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Your FREE Weekly Newspaper serving Dover, Hampton, No. Hampton, Rollinsford, Rye, Portsmouth, Seabrook, and Somersworth, N.H. Friday, October 19, 2012

Volume 4 • Issue No. 42

Author Talks about Fatwa, New Memoir in Portsmouth Story and photo by Timothy Gillis PORTSMOUTH – Best-selling novelist Salman Rushdie spoke at the Music Hall last week, about his new memoir called “Joseph Anton” and the life he lived in fear since the 1989 “fatwa,” or death sentence, imposed on him by the Ayatollah Khomeini. The fatwa was for his allegedly blasphemous novel “The Satanic Verses,” which Rushdie said is actually one of his least political works, much less so than “Midnight’s Children,” which took on the public life of India or “Shame,” which was based on “genuine political confrontation” in Pakistan. Rushdie seems to have

Salman Rushdie says it’s “Get-Along Time”

weathered the storm, though the 600-page book is a harrowing account of the effects of the fatwa decree, including the dis-

solution of a dying marriage, his raising of his nine-year-old son, and living with a 24-hour security detail from Scotland

Yard. He was shocked at the reaction to “Satanic Verses,” especially the accusations in the British press that he did it on purpose to attract attention. “’Joseph Anton’ is how my real life turned into a novel, stranger than anything I had ever made up,” Rushdie said. A dream sequence from the work, in particular, seemed to incite Islamic tension. Rushdie read from this episode to start his talk, and emphasized that “Satanic Verses” was a novel “primarily about migration,” he said. “In the middle of it there was this dream sequence… about a prophet, not called

St. Thomas Aquinas High School Announces Alumni Award for 2012 DOVER – St. Thomas Aquinas High School is pleased to announce Gina (McCabe) Pike, class of 1971, as the recipient of the 2012 Distinguished Alumni Award. As part of St. Thomas’ Homecoming celebration on Friday, October 12, Pike was presented with this honor by principal

Index

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Arts & Entertainment Business Profiles Calendar of Events Computer Lady Library News

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Kevin Collins during halftime of the football game. A devoted faculty member at St. Thomas Aquinas High School, Pike recently celebrated thirty years at the school. It is estimated that she has taught and enriched the lives of nearly 5,000 students. In that time, she has moderated service-oriented organizations like Key Club and has worked intimately both with Students Against Destructive Decisions and the Student Advisory Board. Pike has constantly worked to serve St. Thomas students, faculty, and the community as a whole. At the 2012 Baccalaureate celebration, St. Thomas Aquinas High School presented Year of Service awards to faculty and staff members. For thirty years of service, St. Thomas Aquinas traditionally presents a beautiful wooden chair as a gift. In lieu of a chair, Pike asked that the funds be given instead to a member of the senior class to help them defray the costs of college. It is precisely this compassionate and generous spirit that has endeared her to all who know her. Pike is also proud to be the

mother of two STA graduates, Justin, ’99 and Jillian, ’04, the mother-in-law of Becky Pike and Bobby Cote (’04) and the grandmother of Norah Elizabeth Pike and Adalyn Jane Cote. The St. Thomas community is honored to present this award to a person who not only believes in the mission of St. Thomas, but has continued to live her life as a journey to make a difference in the world. For more information, visit www. stalux.org or call 603- 742-3206.

Gina ( McCabe) Pike (cour tesy photo)

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Muhammad, living in a city, not called Mecca, inventing a religion not called Islam. And the person having the dream was losing his mind and going insane. This is what we, in the trade, call ‘fiction.’ Unfortunately, it wasn’t read like that.” The serious thing that this passage talked about, Rushdie said, was the nature of revelation, or “how does a new idea come into the world?” Also integral to the contentious passage was “what do you do when you are strong? When your enemies are at your mercy?” After a short break, Rushdie returned to the stage with Virginia Prescott, host of Word See RUSHDIE page 11...

Community College Hosts Event to Honor Governor John Lynch PORTSMOUTH – The first annual Walter R. Peterson Education and Public Service Award will be presented to Governor John Lynch at a dinner and reception to be held on Sunday, October 28, at the Wentworth by the Sea Hotel in New Castle. Close to 300 people from across the state are expected to attend the event hosted by Great Bay Community College. The award, which will be presented annually by the Community College System of New Hampshire, will recognize an individual whose contribution to higher education best exemplifies former Governor Walter Peterson’s values of public service and dedication. After two terms as governor, Peterson served as president of Franklin Pierce College, interim president of the University of New Hampshire, interim commissioner of the New Hampshire Community Technical College System (now the Community College System

Gover nor John Lynch, who is receiving the 1st annual Walter R. Peterson Education and Public Service award (courtesy photo)

of New Hampshire), and a trustee of both the University System and Community College System. His involvement in higher education included service as chairman of the New Hampshire Postsecondary Education Commission, chair-

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October 19, 2012

2 The Granite State Sentinel

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~ News ~

First Annual Apple Pie Eating Contest

EXETER – Mark your calendars and bring your appetites! The Exeter Area Chamber is inviting all pie lovers in the Seacoast region to showcase their pie eating talents for the Apple Pie Eating Contest at Swasey Parkway as part of the 14th annual Fall Festival on October 20. How much apple pie can you eat? The public is encouraged to take part in celebrating the quintessential taste of fall and give it a try. There will be

two different divisions: Ages 12 & Under and Ages 13 & Up. Contestants will be competing for $25 gift certificates provided by Stop & Shop, who is proud to be a sponsor of this event. Prizes will be awarded to the individuals who eat the most pie in their division. Registration will take place between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. at the 14th Fall Festival located along Swasey Parkway in downtown Exeter. The Apple Pie Eating Contest will begin

at 1:30 pm, and is sure to draw a large crowd. The 1st Annual Apple Pie Eating Contest is just one part of the dynamic Exeter Fall Festival line-up featured this year.

Enjoy a horse-drawn wagon ride, stroll through the autumn leaves down crafter ally, or take in some of the scheduled entertainment that will be fun for all ages. Be sure to bring your little

...LYNCH from page 1

OLD LOCATION / NEW NAME

Saints Taking Action 2012 a Huge Success ROLLINSFORD – Students and chaperones pose for a photo while doing work for The Housing Partnership in Rollinsford, NH. More than 800 St. Thomas students, faculty, and volunteers dressed in neonorange t-shirts and went out into area communities to perform volunteer work. (courtesy photo)

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ones as there will be plenty of fun for them at the petting zoo, bouncy house, and pony rides. The event is free and open to the public. Activities take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The day’s events are produced by the Exeter Area Chamber of Commerce, and are underwritten by Service Credit Union and sponsored by Amtrak Downeaster, Airzone LLC, Access Sports Medicine & Orthopedics, Wall Industries Inc., and First Student Transportation. For additional details, contact the Chamber at 603-772-2411 ext.11, or email krystas@exeterarea.org.

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man of the New Hampshire College and University Council, and chairman and delegate to the New England Board of Higher Education. “Governor Peterson set a standard for devotion to his fellow citizens, to higher education, and to the New Hampshire way of life,” said CCSNH board chairman Paul Holloway. “Few people in New Hampshire’s history have had the impact he has had on education, particularly in the areas of access and affordability. We are pleased to honor him, and to recognize Governor John Lynch for his enduring commitment to education.” Proceeds raised from the event this year will support scholarship assistance for Great Bay Community College students. Albany International Corp. is the lead sponsor of this year’s event. For more information, to sponsor, or to purchase tickets, contact Annette Brennan, director of Institutional and Alumni Development, Great Bay Community College at abrennan@ccsnh.edu or 603-427-7713.

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October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 3

GSS

~ News ~ Hilltop Receives Unanimous Support from City Council

SOMERSWORTH – In a unanimous vote, the Somersworth City Council voted to approve a $38K capital reserve fund for the reconstruction and rehabilitation of the empty Hilltop School. The status of the school has been at issue for the past three years after the City decided to close the school and build a new elementary school, the Idlehurst School, which opened its doors last year. Residents of the City began organizing in opposition to any commercial re-use or demolition of the historic building. Initially rejected by a previous City Council, in February of 2012 the community organizers received unanimous City Council approval to form a public-private partnership with the City of Somersworth to explore the re-use of the Hilltop School for the benefit of the whole community. The residents formed the Friends of Somersworth, Inc., (FOS) a nonprofit, 501(c)(3) whose mission is “to promote and support awareness of and education in the arts, culture, and sciences in the Hilltop City through community building, historic preservation, and public/private collaboration.” The organization’s focus is to develop the Hilltop school into a center for arts, sciences and culture by renting space to artists and community organizations whose purpose promotes the FOS mission and by providing space for education in the arts, sciences and culture. Emmett Soldati, chair of the organization’s Board of Directors said, “The funding provided by the City is a first step in helping the Friends of Somersworth in its initial fundraising efforts. There’s lots of work to be done, and we are starting on the first floor. We need to raise at least $150,000 to be able to open our doors to the first tenants. We’ve met with experts and have developed a floor plan to create a ceramic arts center on most of the first floor. We are seeking grant funding as well as corporate support.” Anyone can make a tax-deductible donation to the Friends of Somersworth by mailing donations to Friends of Somersworth, 109 Main Street,

Somersworth, NH 03878. For more information, interested people can subscribe to the organization through its website, www.friendsofsomersworth.com or contact Soldati at 603-6920220. (courtesy photo)

Youngsters Plant School Gardens BRENTWOOD – Mast Way School third and fourth grade students learned how to protect their school garden with row covers. The students planted their garden in September and will harvest their vegetables through Thanksgiving because of the row covers’ cold protection. The Walmart 4-H Healthy Living Grant funded the purchase of the garden materials. UNH Cooperative Extension master gardener Lorrie O’Connor led the effort. For more information on starting a school garden, contact the UNH Cooperative Extension Rockingham office in Brentwood at 603-679-5616. (courtesy photo to the right)

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October 19, 2012

4 The Granite State Sentinel

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~ News ~

Local Experts Discussion Series on the “Cloud”

DOVER – The Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce will hold its monthly Local Experts Speaker Lunch Series event on Wednesday, October 24 from noon to 1:30 p.m. am at the Dover Chamber. Join them for the monthly lunch event, featuring Anne Brown of Daystar. “The Cloud” sounds ominous, doesn’t it? What is cloud computing? What does it mean for your business? Cloud computing can deliver real enterprise-level technology

to the small- to mid-sized business at a price and platform they can afford. When used properly, cloud applications cut costs, increase productivity, and enable new functions. If and how you should move an application or function to a cloud-based model requires careful consideration. This seminar will focus on defining the cloud and exploring what uses may be appropriate and advantageous for your business. Topics will include: • What is the cloud?

