Guides and loved it. In Los Angeles, I won the silver medal for the 200-metre kayaking singles race and fifth place in the 500-metre singles event. I was the only woman among eight of us in the GB kayaking team and I wanted to win it for the girls! ‘When I’m out on the water I can just focus and do what I love to do. With my disability, walking can be difficult, but my upper body is strong. I love that I can make my dreams reality and win medals. ‘I also won a gold medal in the 2009 Special Olympics in Leicester and two bronze medals in the 2007 Special Olympics in Shanghai. ‘I was absolutely delighted to win my medals. It took a lot of effort, a lot of training and the support of all the people around me including my unit, who helped me to fundraise, and my family. I am so grateful.’

‘The camaraderie of camp is so important – it really helps the unit feel more cohesive’ VIV HEWETT, LEADER, ELOISA, 12, AND DAISY, ELLA AND TILLY, 11, 4th BUSHEY GUIDES

Viv: ‘I go camping with my Guide unit once a year. This summer we went to Lees Wood in Hertfordshire. It was pouring with rain when we arrived, and did so all day long, but the girls were so excited that they didn’t notice the rain – we even managed to collect wood and cook our dinner on a fire! ‘The camaraderie of camp is so important – it really helps the unit feel more cohesive, and is also a chance for the Leaders to get to know the girls better.’ Eloisa: ‘The weather didn’t change any of the activities we did, and anything we did we enjoyed.’ Daisy: ‘It was fun to meet up with people that we wouldn’t otherwise have seen during the holidays.’ Ella: ‘I love camping and this was the best experience yet!’ Tilly: ‘Our next camp could be anywhere, and it would still be fun because I am with all of my friends.’ Talk to your Commissioner about training to help you take girls camping.

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Your voice

‘I arrived at camp three days before the opening’ SUE BARANEK, MATLOCK TREFOIL GUILD

‘Matlock Trefoil Guild gets involved with as many local events as possible. I’ve been involved in Peak, the Derbyshire County international camp, since the 1970s,

‘Happiness is Wellies and Wristbands!’ FRANCES PARRETT, TREFOIL GUILD ‘Trefoil Guild members, including my friend Carole Comber (pictured) and I, volunteered at both 2015’s Wellies and Wristbands festivals, supporting Girlguiding by checking in over 4,000 participants, running a swap shop, leading drumming

when I was a Guide Leader and Trainer. When we opened the new Guild six years ago, helping out at Peak again seemed an easy choice, but on the admin side this time. There are 7,000 campers and 5,000 members of staff, so there’s plenty to do. ‘Peak happens every five years and we start planning the next one almost as soon as the last one is over, so we can learn from our mistakes. I was heavily involved for several months before this one, helping the admin team chase up applications. ‘The camp has changed a lot since my first Peak – now our Admin tent has 12 computers, and we can take photos and print ID cards there and then. Campers order their food online now so they don’t have to bring it all with them (or buy from the supermarket on site) – one year I was part of a team unloading a convoy of 12 Sainsbury’s vans! ‘My friend and fellow Trefoil member Jennifer and I arrived at camp three days before the opening to pack welcome bags for the campers. Although there was a huge staff campsite, as I live only 20 minutes away I could go home at the end of the day, via the on-site wine bar!’

workshops and serving at the Night Café, as well as bringing their own guiding units. ‘Gaggles of excited Guides and members of The Senior Section could be seen all day setting off for a huge variety of activities, from fencing to hot tubs and from crafts to canoeing, not to mention spinning around in zorbing balls. ‘As the evening arrived, the smiling youngsters became devotees of the young talented singers and instrumentalists on stage. The Guide audience put so much energy into singing, dancing and jumping the evening away. The audience and performers had a great time. ‘Happiness is Wellies and Wristbands! These festivals for Guides and members of The Senior Section are so much fun – thanks to the volunteers who spend weeks getting the admin right, and who give up their Bank Holiday weekend to make it all run smoothly.’ Sign up to volunteer at 2016’s Wellies and Wristbands festivals at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ welliesandwristbands. Or find out more about what Trefoil Guild can do to support local guiding at www.trefoilguild.co.uk.

