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Herald the

a publication for students, parents, alumni, and friends of trinity school

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2008-2009, winter

The Herald 1


Dear Trinity Family, Trinity School of Midland 3500 W. Wadley Avenue Midland, TX 79707 432.697.3281 www.trinitymidland.org Founded in 1958, Trinity School is an independent, coeducational, collegepreparatory day school. Enrolling student from preschool to grade twelve, Trinity is accredited by the Independent School Association of the Southwest and is a non-profit, non-discriminatory institution which operates without funding from church or state. Trinity School seeks to enroll students of good character of any race, religion, or economic background who have the necessary interest and ability to perform superior academic work.

“Trinity School of Midland is a college preparatory school that provides a nurturing environment to enrich the mind, strengthen the body and enliven the soul.” (Trinity’s mission) One of the distinguishing features of Trinity is the importance of community in the life of the school. Often the word community is used simply to designate a place or a group of people. But, it is much more, as it reflects and defines the kind of school that we are. The root for the word community is the Latin communis, com meaning together and munis implying readiness for service. Thus, it conveys that together we are ready to serve. Independent schools are unique environments for the creation of community. They are guided by clear purpose and mission. They are maintained by shared values.

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2008-2009, winter

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Adrianne Clifton, Editor Jenness Gilles, Editor Elise Coombes, Editor David Gilles, ‘04, Design and Layout

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G I S E D S Contributors: Geoffrey Butler Cindy Brock Chris Jauz, ‘87 Jaci Snuth Janneke Garos Emily Klemme, ‘90 Doris Cooper Patricia Maurer Laura Brown Nina Noel Paige Gates Lucy Bourland Terry Miller Tina Ice Chad Brown, ‘89 Kathy Webster Molly McCabe, ‘09 Richard Catania

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This does not mean that we must be of one mind on all issues. Each constituency – students, parents, faculty, alumni, past parents, trustees and staff – is unique. Children learn in a variety of ways, have different talents, and develop at different rates. Teachers come with their individual talents, aspirations and interests. Alumni remember how it was and attempt to reconcile change with tradition. Parents have dreams and expectations for their children that may or may not coincide with those of the child.

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The condition of the community cannot be taken for granted. It requires steady attention to the mission which states the cause that gives the community common ground. It protects the school from becoming a weathervane that spins around in reaction to whims or temporary trends. The first and most important responsibility of the board of trustees is to define, promote and defend the mission of the school. All decisions of the board are guided and tested by the mission. If a decision does not support or advance the mission, it will not stand.

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schools like Trinity exist, to elevate expectations.

The good independent school sets standards that are higher than the norm in its educational process, attention to the individual, behavioral expectations, and values. While it is important to recognize that the school is made up of a number of constituencies, the good school cannot negotiate away its standards in an effort to become all things to all people. Our children are too important to be victims of quality compromise. Mediocrity is available throughout our society; that is why

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Promoting community, while respecting differences, requires some work and a lot of goodwill. Avoiding divisiveness is not the same as ignoring diverse views. The leadership has a responsibility to listen, understand, explain and communicate. We need the confidence to know when another’s view may be better than ours; and we have to respect decisions that may not coincide with our individual interest but that serve the greater community. Cooperation, understanding and trust are essential to our being a successful community. In my short time at Trinity, I have already seen the best of a healthy school community. The commitment, dedication and love that so many have for the school is evident every day. As our community works together to serve the children and the school, we are individually and collectively enriched. Sincerely,

Geoffrey Butler Intermin Head of School


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Board of Trustees 2008-2009

On the cover: 5th graders celebrating Egypt Day

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In This Issue 4 5 7 8 9 10 12 13 14 16 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

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Model Organization of American States Theory Guides. Experiment Guides Opportunities in Middle School A Window Into... Creating with Computers Sing a Song Unto the Lord Operation Bless the Children Plan It, Grow It, Eat It 50th Anniversary: Celebrate the Legacy Alumni News All-Saints Day Trinity School’s New Website Dog Days and TOMS shoes Faculty and Student News Sports: Football, Volleyball, Tennis, Cross Country Grandparents Day Trinity Parents Association Farewell to Alan Barr, former Head of School

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Kate Beal, President Dan Hart, 1st Vice President Candyce Roybal, 2nd Vice President Rupa Naidu, 3rd Vice President Tony Farish, Treasurer Carolyn Stimmel, Secretary Pam Cepero Bryan Coleman Georgia Corwin Bill Dingus Robin Eiland The Honorable Jody Gilles, Holy Trinity Reprsentative Jeff Grigsby Link Grimes Nasreen Islam Duncan Kennedy Paul Lerwick Russell Meyers J Purvis Jane Williams

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Advisory Trustees 2008-2009

Kelly Beal Larry Beal Mary de Compiegne Norbert Dickman Paul Latham Steve Person

Administration 2008-2009

Geoffrey Butler Interim Head of School John Elmore Head of Upper School Laura Brown Head of Middle School Patricia Maurer Head of Preschool & Lower School Adrianne Clifton Director of Admissions Jenness Gilles Director of Development David Barrientes Business Manager Jack Hickman Fine Arts Department Chair Jeff Young Girls Athletic Director Chris Jauz Boys Athletic Director The Herald 3


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MOAS For the 13th time, a group from Trinity School participated in MOAS, Model Organization of American States. This was a history-making event; first, it was our largest delegation ever, second, we represented two countries – St. Kitts and Nevis, and Columbia, and third, Daniel Scott attended this model for the second time – 12 years ago as our first head delegate and this time as a teacher-sponsor. We walked and walked, getting from here to there and all around and through the monuments. One of my personal favorite things was to see the restored Star Spangled Banner. The changing of the guard at Arlington Cemetery was moving, the Library of Congress was magnificent, and FINALLY, after eight years, we were able to get into the White House – thanks especially to Malone Sams (class of 2006, and a former “MOAS kid” who works in the “House.”) We even got to see the Oval Office!

