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Surrey & South London 2013/2014

All the advice and information you need for the year ahead

Further Ed.

Training

Work

Where next?

Exams

Money

Your body

Friends/family

Solutions

The law


Post‐16 Academies

Thinking about your future career? ...So are we!

Engineering Horticulture Dance Cricket Business Golf Football

Where and what to study at Post-16 are really important decisions that you will be considering very carefully. Please remember, one of our key priorities at Stanley Park is to identify and bring out your full potential in whatever your strengths are while supporting your development and your future ambitions. To better prepare you for university, apprenticeship or employment we now deliver a range of Academy Programmes to provide you with both the subject expertise and the skills necessary for these routes. Our Academy Programmes are designed to combine full time study alongside preparation for your chosen undergraduate degree or path in industry or another career. Opportunities available with the Academies could include training with UEFA coaches, working with our industry recognised partners RHS Wisley, the Chartered Management Institute or Civil Engineers Parsons Brinckerhoff, to name but a few. Stanley Park High is a highly successful mixed community for students of all abilities. It is housed in a ‘state of the art’ building with facilities and equipment that fully meet the demands of learning in the 21st Century. We have: • A Flood lit large Multi Use Games Area (MUGA) with Astroturf pitch suitable for Football, Hockey, Tennis, Netball and other training and educational uses • Cricket Nets, a Fitness Suite and a four court Sports Hall • A Four Lane Running Track with athletics facilities suitable for Triple, Long, High Jump, Shot‐put, Discus and Javelin • A Performance Hall with theatre style seating used for Dance & Drama • 9 ICT suites, 3 Business Studies suites and numerous breakout areas that have ICT facilities for students to utilise during the school day • A 20m polytunnel, on‐site allotments and herbaceous borders • High‐spec science laboratories, classrooms and dedicated purpose built learning areas for both engineering and construction Acceptance to all Academies is by interview. All students in Post-16 are required to have gained 5 GCSEs grades A*‐C. Please see prospectus for further details. For further details and application forms please contact: Miss D Patel, Administration Manager – Post 16: dpatel28@suttonlea.org Visit our website: www.stanleyparkhigh.org.uk Stanley Park High, Damson Way, Carshalton, Surrey SM5 4NS

Co-ed day and boarding school for 11-18 year olds

l 99% International Baccalaureate

pass rate since 2004 l the best preparation for university

and beyond l Sixth Form day scholarship

available - up to 100% of fees l small class sizes and excellent

choice of subjects

OPEN mOrNiNgs throughout the year

W

l nurturing house system with

e warmly invite you to

one of our Open Mornings

(please see our website for dates). To book your place, please call Jacky or Yvonne on 01428 686735. We very much look forward to meeting you.

email admissions@kesw.org visit www.kesw.org

outstanding pastoral care l 100 acres of beautiful parkland l easy rail links - 3 mins, on

mainline to Waterloo


RES

RES SIXTH FORM

INFORMATION

EVENING Thursday 10th October

Sixth Form College

Main Hall 7pm - 9pm Talks begin at 7:30pm

“Sixth form at RES will give you loads of amazing memories that you’ll cherish forever.”

www.rydens.surrey.sch.uk

CroYdon College open events

• Wide range of advanced courses including new Level 3 BTEC courses. • Proven academic success. • Level 2 programmes offered. • Sixth Form block with dedicated study facilities. • Numerous enrichment activities. • Excellent pastoral management. • Enthusiastic and effective Sixth Form Council.

open event dates: Wednesday 23/10/2013 4.00pm – 7.00pm Wednesday 29/01/2014 4.00pm – 7.00pm Saturday 22/03/2014

11.00am – 2.00pm

CommunitY daY: Wednesday 11/06/2014 2.00pm – 7.00pm

start Your learning bY visiting us and:

Find out about the courses / Meet the tutors / Take a tour of the College facilities / View demonstrations / Pick up the latest prospectus / Speak to students about life at the College

Your future begins at CroYdon College

t: 020 8760 5914 e: info@CroYdon.aC.uk W: CroYdon.aC.uk


Contents

Further education 

6

Vocational and training 

10

Work 

13

Where next? 

16

Exams 

18

Money 

20

Your body, your choice 

22

Friends and family 

26

When things go wrong 

28

Crime and punishment 

29

Additional plug-ins 

32

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL WITLEY An independent day & boarding school for boys and girls aged 11-18

Interested in commissioning a bespoke publication? Call 0121 779 1999 or visit www.gingernut-creative.com Concept, design and print by Gingernut Creative. www.gingernut-creative.com


School’s out – now what? There are loads of choices ahead of you. Do you continue in education, go straight into work, or start training for your dream job? And what about the day-to-day issues that you are going to encounter, such as money, relationships and health? Even when you’re out and about, do you know how to find the facilities in your area that can help you make the most of your interests and could even turn them into a career? Whether you’re from Guildford to Bromley, in fact from anywhere in Surrey and South London, we’ve got the information that you need. The Manual 2.0 is a handbook for the year ahead, offering advice and information about a range of subjects. And if you find that you need more, there are signposts in every section to help you reach the people who have the most current and in-depth information. Although things are changing all the time, The Manual 2.0 aims to keep you right up to date. For example, if you’re in Year 11, you’re the first school year who must be in full-time education, full-time employment with part-time education, or an apprentice, until you’re 18. The Manual 2.0 also has space for you to plan for your exams and beyond, so it’s something you will want to keep with you for the rest of the year. And, while everybody will have different aims and ideals, there are some things that it’s always useful to know. To find out what they are, and how to make life work best for you over the coming months, it’s The Manual 2.0 that you need.