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Your voice

‘I arrived at camp three days before the opening’ SUE BARANEK, MATLOCK TREFOIL GUILD

‘Matlock Trefoil Guild gets involved with as many local events as possible. I’ve been involved in Peak, the Derbyshire County international camp, since the 1970s,

‘Happiness is Wellies and Wristbands!’ FRANCES PARRETT, TREFOIL GUILD ‘Trefoil Guild members, including my friend Carole Comber (pictured) and I, volunteered at both 2015’s Wellies and Wristbands festivals, supporting Girlguiding by checking in over 4,000 participants, running a swap shop, leading drumming

when I was a Guide Leader and Trainer. When we opened the new Guild six years ago, helping out at Peak again seemed an easy choice, but on the admin side this time. There are 7,000 campers and 5,000 members of staff, so there’s plenty to do. ‘Peak happens every five years and we start planning the next one almost as soon as the last one is over, so we can learn from our mistakes. I was heavily involved for several months before this one, helping the admin team chase up applications. ‘The camp has changed a lot since my first Peak – now our Admin tent has 12 computers, and we can take photos and print ID cards there and then. Campers order their food online now so they don’t have to bring it all with them (or buy from the supermarket on site) – one year I was part of a team unloading a convoy of 12 Sainsbury’s vans! ‘My friend and fellow Trefoil member Jennifer and I arrived at camp three days before the opening to pack welcome bags for the campers. Although there was a huge staff campsite, as I live only 20 minutes away I could go home at the end of the day, via the on-site wine bar!’

workshops and serving at the Night Café, as well as bringing their own guiding units. ‘Gaggles of excited Guides and members of The Senior Section could be seen all day setting off for a huge variety of activities, from fencing to hot tubs and from crafts to canoeing, not to mention spinning around in zorbing balls. ‘As the evening arrived, the smiling youngsters became devotees of the young talented singers and instrumentalists on stage. The Guide audience put so much energy into singing, dancing and jumping the evening away. The audience and performers had a great time. ‘Happiness is Wellies and Wristbands! These festivals for Guides and members of The Senior Section are so much fun – thanks to the volunteers who spend weeks getting the admin right, and who give up their Bank Holiday weekend to make it all run smoothly.’ Sign up to volunteer at 2016’s Wellies and Wristbands festivals at www.girlguiding.org.uk/ welliesandwristbands. Or find out more about what Trefoil Guild can do to support local guiding at www.trefoilguild.co.uk.

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45 bed house 7 campsites 27 activities Discovery Zone Guiding shop Residential & activity packages Badge days New for 2016... Reedcutters Village! (48 person max capacity) Anglia GgLP_BL_C

01603 737357 www.hautbois.org.uk REF: GM16

NEW

Featuring: Astroglide Dropslide Sky Walk

is for...

fun and freedom. You can run or relax, climb or dine, ride or ramble at Wicksteed Park. Do whatever you enjoy in our beautiful park grounds and entertainment areas. Bring your unit – big group or small, there’s something for all! Visit our website for more information or come on down and find out for yourself.

wicksteedpark.org


Your voice

‘Parents can do their shopping while girls are at Rainbows’ SARAH WHEELER, POOLE WEST DIVISION COMMISSIONER ‘We had a large number of Rainbows on waiting lists at three Districts who would probably never make it into a unit. The best way to make sure they didn’t miss out on guiding altogether was to open a Poole West Division Rainbow unit, meeting once a month. ‘We were looking for a location that was accessible for people from all three Districts, cheap and available for one Saturday afternoon a month. The Tesco superstore at Fleetsbridge has recently been refurbished and now includes a community room with separate toilets, tables, chairs, beanbags, a couple of

‘If all I had to live on was 50p, then I would feel very different about the world’ JANE COZENS, LEADER, DAISY, 8, AND KATIE, 7, 1st ORDSALL BROWNIES, NOTTINGHAMSHIRE

computers, and a microwave and kettle, and it’s free to any group who wants to book it. ‘The Unit Leader is supported by a rota of all the Leaders in the Division, each helping once a year. Tesco benefits by having a set of parents walk through the shop to drop girls off at the meeting, and again to pick them up. And from the parents’ point of view it is easy to park, and they can do their shopping while girls are at Rainbows!’