• Types of cloud applications • Pros and cons of cloud services • Tips for moving to the cloud At the end of the meeting, Brown will open the floor to questions. Call the Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce at 603742-2218 to make a reservation. You can register for this event at www.dovernh.org/business calendar. The charge for attending this event is $7 for Chamber members and $10 for non-Chamber members. Lunch will be provided by the Rebel Chef.

Rye Driftwood Garden Club Calls for Grant Applications RYE – Rye Driftwood Garden Club is now accepting applications for landscaping grants to seacoast locations on public view. In past years these grants have been awarded to town halls, libraries, historical societies, and businesses, to name a few. The grants awarded are up to $500 for needed improvements, to start a new project, or to enhance an existing location.

Flyers and applications are now available for Spring 2013 planting season. Applications need to be submitted no later than November 1. Grants will be awarded at the club’s 2013 March meeting. Businesses and public institutions are invited to apply by either writing to RDGC, PO Box 33, Rye, NH 03870 or calling Manon at 603-772-4238 or Nancy at 603964-6567.

~ Ask The Computer Lady ~ Dear Computer Lady, I am using Windows XP with Excel 2002. I would like to know if there is a way to have two lines of type in each cell (for a round robin tournament spreadsheet I’m trying to create)? Thanks, Geri Dear Geri, There is a way to create two (or more) lines of text in a single cell. When you are typing in an excel cell, just hold down the “Alt” key on your keyboard and press the “enter” key. This will keep you in the same cell, and create a second line in that cell. You might need to adjust the line height and column width to get the text in the cell to display the

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way you want. Just point your cursor to the intersection of the rows and drag up or down. Elizabeth Dear Computer Lady, Could you please send me the website for the red printing calculator? I really like that one. Thanks, Janette Dear Janette, You must be referring to the FreeCalc program by Moffsoft. Moffsoft FreeCalc is a great replacement for your existing WindowsÆ calculator. They took the standard Windows calculator functionality and added the following features: • Adjustable calculator size Make it any size you want and Moffsoft FreeCalc will remember the size and position next time you use it. WE LOAD & HAUL

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• Tape - Save, print, or clear the simulated paper history tape. • Color schemes - Select a color combination or use your Windows color settings. • New keys - Clear Tape {CT}, double zero {00}, triple zero {000}, and memory subtract {M-} keys have been added. • Visible memory value - You’ll always know what’s in memory because it’s displayed on the calculator status bar. • Option settings - Flat buttons, always on top, tray icon, run on startup, and hiding the tape are some of the calculator options. • Digit groupings - Number groupings for easy to read numbers. • International support - Digit grouping and decimal point characters change based on your regional settings. • Tray icon - Turn on the tray icon for quick and easy access. You can find FreeCalc at: www.moffsoft.com. Elizabeth Dear Computer Lady, Thanks for wonderful and informative newsletters. I have a question for you. In my Device Manager, I have a yellow question mark against SM Bus Controller. What does this mean and how to remove this eye-sore from my computer? I run Windows XP on my computer. Thank you. Prem Dear Prem, The yellow question mark means that the driver for that device is either missing, or not working correctly. All you have to do to remove the question mark is to install the correct driver. This might not be as easy as it sounds though. If your computer came with a driver’s disk, you might be able to find the driver on the

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disk, or you might be able to download it from the manufacturer’s website. My advice, however, is to leave it alone unless you are having a problem with the device not working. Often when trying to install new drivers, you end up with problems that you didn’t have before. If the fact that it is an eyesore is the only problem you are currently experiencing, I would just leave it as it is. Elizabeth Dear Computer Lady, When turning on my pc today, I got “system messagewrite fault error” - and then a “file recovery” message and a “critical error” and “data error reading C drive,” saying I’d be losing information if it didn’t get fixed. Well, when I tried to open my documents, they were already lost. Not a big deal, however, why did this happen and how do I prevent it again? Your newsletters are so helpful. Jan Dear Jan, This sounds like one of two things. Either your hard drive is developing bad sectors, or you have been infected with some malware that is trying to trick you into believing that you need to purchase their product in order to fix your hard drive. As I read your question, at first I was thinking that you are experiencing a hard drive failure, but as I continued to read, there were a couple of clues that make me suspect that it is really a malware problem. The first is the warning that you might lose information if you don’t get the computer fixed. This is not a normal symptom of hard drive failure, but it might be possible that you have software installed that

would give you that warning. The second clue that this might be malware is the fact that your documents have disappeared, and yet it sounds like the computer is still working. This is a common malware trick. It sets the file properties of your documents to “hidden” and when you go to look for them, they are no longer visible. If this is indeed a malware infection, you just need to get rid of the malware, and return your file properties to normal, and you will not have lost any data. Unfortunately, the only way to know for sure is to run some diagnostics on your computer. If you live in the area, I would be happy to take a look at it for you. Otherwise, find a good computer shop in your area and bring it to them. The last part of your question asks how to prevent this from happening again. If it is truly a hard drive failure, there is nothing you can do to keep it from happening again. Hard drives will fail. All you can do is make sure you have your data backed up. I would recommend an automatic, online service like Carbonite or Mozy. To prevent a malware infection from happening again, you need to be sure that you have a complete internet security program installed. I use AVG Internet Security, and it has protected my computer from all kinds of infections for more than ten years now. Elizabeth Interested in learning more? Elizabeth has answered thousands of computer questions over the years. Come browse her articles, watch instructional videos, ask questions, and view comments at: www.askthecomputerlady.com/ questions.

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October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 5

~ Calendar of Events ~ Sunday, October 21 Benefit Concert

Rick and Ron Shaw have volunteered their time and talents to benefit both the Portsmouth Athenaeum and St. John’s Common Table program. At 2 p.m. at St. John’s Church, Portsmouth. Patron tickets are $50 (see below) and include a buffet reception after the concert. This will be their first appearance in Portsmouth in five years.

Tuesday, October 23 Piano Trio to Perform

Historic Portsmouth Chamber Music will present its final concert of the 2012 season at 7:30 pm, at the New Castle Congregational Church. Trio Cleonice will perform works by Beethoven, Ives and Mendelssohn. The piano trio is the graduate trio-in-residence at the New England Conservatory. Trio Cleonice will perform Beethoven’s little known gem, “Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu,” Op. 121a; Charles Ives’ American masterpiece, his piano trio; and beloved classic of the piano trio repertoire, Mendelssohn’s brilliant and passionate Piano Trio in d minor, op 49. The trio, which was formed in 2008 at Maine’s Kneisel Hall Chamber Music Festival, includes violinist Ari Isaacman-Beck, cellist Gwen Krosnick and pianist Emely Phelps. The group has been identified as emerging artists at the Juilliard School in New York City, and enjoys cooking together as well as making music. FMI on the trio, visit www.TrioCleonice.com. The public is invited to attend the concert. FMI: go to PortsmouthAthenaeum. org. Reservations may be made by calling the Portsmouth Athenaeum, 603-431-2538. Suggested donation at the door is $15.

Wednesday, October 24 Business After Hours

5-7 pm at Master McGrath’s Restaurant, Rt. 107, in Seabrook. Sponsored by O’Brien’s General Store. Hors d’oeuvres, cash bar, door prizes. FMI: contact 603926-8718.

The Glass Menagerie

At 7:30 pm at the Player’s Ring, Generic Theater will give a reading of “The Glass Menagerie” by Tennessee Williams. The play was Williams’ first popular success and launched a brill1ant career. Almost sixty years after its premiere in Chicago in 1944, the play still resonates deeply and universally. Set in the 1930s, it is the story of Amanda Wingfield. Abandoned by her husband she comforts herself with recollections of her earlier, more gracious life when she was pursued by ‘gentleman callers’. Her son Tom, a poet with a job in

a warehouse, longs for adventure and escape from his mother’s suffocating embrace, while Laura, her shy crippled daughter, has her glass menagerie and her memories. Amanda is desperate to find her daughter a husband, but when the long awaited gentleman caller does arrive, Laura’s romantic illusions are crushed. The reading will feature: Helen Brock, Alan Huisman, Brett Reis, Molly Sullivan and Eric St. Cyr.

Thursday, October 25 Local Candidates

The Hampton Area Chamber of Commerce presents a forum for local candidates that will take place from 7:30-9 am at The Old Salt. The event is free and open to the public. Invited to participate are candidates for state representative and state senator who hope to represent Hampton. Candidates will make brief remarks and then take questions from those in attendance. Attorney Bob Casassa will moderate. RSVP to Katie Curran katie@hamptonchamber.com or call 603-926-8718, ext. 104.

Friday, October 26 Sacred Circle Dance

From 7-8:30 p.m., at Portsmouth Center for Yoga/Arts, 95 Albany St #14, in Portsmouth. No experience or partner needed. $5 FMI: 603-664-2796, amyla44juno. com, www.portsmouthyoga.com/ vlt6082.htm.

Saturday, October 27 Harvest Craft Fair

The 18th Annual Harvest Craft Fair sponsored by the Somersworth Festival Association will be held from 9 am to 3 pm at Somersworth High School. This well-attended fair is one of the largest craft fairs in the area and features more than 150 of the best crafters in all of NH, Maine, Vermont and Massachusetts. This is a good time to start your holiday shopping and to buy your fall decorations. Plenty of parking, and food will be served by the Board members of the Festival Association. For more information, call Sue at 603-692-5869. Check out our website for the applications nhfestivals.org.

Haunted Happening for Halloween

Do you believe in ghosts? Find out at “A Haunted Happening” which includes dinner, a program on ghost hunting by North East Paranormal Associates, and a haunted tour of the Gonic Mills in Gonic, New Hampshire - all to benefit Friends of the Earth, Sea & Space Center, a nonprofit organization working to develop a museum of earth, sea and space on the Seacoast. Only eighty tickets will

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be sold for this one-of-a-kind evening out, so get yours today. The evening begins at 5 pm with a buffet dinner at Brickstones in Gonic, featuring steak tips, lemonpepper chicken, eggplant parmesan, potato, salad, coffee/tea/ water and apple crisp for dessert; at 6 pm North East Paranormal Associates presents a program on ghost hunting which explains why it’s done, the benefits to be gained, and the equipment used. At 7 pm, guests will adjourn for a tour of the haunted depths of the Gonic Mills, located adjacent to Brickstones. The tour will be led by North East Paranormal Associates, and will end at 11 pm. Cost for the

dinner, program and tour is $50 per person. Those interested in attending the haunted tour only have the option of purchasing tickets for just the tour for $35. The tour starts at 7 pm. Sorry: no one under age 15 is allowed at this event. FMI: Visit ww.earthseaspacemuseum.org or call 603-742-0800.