Further education What to study and why? Choosing a purely academic route to the age of 18 won’t be for everyone. However, if you have enjoyed school and want to continue in education, there are plenty of options.

Y  ou normally need to take A Levels if you want to go on to university. They are also useful if you want to enter the workplace as a trainee in some professions, such as administration.

If you are going to take this route, pick subjects that interest you. Why? You’ll be more likely to stick at the course, and to succeed.

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Where to study For academic subjects you will probably have a choice of school or college-based education. If your school has a sixth form and you choose to stay on, you will have the benefit of being in familiar surroundings with students and teachers you probably already know. Moving to a dedicated college means you will be in a new environment. If you choose this path, remember that the devil is in the detail. It’s not just a case of finding the place that offers the right course for you. You will also need to think about location, and travel to and from college each day.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014 Birmingham Edition – 2013/2014

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Further education Certificates If you choose a purely academic route after the age of 16, you will most likely study for GCSE or A Level qualifications. You may choose to study for a GCSE in a subject that interests you but that was not available at your school. Or, you may find that your school or college needs you to resit certain subjects in order to qualify for a higher level course. This is most common if you do not have mathematics and English language at grade C or above, as most institutions will insist you obtain these. GCSE resits are usually covered in one year.

 ou can normally take three or four Y A Levels in a year, so it’s easy to keep your options open if you are unsure of what to do afterwards.  nother option is the Extended Project, A a free-standing piece of work in a subject of your choosing, equivalent to half an A Level. Whatever route you choose, you will normally be assessed by a combination of written examination and coursework, depending on the subject.

 verall, you will normally be expected O to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above. However, remember that competition is becoming greater. You may find that you have to do better than ever in order to achieve your goals. If you are studying for A Levels, your course is most likely to be split into two sections - the AS (Advanced Subsidiary) and A2 Levels. These are covered over two years, and combined make up your final A Level mark. A2 Levels are usually worth more.  ou may choose to study for an Y AS Level over one year, and take this as a free-standing qualification. Or you can continue to take the A2 and obtain a full A Level at the end of your studies. Grades available from 2010 are A* to E.

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International Baccalaureate This is an international programme of education offered in 138 countries. It includes a diploma certificate for students aged 16 to 19.

Many students at the age of 16 will take on part-time work, such as a Saturday job. This can bring in extra cash, but can also leave little free time, especially if you are revising for exams.

The IB diploma programme covers subjects such as languages, the arts, science, maths, history and geography. Not all schools and colleges offer this qualification, so ask your careers advisor where you can study if this is something that you want to do. Your school, college, or training provider will be able to give you more information about this. The cost of your course itself will usually be free, although you may have to pay for books and equipment, particularly if your course is specialised. Ask whether your school or college has arrangements with suppliers to obtain equipment at discounts. Talk to other students, and check notices and online bookstores or auction sites to see if you can get these things second hand.

Funding Money is available for full-time students in financial hardship, through the 16-19 bursary scheme. You may be able to get up to £1,200 per year, if you are a young person in care, a care leaver, a young person claiming Income Support, or a young person who receives both Employment Support Allowance and Disability Living Allowance in your own name.

Reach for the stars with an Apprenticeship! www.first4skills.com

First4SkillsTraining

@First4Skills

KING EDWARD’S SCHOOL WITLEY

The Surrey Manual Banner Feb 13.indd 1

27/02/2013 10:15:56

An independent day & boarding school for boys and girls aged 11-18

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

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Vocational qualifications and training Students who want to get training for a specific job can choose to study for a vocational qualification. These qualifications can be the equivalent of GCSEs or A Levels, and fit into a national framework of examinations and certificates.

This is an area of education in which there has been much change and investment over recent years, as the government has worked with industry and education professionals in order to give students the skills and opportunities they need in the modern workplace. It could be the right route for you if you already have a career in mind. As with purely academic study, vocational programmes for people aged 16 to 18 are normally government-funded. You may get a wage, depending on which route you choose.

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BTEC

Diplomas

This qualification covers a range of levels. A BTEC First is the same as four GCSEs at grade C or above. The BTEC National Certificate is equivalent to two A Levels, and the BTEC National Diploma is considered equal to three A Levels.

Diplomas are skills-based qualifications, available at Foundation Level (equivalent to five GCSEs grade D to G), Higher Level (seven GCSEs grade A* to C), and Advanced Level (three and a half A Levels). Not all schools and colleges offer diplomas, but the number that do is increasing. Call Connexions Direct on 0800 100 900 to find out if this route is available near you.

Applied A Levels Sometimes referred to as Vocational A Levels, these are like A Levels, but offer the opportunity to learn in a more skills-based context. You can choose between AS Levels (single or double), or A Levels (single or double). Grades range from A* to E for single units, and A*A* to EE for double units.