Jane: ‘Our Brownies have been busy looking at the issues around World Food Day. Bassetlaw Food Bank visited the unit and the girls all donated to those who are most in need. ‘It really got them thinking about where their food came from and I think it was a big eye-opener for a lot of them. It was great to see the girls learning such valuable skills in such a fun way.’ Daisy (middle row, second from left): ‘We had to find out how much money it would cost for us to eat and then what we could buy for 50p. It was very hard and most of the food was really unhealthy.’ Katie (middle row, second from right): ‘I’m diabetic so it was interesting to see what food had too much sugar in and what I could eat. It was really fun to try and buy food with only 50p but I did find it hard!’

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Our partners

Girlguiding works with a number of partners to give girls the best possible opportunities to learn and to develop their potential

Three Sainsbury’s Active Kids

Supporting the Guide Communicator badge.

Providing equipment and experiences to Girlguiding members to help get girls and young women of all ages and abilities more active.

Pets at Home SGN Supporting the Guide Active response badge and an online gas and carbon monoxide safety game for Brownies.

Supporting the Brownie Friend to animals badge and GFI! Animal active.

PGL Travel Unity Insurance Services Providing specialist insurance for Girlguiding members and units.

Cotswold Outdoor

Supporting the Guide Outdoor pursuits and the Brownie Out and about badges.

Rolls-Royce Supporting the Brownie Science investigator badge.

Minifigs.me

Supporting our work all over the UK by giving 10 per cent from the sale of guiding Minifigs to Girlguiding.

78 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Providing activity courses and holidays for Girlguiding members including exclusive events for Brownies.

Microsoft

Supporting better understanding of how girls want to engage around digital skills.

Tesco

Engaging girls in healthy eating and helping them understand where their food comes from.

Find out more about our partners at www.girlguiding.org.uk/partners. And check out www.girlguiding.org.uk/benefits to discover all our great membership benefits and offers.


Your voice

‘Cantering through the Mongolian hills on a horse was the most surreal experience of my life’ ELIN HOWELLS, MEMBER OF THE SENIOR SECTION, KUALA LUMPUR ‘Nadia, Izzy and I, all members of the same British Guides in Foreign Countries (BGIFC) unit, did a five-day horse trek in Mongolia for our Queen’s Guide expedition. Although it was run by an external provider, we did the planning and budgeting, so we could fulfil our dreams of staying in a traditional tent called a ger. ‘We had two days before the trek to buy food and equipment from the capital, Ulaanbataar. The locals who

owned the horses we rode looked after us during the treks and even taught us a little Mongolian. I had never ridden a horse before, but after five days of trekking up to 20km a day I could handle a horse fairly well, and cantering through the Mongolian hills was probably the most surreal experience of my life. ‘The scenery was amazing. It was

‘I’d never have dreamed of doing adventurous stuff like this before I became a Leader’

CLEVELAND PHOTO: Michelle Maddison Photography

CAROLYN FOX, LEADER AT 1st INGLEBY BARWICK BROWNIES, MARY LEE, CLEVELAND COUNTY MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS ADVISER, AND MAKAYLA, SOPHIE AND EMILY, 27th HARTLEPOOL BROWNIES

Carolyn: ‘2015 marked the 104th birthday of Middlesbrough’s iconic bridge and of Girlguiding Cleveland. Mary coordinated 104 members of Girlguiding Cleveland – from Rainbows to members of the Trefoil Guild – to climb the bridge.

very cold in the mornings so the last thing we wanted to do was leave our tents, but the incredible view – and remembering that we were camping with best friends in a foreign country – gave us a new sense of amazement and motivation.’ Explore the Queen’s Guide Award at www.girlguiding.org.uk/theseniorsection.

‘I took part to help raise some money to take eight members of The Senior Section from North East England (NEE) to the Jamboree in Finland in July 2016 as part of the year’s celebrations. I absolutely loved it! It was exhilarating to get to the top and see Teesside laid out below us. ‘Guiding has given me some incredible opportunities since I became a Leader eight years ago and there’s lots more to come. I did the Boxing Day dip at Redcar with other NEE Leaders and am planning a zip wire to raise money for the Finland trip. I’d never have dreamed of doing adventurous stuff like this before I became a Leader.’ Mary: ‘I went up in the new glass lift – we had girls aged five and Leaders ranging in age from 25 to 95. We are doing activities that are relevant to girls today. What the girls want is adventure – they like to do the same things as boys do but in a girl-only space.’ Makayla, Sophie and Emily (below, left to right): ‘We made our Promise at the top of the bridge – a big bridge for a big day! We have made lots of new friends since joining Brownies in September. We have been to a Division disco and met other Rainbows, Brownies and Guides, and celebrated our unit’s 60th birthday, where we learned about how Brownies has changed over the years. In 2016 we want to go on our first Brownie Holiday!’