White House Photo

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The kids were on time (usually) and they (mostly) kept up with their schoolwork. In general, debate went well and proposals passed. Their main complaint about the whole experience was that there was just not enough debating time.

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Mr. and Mrs. Scott were invaluable, and I did not come home sick! Altogether, I’d say it was a successful trip. Doris Cooper Upper School Teacher

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Theory Guides. Experiment Decides. An old saying about science, attributed to many different persons, reads something like this, “Theory guides. Experiment decides.” One has to wonder if the researchers at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkley, had heard and believed this quote when they set out to develop the FOSS (Full Option Science System) curriculum. At its heart, the philosophy behind FOSS first acknowledges that young students are more likely to learn science by doing science. The curriculum respects the reality that the scientific enterprise is both what we know (content) and how we come to know it (process). By completing carefully constructed FOSS modules, students in kindergarten through grade six at Trinity School work hard to actively test and construct the content of science through their own inquiries, investigations and analyses.

in FOSS modules grow with them, moving from concrete experiences to abstract conceptions. Organization of the material acknowledges and respects research on human cognitive development.

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FOSS modules become increasingly complex over time, but each module contributes to basic program goals. In every module, FOSS students gain knowledge about the natural world, its diversity and interdependence. In each module, students meet more of the big ideas of science and are asked to demonstrate the ability to apply both thinking skills and technology to scientific inquiry. As children mature, the challenges presented

simple and powerful forces are at work. Students are having fun, and students are obviously learning.

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FOSS modules are full of intriguing questions, and students are actively engaged in pursuing answers. FOSS activities stimulate the natural curiosity about the world that characterizes young children. FOSS experiences are highly motivating and sometimes messy, demanding that children get their hands on the materials of science. Multi-sensory, collaborative, and reflective are words that describe the research perspective fostered by FOSS. The program activates the best of the science of teaching to successfully draw students into the discipline of science. By the time that students complete FOSS modules designed for kindergarten through grade six, they have been introduced to the essential content and basic modes of inquiry for Life Science, Physical Science, and Earth Science. Importantly, they have grappled with scientific reasoning and the application of technology to problems in science. They are primed and ready for success at the secondary level, and interest in science – both on the part of boys and girls – is keen. Walk into a FOSS classroom and two

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Teachers implementing FOSS at Trinity School are a large part of the success of the program. Banay Newton, Kindergarten and Lower School science teacher, represents an example of the professionalism Trinity seeks to find and nurture in its teaching staff. Mrs. Newton is a doctoral candidate at Texas Tech University, and her particular area of interest is the application of technology to teacher education and science instruction. Mrs. Newton has taught at the college level, in AP high school classes, and brings, consequently, a wealth of knowledge to her classroom. She recently attended an “invitation only” symposium jointly sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the Association of Educational Communication and Technology. She was one of 25 doctoral candidates and early career researchers who gathered to share the best of the discipline with experts in the field. She describes the experience as “professionally stimulating” and was amazed at the cross-disciplinary connections that people in the fields of science and technology are ready and willing to explore. She is part of the “cutting edge” in education and our children are benefiting from her experience and expertise. The Herald 5


S E L L Opportunities Abound in Middle School I G N G I S E D S E L L I G N G I S E D ES Trinity’s Middle School provides a supportive environment for the academic, physical, social and spiritual development of each student. In addition, we aspire to create a positive environment that fosters self-esteem, self-discipline and student responsibility. Our belief is that students who are well served in middle school emerge as healthy, intellectually reflective, caring, and ethical citizens. Our hope is to provide a foundation that leads to successful academic careers in high school and college, and afterwards, a lifetime of meaningful work. Simply put, we strive to teach them how to “do school and life.” Lofty goals, I know, but we who spend our days in Trinity’s Middle School have seen these very goals realized time and time again. It takes everyone, but our extremely knowledgeable faculty team works as an interactive and interdependent group to help ensure the success of our Middle School students.

to graphic arts, foreign languages to Things that Fly, we offer an ambitious, comprehensive program that targets the whole child. We offer something for everyone, and we find that by providing for and allowing our students to choose to participate as athletes, artists, musicians and scholars, they leave Trinity Middle School having fully experienced what our wonderful school has to offer. They enter Upper School with a sense of what they might like to specialize in because they have been able to sample it all.

In order to realize our goals, we have coined a phrase in Trinity Middle School that defines our philosophy: Everyone in Middle School has the opportunity to participate! We have a “no cut” policy in all areas of school life. From football to cheerleading, choir

In addition to an outstanding academic program, Trinity also provides a full complement of athletic opportunities for our students. Athletics in Trinity Middle School are considered an integral part of a student’s educational experience. The goals of the program

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At the core of our Middle School is a challenging core curriculum. We are so proud of the outstanding educators who make up the Middle School faculty. They are committed to the Middle School design and philosophy and truly enjoy young adolescents. Trinity is known for its academic excellence, and that serves as the backbone for all we do.

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are to help all students have ageappropriate opportunities to develop skills and knowledge of a sport, collaborate and compete with others, and develop a positive attitude toward themselves, others and Trinity School. The coaches’ goal for each student is to provide maximum participation while being as inclusive as possible, improve individual skills and performance, and promote character, sportsmanship, and leadership. Trinity School has made a name for itself in the area of the arts. We can boast that our fine arts faculty, all artists in their own right, have crafted programs that are second to none. Studio art, graphic arts, band and choir provide our students with opportunities to develop their creativity and express themselves through the arts. Students have the opportunity to perform on stage in our annual spring musical; they can perform at pep rallies and in concerts as part of the band; or they can display their art throughout the campus, especially in the atrium of Trinity’s Middle School. Trinity has a full complement of extracurricular offerings that are options for all students. We have a