Cambridge Technicals These new vocational qualifications are targeted at 16+ students in schools or FE colleges at Level 2 and Level 3. They’re flexible qualifications with a choice of units, with Level 3 qualifications having UCAS points, helping you if you progress to Higher Education.

NVQ National Vocational Qualifications offer training at work. You would be expected to take part in tasks relevant to the job, and prove that you have mastered the skills necessary. NVQs cover five different levels, from 1 for beginners to 5 for senior managers.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

E2E Entry to Employment is for people aged 16 to 18 who are not involved in learning. It involves basic and key skills, developing skills for work, and personal and social development. The E2E programme can lead to an apprenticeship, further education or work.

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Vocational qualifications and training

Apprenticeships

National framework

If you know which career you want, and are willing to take on a programme of work and study that will last up to four years, an apprenticeship could be the right option for you.

Entry Level

You will learn a job, on the job, and gain a qualification such as BTEC or NVQ. In September 2013 the government introduced a new minimum wage of ÂŁ2.68 per hour for apprentices aged under 19 or in their first year. You will also get 20 days holiday each year. The qualifications and skills you gain as an apprentice can help you secure a place at university, or a higher paid, more skilled job.

Functional skills These qualifications cover subjects such as maths, English and computer skills, but they also help you to understand how to use these in everyday situations. They are available at some schools and colleges for anyone aged 14 or over.

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Subjects such as English for speakers of other languages and Basic Skills. Level 1 GCSE grade D-G, BTEC Introductory Diplomas and Certificates, OCR Nationals, Key Skills Level 1, NVQ Level 1. Level 2 GCSE grades A*-C, BTEC First Diplomas and Certificates, OCR Nationals, Key Skills Level 2, NVQ Level 2. Level 3 A Levels, Applied A Levels, International Baccalaureate, Key Skills Level 3, NVQ Level 3, BTEC Diplomas, Certificates and Awards, BTEC Nationals, OCR Nationals. Levels 4-8 These levels involve a greater degree of understanding and analysis of a subject, and help to show your professional abilities.

The Manual Manual 2.0 2.0 The


Work

Going from school straight to work isn’t the best route to take. It will give you a degree of independence, and you will earn money, but it will severely limit your ability to get better jobs in the future. You will also be limited in your choice of work, having had little experience or training. If you do choose this route, you can use newspapers, the internet, and your local Jobcentre Plus to find work. Another option is to take the route of the ‘bedroom entrepreneur’. Plenty of people do and have made money from tiny internet start-ups, but far more have failed. This is an incredibly high-risk gamble. The reality is that, whatever happens to Britain’s economy between now and the day you leave school, the job market is likely to be a difficult place for a long time to come. This puts you in an ideal position. You can sit out the recession in education or training, and hit the ground running with a pile of new skills and qualifications when it’s all over.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014 Birmingham Edition – 2013/2014

Your rights at work Whatever hours you work, even if you take a part-time job whilst studying, you have the same rights as everyone else in the adult workplace. Even though you will probably be one of the youngest and most junior members of staff, you are entitled to work free from any kind of discrimination or bullying. You must also respect the rights of others. Employers must pay a minimum wage (see below), and can make only legitimate deductions from your pay. These include Tax and National Insurance. You should not have unfair deductions taken for uniforms or safety equipment. If you don’t want to work longer than an average of 48 hours per week, you cannot be made to do so, or punished for this. If you use an agency, they are not allowed to charge you for finding or trying to find work.

Money The minimum wage in the UK at the time of writing is £6.31 per hour. However, it is £5.03 for people aged 18 to 20, and just £3.72 for anyone above school leaving age but under 18. The apprentice rate, for people under 19 or aged 19 and in the first year of their apprenticeship, is £2.68 per hour.

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Work

CV writing tips  ell yourself - show what makes S you unique and suited for the job.  hoose a clean, uncluttered C layout. First impressions matter, and an employer may take as little as 30 seconds scanning through a pile of CVs.  heck for errors. Then check again. C You won’t inspire confidence if your spelling is poor.  eep it real. If you falsely claim, for K example, fluency in Swahili and an in-depth knowledge of bee-keeping you will, sooner or later, be found out. And probably fired.  ake the CV fit the post. So if M you were a member of the school bee-keeping club and you’re going for a job at an organic honey firm, tell them about it.

Interviews This is where you get a chance to meet your prospective employer face-to-face, and to demonstrate why you are suited for the job. You may be interviewed by one person in a small firm, or a human resources manager in a larger company. Some organisations prefer panel interviews, at which you will be questioned by several people - just like on The Apprentice. Whatever form your interview takes, you can help yourself by following these tips:  o your research. Find out as much D about the firm and the job as you can.  rrive slightly before time. Compose A yourself before announcing your arrival.  ook the part. Make sure you are L smart and well-groomed, without excessive jewellery, make-up or perfume. T hink about what questions you may be asked, and about the answers you may give. You could be asked about your strengths - but what if you are asked about your weaknesses? And think of a few questions of your own.  e polite, responsive, and as calm as B possible during the interview.