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 79


GUIDING DIRECTORY ACTIVITIES

Beaudesert Activity Centre Located in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Cannock Chase, Staffordshire Camping - Accommodation Activities- Events - D of E

Tel 01543 682278 www.beaudesert.org

Please mention Girl Guiding when responding to advertisers 80 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

ACTIVITY CENTRES


ACTIVITY CENTRES

GUERNSEY’S CENTRE FOR ADVENTURE

A 21 acre site managed by Girlguiding Gloucestershire is situated in the heart of the Cotswold countryside.

2 fields, variety pitches. Campsites with dry shelters and showers, wheelchair accessible. Basic greenfield camping Groups 3-300

Activit ESSEX CHELMSFORD,

Hostel, campsite & activity centre open all year round. Call 01481 256796 adventure@lesmaingys.co.uk www.lesmaingys.co.uk

55 ACRES 24 CAMPING AREAS 25 OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES 3 ACCOMMODATION CENTRES BOOK NOW

LES MAINGYS

For residential and day visitors with onsite archery, mountain biking, traversing wall, low ropes course, pistol shooting, tunnels course and more. Camping

S SKREENK PAy R Centre

ACTIV ITY CENTR E

skreenspark.org.uk

0845 643 6025

Self – Catering Fully equipped House with bunks, sleeps 24 in three rooms.

New - multi discipline High Ropes Tower on site!

Fully equipped Activity Hall with camps beds, sleeps 18 plus leaders room with 4 beds, wheelchair accessible.

For more information visit www.deerparkcowley.com, or contact our onsite centre manager Sarah, Email deerparkcowley@btconnect.com or telephone 01242 870284.

Foxlease Activity Centre

Adventurous activities for all ages and abilities.  Campsites: 15  Bedrooms: 28  Self-catering buildings: 3  Acres: 65 Lyndhurst SO43 7DE • 023 8028 2683 foxlease@girlguiding.org.uk www.foxlease.org.uk Registered charity number 306016

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 81


ACTIVITY CENTRES

CAMPING

Berwick Activity Centre

PAX HOH CAMPSITE

Berwick St James, Salisbury, Wilts SP3 4TS 2 campsites, shower/toilet block and dry store with pioneering and archery available Fully equipped House for 14+, with play area and games Within easy reach to Salisbury, Stonehenge, Devizes, Longleat and Bath Contact Bookings: Tel: 01722 328053 www.girlguiding-wiltshiresouth.org.uk/berwick

On the edge of the Peak District. 15 miles from Alton Towers. Equipment available for 60 campers. Shower and toilet block. Wet weather shelter. Contact: Tel: 01773 880875

HOLIDAYS ABROAD

Ashbourne, Derbyshire DE6 3EH

   

Needwood Forest Scout Campsite Burton upon Trent Centrally heated fully equipped building, with 28 beds (and bedding provided) 2 acres woodland and 2 acres camping field. Located centrally to;Peak District National Park, Cannock Chase, Alton Towers, Waterworld, Snowdome, Drayton Manor Park, Twycross Zoo, and St Georges Park (FA Centre)

For brochure and price list contact Brian Reeves Tel: 01283 546536 E-mail: warden@needwoodforest.org.uk

Please mention Girl Guiding when responding to advertisers

CAMPING

One of the best In Essex NEW

Fully catered residential packages for your group Camping or accommodation

www.belchamps.org.uk To advertise here, call Jane Stoggles on 0203 603 7940 SUPPLIERS

 

  

  



      



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T-Shirts & Polo-Shirts

Call 01702 562690



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 82 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Printing and embroidery. Minimum order just 12 shirts for most designs. Ideal for camps, expeditions and events. Specials: Yellow hoodies & yellow fleeces Tel: 0115 963 2848 sales@welbecksports.co.uk www.welbecksports.co.uk

WELBECK Nottingham

Please mention Girl Guiding when responding to advertisers


SUPPLIERS

TENT SUPPLIERS

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 83


Activities

Things to make and do for all sections This spring, help girls see the power of art, understand what makes a good team and celebrate their rights