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very active student council that plans both social events and oversees our community service projects. We have a relationship with The Bynum School in Midland, and our students lead weekly exercise activities in our gym for the Bynum students who do not have a gym on their campus. In addition, we also participate in food drives, Pennies for Patients to benefit the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society, Operation Bless the Children to provide Christmas gifts to the children of Juarez, Mexico and various other projects that are made known to us each year. One of the strongest bonds we have in Middle School at Trinity is a positive and supportive relationship with our

parents. The Middle School parents are important partners in our success. The Parents Association provides us with Middle School Social Chairmen who plan and organize appropriate, fun parties throughout the year. They also serve as chaperones when needed. Field trips and our annual class trips offer additional opportunities for our students to extend the educational experience beyond the walls of the traditional classroom. The fifth grade trip to the Science Spectrum in Lubbock; the sixth grade hike to McKittrick Canyon; the seventh grade overnight trip to the Alamo and the State Capitol; and the eighth grade week at The Outdoor School, followed by an overnight trip to Prude Ranch for the Blue Gray Ball are

highlights of the year – traditions that are memory makers and community builders. Students return year after year to retell the stories of their experience. And when they return and remember, it is clear that they benefited from their Middle School experience and enjoyed their time as middle schoolers. Trinity Middle School is greater than the sum of its parts, and the choices and opportunities that are available in so many areas of school life ensure the success of our Middle School students, and success at the Middle School level is the key to a bright future. Laura Brown Head of Middle School

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There are always two people in every picture: the photographer and the viewer. - Ansel Adams -

G I A Window S to the Soul E D S The Mission of Trinity School is to provide learning experiences that “enrich the mind, strengthen the body and enliven the soul.” The fine arts, photography in particular, represents one discipline where the mission is constantly in evidence.

Walk into Nina Noel’s corner of the world in Upper School and you will find each student engaged in a lively dialogue running the course between the camera’s lens and an inquisitive mind’s eye. 8 The Herald

Exercising an Artful Thinking Palette (Shari Tishman and Patricia Palmer, Project Zero, Harvard University), Mrs. Noel’s students question and investigate, observe and describe, compare and connect, reason, explore viewpoints, and find complexity in the images that they take such joy in capturing. Mrs. Noel’s students present a view of the world that challenges stereotypes, breaks boundaries, and demands an audience. Poignant in their sometimes solitude, these images isolate and reveal the richness of otherwise singular

moments in time. In Mrs. Noel’s own words, “I am in the enviable position of being surrounded by young, enthusiastic and innovative students every school day. Watching them gain confidence as they master this craft is tremendously gratifying. Photography class seems to be an important artistic outlet for the rigorous work load that Trinity students shoulder. These students come ready to participate and tend to become fully immersed in creating quality work to be proud of.”


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Creating with Computers “This class is awesome. We have learned a lot of useful things that will help us with computers for the rest of our lives,” seventh grader Olivia Mallow said.

the computer graphics class. Props, costumes and fellow students were used to create photographs to advertise the event. The photos were blended and manipulated to create unique artwork. Each student designed logos, compact disc covers, tickets, posters, tee shirts, animations and Web sites based on their individual events. After taking the class, Chad Carr said, “Now I can make a logo or any type of ad for a future company or business.”

The computer graphics class offered to seventh and eighth grade students at Trinity School is new for the 200809 school year. The course utilizes multimedia and graphic applications to incorporate computer skills and art skills. While students learn about graphic and animation software, they are also encouraged to be creative. Seventh grader Alaina Carter said, “This class teaches you to be creative with the computer and it allows you to be yourself and express your thoughts and feelings.”

The students have abundantly raised the expectations of Mrs. Gates. Before teaching at Trinity School, Mrs. Gates worked as a graphic artist for University of Texas of the Permian Basin, Wommack Claypoole Advertising Agency and for individual clients.

Be a movie star, a Broadway actor, a rock star or other major performer. Create an imaginary major performance and do an advertising package for the event. This was the first assignment for

“I am so amazed at the level of work. I would easily hire them to be graphic artists. The students learn very fast and are eager to experiment with the software. By the time I watched their

animations, I was truly amazed,” Mrs. Gates said. The class has also learned how to make action movements with animation; one student made basketball players slam dunk a ball while another made Popeye swing his arms. In another assignment, students cut two to three sections of animals, blended them together and put them in a new background to create a new species. Some of the new animals include a moose jack rabbit, an eagle tiger and a hawk cat. This was a favorite among many students.

The 30 students who participated in the first semester of the computer graphics class are enjoying their new experience and are eager to use their new computer and artistic tools. “With the skills I have learned, I can make a nice video or a homemade card. It will have much more sentimental value than a gift card or bought trinket,” said Maggie Newton.

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Sing to the LORD a new song; sing to the LORD There is a new song being heard in the Fine Arts Building at Trinity School this year. It’s being led by newcomers Vivian Moss, Cari Garner and Lucy Bourland. These ladies are excited to continue the tradition of excellence in the vocal program as Trinity begins its next fifty years.

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Last spring a void was created in the fine arts team when the capable vocal directors decided to go a new direction down the road of life and career. At that time three other paths were leading towards Trinity School. Vivian Moss, Cari Garner, and Lucy Bourland were each at a crossroad in their lives and careers. Each of them chose to move in the direction of Trinity School of Midland.

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Vivian Moss has been a leader in the music education scene of Midland since moving here in 1985. Before the move, she served as a choir director/organist in Hawaii and Virginia. Mrs. Moss was asked to consider a music teacher position at Trinity but didn’t pursue it because she wanted to be home with her daughters. At that time she began to teach privately at Midland College. 10 The Herald

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She then began her long time affiliation with Trinity School as more and more of her voice and piano students came from Trinity. Her connection with the school deepened when her daughter became a student. When the current Upper School choir position became available her path finally took her into the classroom. Mrs. Moss likes to say that she took the “scenic route” to be at Trinity.

