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CONTENTS

Contents COLUMNS

WINE INTERNATIONAL NEXT ISSUE OUT DECEMBER 2010

COVER: SHOT ON LOCATION AT THE REGENT HOTEL BORDEAUX

46-51

GILBERT & GAILLARD

WINE GROWER PORTRAITS • Lidewij van Wilgen of Mas des Dames: Dutch Angles • Chantal Brégeon-Gonet of Champagne Philippe Gonet: Gone to Earth • Coralie Goumarre of Domaine Galévan: Spirit of Wine

WINE INTERNATIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS 2 YEARS 43.90 € - 1 YEAR 23.60 € SEE ON PAGE 35

52-53 ORGANIC NEWS Sulfites and organic wine

70-71 NEW YORK LIFE Harlem’s wine renaissance

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72-73 EXPORT The United States: a growing market for wine

74-79

11-12

18-22

PARIS LIFE

NEWS

FAMILY BUSINESS • Château Figeac: a hard act to follow • Jacques Beaujeau - Château la Varière and Domaine de la Perruche: from generation to generation • Louis-Fabrice Latour: keeping it in the family

40-41

82-83

STARS AND WINE • Julia Roberts: wine lover and gourmet • George Clooney: a gentleman and epicurean

84-85

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13-14 LONDON LIFE

15 TOKYO LIFE

16 SHANGHAI LIFE

WINE QUOTATIONS Rhône wines- a class of their own

TRAVEL A visit to Cognac country

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CONTENTS

Contents REPORTS

PLEASE GIVE US YOUR FEEDBACK info@gilbertgaillard.fr

54-69 QUALITY FACTORS • Catalonia: a Spanish giant • California, Oregon, Washington USA does terroir!

80-81 WINE AND FOOD • Alain Passard: putting emotion into cooking • Recipe: Onion Gratin with Parmigiano Reggiano

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86-109 REGION • LOIRE - Bourgueil, Chinon and Vouvray - Coteaux du Cher • ITALY Piedmont, Tuscany and Veneto • HIGHLANDS Malt whiskies and the Scottish art of living

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110-113 25-39 GOLD CLUB Rated wines 90/100 and more

GOLD CLUB FOCUS ON 2009 BORDEAUX

42-45

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HISTORY OF THE VINEYARDS • Provence: 2,600 years of winemaking • Provence rosés come of age

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THIS MAGAZINE IS PRINTED ON RECYCLABLE PAPER

SEPTEMBER 2010


FRANÇOIS GILBERT

www.gilbertgaillard.com

B

ordeaux has once again delivered an exceptional

vintage, aided by a virtually perfect growing season and excellent weather. The grapes bursting with promise that were pressed and put into casks just a year ago confirmed all the predicted hype. Certain aspects are already sending oenologists into paroxysms of joy, such as the grapes’ ideal ripeness and high polyphenol concentration - the

An Eastern wind

classic template for fine vintage wines that will age well. However, every rose has its thorn, and in this case it is cost. The prices are in line with the high quality, with increases of 20-30% compared to 2005, a year in which prices already broke all records. Since then, a new phenomenon has appeared. The market for Bordeaux en primeur (new wines sold while still in the barrel), which up to now has been essentially Western, may well be swinging to the East, particularly towards a China in continual transformation, where the demand for fine wines is rocketing. Of the many examples of this trend, this one stands out: the wives of members of the Chinese elite have reinvented the traditional Tupperware® party, replacing the famous plastic containers with bottles of Bordeaux grands crus classés. For these buyers, the sky-high prices are trivial, and orders worth 50,000 or 60,000 euros are not uncommon. This should maintain the future market for the top en primeur wines, as China seems set to remain economically strong; in any case, stronger than Old Europe, which is still paralysed by the crisis.

François Gilbert Editorial director

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PHILIPPE GAILLARD

www.gilbertgaillard.com

O

rganic wines have a long history (technically

speaking, the term refers to organically-grown grapes), but the last two decades have seen a rise in this production method, following more than 40 years of industrial agriculture that has increasingly come under criticism. Winegrowers, it can be hoped,

Shining the spotlight on organic wine

choose organic or biodynamic methods by conviction. They are required to submit their production methods and wines to inspection to prove that they have respected the relevant regulations. In France, the organisations that oversee organic and sustainably produced wines include Ecocert, Demeter (the oldest label, registered in 1932) and Nature & Progrès. But who monitors the regulators? How can we be sure of their qualifications and independence? How do they carry out their tests and how often? Where do these organisations get their funding? Are they connected with the government? Are organic wines produced the same way in France, Canada and Australia? All these questions and more will be explored in an upcoming detailed report in our ‘Organic news’ section, in which we will review the current reality of organic wines.