Sunday, October 28 Haunted Firehouse

From 5:30-7:30 at the century old HBVD Firehouse, 64 Ashworth Ave, Hampton Beach. Event is free for children 12 & under with an adult. Enjoy crafts, games & treats. Sponsored by the Hampton Beach

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE OF REAL ESTATE & SURPLUS ITEMS Pursuant to 36 M.R.S.A. Section 943, Tax Collector’s Lien Certificates (“Certificates”) evidencing liens and tax lien mortgages claimed against the property identified below, were executed and recorded by the Inhabitants of the Town of Wells and recorded in the York County Registry of Deeds at the locations cited below; thereby creating Tax Lien Mortgages, which Tax Lien Mortgages automatically foreclosed eighteen (18) months after the date of recording, thereby vesting title to the real property described in the said Certificates in the Town of Wells. Pursuant to §3-4 of the Town of Wells Municipal Code, the Board of Selectmen authorized the sale of the real property described in said Certificates (“Premises”), reference to which Certificates is hereby made for a more particular description of the Premises, each being a certain lot or parcel of land, together with any and all appurtenances thereto and improvements thereon, depicted in the Town’s records as the Tax Maps and Lots referenced below: Tax Maps referenced herein are those of the Town of Wells, said Tax Maps having been made originally by James W. Sewall Co., Old Town, Maine, dated April 14, 1974, as thereafter amended, revised, and updated, and currently updated and maintained by Woodard and Curran, Portland, Maine, and consisting of 136 maps numbered 3 through 84 inclusive and 101 through 154 inclusive, and which are on file at the Assessor’s Office in the Town of Wells, Maine, and being the same premises described in the said Certificates. Notice is hereby given that a public sale of the Premises will be held at the Wells Public Works Facility, 577 North Berwick Road (Route 9), Wells, Maine, at 10:00 a.m. on October 27, 2012. The Premises to be sold consist of various Time Share Units and parcels all of which are located in the Town of Wells, Maine. TERMS OF SALE: Oral bids will be accepted beginning at 10:15 a.m., and all bidders will be required to deposit $250.00 per time share unit and/or $1,500.00 per parcel of land in cash or certified funds with the auctioneer to register to bid. Bids shall be received on the entirety and on individual parcels of land and timeshare units. The Premises will be sold to the highest bidders, who must leave the appropriate deposit with the auctioneer as a non-refundable down payment. The highest bidders must also sign a purchase and sale contract with the Town, calling for a closing on or before November 13, 2012 for timeshare units or November 29, 2012 for land parcels, at which time the balance of the bid price will be due in cash or certified funds, and the Town will deliver a fully executed release deed for the applicable portion of the Premises. The above terms are subject to modification, including the addition or deletion of terms, prior to or at the public sale. Final terms will be announced at the public sale. See description of the properties further auction information at www.wellstown.org. Further information regarding the property and surplus items can be obtained by contacting Jonathan L. Carter, Town Manager, Town of Wells, 208 Sanford Road, P.O. Box 398, Wells, Maine, 04090, (207) 646-5113 or jcarter@wellstown.org.

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Village District Beautification Committee. For more info or to help out with this fun event, contact Linda Gebhart at 603-929-3850.

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October 19, 2012

6 The Granite State Sentinel

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~ Arts & Entertainment ~

Get Spooked by “Interference” at Players’ Ring

PORTSMOUTH What happens when a group of ghost hunters investigate a possible haunting inside a New England theater? Far more than they bargained for in “Interference,” a late-night scarefest by local writers Jacquelyn Benson and Heather Bourbeau. Since the play’s successful premiere five years ago, Bourbeau and Benson have extensively revised the script. “We wanted to make it leaner, funnier – and fit in more of the scary stuff,” Benson says. The story follows the experience of a group of four paranormal investigators looking into an alleged haunting at The Players’ Ring Theater – a setting that puts the audience in the heart of the action, blurring the lines of disbelief as the show’s haunting takes place around them. Both playwrights based the story’s paranormal thrills on their research into actual hauntings and ghost hunts – and some

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Left to right: Danica Carlson, Cassandra Heinrich, Mark Tuomanen, and Kyle Milner (courtesy photo)

of their own spooky experiences. “We wanted to make it as authentic as we could,” says Bourbeau. The pair even included a clipping of a real EVP into one of the sound files used for the show. It was recorded by Benson during her work with a Massachusettsbased ghost hunting group. “I’ve tried to think of every rational explanation for that voice that I can. There was just nothing else in that room that could have been responsible,” she says. Of course, “Interference” is more than just a spooky story. Some its characters share a troubled past, which quickly comes to the surface – and there’s also plenty of laughs. “Humor and fear are a great mix,” Bourbeau

says. “When it comes down to it, horror is really meant to be fun.” The cast includes both established Players’ Ring favorites and new faces: Danica Carlson, Mark Tuomanen, Kyle Miller and Cassandra Heinrich. “Interference” represents The Players’ Ring’s first shot at a late-night Halloween event. The show, which will run just over an hour with no intermission, will follow several performances of “Wait Until Dark” – making for a great thriller double-feature. For those who aren’t night owls, there are two earlier performances, including one directly following the Portsmouth Halloween Parade on October 31. That performance will also feature a post-show talk with Roxie Zwicker of New England Curiosities Walking Tours, who will share some stories about the true haunted history of The Players’ Ring. Advance reservations are recommended. “Interference” will show at The Players’ Ring Theater, 105 Marcy Street, in Portsmouth, on October 19, 20, 26 and 27 at 11 pm, October 25 at 7:30 pm, October 28 at 10 pm. A special postparade Halloween performance will take place on October 31 at 8:30 pm. Tickets $12 general admission, $10 students, seniors, and members. To book tickets, call 603-436-8123 or visit PlayersRing.org.

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Left to right: Liz Meyers, Jack Lagasse, Theresa Andrews, Sara Rizkalla, and Walter Laux (courtesy photo)

Halloween Dinner Theatre Haunts Bow Lake Grange Hall STRAFFORD – The Lakeside Players present this year’s mystery dinner show “Murder at the Monster Bash,” written by Paula Hinton and directed by Paula L. King. Ivana Crump is having a costume party. It’s her annual fundraiser for HOWSA, along with her two half sisters Iona & Isabella, her husband Clark, and her ex-husband Connor (who also happens to be Iona’s ex-husband, Isabella’s current husband & Clark’s brother). But the party does not go as planned. Watch as money goes missing and someone ends up dead in this hysterical comedy. Surprise

musical performances by some of the area’s award winning karaoke singers. Remember, it is a costume party for the audience, too! Shows are Friday, October 26 and Saturday, October 27 at 7 p.m., with a matinee Sunday, October 28 at 3 p.m. at the Bow Lake Grange Hall 569 Province Road, in Strafford. Tickets are $20 each. Entree choices are seafood casserole, chicken picatta, or spinach lasagna roll-up. All entrees come with Caesar salad, apple crisp, rolls/bread, and coffee or tea. All proceeds benefit the Bow Lake Community Club. Reservations required, call 603-664-5557.

Not-So-Spooky Spectacular at Children’s Museum of NH DOVER – The Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is hosting its annual Not-So-Spooky Spectacular on Saturday, October 27 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., with a focus on fun rather than fright. The museum’s Not-So-Spooky Spectacular features a variety of activities for kids and families, including: • Non-food trick or treating throughout the museum from 10 am – 3 pm • Amazing science experiments with the museum’s own Wacky Scientist at 10:30 am, 11:30 am, 1:30 pm and 2:30 pm • Tours of the museum’s decorated ‘bat cave’ from 11 am – 3 pm • Fancy costumes to try on donated by Ballet New England • Face painting • Hands-on holiday crafts “With so many haunted houses, hayrides and other scary events happening during

this season, we like to provide a fun alternative for families with young children,” said Jane Bard, director of education at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. “We mix traditional activities like trick-or-treating and dressing up in costume with engaging learning opportunities. Kids love to try experiments with our Wacky Scientist, and they’ll find all kinds of fascinating facts about bats when they visit our not-too-scary Bat Cave. We invite everyone to come in costume or try on some of the ones we have on hand.” All Not-So-Spooky Spectacular festivities are included in regular paid admission ($9 for adults and children, no charge for children under 12 months old) and free for Children’s Museum of NH members. This event is underwritten by Bank of New Hampshire.

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October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 7

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~ Arts & Entertainment ~

Original Adaptation of “House of Seven Gables” to Play in Portsmouth

The Discovering Beauty exhibit at the Children’s Museum of NH includes this multi-media work by Kiera McTigue titled “Utopia Window” (courtesy photo)

New Gallery 6 Exhibit Collaborates with New Hampshire Institute of Art ‘Discovering Beauty’ showcases work of 12 recent NHIA grads DOVER – This fall, the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire is showcasing the work of a dozen young artists -- all recent graduates of the New Hampshire Institute of Art – in the Museum’s Gallery 6 exhibition space. The Discovering Beauty exhibit will be on display through December 2. In this special collaborative show, twelve new alumni of the New Hampshire Institute of Art were selected to share their vision of the elusive concept of beauty. Their work offers a fresh insight into contemporary art trends as well as thoughtful responses to how beauty can be perceived in

different ways. This exhibit was curated by Alison Williams, chairman of the Painting Department at the New Hampshire Institute of Art. “We are so grateful for Alison’s leadership in putting this dynamic exhibit together,” said Tess Feltes, gallery coordinator at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire. “We love the idea of featuring the work of emerging artists and giving them this exposure in a public show. Part of the museum’s mission is to support creativity and learning, so working with the New Hampshire Institute of Art has been a wonderful partnership.” The artists represented in this show include Jameson Connor, Louise Dichard, Sara Fallahkhayr, Tracey Hayes, Nick Levesque, Tim Loraditch, Kiera

McTigue, James O’Brien, Brittany Reynard, Britny Savary-Bersani, Carol Whalen, and Laura Zube. The Discovering Beauty exhibit can be viewed in Gallery 6 during regular business hours at the Children’s Museum of New Hampshire: Tuesday – Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sunday noon – 5 p.m. No admission fee is required to view the gallery only. Regular admission applies for families who wish to also explore the rest of the museum. The New Hampshire Institute of Art is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. More information about the Institute is available online at nhia.edu.