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Writing your CV When you are applying for a job, your prospective employer will first want to read your CV. This is your chance to show off your achievements and demonstrate why you should be invited to interview.

and Your name ils ta contact de

Your CV should look something like this:

ents tatement ur achievem yo g in in tl u Personal s o t, nal statemen A brief perso and aims. tory won’t ur work his o y f o e . Employers in ed tl rk o w t An ou ye ’t ut you if you haven ed career – b g ed fl yll Don’t worry fu a perience. have forged your work ex e expect you to in tl u o to section can use this your y have, and d ea lr a u Education yo s ke. qualification u are yet to ta Include any yo s m a ex r des fo predicted gra orting nd skills Interests a ip of clubs, sp sh er b . Try to em m e ud ity and so on il b a l You can incl ca si u t unusual ts, awards, m member tha re d n a , b achievemen jo levant to the make these re sity. arouse curio l il w s ie b b o h vouch s employer to e th y b Reference ed ct o this can be conta teachers to d r u yo sk People who a n racter. You ca for your cha for you.

Gain a career in Hospitality.. not just a Job... Apprenticeship Vacancies now available! 0800 093 5892 | info@hittraining.co.uk

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

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Where next?

You can use this page to help work out which path you want to follow post-16. Start by thinking about the kind of job you want to do. This doesn’t have to be the career you follow for the rest of your life - plenty of people change direction but it will give you an idea of what you need to be doing now.

Use the websites below to find out more information about your choices. These are only starting points, so get Googling. Keep a note of any contacts who can help you, as well as the qualifications or experience you need for your job, and how and when to apply. If you want to go to university, you can start by looking at the UCAS website.

ibo.org – International Baccalaureate gov.uk – the new government website gov.uk/browse/working – work and benefits ucas.ac.uk – your first step to university youthaccess.org.uk – free information about a range of subjects for young people

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“My experience in Christ’s College Sixth Form has helped me to become a more confident person. You are treated as an individual and have more opportunity to shine.” Student 2013 “Students here make good progress in a supportive environment. They contribute strongly to the life of the school.” Ofsted 2013 “I am convinced that my daughter has achieved more as a result of Christ’s College Sixth Form than she would have elsewhere.” Parent 2013

For further information, please contact Mrs E Unwin on 01483 484511 or email eunwin@christscollege.surrey.sch.uk or visit our website www.christscollege.surrey.sch.uk PH5171 Christ's College_Half page_Surrey Manual ad.indd 1

11/3/13 16:11:10 Co-ed day and boarding school for 11-18 year olds

l 99% International Baccalaureate

pass rate since 2004 l the best preparation for university

and beyond l Sixth Form day scholarship

available - up to 100% of fees l small class sizes and excellent

choice of subjects

OPEN mOrNiNgs throughout the year

W

l nurturing house system with

e warmly invite you to

one of our Open Mornings

(please see our website for dates). To book your place, please call Jacky or Yvonne on 01428 686735. We very much look forward to meeting you.

email admissions@kesw.org visit www.kesw.org

outstanding pastoral care l 100 acres of beautiful parkland l easy rail links - 3 mins, on

mainline to Waterloo


Exams The results of your GCSE exams this summer will influence what you are able to do afterwards. The better the results, the more options will be available to you. Your own school will have procedures for examinations, and you will be made aware of them (many times) before you enter the exam hall. You should also have been given copies of the syllabus you are studying for each subject, and taken mock exams. However, there is one thing that will influence your performance more than any other - revision.

Timetable Work out when you are going to revise for each of the subjects in which you are sitting exams. This should not be a 24-hour a day programme of revision. You need to make sure that you understand the information that is likely to come up in the exam, and the ways in which it can be presented but you also need to eat, sleep and play if you are to perform to your best ability. So make sure you plan leisure time on the timetable too. Don’t forget to allow time for any coursework that still needs to be completed.

Top tips

 on’t panic. If you’ve done the work and the revision, your D results will reflect the best that you can do at this stage.  o prepared. Make sure you know what you need to G take into the exam room with you - and what you must not take in. Avoid giving the exam too much thought when it’s over. There is nothing you can do about it, and you may simply be giving yourself reason to worry when no reason exists. If things go wrong on exam day, such as a family crisis or illness, tell your teachers immediately. If you do not get the results you were expecting, talk to your school about appeals and resits.

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Your personal planner  Make a note here of when, and where, each of your exams will take place.

You can also add your predicted grades. Remember, you should be aiming to beat these predictions, not just to meet them.

Subject Date and Time

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

Venue

Predicted Grade

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Money

Bank accounts If you don’t already have a current account, now is the time to open one. Your employer will probably pay your wages directly into your account, by electronic transfer, or you may receive a cheque. If you receive benefits, the government will make payments to your account. Most current accounts are simple, allowing cash to be deposited and withdrawn, and will usually include a cashpoint card and Personal Identification Number (PIN). From the age of 13 you may also get a debit card - with permission from your parents - which you can use to pay online and in shops.

Savings The best savings accounts are the ones that will offer you the highest rate of interest, so it’s definitely worth shopping around. You will probably have to leave your money in the account for a long time to get the best deals, and you may not be able to get instant access. On top of this, find a box that you can keep at home, and put any small change into it at the end of each day. When the box is full, you can pay it into your account and treat yourself, and at least you will always have change in an emergency.