Street art

Street art in public places such as walls or parks can convey a very powerful message. It can be political, comment on society or encourage us to reflect, and it happens all over the world

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Images of street art – search online for artists Banksy, Faith47, Stik and Swoon Sticky notes, or paper and sticky tack Pens

What to do 1. Display examples of street art around the room. 2. Ask the girls if they have heard of street art before – what is it? Where does it happen? 3. Now, ask the girls to get into pairs, each with sticky notes or pieces of paper. Ask the pairs to add captions to each piece of street art on display – what do they think each image is saying? Encourage the girls to think creatively – there’s no right or wrong answer. 4. Bring everyone back together and explain that street art is often designed to have a clear message – asking for change or trying to raise awareness of an issue. 84 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Take it further Find out about street art in your community – is there any? If not, discuss with the girls whether they’d like to see street art in their area, and if so, what they would want to see and where.

Two Figures photo: AC Manley/Shutterstock.com Phonebox photo: Stephen Clarke/Shutterstock.com

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Help Brownies, Guides and members of The Senior Section to analyse a piece of street art and think about what it means and what impact it could have.

5. MINUTNow put girls into small groups and ask them to discuss the images and captions. How similar NTH they? As a group, what do you MO are think the street art image is trying to say? Which caption do they think most reflects the message in the image? 6. Bring everyone together and share girls’ ideas. Have the girls seen any street art themselves? ES

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Rainbows, Brownies and Guides can develop and create their own street art.

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Making street art

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What you need

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Large pieces of cardboard – A3 or larger Pens and paper Scissors Masking tape Plastic tablecloth or newspaper Poster paints, sponges, brushes, small decorating rollers Paper plates Sticky tack

What to do 1. Explain to the girls that street art often has a very powerful message which can last for just a day or be around for years. Street art uses different techniques – street artists such as Banksy often use stencils, made of one or more layers. 2. Arrange the girls into small groups and explain that each group will be making street art-inspired pieces on cardboard. 3. In their groups, the girls will need to decide: + What will the message of their street art be? What do they want to say to the community or the world? + What it will look like? + Where will it be displayed? 4. Then get the girls to allocate roles. Some should design and cut out the stencil (instructions below right), while others get the paint and sponges ready and protect the area where they’ll be painting. 5. Give the girls 30 minutes to create their piece of street art. Encourage them to be creative and bold, and not be disheartened if the stencil breaks or fails – what can they do to improve it?

6. Stick up the artwork to form a gallery while the groups tidy up. 7. Ask the girls how challenging they found it to work with the stencils. How would it be different if they were creating their street art outside in public? 8. Walk through the gallery and ask girls to present their piece to the unit, explaining who they were inspired by, what they created and why. Most importantly, ask girls where they would display their piece in the community.

Stencil instructions

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Sketch out your design on paper – keep the shapes simple and think about how you can make the stencil keep its shape. Cut it out carefully and use

+ + +

masking tape to attach the stencil to the card. Put your chosen paint on to a paper plate, and use the brush, sponge or roller to start painting! Wait for the paint to dry and remove the masking tape. It might take a few attempts to get this right, so test this out first if you can.

Take it further

Set up an exhibition of the girls’ work and invite other units or parents/family to come along and hear what the girls have to say using street art. For older girls, why not try this activity with spray paint and create street art on a larger scale?

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 85


Activities

International Children’s Day International Children’s Day (1 June) is a celebration of children’s rights and well-being. It is a day dedicated to appreciating the role that children and young people play in their communities, now and in the future

+ + +

Paper Pens Timer

What to do 1. Get girls into small groups and explain that a brand-new planet has been discovered. There are no adults on this planet, just children and young people. 2. Each group has ten minutes to think of up to ten rules to ensure that every young person on this planet is protected and has a good life. The girls will have to work quickly together and make decisions promptly. Ask girls to consider how everyone will be treated equally and with respect. 3. Start the timer! As the girls are working on their ten points, count down their remaining time. 4. Give girls a final minute to come up with a name for their planet, taking inspiration from the rules they have decided on. 5. Bring everyone back together and ask each group to share their ten

86 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

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Encourage the listeners to challenge the rules if they don’t agree, and ask questions to find NTout why the group has picked O H M certain issues to focus on. 6. Once all the groups have had a turn, ask girls to vote on which planet they think would be the best to live on. 7. To finish the activity, ask girls these questions. + Would these rules work in the UK S

Encourage Rainbows, Brownies and Guides to explore and celebrate children’s rights.