Scottish Folk Invasion at Discover Portsmouth PORTSMOUTH – The Portsmouth Historical Society announces the kickoff of Alan Reid and Rob van Sante’s US tour at Discover Portsmouth on Friday, October 19 at 6:30 p.m. Hear these legends of Scottish folk music in the historic surroundings of the Academy Gallery with the release of their latest album inspired by the life of Revolutionary Naval hero and fellow Scotsman, John Paul Jones. Reid and van Sante present an evening of old and new music, featuring Reid’s compositions, Battlefield Band favorites and contributions from van Sante. The show combines open tuned lead and accompaniment guitar work from van Sante, Reids’s keyboard, guitar and accordion and fine harmony singing from both. 2012 has seen the release of the duo’s album on the life of Scots-born mariner John Paul Jones, a long term project for which Reid composed the music. Reid was an ever-present member of celebrated Scottish folk group Battlefield Band from its inception in 1969 until late 2010. Van Sante was nominated in the Scots Tradition Awards of 2009 in the ‘Composer of the Year’ category. Van Sante, born in Holland, has lived most of his life in the north of England and has long been involved in the

PORTSMOUTH – An original adaptation of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 book, “The House of Seven Gables,” will be performed at the Portsmouth Public Library by Pontine Theatre on Tuesday, October 23 at 7 p.m. in the Levenson Room. Pontine Theatre’s co-directors, Greg Gathers & Marguerite Mathews, bring their unique approach to literary adaptations to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 romance. Set in Salem, Massachusetts, the story follows several generations of the ill-fated Pyncheon family, bowed under a curse dating from the famous witch trials, and trapped in the once magnificent, but now decrepit, House of the Seven Gables. Based on Hawthorne’s experience of growing up in Salem, and interwoven with incidents from the history of the Hawthorne family, “The House of the Seven Gables” was an instant success and remains a great American classic. Pontine Theatre annually creates new work, adding to its repertory of productions

that explore the history, culture and literature of New England. Since its founding in 1977, Pontine has created dramatic interpretations of such classic 19th and 20th century New England writings as Sarah Orne Jewett’s “Country of the Pointed Firs;” Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town;” and Thomas Bailey Aldrich’s “The Story of a Bad Boy.” Pontine does not script its works in the conventional sense; its actors speak found text exclusively, and interpret those words through lyric and dramatic movement. Unique to Pontine, this artistic choice creates readily accessible works of extraordinary authenticity and immediacy. This adaptation is suitable for ages 10 and older. The library is located at 175 Parrott Avenue, next to the Portsmouth Middle School. For more information contact the library at 603-427-1540 or visit www. cityofportsmouth.com/library. You can visit Pontine Theatre at www.pontine.org or contact them directly at info@pontine. org. (courtesy photo)

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Alan Reid and Rob van Sante (courtesy photo)

U.K. folk scene. He is noted for his subtle guitar accompaniment and fine harmony singing. They have toured the US, France, Holland, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, and Australia, where they

played in the prestigious National Music Festival in Canberra. For more information, contact Discover Portsmouth at 603-436-8433 or visit PortsmouthHistory.org.

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8 The Granite State Sentinel

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Health & Fitness

Grant Demonstrates Positive Outcomes for Youth with Autism in N.H. and Maine DURHAM – A collaborative study from the universities of New Hampshire and Maine has found that youth with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) benefited significantly from a family-centered transition services model, with ninety percent of participants finding employment after high school. In a randomized experimental trial, researchers found that, during the first year, youth with ASD who received services through the Family-Centered Transition Project (FCTP) had significantly higher student expectations for the future, parent expectations for the future, self-determination, and vocational decision-making ability than a control group. “FCTP’s process has been proven effective and results in good transition outcomes,” said David Hagner, project director with the UNH Institute on Disability (IOD). “About ninety percent of the students who participated in our first project have obtained employment since graduating from high school.” Results of the study were published in the journal Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities and have been presented at seven national conferences since the project’s conclusion in August 2011. The project’s first phase served a total of forty-seven students with ASD ages 16-18 and their families from New Hampshire and Maine. The study was funded by a twoyear, $800,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Ad-

ministration, Maternal and Child Health Research Program to the IOD and the Center for Community Inclusion and Disability Studies at the University of Maine. Thanks to an additional three-year, $600,000 grant from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, more students with ASD from New Hampshire and Maine will benefit from transition services proven effective during the first round of project activities. In the second phase of the project, the Autism Society of Maine and the Strafford Learning Center (Somersworth) are working with schools, developmental service agencies, and vocational rehabilitation agencies to redirect and blend existing transition service funding to support FCTP’s process so more students and families can experience positive outcomes. “We use grant funds to fill in gaps while we work on developing and marketing the service, with the expectation that it will be sustainable after the three-year project is over,” said Hagner. The Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire was established in 1987 to provide a coherent universitybased focus for the improvement of knowledge, policies, and practices related to the lives of persons with disabilities and their families. Its mission is to strengthen communities to ensure full access, equal opportunities, and participation for all persons.

Lahey Clinic – Frisbie Memorial Hospital Formally Announce Expanded Affiliation ROCHESTER – On October 2, Frisbie Memorial Hospital and Lahey Clinic formally announced their newly expanded clinical affiliation to include cancer services. Lahey and Frisbie Memorial already have a successful urology affiliation, and now patients in the greater Rochester community will have access to more comprehensive cancer care, close to home. Lahey Clinic president and CEO, Howard Grant, JD, MD, addressed Frisbie Memorial physicians, clinical department managers and Board of Trustees on health care reform, the state of the local health care landscape, and the benefits of developing long-standing affiliations with community hospitals. “We are so pleased to extend our clinical affiliation

PORTSMOUTH – Home Instead Senior Care, a provider of in-home care for seniors, today announced that Dover resident Becky Parsons has been promoted to recruitment and retention coordinator for seacoast and southern New Hampshire. In this role, Parsons will be responsible for interviewing and recruiting high quality caregivers and maintaining satisfied client relationships. Equally as important will be her efforts spent coordinating caregiver training seminars and other functions that continue to focus on Home Instead’s strong retention strategies. “Attracting and keeping high quality caregivers is at the very heart of our business,” said Lisa Ganem, owner of Home

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with Frisbie Memorial Hospital to include cancer services,” said Grant. “By working together, Lahey and Frisbie Memorial can now bring even more com-

Parsons Promoted to Recruitment & Retention Coordinator for Home Instead Senior Care

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Becky Parsons (courtesy photo)

Instead Senior Care of Seacoast and Southern NH. “Becky’s promotion to recruitment and retention coordinator will enable us to continue to focus on recruiting highly qualified caregivers as our company continues to expand and grow. Becky’s previous role will help her tremendously as she already has a great relationship with our staff and knows what characteristics make for a strong Home Instead caregiver.” Previously, Parsons served as operations coordinator for Home Instead Senior Care, where she worked closely with caregivers and clients to maintain daily schedules and ensure that all areas of operations were running smoothly. Parsons received her B.A. in English from the University of Maine in Orono.

prehensive cancer and urologic care to patients in Rochester and surrounding communities.” The urologic and oncologic clinical affiliations demonstrate Frisbie Memorial’s commitment to providing comprehensive and expert medical care to patients in its community. Both Lahey Institute of Urology and The Center for Cancer Care at Frisbie Memorial are comprised of a multidisciplinary team of specialists working together to provide innovative care to patients. Now, urologists and oncologists have access to Lahey Clinic’s advanced clinical training, and the opportunity to participate on Lahey Clinic’s Tumor Boards, which will afford direct access to specialists during patient case reviews. With the recommendation of the urologists and oncologists, patients will also have access to Lahey’s clinical trials, which evaluate new and innovative cancer treatments. James Betti, MD, of the Lahey Institute of Urology at Frisbie Memorial Hospital, spoke to the benefits of having a clinical affiliation with Lahey Clinic. “Our two Lahey-trained urologists, Egbert Baumgart and Chad Wotkowicz, are performing innovative surgeries to treat kidney cancers and female pelvic prolapse and incontinence, which were previously unavailable in the greater Rochester area. Patients now have access to urologic expertise right here at Frisbie Memorial Hospital. In those limited cases, where patients require additional medical care, they now have the added benefit of a seamless referral to Lahey Clinic, in Burlington, Massachusetts.”


October 19, 2012

Health & Fitness

Tops in Calendar Sales Announced

ROCHESTER A total of $2,715 was raised for The Homemakers Health Services Day Out Activity Fund through a special Day Out Calendar fundraising event held throughout the month of September. Receiving cash prizes for selling the most calendars were employee Cheryl Gagnon, far left, and Day Out participant Rita Parker, center. At far right is Elaine Dunton, adult day care program manager. The Homemakers Day Out, an adult medical/social day care, provides participants the skilled care, stimulating activity and interaction with peers that they need to make each day as fulfilling as possible. (courtesy photo)

of the organizations in providing information about their charities. Here are some of GiveSpot. com’s top picks for charities. • Accion International (international relief and development) • American Kidney Fund (health) • Boys and Girls Clubs of America (human services) • Christian Foundation for Children and Aging (child sponsorship) • Doctors Without Borders (international relief and development) • Fisher House Foundation (veterans and military health) • Food for the Poor (humanitarian relief) • Global Impact (public benefit) • Lupus Foundation of America (health) • The Multiple Myeloma Re-

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Free Fall Health and Wellness Fair for Seniors ROCHESTER The Homemakers Health Services will be hosting a free Fall Health and Wellness Fair for seniors, their families and caregivers being held Friday, October 26 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the American Legion Hall in Rochester. The event is free and open to the public. Sponsored by Goodwin Community Health Center, Pain Care, Northeast Rehabilitation Hospital Network, Sol Amor Hospice, Sound Advice Hearing Center, Prudential Insurance – Dave Whitney and Tara Estates, the Fall Senior Health and Wellness Fair will feature more than fifty area organizations and

businesses, including community health care providers, hearing and vision specialists, rehabilitation services, insurance and financial planning counselors, assisted living facility representatives and more. The events will also feature a free light breakfast and lunch for those who attend. “At the Homemakers, we believe that taking good care of your health is one of the most important things you can do for your family. With this in mind, we’re inviting all seniors, their families and caregivers to a special day of health and wellness,” says René Philpott, community relations director at The Homemakers. “You’ll be able

to get a flu shot, meet health specialists, take advantage of free screenings and learn more about healthy living so that you can live your best possible life. It will be both informative and fun, with free give-aways, raffles and prizes.” As this event will feature a Fall/Halloween theme, all vendors and attendees are invited to dress in costume and use the theme to have fun. For more information or to learn more about being a vendor or sponsor of the Fall Health and Wellness Fair, contact Linda Nylund at 603-3351770, etc. 114 or lnylund@thehomemakers.org.