Philippe Gaillard Editorial director

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SYLVAIN PATARD

www.gilbertgaillard.com

W

ine consumption in the United States

has been steadily increasing since 1991. In 2005, Americans drank more than 23 million hectolitres of wine (as estimated by the US-based Wine Institute), making the United States the third largest wine consumer in the world (following France and Italy). If this trend continues, it will be the world leader in two years.

Rediscovering America

Several factors have contributed to this increase in wine-drinking. First, the image of wine in the eyes of consumers, the media, and even the government, is more positive than it has been for many years. In addition, the Supreme Court decided in May 2005 that wine producers could sell directly to consumers in all American states. This decision has not only benefited American wineries, it has also favourably influenced public opinion and helped to develop the wine knowledge of potential consumers. But the main determining factor is no doubt the demographic trend, which has led to a natural increase in the American wine market. The adult population (age 21-65) has grown by 15 million people since the year 2000, including the ‘Echo Boomers’, or Generation Y. As opposed to France, where the younger generation drinks little wine, young American adults (born between 1970 and 1990), are increasingly choosing wine as part of their lifestyle. This is a real opportunity for French and other European wines, whose domestic markets are in decline. .

Sylvain Patard Editor in chief

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SEPTEMBER 2010


PARIS LIFE

Christine’s Wine Lists

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Two unique establishments with totally contrasting styles nestled in two typically Parisian streets. Take your pick from a colourful, down-to-earth wine bistro or an elegant champagne and cocktail bar: excellent examples of the wealth of choice that Paris offers.

Christine Fabre

DOWN-TO-EARTH WINE Mémère Paulette

BISTRO

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

3, rue Paul Lelong 75002 Paris Owner: Laurent Savary Tel. +33 (0)1 40 26 12 36 Open: Monday-Friday 12 - 2.30 pm and 8 pm - 10 pm Tucked in a small side street between the Paris Stock Exchange and rue Montmartre, “Granny Paulette's” is a hidden gem. The owner, Laurent Savary, is a wine lover with a genuine personality who knows how to give an authentic welcome. He seeks out small winemakers as well as more classic vintages from overlooked years to offer a large choice of wines, some of which do not appear on the wine list - a visit to the wine cellar is necessary to choose the best match for your meal. The cellar itself constantly evolves depending on the season and on the owner's latest discoveries. Before you begin searching for the perfect bottle, we recommend starting with an aperitif of Philipponnat's Cuvée Non Dosée champagne, which will allow you to

discover this excellent house through a surprising and little-known vintage that has existed for only two years. For a wine to accompany your meal, you are spoiled for choice. One option is a white Coteaux du Languedoc - Rosmarinus 2007 from Domaine Calage Resseguier (25 euros), with its initial sensation of fruit of rare quality, perfectly balanced with oak. Or a 1983 Margaux from Château Cantenac Brown that delivers a mouth-filling, powerful attack for only 50 euros. Another option is a classic that we never tire of, Pascal Lambert's Cuvée Marie 2007 (30 euros): an excellent Chinon that has surprised many in blind tastings. There is

also a 2008 Vacqueyras from Jérôme Benoit's Mas des Flauzières: a delightful nose and bold palate with a perfect balance of grape varieties (26 euros). A favourite from Corsica, Patrimonio d’Anette Leccia 2005 (28 euros), provides a taste of terroir with its characteristic Nielluccio grape variety. Suzzoni's white Clos Culombu is another fine Corsican wine that is sometimes unjustly overlooked (25 euros). We mustn't leave out the region of Alsace: Claude and Sandrine Weinzorn's Domaine de l'Oriel 2004 Grand Cru Sommerberg is a magnificent expression of Reisling terroir (30 euros). Or perhaps you prefer taking a trip to

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PARIS LIFE

Christine’s Wine Lists Burgundy with a rare white 2007 Côte de Beaune from Domaine Newman (24 euros), quite simply a success! Finally, a 1995 Cahors from Jean-Luc Baldès, a winemaker that has won this appellation many admirers: Prince Probus, a wine with soft tannins and an intense flavour of dark fruit (40 euros).