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today? Can they be used? What is stopping them being used? Who could help make these a reality? Who could we influence?

Take it further Have a look at new.girlguiding. org.uk/girls-matter for inspiration on how to take action.


Activities

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Paper Colouring pens Craft materials

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1. Give girls in small groups five minutes to discuss superheroes – NT H MO who they are and what they do. Remind girls that superheroes have a moral goal – usually to protect others. 2. Now ask the girls what a superhero who fought for children’s rights would be like. Give them ten minutes to think about the powers this superhero would have, their message and how they would save the day. S

Younger girls can find the idea of their rights hard to understand. Help Rainbows, Brownies and Guides get creative and think about what rights they have.

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3. Give them another ten minutes to design their superhero character using materials provided. 4. For the last five minutes, ask each small group to present their superhero to the unit.

Take it further Ask girls to choose a real-life situation from today’s news and work out how their superhero would act.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 87


Activities

Geology rocks! The earth under your feet might seem solid, but it’s constantly moving and changing. Try these activities to help girls understand some of the forces at work

+ Large paperback book per girl + Deck of cards + Sticky tack

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1. Explain to the girls that Earth’s crust is split into a number of NT H MO parts, called plates, that slot together a bit like pieces of jigsaw. These pieces are constantly shoving against, pushing past or pulling away from each other. This pushing and shoving at plate edges or ‘boundaries’ creates mountains, earthquakes, rift valleys and lots of other geological features. 2. Ask girls to pair up and sit opposite each other. Get them to place the books on the floor or table in front of them.

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This activity will get Brownies, Guides and members of The Senior Section to think about plate tectonics, how mountains are formed, why earthquakes happen and why buildings may fall down near plate boundaries.

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Each book represents a different tectonic plate. In pairs, girls should push against each other’s books spine to spine. The bit where the spines meet represents a fault line. After a minute or two, stop the girls and ask them to share what happened to the books. Did they slide past each other, or did one buckle? Did they stay pressed against each other with no movement? Did one slide underneath the other? Encourage girls to discuss why some of the books may have buckled. This might be due to the weight, size and shape of the book, the materials it was made from, or the amount of pressure applied. When these plate boundaries push against each other, the pressure created can cause earthquakes. Ask girls to assemble some small ‘houses’ using playing cards and sticky tack. Girls should now place a couple of card houses on either side of the fault boundary and push their books together again. What happens to the cards? Encourage girls to think of ways to reinforce their card houses.

Take it further Encourage girls to look at inventions that have been developed to make buildings earthquake-proof. Can your unit come up with an alternative invention?

88 | guiding magazine Spring 2016


Activities

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Through experimentation and critical thinking skills, get Rainbows, Brownies and Guides thinking about how lava changes the shape of volcanoes.

What you need (per group)

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Pictures of two different types of volcano – shield and stratovolcano Three pieces of thick card, 20cm square Scissors Pencil or pen Ruler Tray Aprons Plastic tablecloth 50ml honey or syrup 50ml shampoo 50ml cooking oil Timers

2.

Key terms Shield Volcano: A flat, shallow sloped volcano that looks like a warrior’s shield upside-down.

3.

4. Stratovolcano: Tall volcano with steep sides.

What to do 1. Arrange the girls into small groups and give each group the

5.

6.

resources they need for their activity from the list above. Explain that volcanoes are formed by many years of eruptions of hot lava. The smaller, more common eruptions leave lava close to the main crater. Rarer, large eruptions send lava further away from the crater. Explain that the type of cone (tall or flat) depends on how thick (or viscous) the lava is. Thin lavas can flow for many miles creating flat ‘shield’ volcanoes. Thicker lava cannot flow very far and creates tall steep-sided ‘stratovolcanoes’. Tell girls to take the first sheet of card and fold it diagonally in half, then in half again. Open the card and ask girls to cut along one of the diagonal folds to the centre, then fold the paper so that two of the triangles overlap, making a rough cone shape. Repeat to make three cones per group. Protect the area with plastic tablecloths and girls’ clothes with aprons. Get girls to place one of the cones

on the tray and pour one of the liquids over it, timing how long it takes to reach the tray. Then repeat this for the two remaining cones and liquids. 7. Girls should discuss in their groups which liquids flowed the slowest. The girls should discover that the more viscous a liquid is, the slower it will flow, just like lava. Ask groups to imagine how repeating this hundreds of times would affect the shape of each volcano. 8. Bring the girls back together and ask them to share their findings.