Psychological Benefits of Giving Charities often benefit significantly from the generosity of donors and volunteers. But the person providing the philanthro-

Choosing a Charity Sometimes choosing to make a charitable donation can be difficult, particularly when you are unsure to which charity to donate. Different factors influence such a decision. There are several ways to research charities, not the least of which is word-of-mouth recommendations or confirmation of a reputable business through the Better Business Bureau. There also are organizations that publish information on charities and rate them on various factors. Those like Charity Navigator, BestRatedCharities.com and GiveWell. org help consumers make informed decisions. GiveSpot. com also offers their ratings of charities based on the percentage of funds that go to program expenses and the transparency

The Granite State Sentinel 9

search Foundation (health) • Operation USA (international relief and development) • Scholarship America (education) • UNICEF (international relief and development) • World Wildlife Fund (animals) This article was provided by MetroCreative. The Weekly Sentinel does not endorse any products or services suggested by articles from MetroCreative.

py also takes away something from the experience, and there actually may be measurable emotional advantages to being charitable. Helping others not only makes a person feel good, but it may also increase physical and emotional well-being. Several studies have indicated that being generous has profound effects on how a person thinks and feels. One such study from researchers at Cornell University uncovered that volunteering increases one’s energy, sense of mastery over life and self-esteem. It also promotes feelings of positivity, which may strengthen and enhance the immune system. In 2008, Dr. Ellen Langer, a

professor of psychology at Harvard University, advocated for giving gifts and being generous - even in tough financial times. “When you give a gift it makes you feel generous, it makes you feel in control, it’s good for your self-esteem, and it’s good for the relationship,” says Langer. According to psychologist Robert Ornstein and physician David Sobel, authors of “Healthy Pleasures,” they talk about a “helper’s high.” This is a sense of euphoria that volunteers experience when helping others. It can be described as a sense of vitality and a warm See GIVING page 10...

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October 19, 2012

10 The Granite State Sentinel

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~ Library News ~

Fall Friends Celebration & Scarecrow Contest

ROLLINSFORD – The Friends of the Rollinsford Public Library will host the second annual Fall Friends Celebration from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, October 21 outside the library at the Lower Mill in Rollinsford. This is the library’s largest fundraising activity of the year and serves as the culmination of the annual Scarecrow Contest. At the Fall Friends Celebration the public is welcome to tour the library, vote on their favorite scarecrow, and enjoy concessions, kids’ crafts and games. Concessions are being sold for a small fee, all to benefit the library. “The celebration at the library is such a traditional fall activity that’s fun for families, all while supporting an important cause,” said Tia Pass, president of the Friends of the Rollinsford Public Library.

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Families, businesses and organization participating in the annual Scarecrow Contest paid a small registration fee to enter the contest. Voting in the scarecrow contest ends at 3:55 p.m. on October 21. Prizes for first-, secondand third-place will be awarded to contest winners Sunday afternoon. To vote prior to the Fall Friends Celebration simply visit the library at 3 Front St. or vote online at rollinsfordlibrary.org. Voting costs just $1. “If you live in Rollinsford, it is important to support the Friends because the Friends support the library,” Pass said. “The town budget does not fully fund the library’s basic operating expenses, let alone the acquisition of new books and other services.” For more information, e-mail rollinsfordlibrary@comcast.net, visit www.rollinsfordlibrary.org or call 603-516-2665.

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Dover Public Library Story Time Registration

Story Time registration begins Monday, October 29 (Session II: Nov. 5 - Dec. 7). Registration for “group” story times (limited to Dover Public Library card holders) is required for each five-week session. Registration begins at 9 am (in person) and 9:15am (by phone) on October 29. Drop-in Story Time is open to all with no registration required. Toddler Groups (ages 21-36 months) - Thursday morning 9:30-10:30, Friday morning 9:3010:30; Pre-school Groups (ages 3-6 years) - Monday afternoon 1:30-2:15, Monday night 7:00-7:45, Tuesday morning 9:30-10:15; Dropin Story Times (all ages welcome) - Wednesday morning 9:30-10:30.

Book Sale

The Friends of the Library will sponsor an annual book sale of hundreds of used books and media for both adults and children. The sale begins on Friday, October 26 (for card holders only), and for the general public on Saturday, October 27.

For more information

Contact the library at 603-516-6050 or www.dover.lib.nh.us.

North Hampton Public Library The Human-Animal Bond

On October 23, at 7 pm, Jerilee Zezula of the University of New Hampshire department of Applied Animal Sciences, will present a talk. Zezula, D.V.M., Michigan State U., is a retired associate professor of applied animal science at the Thompson School of Applied Science at the University of New

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Hampshire. During her tenure at UNH, she administered the Small Animal Care Program, Grooming Diploma program. She is still actively involved with ELDERPET, and is a campus coordinator for the New England Animal Control/ Humane Academy. She also serves on the Governor’s Task Force for the Humane Treatment of Animals. She is the recipient of the 2006 Alumni Association Excellence in Public Service Award. “The Human-Animal Bond” will give an overview of the relationships between pets and people - both good and bad. Health and psychological benefits of pets will be explored as well as animal hoarding and the links between domestic violence and animal abuse. This program was made possible by the University of New Hampshire Speakers Bureau which connects faculty and staff speakers with non-profit organizations to share the research and knowledge of the university with the people and communities of New Hampshire. For more information on obtaining a speaker for your organization, contact the UNH Speakers Bureau at 603-862-4401 or on the web at www.unh.edu/speakersbureau. For more information on this event, contact Liz Flot at 603-964-6326 or circdesk@nhplib.org.

For more information

Contact the library at 603-9646326 or www.nhplib.org.

Portsmouth Public Library Writer’s Café Opens on November 6

For the second year the Portsmouth Public Library will assist Seacoast writers by participating in National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo). November is National Novel Writing Month, and the Office of Letters and Light challenges writers to create a 50,000 word novel in thirty days. The Library will open the Writers Café in the Hilton Garden Room each Tuesday in November from 9 am to 9 pm as a quiet place to work on your novel.

Kick-off Party

To kick off National Novel Writing Month, the library will host a party on Monday, October 29 from 6-8 pm. This is an opportunity to chat with fellow ‘WriMos’ past and present, hear pep talks from successful past participants, Terri Bruce and Jeff Deck, and partake of delicious pies from Flatbread Pizza. Library staff members will be available to answer your questions. To find out all there is to know about NaNoWriMo and sign up to participate visit

their web site: www.nanowrimo.org.

For more information

Contact the library at 603-427-1540 or www.cityofportsmouth.com/ library.

Rye Public Library Military Book Group

“If by Sea” by George C. Daughan is the title for Military Book Group’s November 1st discussion at 6:30 pm. The Military Book Group meets on the first Thursday of the month. Drawing on decades of prodigious research, historian George C. Daughan chronicles the embattled origins of the U.S. Navy. From the bloody and gunpowder-drenched battles fought by American sailors on lakes and high seas to the fierce rhetorical combat waged by the Founders in Congress, “If By Sea” charts the course by which the Navy became a vital and celebrated American institution.

Digging In To Native American History

The Friends of the Rye Public Library and the Rye Historical Society worked cooperatively to secure a New Hampshire Humanities Council grant allowing for the presentation of this fascinating program. Join them on Monday, October 22 at 7 pm, as Dr. Robert Goodby, professor of anthropology at Franklin Pierce University, recounts his archaeological explorations of New Hampshire in search of the record of Abenaki culture. Abenaki history has been reduced to near invisibility as the result of conquest, a conquering culture that placed little value on Indian experience, and a strategy of self-preservation that required many Abenaki to go “underground.” The true Abenaki identity has been concealed for generations, but archeological evidence shows their deep presence in New Hampshire, inches below the Earth’s surface. A veteran of archaeological field research in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island, and author of more than fifty technical reports on New England prehistoric archaeology, Goodby is well prepared to lead this discussion. He is also director of the Monadnock Archaeological Project, a long-term program of archaeological field research focusing on the prehistory of the upper Contoocook and Connecticut River valleys of southwestern New Hampshire.

For more information

Contact the library at 603-964-8401 or www.ryepubliclibrary.org.

...GIVING from page 9 glow. It has been compared to a runner’s high and may be attributed to a release of endorphins. Various studies have found that donors and volunteers gain the most from a charitable encounter. Here are a few more health benefits that may result from being altruistic: • an activation of emotions that are key to good health, • lower stress levels, • longer periods of calm after the generous act, • improved mood, and • a potentially longer life span. There are many ways to give back and experience these physical and psychological benefits, including:

• sharing experiences at a school, • volunteering at a hospital, • volunteering at a national or local park, • donating unused items, like clothes or cars, • reading to children at a library, • helping to care for animals at shelters, • volunteering at a hospice and comforting those at the end of their lives, • donating supplies to a new teacher and • becoming a companion to a senior citizen. This article was provided by MetroCreative. The Weekly Sentinel does not endorse any products or services suggested by articles from MetroCreative.


October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 11

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~ News ~ ...RUSHDIE from page 1 of Mouth, for an interview. The Music Hall house band Dreadnaught played the Platters “Great Pretender,” and Rushdie noticed the tune and sang along. Prescott asked how Islamic culture has changed since he was a child. Rushdie said he grew up in a house that was “happily godless,” where his father and his father’s friends would discuss whatever they wanted. Rushdie was free to think and express himself. That did not mean his opinions went uncontested. There just wasn’t a threat of violence for unapproved thoughts. Then came Valentine’s Day, 1989, when the fatwa was issued, and there began “the difference between rhetoric and reality,” said Rushdie, exasperated after all this time at the extreme re-

action. “Books are books. If you don’t like it, don’t read it. This is why they have books by more than one person in bookstores,” he said. The United States is a very divided country, he pointed out, where half the people are often saying things that the other half of the country can’t stand, “but it doesn’t occur to either half to burn the country down.” Rushdie was often lighthearted and humorous on the night, belying the years of living in fear. Asked if he was still fearful or looking over his shoulder, Rushdie motioned to the audience and said “Look, there are hundreds of them in the dark. They don’t seem that scary.” Audience reaction to Rushdie was overwhelmingly supportive of his plight, even if many in attendance knew more

about his life’s story than his written works. Peter Randall, a filmmaker on local farms, was invited to the talk by a friend. He said he was interested in the whole story of Rushdie and the fatwa against him. “It’s ridiculous,” Randall said. “I don’t understand why people get so upset about something written. An act, I can see, but it’s just words.” Henry Linscott said he was in grammar school when the fatwa was issued. “I didn’t know what the book was about, but it sounded scary.” Twenty-four years after the fatwa, Rushdie feels it’s “get-along time” now and looks forward to discussing the literary merits of “Satanic Verses,” a work which has been analyzed through political and religious lenses, but has remained unstudied in the language of

literature. Rushdie said he is proud of the novel, but would have changed its history if he could. Related to the “Satanic Verses,” an Italian translator was stabbed, a Norwegian publisher was shot, and a Japanese publisher was killed. Rushdie lived in hiding, in England first and then in the United States, and tried to provide a normal life for his young son. “Joseph Anton” tells of his hidden life and was his alias with the police, based on two of his favorite writers, Joseph Conrad and Anton Chekhov. His case, called Operation Malachi, was considered the most dangerous assignment for the police, and they served by volunteering instead of being required to do so. Despite the disdain from some higher-ups who didn’t feel he had done

anything to deserve their protection, hadn’t “performed a service to the state,” Rushdie grew close to many of the police officers who were protecting him. He thought they had it tougher than he did, since “sitting around, looking out the window, wondering what to do next” was the typical life for a writer. “Joseph Anton” was originally written in the first person, a standard voice for a memoir, but Rushdie changed it to thirdperson. “I had to get beyond the anger and resentment. That’s why I waited so long to write it,” he said. The objective voice also gives him some emotional distance and allows him to write more “novelistically.” “The thing about an autobiography, in the end, is to tell the truth,” he said. “Otherwise, why write it?”