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Cari Garner was one of the many Midland students who benefited from the expertise of Vivian Moss. While she was a Lee High School student she took vocal lessons from her and said Mrs. Moss was a huge inspiration and gave her great confidence. That confidence led her to become an outstanding music educator. She began her career as a fine arts teacher at Rusk Elementary where she produced musicals that involved more than 200 students. She is also credited for beginning a special Veteran’s Day Show that is still held each year at the Commemorative Air Force. After her children were born, Mrs. Garner began teaching half-day kindergarten but never lost her love for music. Last spring this desire to

return to the music profession led her to pray for God’s guidance. A door was opened and the path led to Trinity as the Middle School choir director. Lucy Bourland was raised in Andrews, Texas, but her path led her to the Southwest. Mrs. Bourland taught elementary music in Oklahoma and Arizona. Then, like Trinity’s other two vocal newcomers, she left teaching to stay home with her children. She returned to teaching in Las Vegas, Nevada and directed the city’s largest elementary choir in. In 2006 her husband shocked the family by accepting a position in Midland, Texas. The transition was difficult for her, as well as for her daughter. They didn’t feel like they belonged in their new schools as teacher or student. Mrs. Bourland began to consider leaving education and prayed for guidance. She discovered the Preschool and Lower Lchool music position was open while researching the school for her daughter. The path led them both to Trinity where they have found their “place.” The three new vocal directors appre-


RD, all the earth. - Psalm 91:1

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ciate the legacy of excellence in the music program at Trinity School. They plan to continue many traditions and begin new ones as well. They share the primary goal of teaching their students the basic elements of music and strive to install a love for music in every child. Their programs are interconnected and build upon each other.

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that are taught in Lower School and prepares them for the next step.

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Mrs. Moss’s goal is that her Upper School students will learn musical

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Mrs. Bourland incorporates instruments in the Preschool and Lower School programs, as well as vocal instruction. Her curriculum is based on experiences in speaking, singing, moving, playing, listening and creating. She plans to begin the tradition of a Lower School spring musical. She hopes to create a strong foundation of music learning for students as they move into Middle School.

Mrs. Garner wants to expose students to many types of music. She has added a grade five and six mini-musical and Talent Fridays. She wants her students to understand what they are singing about so that they can truly sing from the heart. She expands the concepts

skills and develop vocal talent as they successfully perform in an ensemble. She is helping them to acquire the ability to work toward a common goal in music (or as the Chili Cookoff champions). Her desire is that her students will integrate music into their

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lives and that they will enjoy it in their future, as performers or listeners. Vivian Moss, Cari Garner, and Lucy Bourland are thankful to be a team and part of the Trinity family. Mrs. Moss said, “It is a great pleasure to be part of a school that values music/fine arts as part of the ‘complete’ learning experience.” Mrs. Garner says “Trinity has been such a blessing to me this year. The students are so talented and sweet.” Mrs. Bourland just calls it “teacher heaven.” They believe that music is an integral part of education and of life. On our paths in life we will sing lullabies to our babies, sing “Happy Birthday” at parties, clap with the band at the pep rally, and dance at our children’s weddings. These three teachers are committed to the music education of the children of Trinity School of Midland. They’ve been led to a place where they can spend their days singing. They know that Martin Luther was right when he said, “as long as we live, there is never enough singing.” The Herald 11


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Operation Bless The Children

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It is said that when we seek to move and a shoebox full of trinkets to boys meal for the children and their families out of ourselves in blessing others, it is and girls, ages two through 14. This is on the delivery day in Juarez. I have often we who are most richly blessed. the only Christmas these children will come to realize that nothing that is Trinity School has been involved with know. I am amazed each year as the worth doing for God can be completed Operation Bless the Children Shoebox Trinity School community continues alone. You give because you recognize Ministry for the past the generous hand of five years. OBTC God in your life, and “But just as you excel in everything – in faith, in speech, in began in 1996 as a you want to respond knowledge, in complete earnestness and in your love for us – call of God to Elias in gratitude. You give see that you also excel in this grace of giving.” Rodriguez to minister because you have 2 Corinthians 8:7 to the neediest been touched by the children of Juarez, depth of God’s love to donate Christmas boxes and place for you, and you want to share that love Mexico. them on the altar for holy blessings. For with others. Because you excel in the Since that first year, the Lord has many students at Trinity, this outreach grace of giving, vital Christian ministry fulfilled his promise that He would has become a family tradition during can take place. Thank you for making always bless this outreach. What the Christmas season. Together, they a difference in the lives of the children started with 200 children in 1996 has choose a child’s gender and age, shop of Juarez, Mexico. increased to 5,000 in 2008. OBTC for special gifts, wrap a shoebox, and provides a hot meal, the Word of God place the gifts inside. A love offering of Terry Miller preached by Pastor Elias Rodriguez five dollars in every box providea a hot Lower School Teacher 12 The Herald


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Plant It, Grow It, Eat It Mrs. Susan Rodenko had a vision for Trinity’s Preschool garden. Over the summer she transformed the previous garden into a beautiful living garden full of herbs, vegetables and flowerbeds just right for all the Preschool children to enjoy. To top it off she brought in wood chips that have kept the garden weed free. The kindergarten classes enjoyed a “Fall Harvest Day� where parents cooked with different herbs and vegetables from the garden. The children have also cut sprigs of rosemary or lemon grass, which is good for small hand

coordination as well as smelling great in the classroom! Susan attracted the wildlife with suet feeders for the birds and hummingbird feeders for those tiny hummingbirds! A few of the hummingbirds have buzzed the feeders while the children are sitting on the sidewalk watching! Whenever the weather is nice you will find children sitting on the sidewalk munching on a snack and enjoying the garden. Thank you to Susan who has brought happiness and special memories to all the children in the Preschool.

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the Legacy

Chili Cook-off • Homecoming • Tower Shoot • 50th Anniversary Celebration (April)

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History of Trinity School Trinity School was established in 1958 by the Vestry of the Episcopal Church of the Holy Trinity. The Episcopal Day School, as it was originally named, initially offered kindergarten and grade one in the classrooms of the church. The Vestry served as the school’s first board, and the Curate of Holy Trinity was the first headmaster.

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Construction began in 1962 on a new facility located on 20 acres of property donated by William B. Blakemore II. Midland architect Frank B. Welch designed the original buildings, consisting of All Saints Chapel, four classroom clusters, and Beal Gymnasium. In 1963, construction was completed, and the school, which had grown to include kindergarten through grade seven, opened its doors for classes at its present site on 3500 W. Wadley. In 1965, a Commons, Marian Blakemore Library, and classroom clusters for grades seven through nine were added.

