Issuu on Google+

Wyoming Fair Association 2014 Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo July 4-12, 2014 ............................................................... 2014 Lincoln County Fair Saturday, August 2nd & Monday, August 4th thru Saturday, August 9th ............................................................... 2014 Converse County Fair & Rodeo August 10-17, 2013 ............................................................... 2014 Teton County Fair July 18 -27 ............................................................... List your Fair Here.......................$50 ...............................................................

Add your Listing Today!

Page 6.............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


Cowboys and Cowgirls . . . It’s CNFR 2014 June 15-21, 2014 The 66th CNFR will celebrate its 16th year in Casper, WY, June 15-21, 2014, at the Casper Events Center. The CNFR is the “Rose Bowl” of college rodeo. It is where the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association crowns individual event champions in saddle bronc riding, bare back riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, bullriding, team roping, barrel racing, breakaway roping, and goat tying. National team championships are also awarded to both men’s and women’s teams. Over 400 cowboys and cowgirls from over 100 universities and colleges compete in Casper each year

www.cnfr.com

Page 7.............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


Welcome to the 2014 CNFR

The 66th CNFR will celebrate its 16th year in Casper, WY, June 15-21, 2014, at the Casper Events Center. The CNFR is the “Rose Bowl” of college rodeo. It is where the National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association crowns individual event champions in saddle bronc riding, bare back riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling, bullriding, team roping, barrel racing, breakaway roping, and goat tying. National team championships are also awarded to both men’s and women’s teams. Over 400 cowboys and cowgirls from over 100 universities and colleges compete in Casper each year.

The Old Rodeo Rider With age, his eyes were dim, But you could see the fire within! He was malnourished and thin, This old rodeo rider named Slim. There’s not a horse, he’s not rode Upon rodeo circuits, along the road, Or counting the wild oats he’s sowed From the William’s Lake Stampede, He rode hard, but failed to succeed. Bruised and scraped he did bleed! Alkali Lake Rodeo he took a purse, With busted ribs; that he nursed, When he drew that ride, he cursed! As bulls went, this one’s the worst. They say death rides a dark horse, I’ve little or no remorse With the lord, I stayed the course Well Slim says with a grin, As he tipped his Stetson’s brim! The Devil won’t ride old Slim, The lord’s already branded him. Derrick Fernie

Page 8.............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


JULY 4TH- 12TH The 2014 Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo will be held July 4-12, 2014. Our site promises to offer you the most information you can get, from events taking place on the Midway to what the Rodeo is kicking up every night. Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo 1700 Fairgrounds Road Casper, WY 82604 Phone: (307) 235-5775 Fax: (307) 266-4224 E-Mail: centralwyomingfair@bresnan.net

SPONSORS

Page 9.............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


The History of the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo

One of the best ways to experience the community spirit of any town is to check out the local fair. Folks and families coming together for exhibitions and competitions of all sorts. And let’s not forget those thrill-seekers who will ride any carnival ride that spins around, shoots up in the air or plunges toward the earth!

In 1904 the town of Casper, then just 15 years old, held its first fair on record. The state-wide celebration, known as the Industrial Convention was organized, and all surrounding counties were invited to contribute to the exhibitions. Without a permanent fairgrounds, Casper’s earliest fairs and rodeos were held in many different places. It’s believed that there were rodeo events hosted in the Garden Creek and Mountain View areas, and

in 1914 the first annual County Fair was held... well, somewhere! Sept. 23-25. Even the 3rd floor of the Natrona County High School was used to showcase fair exhibits. The first rodeo was produced by Leo Cramer of Big Timber, MT, and he later formed a partnership with Harry Knight, producing the rodeo in Casper for several years. After a time, Harry Knight was partnered with the legendary Gene Autry, and finally, took over producing rodeo without a partner. In 1947, the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo finally found a home! Along with the excitement of the rodeo, the fair’s early years offered up shows with acts like Stan Volera on the Sway Pole, The Pribels, Outstanding Circus Clowns (1953) and “Henry’s Liberty Ponies” (1957). Entertainment ranged from cowboy crooners “The Sons of the Pioneers” (1953) to country boy Eddie Arnold (1966) to “The Rajun Cajun” Doug Kershaw in 1975. And every carnival pulled folks in with food, games and thrilling rides with names like Mad Mouse, Super Twister and Zipper! Over 60 years later, that community spirit continues. The PRCA showcases many of the rodeo greats from the College National Finals Rodeo. The exhibits from the 4-H and FFA folks keep the tradition of excellence in showmanship alive. And Crabtree Amusements Carnival delivers rides from the tame to the blood-tingling! No matter what the next sixty years brings, the Central Wyoming Fair and Rodeo will still be bringing families together

