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Have you ever felt to try something new? Try Japan. With foreign traditions such as, sumo, kimono, yukata and cormorant fishing

Brochure by Gilbert


Things to know….. •

Although if you are not traveling to Japan its always good to have a small dictionary in your pocket, you might never knew what you will need it for

In some countries like America they take tips, but in Japan there is no need to succumb the American guilt; servicepeople are paid a living wage

If you have decided to travel to Japan then are things that you should know

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In Japan, as in many Asian countries, it's customary to take off one's shoes when entering a carpeted room, certain areas of restaurants, and, above all, in someone's home.

By the way chopsticks are not for passing food .Why? Because doing so equals death. Literally—over 99% of all Japanese funerals are cremations, and part of the cremation rite is kotsuage, the "bone-picking" ceremony. After the body has been cremated, the deceased's relatives are given pairs of giant chopsticks with which to pick any remaining bones from their loved one's ashes and pass them between family members before placing them in a funeral urn.

• Unless you're in Tokyo or visiting tourist attractions, it is very probable that your restaurant menu will be written in Japanese. Many restaurant owners cater to nonJapanese speaking customers by including photos of the food next to its name. Helpful, yes...except for the fact that Japanese cuisine often makes use of animal parts considered trash in the Western world. That delicious plate of fried "chicken"? Might be fried cartilage.


In Japan • Unless you're in Tokyo or visiting tourist attractions, it is very probable that your restaurant menu will be written in Japanese. Many restaurant owners cater to non-Japanese speaking customers by including photos of the food next to its name. Helpful, yes...except for the fact that Japanese cuisine often makes use of animal parts considered trash in the Western world. That delicious plate of fried "chicken"? Might be fried cartilage.

• If you don't plan to learn basic Japanese for your trip, consider learning some Japanese hand gestures. When someone points at their nose, they're referring to themselves, but pointing at objects and people is considered rude—gesture to menu items with your outstretched hand instead

• If its your first time visiting restaurant on Japan don’t be a afraid if a random man shouts at you. They shout at you because it’s the only way to say “come in” and they alert the staff that a customer is here

The Japanese are famous for their work ethic; tardiness is not tolerated, and calling in sick for a common cold is unheard of. What's a germsusceptible human being to do? Prevent, prevent, prevent. Visit any convenience store and you'll find shelves full of Vitamin C products. Set foot out of your hotel room and find dozens of commuters in dental masks.



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