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Debt Getting into debt shouldn’t be a problem, as it is not legal for anyone under the age of 18 to obtain credit. There will be no overdraft facility from your bank, and definitely no credit card. However, try to get into good habits early on. Keep an eye on your money, and track amounts going into and out of your account. Make a note of how much you spend each week, including everything that you have to pay for yourself, such as travel and clothes. Then compare this to the amount of money you have coming in each week.

Online payments From the age of 10 you can apply, with parental permission, for an online payment card. You will probably be familiar with how this works if you use a card to top up your mobile phone. Depending on the card, you can top up online or at places such as the Post Office, then use the money to buy goods online.

moneysupermarket.co.uk - search for and compare financial products gov.uk - information about money and benefits

The Manual 2.0


Travel You can get discounts on bus, coach and rail travel in Surrey, South London and beyond. If you’re 16 to 18, there are big discounts on using public transport across London. You can get a 16+ Zip Oyster photocard and get Travelcards, bus and tram passes at the child rate. You’ll get half-fare on bus, tube, tram, DLR, London Overground and some national rail services too. If you’re under 18, your parent or guardian needs to apply on your behalf. Surrey also offers a pass to students in full-time education that lets you travel to and from school at the same fare as under 16s. Go to tfl.gov.uk/tickets for information on discounted transport in London

National Insurance Everyone aged 16 is issued with a unique personal identity number. This National Insurance number is used to identify you throughout your adult life, and allows the government to ensure working people pay the right amount towards future benefits. Unless you work for yourself, National Insurance is usually deducted from your wages by your employer.

You may also be entitled to Housing Benefit, Working Tax Credit (although this is usually only available for those over 25), Child Tax Credit, Disability Living Allowance, or a Carer’s Allowance or Carer’s Credit. Parents under the age of 20 who are at college, school or on some training schemes, can get help with childcare costs through the Care to Learn scheme.

Benefits The government may provide financial help for anyone aged 16 or over and on a low income. You may get Income Support, for example, if you are a parent who is caring for children and unable to work, if you care for an adult relative who is disabled, or if you are disabled yourself.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

If you need to make a claim for benefits, call 0800 055 6688 (8am-6pm Monday to Friday)

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Your body, your choice

Tattoos and piercing The law says you must be at least 18 years old before you can have a tattoo. You can get a piercing at any age although under-16s cannot have genital piercing (including nipple piercing for girls). Most reputable places will ask you to prove that you are old enough before giving you a tattoo. If you come across a tattoo artist who is willing to work on under-18s, ask yourself whether this is the only law they are breaking. How clean and safe is their equipment? And do they really know what they are doing?

You already know that you don’t have the equipment or the expertise, and you will be putting yourself at serious risk of infection, possibly fatally. And, don’t forget, a tattoo is a long-term commitment. Removal is not always possible, and in any case can prove to be very expensive. Getting a piercing is not permanent, but you still need to make sure you go to a reputable establishment. Keep safety foremost, and remember that just because it’s legal to get a piercing, you can still be refused.

Ask yourself the same questions if you are thinking of tattooing yourself.

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l gbtlondon.com – information portal for London’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) community stonewall.org.uk - national organisation promoting LGBT rights

Sex Birds do it, bees do, and humans would not do it nearly as much if it wasn’t so much fun. First, the law. You have to be 16 years old before you can legally have sex. Anyone who has sex with a minor (ie, under 16) can be prosecuted for offences that vary in severity. But, whenever you are sexually active, you need to be thinking about safety. This can include guarding against pregnancy, and for this you can choose from a variety of contraceptive devices. You also need to protect yourself against sexually transmitted infections - and the only way to avoid unwanted pregnancy and infection is to use a condom.

Sexuality In the UK it is illegal to discriminate against anyone on the grounds of their sexuality, whether you are heterosexual, lesbian, gay or bisexual. Unfortunately, you may still encounter ignorance or intolerance. If this happens, you can get advice from organisations such as Stonewall. You can also get help if you are worried about coming out to friends and family, or if you simply want confidential advice.

If something goes wrong, you can get free help from your doctor or health centre. The ‘morning after pill’ effectively halts a pregnancy if you have had sex without using contraception. If you have had sex without protection or are worried that you may have an infection, seek medical help immediately.

For advice about contraception (and where to find it) at any time of the day or night visit the NHS Live Well portal at – nhs.uk/livewell/contraception

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

Tobacco  ou can’t legally buy tobacco until Y the age of 18. T here is nothing safe about smoking. From your first cigarette, your health is deteriorating and you are becoming addicted. Almost every part of your body can be affected by smoking, from lung capacity to sexual performance.

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Your body, your choice Alcohol  our body may not be able to deal with alcohol properly when you are young. Y So, if you are drinking before the age of 18, you may already be causing damage. There’s lots of information about ‘safe’ units. But units are based on pub measures, and if you’re under 18 you won’t be drinking in the pub. Do you really know how much - and what - you are drinking? Health problems associated with alcohol abuse include obesity, liver disease and mental illness. You are more likely to commit or become a victim of crime if you are very drunk. You’ve heard the phrase ‘Everyone’s done stupid things when they’ve had a drink’; while alcohol lowers inhibitions, it also has a similar effect on common sense.