Page 10............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


JULY 18TH- 27th

The Daddy of 'Em All Physical Address: 4610 Carey Ave Cheyenne, WY 82001-7505 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2477 Cheyenne, WY 82003 Ticket Office: (800) 227-6336 or (307) 778-7222 (Mon. - Fri., 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. MT) Headquarters: (307) 778-7200 Fax: (307) 778-7213

www.cfdrodeo.com

Page 11............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


WY State Fair History

To know where we’re going, it helps to understand where we’ve been. Take a short trip through our history to learn a little more about our roots in this area. To really appreciate the history of the Wyoming State Fair, one needs to take a trip through the Pioneer museum located on the fairgrounds, dig through the files at the library, and more importantly, visit with the Old Timers. These State Fair pioneers will tell you some of the most wonderful stories surrounding the events and the years at the Fair with a warmth and feeling lost in printed words. The Wyoming State Fair had its roots back as early as 1886 in an event called the “First Annual Wyoming Territorial Fair” conducted by the Board of Trustees of the Wyoming Fair Association. The original 80 acre site is lost to history but was somewhere along the old Cheyenne and Northern Railroad right-of-way, near Cheyenne. This must have continued for at least 4 years as there is mention of this event taking place as late as 1890. In 1901, the Wyoming Industrial Convention was held in Laramie. Then it was on to Sheridan and finally to a very lavish show in Casper in 1904. The 1904 show ended with a resolution for the establishment of a permanent fair. After several political battles, Douglas won the nomination with the passage of a bill in the 1905 Legislative session and an appropriation of $10,000 for the two-year period. With the $10,000, the Fair had to secure land, erect buildings and pay premiums and other expenses. The people of Douglas guaranteed the Fair and with this, plans for the 1905 Fair began. Nearly all of the $10,000 was used in the preliminary work and it was necessary for the people of Douglas to subscribe the money necessary for the running of the State Fair. A race track costing $5,000 and billed as the “Best Track in the State,” a modest grandstand and an Art Hall were built. The merchants of Douglas donated $3,000, enough money to begin building the Agriculture Hall, which was finished in 1913 and is still in use today as the Administration Building and Director’s Office. The Midwest Review in 1925, published by the Midwest Refining company, stated that $40,000 was appropriated for the operation of the Fair on a two-year basis but “This will not be ample to provide for any

new buildings which are sadly needed because the Fair is growing to greater proportions.” By 1925, the Ag Hall had been erected, the Art Hall enlarged and remodeled and the wooden grandstand replaced by a steel grandstand. An exhibit pavilion for horses, cattle and sheep had been built. It was equipped to care for the wants and needs of the exhibitor in a much better manner than the first Fair. The early camp at the Fair consisted of tents set up military style, with a military call to rise and sleep with the raising and lowering of the flag. Another quote from the 1925 Midwest Review, speaking of the “Boys and Girls Clubwork” (now known as 4-H), says: “They come in force, dormitories are provided for the girls and the boys camp on the grounds. The special prizes which are provided in the club work are of value, demonstrations are given daily by the young people; judging contests are held and it is the aim of the management to make the Fair a school

for spreading knowledge to the farm and the home”… and…”…local leaders and club members as well, realize that winning a prize is not the primary purpose of club work, but that the true value lies in learning better practices in agriculture and homemaking.” Today the Fair is predominantly young people participating in 4-H or the Future Farmers of America, which became strongly involved in 1929. This is far different from the adult activity held in Laramie in 1901, when about 500 adults attended. One of the special early features of the State Fair was the State Spelling Contest. Nearly every county had its representatives, and the Wyoming State Tribune offered “prizes in the sum of $100” for the contest, which was under the supervision of the State Educational Department. Rodeo has become one of the strong features of the Fair, with such wild and wooly participants as Mabel Strickland and Prairie Rose, and incredible acts such Continued on page 17

Page 12............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


2014 Wyoming State Fair

Aug. 10-17

2014

www.wystatefair.com Page 13............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