Take it further Contact the National Geological Society to find out more about geological features in your area. Maybe there’s something unique or interesting in the ground beneath your unit meeting place! Get investigating at www.geolsoc.org.uk.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 89


Activities

Promise and Law 1

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90 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

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1. Divide the girls into two teams and arrange them in rows, facing each other. 2. Give each girl a paper plate and piece of fruit. Give the first girl in each line a pair of mittens. 3. On ‘go’, the first player in each line puts on the mittens and tries to peel her fruit. Once she has, she should quickly take the mittens

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off and hand them to the second person in line. ET ETIN ME IN 4. This should continue down Y OR M the ME MINUT line. Encourage the girls to support each other, and cheer on their team. The team that finishes first, wins. 5. Now ask the girls how they thought the activity went. Explain that celebrating individual contributions to team successes is very important – everyone in the team has a role to play in this game. Encouraging each other and working together, no matter what the outcome or how serious or silly the activity, is a key part of guiding. ES

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The Promise underpins all that we do in guiding, from showing kindness to others to trying our best. Try these activities based around team building and trust


Activities

15-

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Cars and drivers

MINU 20

This trust exercise will encourage Brownies, Guides and members of The Senior Section to think about how they work together as a pair and how they can support each other.

You will need

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Scarves or blindfolds

What to do: 1. Choose two or three responsible girls to play the role of the police. 2. Ask the remaining girls to get into

pairs and label themselves ‘car’ and ‘driver’. Cars must stand with their arms folded and be blindfolded by their driver. Drivers put their hands on the cars’ shoulders to move them around. 3. Explain to the pairs that it is the responsibility of the drivers to ensure that their car doesn’t crash and that the journey is made safely. If anyone is ‘driving dangerously’ or ‘speeding’, the police can stop the cars or issue fines (penalties of the girls’ choosing). The cars will need to relax and trust their driver, and

the drivers must be quick, alert and careful. 4. After a few minutes, stop the pairs and ask the girls to swap roles. 5. Bring everyone back together as a group and ask them for their feedback. Did the cars trust their drivers the whole time? Why is trust important in this activity, and in guiding?

Take it further Add obstacles in the room to make this activity more challenging for older girls.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 91


Activities

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As the months gets warmer and the days get longer, get outdoors and get exploring!

You will need (for each group)

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Copy of the list of things to find (right-hand page) Bag or bucket Watch Pens

Before the activity 1. Decide on an outdoor area for your scavenger hunt. This could be a playground, a park, a nature reserve or anywhere else outdoors. 2. Arrange the girls into small groups and set the boundaries for the activity. 3. Hand each group the list of items. Each item has points allocated to it, but it is up to the girls to decide which order they want to find them in. 4. Tell all the groups they have 30 minutes to find as many items on the list as possible and return to base. If they don’t make it back in 92 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Take care

+ + + +

Take sun cream, a hat, water and lots of care when heading outside. Be sure to inform your Commissioner if you are moving from your regular meeting place. Contact your local Walking or Outdoor Activities Adviser for more information and inspiration. Remind the girls to stick together and with an adult, or let an adult know where they are.

time, they’ll have 20 points deducted from their score. 5. Let the scavenger hunt commence!

5. Share your findings with Girlguiding via Twitter and Facebook. Show us what your unit has found!

After the scavenger hunt 1. Bring everyone back together and ask each group to lay out what they have found. Ask each group to write their Patrol or team name on a checklist of items. 2. Now swap the groups round so that they can check each other’s haul. Ask them to check off each item from the list and calculate the points, making sure that they deduct any points for lateness. 3. Ask the girls to reflect on their strategy. How well did they work together as a team? 4. Congratulate everyone on getting their items together and declare the winner.

i Safety Make sure that the girls know that they should not disturb any wildlife or touch anything dirty, sharp or dangerous.


Activities

What to find

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1. Put girls into pairs and give them each a balloon to blow up. Explain that they are going to be playing balloon tennis, and their hands are the rackets.