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In 1966, the school was reorganized to become an independent school and was renamed Trinity School of Midland. In the ensuing decade, Trinity earned membership in the Independent Schools Association of the Southwest, an association recognized by the Texas Education Agency as an accrediting body. Trinity also joined the National Association of Independent Schools. Although the school is no longer an adjunct of the Episcopal Church, daily chapel services conducted under the authority of the Bishop of the Diocese of Northwest Texas remain a part of the regular school program for every student.

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Over the years, the campus and programs of Trinity School have continued to expand. Physical additions have included new classroom clusters, a second gymnasium, tennis courts, playgrounds and other athletic facilities, and an after-hours care facility. In 1988, an Upper School with established. The first senior class graduated in June of 1991. A new Upper School complex was completed in the spring of 1995. The new Tennis Center was added in 2003 and the Rhonda G. Durham Play Center in 2004.

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Cathy Party, Bill Fleischmann and Emily Klemme, ‘90

Alumni News

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Doris Watson and Liz Pennebaker Truitt, ‘74

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Emily Schatzle, ‘07, Kelly Tipton, ‘07, and Laura Quinn, ‘08

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Evan Sauer, ‘07, Meredith Madden, ‘06, and Tyler Babb, ‘06

Sawyer Powers, ‘05

Jeesoung Yi, ‘01 and Matt Midkiff, ‘01


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Class of 2007

After passing her French fluency test while studying in France, Amanda McCabe qualified to attend a French university and/or teach French.  She  spent the  next semester, spring 2008, in Spain working on her Spanish.  In summer 2008 she  took an online French translator’s course through the University of   Toronto, and then attended the University of Chicago to learn  Turkish.  She has moved to Florence and attends NYU’s campus there. 

Class of 2006

With parents Randy and Glenna Bell in the audience, Alex Bell was inducted into the Order of the Gownsmen at Sewanee (University of the South) on Oct. 7. Among Sewanee’s many customs, none is more distinctive than the wearing of the gown by students and faculty. Allie Bray and Anne Olson are attending University of North Texas and pursuing degrees in Interior Design.

in batteries). I may start in oil and gas depending on how the job market looks in three years.” Candace Williams graduated in December and plans to attend law school. She spent last summer interning at two law firms.

Class of 2004

Katie Beal is living in Dallas and getting ready to start working for a fashion show producer. K.C. Beal graduated from TCU with a degree in entrepreneurial management last May. She is studying Spanish in Argentina and most recently returned to the U.S.  to  receive the National Female Polo Player of the Year award. 

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Brent Bennett reports: “I am applying to (in order of preference) Stanford, UT, Colorado School of Mines, Rice and Vanderbilt. Of course, at this time four years ago, I never would have thought that I would be going to Tulsa, so we’ll see. I will study materials science with the hope of eventually going into alternative energy (probably solar or

Megan McKenna reported: “I got into medical school (off the waitlist), so I’m so excited! And actually, it turned out to be my top choice, UTMB in Galveston.” Vikas Nath is in his second year at Texas Tech University Medical School. Even with research and class, he reports that his second year is a lot easier than his first.

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Colby Frerich graduated Summa Cum Laude in Engineering with minors in physics and math from Trinity University in San Antonio last May. David Gilles graduated from TCU last May with a degree in advertising/ public relations. He is a freelance graphic designer, working for various clients from Nokia to Trinity School, designing this publication. He is currently pursuing a master’s in Chrisian formation and soul care at Denver Seminary in Littleton, CO.

Travis Klunick has been Program Crew Boss at Laity Lodge Youth Camp the last two summers. He oversaw a group of guys between their junior and senior year in high school who do “all work and no pay” for half the summer. They set up, cleaned up, hauled, and served the camps – Singing Hills, Echo Valley and the new Laity Lodge Family Camp.  Travis graduated from the

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Greg Robichaud just recently reopened The Ground Floor coffee house in a new location downtown just across from the Midland County Courthouse. With a full menu of coffees, teas, and treats, Greg has re-established a favorite hang-out now featuring free wifi, live music and comfy couches.

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Jill Chandler is working on her master’s degree at Texas Women’s University, Houston and has accepted a dietetic internship at the Veteran’s Affairs Hospital.

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Malone Sams is the assistant to the First Lady’s photographer. She helps her with whatever she needs like making edits, helping with shoots, lighting, making prints, etc. Malone was looking for internships or jobs related to photography and applied as an intern for the White House Photo Office. They hired her as the First Lady Photographer’s intern in 2007. After her internship was over they offered her a full time job as First Lady Photographer’s Assistant.

University of Texas last May.

Cameron Salehi has returned from her National Geographic Photography School travels and will soon have more updates on her website, www. cameronsalehi.com. Aubrey Olson is getting married to Ashley Otis this coming June. They plan to move to Japan to teach English. Chelsea Womble graduated from Colorado School of Mines last May and has moved to Oklahoma City where she works with an oil and gas company. After graduating from Officer Candidate School, Lieutenant Michael Wood finished six months of Basic School and six months of officer infantry training at Quantico. Once he is assigned his Military Occupational Specialty and unit, he will most likely deploy to either Iraq or Afghanistan.

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Jay (Jackson) Rathbone, who attended Trinity through grade 10, is one of the main characters in the movie “Twilight.” Cameron Salehi, ‘04, said, “He’s an amazing guy and The Herald 17


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has definitely worked hard to be where he is.” For more information about Jay, you can check out his interview in Vanity Fair magazine online.