Drugs

Class A drugs and side-effects

All drugs, at some level, will effect a change in our bodies that, consciously or not, feels in some way beneficial or pleasing. Unfortunately, all drugs also carry a degree of danger, and misuse can be fatal.

Crack cocaine (rock, wash, stone): Breathing problems, depression, heart problems, addiction.

Some drugs, such as simple painkillers and caffeine, are relatively freely available. They will have serious and dangerous effects if misused, but are not heavily regulated. Others, including alcohol and tobacco, are very heavily regulated and taxed. And some drugs, such as cannabis and heroin, are banned outright, because they are considered too dangerous for consumption.

Cocaine (coke, C, charlie): Depression, heart problems and addiction.

Ecstasy (E, brownies, ‘brand’ names such as Mitsubishi, Rolex): Depression, major organ damage, brain damage, dehydration, addiction. Heroin (smack, brown, gear, junk): Blood infection, vein damage, overdose, addiction. LSD and mushrooms (acid, tabs, liberties, magics): Poisoning, bad trips, mental health problems, addiction.

Penalties: 7 years in jail and an unlimited fine (possession). Life in jail and an unlimited fine (possession with intent to supply).

Advice and treatment for all kinds of addiction are available:  RANK, the friendly, confidential drugs advice service can point you in the F direction of free face-to-face advice, treatment centres or support groups in your part of London. They’ve also got the facts on all aspects of drug law, street slang and personal stories. Call 0800 776 600 or visit talktofrank.com

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The Manual 2.0


Legal highs… Aren’t legal any more. Drugs that were being taken as a legal alternative to ‘traditional’ (and long illegal) substances were banned in Britain in 2010, after at least 25 deaths were attributed to their use. BZP and GBL became Class C drugs, while Spice and mephedrone were re-classified as Class B drugs. The penalties for possession or supply of these drugs are the same as for others in the same category.

Class B drugs and side-effects Amphetamines (speed, whiz, uppers, billy): Depression, anxiety, heart problems, addiction. Cannabis (marijuana, weed, hash, dope): Memory and mental health problems, infertility, lung disorders, addiction.

Penalties: 5 years in jail and an unlimited fine (possession). 14 years in prison and an unlimited fine (possession with intent to supply). Class C drugs and side-effects

FRANK The drugs service FRANK will tell you that there is a risk of psychological or physical addiction from all of the drugs listed. FRANK, or local health services, will also be able to advise you about making the use of illegal drugs safer. But don’t forget, that’s only ‘safer’ in the same way that it’s ‘safer’ getting hit by a car than by a bus. The only really safe way is to avoid illegal drugs completely.

Steroids (brand names such as Dianabol, Anavar, Stanozolol): Developing characteristics of the opposite gender, serious mental health problems, liver and heart problems, addiction. Tranquilisers (jellies, roofies, mazzies, downers): Memory loss, panic attacks, addiction. Ketamine (K, green, special K, horse pills): Mental health problems, temporary paralysis, breathing and heart problems, addiction.

Penalties: 2 years in jail and an unlimited fine (possession). 14 years in prison and an unlimited fine (possession with intent to supply).

Solvents Eight times as many young people die in the UK from solvent abuse than from the abuse of illegal drugs. You can’t buy solvents, such as glue and cigarette lighter fuel if you are under 18. It is particularly dangerous to inhale solvents, as this can slow or stop your heart, poison your blood supply, and lead to serious brain damage and hallucinations. It can also cause damage to your liver and kidneys. What’s more, almost 40% of fatalities from Volatile Substance Abuse (VSA) were first-time users.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

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Friends and family

So, you’ve sorted out what you want to do when you leave school, you’ve got the exam stuff nailed, and you’ve made plans to keep your career, education and finances in order... Great, now all you need to do is work out how you’re going to approach the changes in your relationships, as a young adult, with those around you!

Online friends

Home life

You already know about the dangers of going on a blind date with ‘dancing_ed19’ who you met in a chatroom and insists he’s 17 years old and Harry Styles’s cousin.

Happy families are all alike, but every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way (Tolstoy, if you’re interested). The fact is, what people want and need from their nearest and dearest varies from family to family, and even within the household. Family structures change, and your responsibilities within that structure will alter - especially now.

But have you thought about the other stuff that goes on when you interact with people over the internet? Some of the people on Facebook or Twitter are friends you actually know and see in the ‘real’ world, but a lot will be people you have met only on a networking site. So how much information about yourself and your life do you want to share with them? How secure are the sites you are sending your bank details to? And do you really want a potential employer to see that private video or photograph? Because once it’s online, there’s very little you can do to stop it being replicated and posted around the web for years to come.

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If things get difficult, remember that communication is the key. You weren’t born with a guide book, and whether you are the youngest or oldest in your household, your relationships with your parents or carers are constantly new and evolving, for both of you. Give each other space and support... and talk!

heartprogramme.org

- improving the life chances of young people in London with advice on healthy relationships, gang violence and youth crime

The Manual 2.0


Gangs and peer pressure If you are a member of a gang, you are likely to be opening yourself up to scrutiny from the police and other authorities. You will also be in more danger of becoming the victim or perpetrator of crime. If you are worried about the things people are doing, or think that those around you are behaving in a way you believe to be wrong, walk away. It’s difficult to refuse to take part when everyone around you is urging you on. But, it’s your choice. You can say no. Always.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

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When things go wrong Dealing with the normal stuff over the coming months is going to be a bit of a job in itself. So when the unthinkable happens, it can hit very hard indeed. Sexual assault

Homelessness

The statistics on rape in the UK are varied, but here’s the only one that really matters. For every attack, there is a victim of a serious, violent crime who will suffer physically and emotionally, and it’s never their fault.