business & finance Save When Shopping this Holiday Season The holiday season is filled with tradition. Many families have their own unique customs, and those traditions create lasting memories for adults and children alike. One such holiday tradition is shopping for gifts for family and friends. Many people enjoy holiday shopping, anxiously anticipating the look on their loved ones’ faces when they open their presents. But holiday shopping is even more enjoyable for shoppers who can save a little extra money. The following are a few tips for shoppers who still want to give the perfect gifts but don’t want to break the bank. Stop paying for shipping. Many people now do their holiday shopping online. Online shopping can be more convenient and give consumers more options. But some shoppers still shy away from online retailers for fear of high shipping costs. However, some retailers offer free shipping to consumers who spend a certain amount of money. In addition, savvy shoppers can scour the Internet for free shipping codes they can use at checkout. Some retailers even offer free shipping during the holiday season (last minute purchases might not be eligible) to entice customers. Empty your wallet of gift cards. Gift cards are popular gifts come the holidays, but many gift card recipients fail to use their cards prior to their

expiration dates. Many cards expire twelve months after their initial purchase date. If your wallet is filled with gift cards you received last holiday season, use them to buy gifts for friends and family now before they expire. Make a list. Santa Claus is renowned for making a list come the holiday season, and holiday shoppers should follow his lead. Prior to your first holiday shopping trip, make a list that includes the names of friends and family to buy for and what you want to buy for each one of them. Doing so decreases the chances you’ll forget someone and be forced to drive back to the mall. Reducing the number of shopping trips you have to make will conserve fuel and save you a substantial amount of money and time. Pay in cash. If you’re not a fan of online shopping, then use only cash when shopping at brick-and-mortar stores. Paying with cash eliminates the risk of overspending with credit cards, which will come back to haunt you in January when the bills are due. Take a predetermined amount of cash with you when shopping, and once that money is gone, then it’s time to go home. Don’t be tempted by retailer credit cards. Retailer credit cards can be very tempting, especially when the cashier offers an immediate twenty percent discount if you sign up for the card at the register. But that discount comes at a steep price down the road. Not only will

Somersworth Downtown District Map Comissioned SOMERSWORTH – As one of its projects of engaging with the community and supporting Somersworth’s rich history, the Friends of Somersworth commissioned a local artist to produce a map of the historic downtown business district. Jessica Packer, manager of Paint Along Dover, offered her artistic abilities to design a map that would be both engaging and fun. The you be receiving a bill after the holiday season, but that retailer credit card will most definitely feature a high interest rate that can negate the initial discount at the register – unless you pay off the balance in full. Create spending parameters with your immediate family. The economy has yet to fully recover from the downturn that began nearly half a decade ago. As a result, many people still approach the holiday shopping season with a degree of trepidation. Get together with your immediate family and establish spending parameters so no person feels like he or she has to spend too much money on holiday shopping. Agree that no gift should cost more than $25. Everyone will still enjoy the holiday season and one another’s company, and they won’t be forced to deal with the stress of overspending. This article was provided by MetroCreative. The Weekly Sentinel does not endorse any products or services suggested by articles from MetroCreative.

map is a collaboration between the Friends of Somersworth and local downtown businesses to promote the historic aspects of Somersworth’s downtown area. Emmett Soldati, chair of the Board of Directors, said “The collaboration has been an opportunity to network with local businesses and to educate them on how the mission of the Friends of Somersworth is part of a larger picture of economic development for the City. By celebrating the downtown and the largest historic

district in the State, we can strengthen the businesses that keep Somersworth’s economy strong and help open opportunities for smart growth in the future.” More than 2,000 large, full color maps have been printed with a description of the city and the Friends of Somersworth on the back. The maps are being distributed locally and regionally, but can also be picked up at Teatotaller Tea House or the Greater Somersworth See MAP page 13...

“Optima’s understanding of the local commercial and residential market is a lifesaver. They epitomize the local bank with their local knowledge, business savvy and focus on exceptional service. Once you have done business with Optima, you look forward to the next time. It’s that simple.”

George Carlisle, Olde Port Properties, Portsmouth


October 19, 2012

12 The Granite State Sentinel

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Audubon Partnership the Latest in Local Golf Course’s Green Push

NORTH HAMPTON – Way back in 1929, when R.E. Luff first founded Sagamore Golf Club in Lynnfield, Massachusetts, “green” wasn’t merely an industry fad or maintenance buzzword; it was, quite simply, the way things had always been done. By the time the family opened its second location in North Hampton, New Hampshire in 1962, all-natural lawn care and links treatment had become an integral part of the Sagamore fold. Over the years, the Luff family charges have become a beacon of sorts for public courses – most of which don’t have the luxury of tapping into country club coffers – looking to eliminate as many chemical-heavy pesticides and fertilizers as possible. Still, current owner Richard Luff and his crew would be the first to admit that the picturesque, 18-hole course’s green efforts are far from complete. Which is why Sagamore recently struck up a partnership with the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program for Golf Courses (ACSP). A branch of the century-old Audubon Society, ACSP was established in 1992 as a resource for helping golf courses – public as well as private – incorporate environmentally responsible maintenance practices into their daytoday operations. Through a program that includes on-site evaluation, wildlife and habitat mapping, employee engagement, and regular progress tracking, the ACSP seeks to help courses like Sagamore strike a balance between environmental stewardship on the one hand, and the often delicate issue of “playability” and competitiveness. “We’re one of many courses to adopt this program, and a lot of those who have are very well known,” says Luff. “We feel like we’ve had a head start on a lot of

People and Business Profiles

Great Bay Stewards Immerse Students in Estuary’s Uniqueness

Dover Chamber Welcomes Kylene Photography DOVER – Kylene Hillsgrove of Kylene Photogrqaphy, recently joined the Greater Dover Chamber of Commerce and celebrated with Chamber members at a ribbon cutting ceremony. “Being able to capture memories for others makes me so happy that I am a professional photographer. I do not know of any other job that could be so much fun and rewarding at the same time. Being able to document your life’s journey is what makes my job so exciting. I take my job very seriously because there are fleeting moments that cannot be brought back. Your wedding or your growing family becomes a part of my life because I get to share it with you! I have been professionally capturing memories since 1998,” says Hillsgrove,

who has had a love for photography ever since she picked up her first camera at the age of nine. Her parents had given her a pink camera for Christmas. It was something she really, really wanted. Once she had that camera in her hands she could not put it down. That camera gave her so many fond memories, and made her feel so good inside when she created something so spectacular. Since then, cameras have come quite a long way, and with the new technology, Hillsgrove has the ability to create things she never dreamed she could do. Join us in welcoming Kylene Hillsgrove of Kylene Photography to the Dover Chamber of Commerce. To reach Kylene, call 603-988-3269 or visit her online at www.kylenephotography.com. (courtesy photo)

this for years, so we’re not worried about playability being affected at all. Still, that doesn’t mean there won’t be challenges. To date, the course has erected seven, two-foot high signs indicating various habitats – usually

in the tall rough – and requesting that people walk instead of using carts to track down errant drives. “Because it’s not a private course where all the members have a vested, financial interest, some of the golfers might not be as receptive to the new guidelines,” said Morgan Crowley, a McGill University student who spent this past summer helping Sagamore up its own green ante. “We just think it will take some time, but that ultimately people will understand what we’re trying to achieve.” Sagamore’s adoption of AGSC standards is just the latest in a series of partnerships aimed at helping improve – and promote – the course’s unique green initiatives. In 2009, the course became See GOLF page 13...

Sagamore Golf Club is an 18-hole course in North Hampton (courtesy photo)

Great Bay Stewards boarding the gundalow. (courtesy photo)

GREENLAND – A successor to the group that forty years ago helped stop the development of a Great Bay oil refinery, the Great Bay Stewards has since expanded its environmental and conservation efforts to include education of young and old alike. A “friends group” to the Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, the stewards help and rely on the Great Bay Discovery Center, the educational cornerstone for the Reserve, to meet the organization’s core mission. The Stewards provide funding for programs, capital improvements, and new exhibits that promote learning — and none too soon. The health of Great Bay is less than ideal, says Jay Diener, president of Great Bay Stewards. Though there is a “difference of opinion,” too much nitrogen is polluting the Bay, Diener says, and he identifies two sources: “point-source” pollution, which origin can be identified, such as waste water treatment facilities, and “non-point source” pollution coming from lawns, roads, bridges and parking lots, among other sources, of which there are too many to be identified and targeted by any one approach. Other issues of concern include the decline of eel grass and oyster beds, shoreline erosion, and invasive plant growth. As one component to help combat these threats, the Great Bay Stewards’ educational program highlights the importance of preserving the Great Bay’s ecological integrity. The Discovery Center runs programs in fall and spring for school children (grades 1-5) from throughout the state, 2,000-plus a season. Students learn about natural and cultural history — from mud

snails, to horseshoe crabs, to ancient Native American tribes, to the role gundalow boats played in the region’s economic development. “It’s a very, very popular program for schools, a great outreach program,” Diener says. Children learn about the Great Bay Estuary, one of only twenty-eight estuaries of national importance in the country, and how an estuary is different from other bodies of water. Simply put, an estuary is the place where fresh water and salt water meet. Rivers and streams feed into the estuary, which is also affected by ocean tides, creating a push and pull of two water sources. “It creates a unique environment for marine life as well as plant life,” Diener says about estuaries. “And it’s a unique environment for upland animals around the Bay. We’re very fortunate to have the Great Bay estuary in our back yard.” The spring theme for school trips is “habitat and natural history,” focusing on the natural history of the Great Bay, offered in May and June. Trained volunteer educators and Great Bay Discovery Center staff lead field trips for the students, but can also accommodate older or younger students. Up to seventytwo students with chaperones can attend each session, which take two and a half hours, mostly held outdoors at the Discovery Center, rain or shine. The spring field trips include: • The Habitat Discovery Walk, a guided hands-on and senses tuned-in investigative activity using the Discovery Center trail to answer such questions as “What furry predators hunt in Great Bay salt marshes?” “How See ESTUARY page 13...