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Clint Kitto graduated from A & M in December 2007 and was commissioned into the Army to pursue an aviation specialty. Clint was planning to go to Fort Rucker in Alabama for helicopter flight training. Jay Whisnand wrote this update over the summer: “I’m about to graduate this summer, and I will be moving the next day before getting married this October. In the meantime, I will be living with my parents. They now live in Seattle.”  Jay’s mom, Dianne was the choir director for Trinity for a few years in the ‘90s.

starring in a fundraiser for the Midland Association for Aids Support at the Yucca Theatre. Matt introduced his original music to a roaring crowd. The next night, Matt was seen at the Charger football game.  On the professional front, Matt reports: “Iin March I released an album of all-original rock ‘n’ roll for which I wrote music and lyrics as well as co-produced. I have also been providing guitar and music direction for a number of projects; the most exciting was for Joe Iconis’s rock musical The Black Suits at the Public Theater, for which I was music director, arranger, guitarist, rehearsal pianist, and acted several roles. It’s in talks with several producers, and we’re tempering our enthusiasm yet keeping our fingers crossed that it makes it to Broadway next season. I’m currently music directing a piece for the NYC Fringe Festival called Green Eyes: www.greeneyesthemusical.com.”

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Christian Albo came out to watch her brother, Andrew, play in the state championship football game. Christian is living in Midland and working at Ameritox.

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Sara Coffey Thornton is married to Steve and is living in Woodburn, OR. She received her undergraduate degree in French/Creative Writing from Texas Tech in 1993 and will have her MAT from Williamette University in Spring 2009.

Last summer Jonathan Hoose started a gift basket business in Provo, UT: www.buildabetterbasket.com. Things look positive, though it’s still too early to know how undoubtedly successful it will be. Don’t try to order online, it’s a local delivery business, but feel free to send him a greeting!

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Jaden Berry has a preschool-aged daughter and attended Trinity School’s Preschool Preview recently. Jaden attended Trinity School for many years, but graduated from Lee High School in 1997.  He’s connected the Alumni Department with a few lost former students from his years at the School. 

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In October, Joel Fregia stopped by the School to tell us that he’s off to Iraq for a year. Joel has been stationed at Class of 1998 Fort Hood with his wife Leigh, who Daniel Scott is a member of the will move closer to family for the year.  Upper School English faculty at Trinity After the Army, he plans to go back to School. Daniel and his wife, Meg, who college to become a dentist. is the new College Couselor, moved to Midland from Virginia last summer.  In October, while the Trinity Homecoming bonfire and pep rally was revving up, Matt Hinkley was

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Michael Midkiff joined the coaching staff with the Middle School football team. Jeff Young, ‘84, and Chris Jauz, ‘87, continue to serve Trinity School as Co-Athletic Directors.

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an MFA in creative writing (poetry). I applied to many schools, but VCU made me an offer I couldn’t refuse! I miss Texas terribly, though.” Tarfia was on campus with her mom at the Lower School Awards Ceremony to congratulate Cooper Jauz for the Tangia Faizullah Memorial Award.

Tarfia Faizullah shares: I’m in graduate school at Virginia Commonwealth University, getting

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Clay Garlitz and Carl Beal both have beautiful daughters! Carl and Haley Nicole visited Clay when Addison Jane was born. Clay promises that Addison will be a Trinity Charger some time in the next few years!

Have news you want to share? Please let us know! Email j_gilles@trinitymidland.org or e_coombes@trinitymidland.org Be sure to check out the alumni section of the Web site: www.trinitymidland.org The Herald Don’t forget to join our new Trinity School Alumni Facebook group!


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Dear Fellow Alumni, As an active member in the Trinity family, I am fortunate to be able to regularly visit the school for meetings or my son’s events and recall the wonderful memories of my time as a student more than twenty years ago. While I walk the halls and visit the same classrooms, it gives me great comfort to remember my friends, the conversations and activities that I enjoyed so much and to see that traditions remain. This is a special year at Trinity as we celebrate 50 prosperous years as a school that is and will remain completely devoted to its students and families. The continued growth of enrollment and the school’s physical environment is testimony to Trinity’s unique position as a prominent school in the Permian Basin.

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During the course of the past two years, the Board of Trustees and all of the school’s committees have collectively been planning a special 50th anniversary year. In addition to the traditional homecoming events, we added a Chili Cook-off that was also flanked by a number of bounce houses for the kids. The Cook-off was held on October 17th just before the homecoming game. We were pleasantly surprised when 13 teams entered and let their creativity and school spirit flow as they decorated each of their tables. The teams provided a wide array of interpretations of chili flavors and it certainly drew a large crowd of curious taste testers. The funds generated went to the Alumni Scholarship Fund. To say the least, I think a new homecoming tradition has been born so get out your best recipes for next year and join in the fun. Coach Jeff Young, ‘84

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The fourth annual Trinity Dad’s Sporting Clays Shoot was held on October 25th. Fifty men participated in the tournament which yielded an amazing $30,200 in funds for the Trinity Merit Scholarship.

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On April 18, 2009, the entire Trinity School community of the past and present are invited to join in Celebrating the Legacy. This is sure to be an impressive event so please mark your calendars to attend.

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Grant Benson, ‘02

Last, but certainly not least, I want to thank those who contributed to last year’s Alumni Scholarship Fund. Supporting this fund is an effective way for all alumni to express our gratitude to the school that did so much to shape our minds, characters and lives. Best of all, the Alumni Scholarship Fund empowers us with the ability to offer the same beneficial experiences and education to someone who might otherwise not be able to attend Trinity School. The hope and power of any great institution lies in the care and affection of its alumni and your support in this fund is much appreciated. Respectfully,

Chad H. Brown Class of 1989 President, Trinity Alumni Association

Drew Lambert, ‘07

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The Trinity School “Lifers� who have attended from pre-kindergarten through grade 12.

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Trinity School’s New Web site The Trinity community is more connected than ever, thanks to its website. Users log in to find information tailored to their specific needs.

PARENTS Parents can view their children’s schedules, report cards and athletic team schedules. They can easily download forms and lunch menus, find contact information for teachers and other parents, read the latest news and announcements, check a calendar customized to their needs, and view and download photographs and videos.

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Students Students find not only assignments, but also downloadable worksheets or links necessary for homework and contact information for their teachers and coaches.