If you feel that you have to leave your home, try to stay with another family member, or a friend, until things are sorted out. If you do spend any time on the streets, you will be at serious risk in terms of crime and health.

You should report any attack, and you can get help from the organisations listed.

r apecrisis.org.uk freephone: 0808 802 9999 Mpower – supporting male survivors of sexual abuse, web: male-rape.org.uk Victim Support tel: 0845 30 30 900

Bullying Your school or college will have an antibullying policy, so report any incidents. At work, you should take complaints to your manager - you can’t be sacked for complaining.

bullyfreezone.co.uk tel: 01204 454 958

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shelter.org.uk – for homelessness advice centrepoint.org.uk – giving homeless young people in London a future.

Mental health One in four people will experience mental health problems. Depression, stress and eating disorders are common mental health problems, and all of them can be dangerous. If you are concerned about your own mental health, or that of a friend, talk to your doctor.

mind.org.uk – confidential and free advice about mental health youngminds.org.uk – the voice of young people’s mental health and wellbeing Samaritans tel: 08457 90 90 90, web: samaritans.org

The Manual 2.0


Crime and punishment Even if you haven’t committed a crime, you may still come into contact with police officers. You may not agree with some of the powers that the police have, or the ways in which they are used. However, the police have no power to make the law, or to change it. They can only act according to it. In any circumstances involving the police, behave calmly and cooperate, even if you need to make a complaint later. If you don’t, you may find that the situation gets worse, and that you end up committing a public order offence.

Stop and Search If a police officer or police community support officer (PCSO) suspects you are involved in terrorism, or carrying illegal drugs, stolen goods, or anything that may be used to commit a crime or cause criminal damage, they can stop you. A PCSO must wear a uniform when they stop you. A police officer, in uniform or with an identity card, can both stop you and search you. They can also stop members of the public and ask questions about who they are and what they are doing. Or, they may simply want to know if you have seen anything suspicious in the area. Police and PCSOs may not stop you only because of your clothes or your age, your race, religion or gender, unless you fit the description of a crime suspect. They must have a specific, reasonable cause to search you.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

Police and PCSOs must:  ecord the reason for the search R and what they are looking for, when and where you were stopped, and the ID of the officer(s) involved. A ‘Stop and Account’ where you can be stopped and asked to explain your actions no longer needs to be recorded.  arry out searches in public (unless C they believe you have committed a crime), allowing you to empty your pockets, open your bag and take off your coat. If they have strong evidence of involvement in terrorism or concealed identity they can search you further, in private, and by a same-sex officer.

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Crime and punishment

Right to complain You can complain directly to the officer’s police station if you feel that you have been stopped unfairly, or that the rules have been broken. You can take the matter further by visiting your nearest Citizens’ Advice Bureau.

Dispersal, protests and street drinking If anti-social behaviour is a problem in a certain area, it can be designated a dispersal zone. This means police and PCSOs have the power to order groups of people away, and ban them from returning within 24 hours. In any case, a police officer can ask anyone under the age of 16 to go home after 9pm. Although you do not have to go home, you will be committing an offence if you refuse to leave the area.

and may stop and search you if you are nearby - but the normal stop and search rules still apply. Remember, although you have the right to peaceful protest, you will be committing a crime if you engage in violent, anti-social or racist behaviour. Street drinking is controlled in many areas of London. In fact, areas including Merton, Lambeth, Richmond and Lewisham have been declared Controlled Drinking Zones. This means that police have powers to prevent the consumption of alcohol in public places and can take open containers from you and pour away the contents. Don’t forget, police can confiscate open containers of alcohol if you are drunk anywhere in public, and you may not drink on London ‘s public transport network. The owners of private property can also make their own rules, as long as they don’t break discrimination laws. For example, a shopping centre’s owners may ban you from entering or ask you to leave if they wish.

If you take part in a peaceful protest, you may be observed and even photographed by police. Officers can break up a protest or rally in order to prevent crime,

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The Manual 2.0


If you are arrested You still have rights if you are arrested on suspicion of committing any crime. Officers must identify themselves as officers (but not necessarily by name), and tell you that you are being arrested, why, and for what offence. They must also tell you about your rights. If you resist arrest or try to escape they will use ‘reasonable force’ to detain you. The situation will be assessed at the police station, and if there is no legal reason to hold you, you will be freed. If you are kept in custody, you have several rights. You can speak to a solicitor, have somebody informed where you are, inspect the police codes of practice, and have regular breaks for food and to use the toilet. Until you are 18, police must find a responsible adult - usually a parent, carer or social worker - to help you at the station, and this person can be present at interviews. You must be charged with a crime or released within 24 hours, although for very serious crimes and with a court’s permission, this can be extended to 96 hours. If you are charged you will be released on bail and ordered to attend court on a set date, at a set time. You will be kept in a cell until the court hearing if police think you have lied about your identity, that you won’t come to court, that you need protection, that you will commit further crimes, or if the offence is very serious.