October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 13

~ News ~ ...GOLF from page 12 the first of its kind to join the Green Alliance (GA), a Portsmouth-based union of nearly 100 local, sustainability-minded businesses. Sarah Brown, who founded the GA in 2008, says that bringing Sagamore aboard presented a great opportunity to show the public that any business can green up their operations. “When you look back, golf courses have taken a lot of flack in the past as far as environmental concerns,” said Brown. “But Sagamore is a perfect example of a business that’s doing some incredible things, things that the public can really wrap their head around.” Things like partnering with Purely Organic, the York-based lawn care company from whom Sagamore sources a majority of their all-organic fertilizers, mulches, and other products. In 2010, the course installed a 55-foot wind turbine, a first for Granite State golf courses. Since then, the turbine has helped significantly cut the course’s energy costs – meaning more resources for Sagamore’s ambitious course maintenance program. Right now, however, the course’s efforts are geared

squarely towards adopting as many of the ACSP’s guidelines as possible. They’ve already gone through a comprehensive site assessment and – while they await word on which steps to take next – remain committed to getting as big a head start as possible. “Because we’ve been adopting a lot of these practices for a while, we have a pretty good idea of where we’re lacking and need to improve,” says Crowley. “That’s allowed us to start working towards longer term goals and projects for the winter.” With golf season at its peak, it would be understandable for Luff, Crowley, and the rest of the Sagamore team to put all their efforts into making their customers happy. To be sure, customer relations will always be tantamount – but that won’t stop Sagamore of continuing to drive for the “green.” “We look at it as taking what we’re already doing to another level, by monitoring and tracking on a regular basis,” said Luff. “The Audubon program has been a great fit so far, and we’re excited about where it’s going.” Learn more at www.sagamoregolf.com. Story provided by Jim Cavan.

...ESTUARY from page 12

...MAP from page 11

is an estuary like a restaurant?” “What is a wetland and how do you find one?” • The Discovery Tank, where students gather around the discovery tank for an opportunity to hold live estuarine animals such as horseshoe crabs, green crabs and lobsters. • Waterfront Exploration, a poke around in bay bottom mud, a hands-on activity through which students uncover the hidden plants and animals found in and around Great Bay and explore their adaptations for survival in the estuarine environment. The fall theme focuses on the environmental heritage of the Great Bay, and programs are offered in September and October, mostly for second- to fifthgraders. The sessions are three hours long.

Chamber of Commerce. The Friends of Somersworth is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization that has entered into a public-private partnership with the City of Somersworth to rehabilitate and re-use the Hilltop Elementary School in the heart of the City’s historic district. The organization’s mission is to promote art,

The fall field trips include: • Bounty of the Bay, an interactive first-person account of natural resource utilization of the Great Bay area. The activity focuses on the tools that were used for the harvesting of wildlife through trapping, water fowling, ice fishing, and shell fishing. • Trail of the Arrowhead: The

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science and culture in the City. Plans for the unused building include offering studio space to artists, providing classes in the arts, sciences, and culture for all ages and providing community meeting space to nonprofit organizations. The organization has just completed a floor plan for use of the first floor as a ceramic arts center. Corporate, business, and private donations are accepted to help fund the project.

Discovery Center is located at a spot along the edge of Great Bay once used by the Msquamskek people more than 400 years ago. A guide leads students on a discovery walk where they will learn about native plants and animals along the way, and they will travel back in time as they visit an Abanaki-style fishing encampment. • Gundalow Row, Gundalow Sail! Students climb aboard and visit the only Piscataqua River gundalow left in existence. Berthed at the Discovery Center waterfront each fall, staff of the Gundalow Company help students learn about the power of the estuary’s tides and why New Hampshire’s watery coastal highway of 200 years ago was home to hundreds of cargo-car-

rying gundalows. Reservations for the elementary school programs are required several months in advance, and the programs fill quickly. Teachers should call 603-778-0015 for program specifics or for reservation requirements. The Great Bay Discovery Center is located at 89 Depot Road, Greenland, N.H. For more information about the Discovery Center, call 603-7780015, ex. 350, or visit www. greatbay.org, which is also the official Web site of Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. For more information about the Great Bay Stewards, visit www.greatbaystewards.org. Story provided by Heikki Perry.

13. Brass that looks like gold 14. School graduates 19. Lively, merry play 21. Make indistinct 24. Egyptian mythological figure associated with floods 25. Washing sponge 27. Old name for nitrogen 28. Impounds for lack of payment 29. Radiotelegraphic signal 31. MN 55731 32. Sun in spanish 33. Helps little firms 34. Cease living 39. Flames up 40. Egyptian sacred bull 41. To wit

42. Mire 43. Bring two objects together 47. Filths 50. Israeli dance 51. Oil cartel 52. A particular instance of selling 53. Microelectromechanical system 54. Var. of 45 across 55. Goat & camel hair fabrics 56. Soda 58. A firm’s operational head 60. Seaport (abbr.)

~ Puzzles ~ CLUES ACROSS 1. European Common Market 4. Poetic go quickly 7. Parts per thousand (abbr.) 10. Pigeon pea 12. Sao __, city in Brazil 14. Longest division of geological time 15. __ Alto, California city 16. Small terrestrial viper 17. Coming after all others 18. Penetrate with a sharp fork 20. Still-hunt 22. Chinese frying pan 23. Cave-dwelling salamander 24. Any thick messy substance 26. About the moon 29. AKA Tao

30. Jet cabin requirement 35. Prince Hirobumi, 1841-1909 36. An easy return in a high arc 37. Italian commune 38. L. Comfort’s illuminator 44. Foot digit 45. Minute tunicate genus 46. Green regions of desert 48. Direct a weapon 49. ___ de Janeiro 50. Equestrian animals 53. Acress Tomei 56. Head of the RCC 57. Twines 59. Scientific workplace 61. Minerals 62. Hypothetical original substances

63. Hit with the open hand 64. Political action committee 65. Winged goddess of the dawn 66. W. states time zone CLUES DOWN 1. Electronic data processing 2. Man or boy (Br.) 3. W. African nation 4. Fault’s incline from vertical 5. Method of birth control 6. City founded by Xenophanes 7. Legumes 8. Beckham’s spice girl 9. Explosive 11. 1936 Nobel winner Otto 12. Greenbay teammate

Answers to last week’s puzzles


October 19, 2012

14 The Granite State Sentinel

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ALL NEW!

10-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Protection 5-Year/60,000-Mile Bumper-to-Bumper Coverage 5-Year/Unlimited Miles 24-hr. Roadside Assistance

10-Year/100,000-Mile Powertrain Protection 5-Year/60,000-Mile Bumper-to-Bumper Coverage 5-Year/Unlimited Miles 24-hr. Roadside Assistance

20 2013 2 0 HYUNDAI SANTA FE BUY $ FOR

33

23,417

LEASE FOR

179 *

$

36 ’s ager M a n e c ia l Sp

MO.

BUYY FOR R $

16 ,980

*

1.9

269

$

%

LEASE FOR

14 866

SILVER, 74K, AUTO., ALLOYS, PL,PW, KEYLESS ENTRY #12528HA

BOOK VALUE $13,495 BUY FOR

$12,967

169

$

*

1.9

HYUNDAI ACCENT GLS % 22013 * BUY $

AVAILABLE

PER MONTH

PER MONTH

159*

$

AVAILABLE 2012 HYUNDAI ELANTRA TOURING * BUY $ , FOR AVAILABLE

2006 CHEVY MALIBU MAXX SS

LEASE FOR

*

FOR

13 , 254

0

%

LEASE FOR

199

$

PER MONTH

ALL NEW

PER M MONTH

*

LEASE FOR

298

$

*

ONLY 1 LEFT

PER MONTH

WHITE, BOOK VALUE 56K, $32,995 AUTO., COOPE, NEW PRICE! LOADED, NAVIGATION #13196HA

$9,975

$29,942

2009 HONDA CIVIC LX

2005 INFINITI G35 x

SLATE, 95K, BOOK VALUE AUTO., AWD, $12,995 ALLOYS, LEATHER, NEW PRICE! HEATED SEATS #12591HB

$11,945

SILVER, 97K, AUTO., AWD, PW, PL, A/C, CD #12522HA

BOOK VALUE $ 13,995 BUY FOR

$11,967

$10,922

2011 KIA SOUL

2009 VOLKSWAGEN TIGUAN S

’s ager M a n e c ia l Sp

2007 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SE

SUPER BOOK VALUE WHITE, $ 11,995 82K, AUTO., A/C, BUY FOR AM/FM/CD #12313HA

$14,988

$16,986

’s ager M a n e c ia l Sp

2008 TOYOTA COROLLA CE

GREY, BOOK VALUE 21K, $15,995 AUTO., A/C, KEYLESS BUY FOR ENTRY, MP3, PW, PL #13036HA

SILVER, BOOK VALUE 47K, $17,995 AUTO., FWD, BUY FOR ALLOYS, PW, PL, A/C, CD #13229HA

MO.

2012 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ UZ UZ LIMITED LIM LI MI D Up to $9000 off!