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ADMISSIONS CANDIDATES Candidates can inquire online, after which the admissions office can move them through the application process easily and effectively.

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Alumni & Grandparents Alumni have their own portal and news page. They can stay in touch with each other and keep up with school events through the site. Grandparents and friends can view and download photo slide shows and videos.

Faculty Faculty have more scheduling and students information available at their fingertips than ever before. Each teacher also has his own web page for each course, along with tools to help with grading.

The Media Gallery The Media Gallery is available to everyone. Check for yourself the many photos and videos of school life available at www.trinitymidland.org.

www.trinitymidland.org

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One for One: For every pair of shoes you purchase, TOMS will give a pair of shoes to a child in need. Since its start in May 2006, TOMS has given over 60,000 pairs of shoes to needy children in South Africa and Argentina.

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This October two representatives from TOMS visited our Trinity community. These shoes are comfortable, neat and only $42! We were expected to sell 40 pairs of shoes; however, we sold around 80 pairs of shoes!

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S E D Dogs Days and TOMS Shoes S E L L I G N G I S E D Dog Days was started around 10 years ago so the Upper School students could have a neutral place to eat lunch while dressed in their Wednesday clothes. Local restaurants would be filled with other high school students who did not understand why Trinity School kids were in coat & tie and dresses.

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Senior parents sign up for a week to serve hot dogs with all the fixings, salads, chips, drinks and dessert for up to 60 teenagers. The chief “Weenie Mom” for 2008-2009, Robin Eiland, said, “Dog Days is fast and furious, and when the kids are gone and out the door, you can hardly tell they have been at your house!”

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Faculty News Adrianne Clifton joined the Administrative team in October as the new Director of Admissions. Adrianne calls Midland home, having graduated from Lee in ’85. She began as a career educator in Spring ISD for seven years. She received her ESL certification (English as a second language) prior to receiving her master’s in Education from UT – Austin. Upon her return to Midland, she was Dr. Bill Maurer’s intern at Pease Elementary and also acted as assistant principal at Scharbauer Elementary. After a whirlwind courtship, Adrianne married Tom Clifton. She was the Principal at Santa Rita Elementary for seven years before joining their daughter, Claire, at Trinity. We are fortunate to add such an experienced educator to the Trinity community. Midland Festival Ballet Nutcracker fans could not help but notice the new Mouse King headpiece in last month’s production thanks to Jack Hickman, Paige Gates, Danielle Luke, US, MS, and LS art teachers. Congratulations to Kevin and Carrie Brown, LS computer teacher, on the birth of their first baby, Mary Emma (left). She arrived October 29, 2008.

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Michael Santorelli, MS/US Band Director, and member of the Lone Star Brass ensemble performed in November with the University of Texas Permian Basin University Strings group to premiere an original composition by Lowell Hohstadt. Later in December, Mr. Santorelli, as a member of the Midland/Odessa Symphony, performed in their annual holiday concert at the CAF. Trustee Paul Lerwick and MS/US art teacher Jack Hickman are working with Onyx Contractors to preserve portions of the former “Belt Buckle Building” as an aesthetic sculpture. “The Keepers of the Belt Buckles” and the city’s parks and recreation board are in conversation as to a suitable location for the new sculpture.

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Laura Brown, MS Head, celebrated the birth of granddaughter, Ann Clay Campbell (right), in November. Annie is the daughter of Daniel and Ellen Brown Campbell, ‘01 and niece of former faculty member Margaret Ann Brown Tettleton, ’97.

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Abroad Scholarship

During the late fall semester recordings were submitted to the Texas Private School Music Educators Association for judging of All-Region and All-State honors. The following students acquired All-Region honors: Mychael Ball – Tenor, Eddy Bello – Tenor, Scott Collins – Tenor, Chris Grunow – Tenor, Emerson Nosek – Bass, Will White – Bass, Lesa Wright – Alto, 1st Alternate: Ryan Wilson – Tenor. All-State honors went to the following choral standouts: Mychael Ball – Tenor, Scott Collins – Tenor, Will White – Bass, 2nd Alternate: Eddy Bello – Tenor.

Established by the Bailey-Yarborough-Baiano families, the Richard J. Catania Scholarship will be available to qualifying students. The purpose of this scholarship is to offer an exceptional opportunity for Trinity School students to travel and study in a French-speaking or Spanish-speaking country, while living with a host family. In order to promote multilingualism as a path to greater cultural understanding, this scholarship will be awarded to one or more students per year for at least one semester of study, during either Grade 11 or Grade 12.

The Midland Festival Ballet’s 15th annual production of Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” included three performances (2 in Midland and the 3rd in Big Spring) and over 100 Permian Basin area dancers. Making up the cast were many Trinity students: Party Children – Clara Hart, Rachel Hickman, and Alexa Mamaoulides; Mice – Claire Clifton and Stephanie Kaczor; Soldier – Rachel Lyon; Snowflake – Ba’Leigh Burns; Angel Consort – Alexa Mamoulides; Chinese – Olivia Lerwick and Rachel Hickman (Big Spring); Candy Cane Twist – Grace Ann Brown; Bon Bon – Morgan Swartz.

“…the truly meaningful successes which make our school stand out in originality and excellence are the result of the unique opportunity that we have given our students to spend a summer or a semester abroad while they are still in high school.” - Richard Catania

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Amanda McCabe, ‘06 (pictured in Nice, Italy) started traveling and studying abroad while in Upper School.

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Volleyball The 2008 volleyball season was a very successful one. The girls ended their season with a 19-13 record. They were the undefeated district champs this year and made it to the semin-finals in the State Tournament. Allison Huseman and Emily Sirgo were named 1st team All-District. Sonja Erlandson and Maddy Cepero were named 2nd team All-District. Allison Huseman was also named 1st team All-State and Emily Sirgo was named 2nd team All-State.