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

Knife and gun crime Most of us will be lucky enough never to be involved, but London does have its share of knife and gun-related crime. Met Police have been working with the community to prevent this kind of crime. You may read about high-profile arrests and operations in the newspapers, or see reports on the TV, but everyday policing involves collecting intelligence and stopping knife and gun-related deaths and injuries before they happen. If you carry any kind of weapon you risk going to prison. You may also find yourself in situations where your life is in danger, because it’s very difficult to back down or prevent serious injury once you have produced a knife or a gun.

101 is the number to call for non-emergencies and general information about the Metropolitan police.

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Additional plug-ins Learning to drive You can ride a moped with an engine size up to 50cc and with a maximum speed of 50km/h from the age of 16. You must be at least 17 years old before you can drive a light or medium-sized motorbike, and you can ride a large motorcycle at any age, two years after passing a test on a medium-sized motorcycle. The minimum age for driving a quad bike or motor tricycle is 17 (or 16 if you get certain disability benefits). You can drive an ordinary car or a light van from the age of 17. You will not be allowed to drive heavier vehicles or public transport until you are aged 18 or 21, depending on the vehicle.

You must make sure you have the right kind of licence for any vehicle you drive. There are also rules about roadworthiness, safety, insurance and supervision. The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency will be able to tell you what you need to do before you can go on the road.

 et on the road at G dft.gov.uk/dvla Find the best way to bike it round the capital at cyclejourneyplanner.tfl.gov.uk

Volunteering More than 20 million people in the UK offer their time for free to help others, meet people and learn new skills. Most young people who volunteer do so informally. This can be anything from helping out at their local club, or even collecting shopping for a neighbour. Every volunteer project that you work on should be included in your CV, as potential employers will be impressed. Organisations such as volunteering.org.uk always have information for volunteers, so visit their website to get involved.

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volunteering.org.uk tel: 0845 305 6979 do-it.org.uk – You can search for local opportunities

The Manual 2.0


 urope’s largest youth sports E event takes place in London. For more information check out londonyouthgames.org

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Anyone between the ages of 14 and 24 can take part in the Duke of Edinburgh’s (DofE) Award programme. You will participate in projects, activities and sports, in order to earn an award. There are three categories available gold, silver and bronze. The DofE Award programme is something that will enhance your CV. You will be helping the community, developing new skills, and getting fitter.

 isit the Duke of V Edinburgh’s award scheme website at dofe.org

Sport Being part of a sports club or in a team is a great activity to include on your CV. As well as showing valuable team-player qualities, it’s fun and helps you keep fit and healthy. Sport in London isn’t all about Wembley, Lords or Wimbledon. If you want to play any kind of sport, you can play it here, from local parks and leisure centres. And London is home to Europe’s largest annual youth sports event the London Youth Games, where over 100,000 participants aged 7 to 18 from 33 London boroughs compete in 30 sports across 25 fantastic event days across the year.

 id you know D that the first ever football match shown on BBC TV was Arsenal versus Arsenal Reserves?

Surrey & South London edition – 2013/2014

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Notes

                  


“My experience in Christ’s College Sixth Form has helped me to become a more confident person. You are treated as an individual and have more opportunity to shine.” Student 2013 “Students here make good progress in a supportive environment. They contribute strongly to the life of the school.” Ofsted 2013 “I am convinced that my daughter has achieved more as a result of Christ’s College Sixth Form than she would have elsewhere.” Parent 2013

For further information, please contact Mrs E Unwin on 01483 484511 or email eunwin@christscollege.surrey.sch.uk or visit our website www.christscollege.surrey.sch.uk PH5171 Christ's College_Half page_Surrey Manual ad.indd 1

CroYdon College open events

11/3/13 16:11:10

open event dates: Wednesday 23/10/2013 4.00pm – 7.00pm Wednesday 29/01/2014 4.00pm – 7.00pm Saturday 22/03/2014

11.00am – 2.00pm

CommunitY daY: Wednesday 11/06/2014 2.00pm – 7.00pm

start Your learning bY visiting us and:

Find out about the courses / Meet the tutors / Take a tour of the College facilities / View demonstrations / Pick up the latest prospectus / Speak to students about life at the College

Your future begins at CroYdon College

t: 020 8760 5914 e: info@CroYdon.aC.uk W: CroYdon.aC.uk


An Independent Day School, 3-18 years, Junior Co-ed, Senior Boys, Sixth Form Co-ed. Bursaries and Scholarships available at Year 7, Year 9 and Sixth Form

Open Days: Saturday 12th October 2013 Nursery and Early Years, Junior and Senior Schools 10:00am – 12:00 noon Wednesday 16th October 2013 Senior School – From 6:00pm

Wednesday 6th November 2013 Nursery, Early Years and Senior School 9:00am – 10:30am Junior School 10:30am – 12:00 noon

Church Street • Ewell • Surrey KT17 2AW Tel: 020 8393 1413 E: admissions@ewellcastle.co.uk • www.ewellcastle.co.uk

The Manual, Surrey & South London  
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