2009 BMW 335 XI

BOOK VALUE $10,995 BUY FOR

LEASE FOR

179 *

$

41

2008 CHEVROLET COBALT LS SILVER, 42K, AUTO., COUPE, A/C, CD #H794A

47

2013 HYUNDAI VELOSTER 2

2013 HYUNDAI SONATA TA GL TA GLS G LS LS

2013 HYUNDAI ELANTRA ALL NEW

LEASE FOR

*

MOLTEN, 31K, FWD, AUTO., A/C #H767

J a c k - O - S av i n g s *$500 Off Any Pre-owned Vehicle exp. 10/16/12

2009 KIA SPORTAGE SILVER, 35K, ALLOYS, A/C, CD, PW, PL #H755

BOOK VALUE $13,995 BUY FOR

$12,932

2008 GMC CANYON SLE BLACK, 31K, AUTO., ALLOYS, 4X4 PW, PL #13089HA

BOOK VALUE $20,495 BUY FOR

$19,486

BOOK VALUE $16,995 BUY FOR

$15,492

2003 HONDA ODYSSEY EX BLUE, 89K, AUTO, PW, PL, A/C, CD #13208HA

BOOK VALUE $8,995 BUY FOR

$7,944

                    Â?Â? Â?Â?     ­ Â? €‚ƒ„Â… †

*All prices an d payments based on in-stock units and exclude tax, title, destination and dealer fees. Price reflects all available rebates Competitive owner, Valued owner, Militar y, Recent college grad, HMF bonus cash. See dealer for qualifications. Hyundai Assurance Trade-in Value Guarantee on New Genesis Sedan & Genesis Coupe. Santa Fe lease: 36 mos., 12k mi. per year, $2,999 due at signing. Touring lease: 36 mos., 12K mi. per year, $2,199 due at signing. Accent lease: 36 mos., 12k mi. per year, $1,899 due at signing. Veloster lease: 36 mos., 12k mi. per year, $2,299 due at signing. Sonata lease: 36 mos., 12K mi. per year, $2,999 due at signing. Veracruz lease: 36 mos., 12k mi. per year, $2995 due at signing, includes competitive owner rebate. *** 1 per customer, must present at time of write up.


October 19, 2012

The Granite State Sentinel 15

GSS

WE WANT YOUR TRADE! - Alissa Bournival

Don’t let anyone stomp on your dreams

BRAND NEW 2013 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

603-431-8900 | 1-800-548-4018 BRAND NEW 2012 COMPASS SPORT

BRAND NEW 2012 LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

LEASE $286/MO

BRAND NEW 2012 JEEP WRANGLER UNLIMITED 4 DOOR 4X4

LEASE $209/MO

3.6 LITER V6, FLEX FUEL, AUTOMATIC, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS. #JG786

V6, AUTO, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, POPULAR EQUIP GROUP, FOG LAMPS, LEATHER WRAPPED STEERING WHEEL, CARGO COVER, TINTED GLASS, UCONNECT W/ BLUETOOTH. #JL1222

MSRP $32,390 REBATES & DISCOUNT $4,000

MSRP $27,660 REBATES & DISCOUNT $6,500

BRAND NEW 2012 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4

BRAND NEW 2013 GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO 4X4

A/C, AUTO, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, CRUISE CONTROL, UCONNECT WITH BLUETOOTH. #JS248 CONNECTIVITY GROUP W/ BLUETOOTH, TUBULAR SIDE STEPS, SIRIUS XM RADIO, ALLOY WHEELS. #JW730 23 MPG | 27 MPG HWY MSRP $21,275 MSRP $29,835 REBATES & DISCOUNT $4,000 REBATES & DISCOUNT $3,000

SALE $28,390 SALE $21,160 SALE $17,275 SALE $26,835 2011 JEEP WRANGLER SPORT 4X4. ONLY 44K MILES, AUTO, SOFT TOP, A/C. #9934 $22,481 2011 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4, AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS, 17K MILES. $289/MO #9936. $19,881

LEASE $263/MO

LEASE $355/MO

2010 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4. SUNROOF, 36K MILES. $17,481 2009 JEEP WRANGLER ULTD SHARA 4X4. DUAL TOP, 6 SPEED, FULL POWER. #9934. $24,991

“X” PACKAGE NAVIGATION. 5.7L V8 HEMI WITH FUEL SAVER TECH. HEATED LEATHER, DUAL PANE PANORAMIC SUNROOF. #JG759

AIR CONDITIONING #JW744

MSRP $23,875 REBATES & DISCOUNT $2,884

MSRP $41,205 REBATES & DISCOUNT $6,750

SALE $20,991 SALE $34,705

2008 JEEP COMPASS 4X4. 26K MILES, SUNROOF, AUTO, #J247A. $15,545 2008 JEEP WRANGLER “X” 4X4. 6 SPEED TRANS, 69K, $245/MO. #9947. $16,881 2008 JEEP WRANGLER ULTD RUBICON 4X4. DUAL TOP, 6 SPEED, 55K MILES, STEEL BLUE. #JG767B $24,881

www.bournivaljeep.net

ALL LEASE 10K MILES. $2,499 DUE AT SIGNING. #JL1222 TOTAL PAYMENTS= $8,248.50, ADJ RESIDUAL 11,064. #JG759 TOTAL PAYMENTS= $13,860.99 ADJ. RESIDUAL $21,014 #JW744 TOTAL PAYMENTS= $10,412.61, ADJ RESIDUAL 13,603.05. #JW726 TOTAL PAYMENTS= $12,516.66 ADJ RESIDUAL 14,718. #JG786 TOTAL PAYMENTS= $10,533.12 ADJ RESIDUAL $16,518.90 TAX TITLE & DOC EXTRA, ALL LEASES BASED ON S/A TIER CREDIT. ALL APPLICABLE REBATES ASSIGNED TO DEALER. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY FOR ALL REBATES. TAX, TITLE, & ADMIN FEE EXTRA. SALE ENDS OCT 31ST, 2012.

2008 SUBARU LEGACY SEDAN

2007 NISSAN SENTRA SEDAN

2009 NISSAN ROGUE“S” AWD

2008 TOYOTA RAV 4 LIMITED

$158/MO

$124/MO

$244/MO

$261/MO

SSPD, A/C, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS. #9950B

SALE $8,950

AUTOMATIC, A/C. #9931A

SALE $6,950

21K MILES, AUTO, A/C, PWR WINDOWS & LOCKS. #9951

LEATHER, MOONROOF, ONLY 30K MILES.#JG764A

SALE $16,888

SALE $17,888

2007 JEEP COMPASS LIMITED 4X4

2008 LAND ROVER LR3 HSE 4WD

$191/MO

$336/MO

LEATHER, SUNROOF, AUTO, 71K MILES. #JP197B

53K MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF, CLEAN. #JW709A

LEATHER, MOONROOF, NAVI, 63K MILES. #9913

ONLY 35K MILES. #9941

2008 MINI COOPER “S”

2006 JEEP WRANGLER “X” 4X4

2008 HYUNDAI VERACRUZ LIMITED AWD

SALE $12,881 2008 HONDA CRV EX 4X4

$259/MO AUTO, SUNROOF, ONLY 46K MILES. #J9927

SALE $17,881

2010 CHEVY SILVERADO CREW CAB 4X4 LT

$379/MO 25K MILES, V8, 5.4 LITRE. #JW767A

SALE $25,991

SALE $22,991

2008 CHEVY AVALANCHE 1500 LT2

$421/MO

SALE $17,991

$221/MO VERY CLEAN. #JG778A

SALE $12,500

$247/MO 27K MILES, HTD LEATHER, SUNROOF, V6. #9922

SALE $16,991

603-431-8900 1-800-548-4018

2011 KIA RIO LX SEDAN

$189/MO 10K MILES, AUTO, BALANCE OF 5YR/60000 MILE WARR. #9938

SALE $12,881

2008 SMART PASSION FOUR TWO CONVERTIBLE

$135/MO

V6, LEATHER, MOONROOF, 41K MILES, LIKE NEW. #9900

CONVERTIBLE, 29K MILES. #JW660B

2003 FORD EXPLORER XLT 4X4

2010 HONDA ACCORD EX-L

SALE $9,188

$261/MO

2010 TOYOTA TACOMA DOUBLE CAB 4X4

SALE $22,881

$293/MO

www.bournivaljeep.net

$204/MO

66K MILES. WAS $9900. #JG671A

$185/MO

SALE $19,991

2008 KIA AMANTI SEDAN

7 PASSENGER, 19K MILES, LEATHER, SUNROOF. #9946

2010 CHEVY IMPALA SEDAN

SALE $7,850

SALE $13,991

$331/MO

2010 VOLKSWAGON DIESEL JETTA TDI

40K MILES, AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF. #9932

ONLY 4000 MILES, LIKE NEW. #JP199A1

SALE $13,991

2006 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT 4X4

LEATHER, SAFETY INSPECTED, W/ WARRANTY. #JS245A

$204/MO

$204/MO

SALE $13,991

SALE $28,881

$261/MO LEATHER, SUNROOF, 30K MILES, AUTO.

2011 MAZDA 3 SEDAN

2012 FORD FOCUS S

SALE $6,950

$335/MO 46K MILES, 6 SPEED, V6, SR5, TRD. #JG765B

SALE $22,881

AUTO, LEATHER, SUNROOF, CERTIFIED. #9912

SALE $17,881

2011 SCION TC HATCHBACK

$233/MO 23K MILES, 6 SPEED, ALLOYS, MOONROOF. #JL1197A

SALE $15,991

2355 LAFAYETTE ROAD, PORTSMOUTH, NH

2005-2007 60 MONTHS @ 5.99%. 2008-2011 72 MONTHS @ 4.99%. ALL PAYMENTS BASED ON 10% CASH, TRADE OR TRADE EQUITY AS DOWN PAYMENT BASED ON TIER 1 CREDIT. SALE ENDS OCT. 31ST, 2012.


October 19, 2012

16 The Granite State Sentinel

GSS

We have TWO full-service websites so online shopping is a breeze with us! Check out all the latest vehicles – new and pre-owned, learn about sales and service specials, apply for worry-free financing AND SO MUCH MORE!

24/7 ONLINE SHOPPING MEANS IT’S SO EASY TO BUY A VEHICLE AT DOVER HONDA AND DOVER CHEVY!

5 Dover Point Rd. Dover, NH 03820

1-800-258-1448 Shop us online 24 hours a day www.DoverHonda.com Mon-Thurs: 9am - 8pm, Fri: 9am - 6pm Sat: 9am - 5pm, Sun: 11am - 4pm

029-0912-DAW-ShopOnline

5 Dover Point Rd. Dover, NH 03820

1-800-396-8109 Shop us online 24 hours a day www.DoverChevy.com

Plus title, tax, license, acquisition, and admin fee. First monthís payment due at signing. EPA highway mileage estimate. Use for comparison purposes only. Actual mileage will vary. See dealer for details.

Mon-Thurs: 9am - 8pm, Fri: 9am - 6pm Sat: 9am - 5pm, Sun: 11am - 4pm

The Granite State Sentinel  

Free community newspaper serving Dover, Hampton, North Hampton, Rollinsford, Rye, Portsmouth, Seabrook, and Somersworth, New Hampshire

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