The 2008 Trinity Chargers overcame many obstacles and injuries to finish the season as the 2008 TCAF State Champions. The Chargers went 4-0 through district play earning the district championship. After earning a first round bye in the playoffs, the Chargers defeated Lucas Christian to earn a spot in the title game. The Chargers put a 51-6 halftime 45 point mercy rule on Ft. Worth Hill to earn their second consecutive TCAF Championship. Earning first team All District were: Offense: Wilson Echols, Robert John Cepero, and Andrew Albo Defense: Wilson Echols, Robert John Cepero, Jackson Babb. Second Team All District: Offense: Will Tindol, Jackson Babb, Travis Newman. Defense: Travis Newman, Will Tindol, Robbie Canon State Game MVP: Robert John Cepero All State: Robert John Cepero, and Jackson Babb.

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Cross Country

Cross Country was offered as a club sport at Trinity this fall. The response was amazing with 23 students participating. The make up of the team ranged from grade five through Upper School. The bulk of our team was made up of the mighty boys of grade five and six. These dedicated student athletes committed their time and efforts for 10 weeks with daily training to compete in two- or three-mile races every Saturday. They had a successful season, attended 6 meets, and got in great condition for basketball. The following students participated in the 2008 season: Grade five: Preston Ramsey, Jacob Maddox, Dane Printz and Frank Agar. Grade six : Powers Ramsey, Jack Purvis, Jared Muncy, Phillip Beal, Damon Printz, Lewis Grimes, Will Farish, Rick Catania, Rachel Hickman, and Reese and Griffin Wilkes. Grade seven: Gabriel Bell and Maggie Newton. Grade eight: Zoe Brock and Carter Maddox. Upper School: Avery Muncy, Ariel Bell, John Green and Connor Brock.

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Parent support sustained the team throughout the season. They traveled to meets in caravans, always had plenty of food and drink supplied for workouts and meets, and were privately funded. Our Middle School boys team won the Reagan County race in Big Lake to start the season. The team ran on a variety of terrain including golf courses, municipal parks and around cow pastures! They certainly had some interesting adventures and are looking forward to next season with the USATF National Cross Country Meet in sight as a 24 achievement. The Herald goal for

The US fall tennis season started with a “Welcome Back to School” tournament in Fort Stockton. It was a good starting point to see what work had to be done in the fall to improve all players’ tennis skills. Throughout the fall, we played some tough matches, winning some and losing others. The US team played dual matches against Ft. Stockton, Big Lake, Midland Christian, Lubbock Trinity and Monahans JV. The team finished the season with a tournament at Midland College in mid-November during which several US players won medals.

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The MS team season had a rough start with cancellations due to weather and some schedule changes. The highlight of the fall season was the tournament and dual match we played at Midland College in November. There were some great results and several medals were brought home!


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Grandparents Day

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Trinity Parents Association th

50 Birthday Bash February 27, 2009 7-11 pm Dinner, Music by Coyote Crude, and a Fabulous Auction (see a few of the items below)

• $50 Gold Coin donated by the Cisneros family • #50 Trinity football jersey • One week at a cabin in Southern Colorado donated by the Lerwick family • 2 packages of Microdermabrasion facial treatments donated by Body Focus, Laser and Longevity Center • Nickelback signed guitar donated by the Coleman family • Dinner party for 50 catered by Julie Edwards

• One week at a house in Santa Fe • Dozens of restaurant gift cards – nice dinners and lunches • And the traditional Trinity favorites: Children’s art projects, top lockers, junior cheerleader, Charger bat boy, parking spaces, and dozens of homemade cakes!

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For more information, please contact: Carla Gotcher at 432.699.1737

More to Me... How fortunate I was to be asked to be the Trinity Parents Association President! I have a special spot in my heart for Trinity. I have been a student here, taught grade one with the much loved Mrs. Miller, worked with the Alumni Association, and now have three of my four children enrolled here. I have been fortunate enough to have been involved with Trinity for almost 25 years! My best friend is someone that I met when I was testing for grade six admission. Some of my dearest friends are former teachers of mine. So, when I was asked to be the President of the Parents Association I said, “YES!” not only because I have children at Trinity but because my heart is here.

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committee members. They organize the fun events that not only help fund the projects the Parents Association helps pay for, but that also bring our Trinity

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I admit that I get a lot of the credit for the things that the chairmen and their committees do since often times someone isn’t sure who to thank, but all the thanks go to them. It does take a president to hold meetings and to organize the nuts and bolts, but the real work is done by the chairmen and 26 The Herald

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family together. For instance, the book fair brings money into the organization, provides a time of fun for the children and parents buying books, and allows the committee members working to get to know each other better. The spring party and auction is always a successful event and takes hours of work on the part of the committee to provide such a wonderful time for our Trinity family to get together for fun!

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I have enjoyed this year as President thoroughly. When you have an amazing executive committee and wonderful chairmen to head your committees, it makes the job easy and fun. Those of you who have not visited in a while or are wondering just what’s going on, you will be please to know that it’s going great! Of course, there are many facets to Trinity that do not all the work together the same way, but as far as the Parents Association Board and the hard workers that are a part of it – you should be proud of the school that you have a history with. You may be a current parent, a former parent, an alum, or even a former teacher – whatever the case, you have had some experience with the Parents Association in the past. You can rest assured that at present, it’s an amazing organization that helps make Trinity the wonderful place that it is. Emily Klemme TPA President (pictured with TPA executive board)


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“Trinity School has much to celebrate – the future is bright, indeed.” Alan K. Barr

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The Board of Trustees of Trinity School of Midland invites you to

Celebrate the Legacy commemorating the

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50th Anniversary of Trinity School April 18, 2009

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(details to follow)

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For updates and more information, please visit www.trinitymidland.org

Trinity School of Midland 3500 W. Wadley Avenue Midland, TX 79707 Return Service Requested

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Trinity School admits students of any race, color, gender, national and ethic origin to all rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students of the school and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national or ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, athletic and other school – administered programs. 28 The Herald

Gilles Design - Trinity School of Midland's The Herald Winter 2009  

Semi-annual magazine informing parents, alumni, and friends of Trinity School about upcoming events, cirriculum, and news.

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