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2. Get each pair to make a space for their court of at least NT ET3m x 3m. MO H ME IN Y OR M 3. Place the rope or string across the middle of the space. One person from each pair will need to be on either side. Get the girls to write their names on their balloon in case it flies off in the wind. 4. Explain that pairs will be out if their balloon: + touches the ground + pops + flies outside their court or flies away in the wind + interferes with someone else’s game. 5. Keep playing until there are a limited number of pairs left, or there is a clear winner. When girls are ‘out’, ask them to cheer on the other pairs. OR

Rainbows and Brownies will enjoy some healthy competition while working around the elements. This game is best played on a slightly windy day to give girls a challenge.

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A round pebble or stone (10 points) Some rainwater (20 points) A feather (5 points) Something black (10 points) Something shiny (10 points) Something red (10 points) Something heart-shaped (30 points) Five different kinds of leaves (50 points) Something made of plastic (10 points) Something beginning with the letter N (20 points) Something dug up from the ground (50 points) Something affected by sunlight (20 points)

i Safety Check on Go! whether anyone has a latex allergy.

guiding magazine Spring 2016 | 93


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Corn cobs – look for the ones with the green husk still attached Bowl of water Cabbage leaves (optional) Butter

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corn in two layers of damp cabbage leaves. 2. Place directly on the embers, turning occasionally – the husk or leaves will prevent the corn burning so it can steam-cook. 3. Open and enjoy with a little butter.

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1. Dunk the corn, husk and all, into the water. If the husks have already been removed, wrap the

EDITORIAL Editor: Helen Jefferies. Deputy Editor: Ellen Reid. Editorial: Nithya Rae.

94 | guiding magazine Spring 2016

Large oranges Sharp knife Chopping board Spoon Eggs

What to do 1. Slice the top off the orange, but keep the lid. 2. Scoop out and eat the orange flesh, being careful not to make a hole in the skin. 3. Break an egg into the orange skin ‘bowl’ you’ve created and place the lid back on top. 4. Place the orange into the embers until the egg is fully cooked.

Editorial enquiries: guiding@girlguiding.org.uk.

Patron: HM The Queen. President: HRH The Countess of Wessex. Chief Guide: Gill Slocombe.

What you need

+ + + + +

What to do

Published by: Girlguiding, 17–19 Buckingham Palace Road, London SW1W 0PT. Tel: 020 7834 6242 Fax: 020 7828 8317. www.girlguiding.org.uk.

Secret oranges

DESIGN Design Manager: David Jones. Studio: Angie Daniel, Helen Davis, Andrew Smith, Yuan Zhuang. PRODUCTION Production Controller: Wendy Reynolds. Photographic Repro by: VCG Colourlink. Printed by: Garnett Dickinson Print Ltd. ADVERTISING Agency: Cabbell, 12 Deer Park Road, London SW19 3TL. Tel: 020 3603 7940 Cabbell Sales Executive: Jane Stoggles (jane@cabbell.co.uk) GENERAL MEMBERSHIP ENQUIRIES Tel: 0161 941 2237. Email: membershipsupportservices@girlguiding.org.uk.

guiding magazine is issued subject to the following conditions, namely that it shall not be lent, resold, hired out or otherwise disposed of in mutilated cover or in any unauthorised cover by way of trade or affixed to or as part of any publication or advertising, literary or pictorial matter whatsoever. Girlguiding takes no responsibility for statements made in any advertisement or from any matter arising whatsoever. Readers should be aware that guiding magazine is not in a position to investigate the goods or services advertised in the inserts included in the magazine, and the inclusion of the inserts is not to be taken as an endorsement by guiding magazine of the goods and services advertised. The inclusion of any advertisement should not be taken as an indication that the goods or services concerned have been investigated or approved. Responsibility for the failure of any advertiser to fulfil his or her obligations to customers gained from an advertisement or insert in guiding magazine cannot, and will not, be accepted by Girlguiding or guiding magazine.


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for Rainbow, Brownie & Guide Groups

15

% OFF

*

Simply quote this code when ordering:

MXD

*Terms and Conditions: Offer applies to goods value only (excl. delivery) and cannot be used against special offers or in conjunction with any other offer.

See our FULL range at www.bakerross.co.uk


guiding magazine spring 2016  

Unusual ways to raise money, bring international experience to your meeting and the local heroes making guiding work.

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