Page 1

Timetable - AM Monday 19th January 10:00 - 11:15

Vectorworks Skills

11:15 - 11:40

Coffee break

11:50 – 1:00

The Design Century

01:00 - 02:00

Lunch break

02:00 - 03:00 03:00 - 04:00

CAD Work in pairs Project work


Lesson Aims – The Design Century – Monday • To discuss the Arts & Crafts Movement • To identify different designers • To recognise Art Nouveau characteristics • To develop 3D CAD skills


Unit 5

Contextual Influences in Art and Design

The Design Century

04

1850 - 1950

The Arts & Crafts Movement Tutor: J o e L y n c h


Southwark Cathedral 1220 Gothic

Polesden Lacey 1830

Little Morton Hall 1570

Edwardian

Tudor

Osterley House 1760

Leeds Corn Exchange 1860

Osterley House 1760

Neo-classical

Victorian

Neo-classical

Which one is Victorian ?


Yes

1

Yes, good

2

Yes, well done

3

Which one is Victorian ?

Yes, your right

4


No, 1970s

1

Yes, good !

2

No, 1960s

3

Which one is Victorian ?

No, 1960s again

4


No not, this one

Polesden Lacey, Surrey, 1906

Yes, this is the one

F.Cooke, Dalston, 1910

Which one is Victorian ?


It was Mrs. Beeton’s and her

Book of Household Management, 1861

Which famous Victorian wrote this ?


Was everyone happy with Victorian design ?


The Design Century

- The Arts & Crafts Movement

It was a ‘reformist movement’….

What does this mean ? “a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals”


The Design Century

- The Arts & Crafts Movement

An aesthetic & decorative arts movement….

What were they looking for ? “ there was asearch for an authentic and meaningful design style for the 19th century.”


The Design Century

- The Arts & Crafts Movement

It was about change and innovation….

Why were they looking? “as a reaction to the eclectic revival of historic styles of the Victorian era and to the soulless machine-made production of the Industrial Revolution”


The Design Century

- The Arts & Crafts Movement

It was evident from 1889 to 1910…

Where did it emerge ? “mainly in Britain, America and Canada”


The Design Century

- The new way forward‌

Who said that ?

"Have nothing in your House that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful“

William Morris 1834 1896


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896

How is he ? William Morris, a British craftsman, early Socialist, designer and poet, whose designs generated the Arts and Crafts Movement in England. Having established Morris & Co. in 1861, he produced, amongst other things, designs for textiles, wallpapers and furniture.

William Morris 1834 1896


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896

What’s his agenda ? Design full of meaning but with little abstraction, his work related to real, natural themes He used natural forms from plants and flowers, leaves and fruits, with names like Artichoke, Lodden and Evenlode He was focused on the relationship between the designer, the object itself and the worker making the item Morris loathed mass production but he understood its place in society


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896

What did he want ? • He wanted designers to understand their chosen materials • He wanted products to be well made and with an understanding of the market • He wanted quality • He held the belief that a good piece of design should combine function, simplicity and mechanical skill.


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896 Morris & Company’s Shop In 1877 an elegant shop was opened at 449 Oxford Street, in London’s fashionable West End. Customers could see not only a wide range of Morris & Co’s products but also ceramics by William De Morgan, metalwork by W. A. S. Benson and John Pearson and glass by James Powell & Sons. • Displayed in the ground floor window are fabrics, embroidery and furniture along with De Morgan pots and, on the upper floor, panels of Morris & Co. stained glass.

Oxford Street Store, 1911


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896

In 1881 the expansion of Morris & Co. continued into weaving and dyeing at workshops in Merton Abbey, South London, moving from Queens Square in Bloomsbury.


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896


The Design Century

- William Morris, 1834 - 1896

Probably the most famous design products of all are his textile designs for Liberty & Co.


The Design Century

-

Arthur Mackmurdo, 1851 - 1942

Typical Arts & Crafts chair in mahogany, with painted decoration on the chair-back, designed by Arthur Mackmurdo for the Century Guild, 1883


The Design Century

- Arthur Liberty, 1843-1917

Liberty Store, London 1890


The Design Century

Cabinet Charles Voysey, 1899

- Charles Voysey, 1857 - 1941

Curtain Charles Voysey, 1896

Table Charles Voysey, 1903


The Design Century

Chair Godwin, 1883

- The Guilds & Craftsmen

Cabinet William De Morgan, 1894

Clock Hugh Ballie Scott, 1900


The Design Century

- Philip Webb 1831-1951

Having met William Morris at G.E Street’s architectural office, where he worked as a senior clerk, he established his own design practice. He carried out a number of commissions for Morris including furniture, interiors and architecture. Probably most famously, he designed Morris’s own home, the Red House in Bexleyheath, South London in 1859.

Phillip Webb 1831-1951


The Design Century

- Philip Webb 1831-1951

The Red House, 1859


The Design Century

- Philip Webb 1831-1951

Standen, West Sussex, 1892


The Design Century

- The Red House 1859 Commissioned by William Morris and designed by Philip Webb, two of the founders of the Arts and Crafts movement, the house is a landmark in the history of domestic architecture and the garden inspired Morris’s early designs of wallpaper and fabric. Completed in 1859, Morris lived there with his wife for five years.


The Design Century William Morris 1834-1896 Philip Webb 1831-1951 Arthur Lasenby Liberty 1843-1917 Charles Robert Ashbee 1863-1942 McKay Hugh Ballie Scott 1865-1945 Sir Edward Burne-Jones 1833-1898 William Frend De Morgan 1839-1917 Christopher Dresser 1834-1904 Edward William Godwin 1833-1886 Archibald Knox 1864-1933 Charles Voysey 1857-1941 George Walton 1867-1933

- The Arts & Crafts Movement

test  

text to see how this works

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you