Page 14............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


5 ways to protect your child in flu season

play dates or postponing birthday parties. If possible, ask teachers to keep desks in the classroom separated By Dr. Jennifer Shu, Special to CNN rather than pushing them together to form larger tables. To help prevent your child from Keep sick children in their own having to seek care for influenza or room, or if the rest of the fama similar illness, here are some tips ily is already sick, “quarantine” to keep in mind: children without symptoms to 1. Make sure your child gets this keep them away from the flu season’s flu vaccine. virus. If flu is hitting your comWhile the vaccine cannot community hard, consider avoiding pletely prevent children from getlarge crowds (such as going to ting the flu (it’s about 62% effective, movies or out to dinner) until according to the latest numbers things settle down. from the Centers for Disease Con3. Keep hands and shared obtrol and Prevention), it can shorten jects/surfaces clean. This is the the illness if they do get sick and keep most important time of year for hand-washing. Teach symptoms milder. kids to their wash hands for at least 20 seconds -- or Flu shot myths addressed 2. Practice good cough etiquette and social distanc- about the time it takes to sing the “Happy Birthday” ing. Flu germs can spread up to 6 feet through coughs song. and sneezes, so teach children to cover their mouth Flu viruses can live up to 8 hours on surfaces, so try to remove germs from toys, handles, counters, tables, and nose with a tissue and to throw away the tissue. phones, TV remotes, etc. using hot soapy water or a • Make sure to clean their hands afterward! cleaning product that removes influenza. The EPA has • What you need to know about the flu a list of disinfectants that are effective against the flu. • Family grieves for teen killed by flu 4. Stay healthy. The usual good health practices still • How to avoid catching the flu apply during cold and flu season; good nutrition, • Dealing with and preventing the flu Continued on page 16 Also, keep your kids home if they are sick (and discourage sick kids from visiting). This may mean canceling

Page 15............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


FLU—Continued

moderate exercise and adequate rest help optimize the immune system. Offer your child a well-balanced diet including fruits, vegetables, milk and water. Make sure your child gets plenty of sleep (at least 10 hours for school-age children and 12 hours for toddlers). Encourage at least one hour of physical activity on most days of the week. 5. For kids with flu, treat the symptoms and keep them comfortable. Home remedies should include rest and plenty of fluids. Offer your child honey for the cough (for kids over 1 year, it’s a good cough suppressant without potential side effects), medicated chest rubs for cough/congestion, a humidifier/vaporizer, and saline nose drops. Fever reducers such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Advil and Motrin) can help, but remember to avoid aspirin, which can cause a serious illness called Reye Syndrome in children with a viral illness. An antiviral medicine like Tamiflu or Relenza may be prescribed for certain patients within the first 48 hours of the illness; the medication can shorten the symptoms and severity of the flu as well as the child’s contagiousness. Most healthy kids over 2 years old get better within a few days without any antiviral medicine. Just be sure to watch out for worsening fever or cough, as this may be a sign of a complication such as pneumonia.

Page 16.............................................................................Shop. Eat. Play. Stay. Wyoming


WYOMING STATE FAIR— Continued

as Carver’s Driving Horses. Today, it is a P.R.C.A. sanctioned rodeo with top names in the business attending. The Fourth Cavalry used to camp on the grounds and the Arapaho and Shoshone Indians participated. In 1925, Chief Yellow Calf and several of his braves were present. Horse races and relay races were very popular in the early days of the Fair. The Fair now lost seven years. There was no event held in 1935-36 due to the Depression. Even though preparations were made for the event in 1937, it was cancelled due to an epidemic of infantile paralysis. World War II arrived and with its rationing of gasoline and tires, no money was appropriated by the State Legislature for the years 1942, 1943, 1944, and 1945. The Kiwanis Club sponsored a show the last two of these years in an effort to encourage the State to put the fair back on an annual basis. In 1946, the Douglas Chamber of Commerce hosted a dinner dubbed “The Stag Dinner.” All the Legislators, State Officials, and dignitaries were invited along with the exhibitors of the fair. The name “Stag Dinner” was due to the fact that no women were invited. It was not until the early 1980s that women were invited and to reflect this, the name was changed to the “Ag Appreciation Dinner.” Tickets are in high demand even today for this event, and it is still well attended by state officials, legislators and others.

The city of Douglas and its citizens have been committed to the success of the Fair from the beginning and take personal pride in it. They have taken as their duty caring for the people who come from outside points, making the stay a pleasant one with their friendly spirit. The merchants don their gala attire with their storefronts sporting humorous rodeo art and provide enough diversity in the city proper during the evening periods to satisfy everyone. It is an opportunity for the people of the state to meet their friends and neighbors. The late 1940s saw the construction of a new dairy barn, sales ring and sheep barn. The 1950s brought construction of the 4-H building and the Pioneer Museum. In 1968, the Arts and Crafts Building burned and was replaced by a new metal building. A new building to house the wool show and an open sheep barn have been added to help provide needed space at the expanding Fair. Other new additions to the fair include modern dormitories and the cafeteria. Future growth of the Fair includes the Multi-purpose Building proposal and the multi-million dollar master plan of development. Attendance also has been increasing, from a humble 2,500 people in 1905 to tens of thousands of people presently visiting the Fair.


Issue4