ELEGANT CHAMPAGNE AND COCKTAIL BAR

Point Bulles 7, rue Clément 75006 Paris Tel. +33 (0)1 46 33 00 47 www.pointbulles.com Owners: Chantal Brégeon-Gonet, Karim Haïdar (Chef) and Daniele Derossi Open: Everyday from noon to midnight This brand new Champagne bar gives pride of place to winemakers from the Champagne region. The wine list offers a good selection of Philippe Gonet Champagnes and a large choice of bubbly by the glass, the bottle or, if you prefer, by the magnum! The chef has created a menu with a Mediterranean influence, complete with sharable starters that will remind you of summer holidays, including wedge shell

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©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Mémère Paulette serves traditional and tasty bistro cuisine made with quality products such as Morteau sausages, an excellent sauerkraut, savoury kidneys, not to forget the homemade starters. Come here for an unforgettable Paris evening with friends who appreciate a good bottle of wine! clams with coriander, fried anchovies, razor shell clams with tarragon, or more traditional dishes such as Iberico cured ham and a delicious sea bream tartare with dill and chives. The cuisine, based on fresh products with hints of spices and aromatic herbs, is simple but innovative. There are also original cocktails, based, of course, on Champagne! The Philomène is a subtle blend of Philippe Gonet Réserve champagne and candied hibiscus flower. L’Arsène, with Grand Marnier, Philippe Gonet Réserve Champagne, yuzu (Japanese citrus) and lemon confit, has striking but well-balanced citrus notes. Or dare to discover the Jeanne, a mixture of melon liqueur, Philippe Gonet Réserve Champagne, sea salt and Indonesian long pepper! The wine list offers classics such as Guigal, Mellot and Pascal Jolivet, as well as excellent lesser-known appellations that are often hard to find in Paris, such as Montlouis (2008 Domaine de la Taille aux Loups) or one of our favourite

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appellations, Arbois (2007 Traminer from Domaine Tissot). Minor digression: we came to appreciate Arbois wines several years ago during a late evening at the Vinisud wine fair, thanks to an enthusiastic restaurateur who offered us a glass of 1990 Domaine Rolet Père & Fils… happy memories! Point Bulles also offers several red wines from the Champagne region, such as the amazing 2008 Ambonnay and a very nice Saumur Champigny from Thierry Germain. Aside from the excellent choice of wines offered, we particularly appreciate that many of them can be ordered by the glass, making this a place where one can enjoy quality in the quantity that suits the mood and occasion. Don't forget to finish your visit to Point Bulles with an excellent 2008 vintage Comté cheese, accompanied by a glass of 2005 or 2002 vintage Philippe Gonet Champagne. Visit the website to find out the programme for tasting evenings organised with the winemakers.

SEPTEMBER 2010


LONDON LIFE

Mark’s favourite venues The term “wine bar’” bring with it images of 1980s London, complete with Yuppies, perms and lots of Chardonnay. Thankfully the perms are no more and the Yuppies have long since entered respectable middle-age; but there is certainly some Chardonnay to be found at London’s new generation of wine bars, alongside plenty of other interesting vino and some fabulous food.

charcuterie (under the guidance of Parisian Gilles Verot) and some excellent burgers. An extensive wine list reveals the guiding hand of a passionate sommelier. ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The focus is French and in particular ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Burgundy and the Rhône Valley, the two regions closest to Daniel Boulud’s (Lyonnais) heart, but many other regions

Mark Andrew

are well represented. As a big fan of JeanFrançois Coche-Dury, I couldn’t resist

“DANIELS” IN LONDON Bar Boulud

his appellation-defying 2004 Bourgogne Blanc

Mandarin Oriental Hotel 66, Knightsbridge London SW1 X 7LA Tel. +44 (0)207 201 3899 www.barboulud.com

(£63),

a

rich

and

smooth ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Chardonnay with layers of white flowers, citrus and cream. Bar Boulud is a class act and, perhaps, the most exciting new opening in London this year.

Following the success of his eponymous restaurant ‘Daniel’ in New York, Daniel Boulud recently took up residence in Knightsbridge’s Mandarin Oriental hotel. Bar Boulud is a more relaxed venue than his three star Michelin restaurant in the Big Apple, but the plush surroundings leave you in no doubt that this a place to The buzz surrounding Bar Boulud’s opening appears to be wholly justified. The bistro-style menu is far better value than I would have imagined, with superb

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Bar Boulod

SEPTEMBER 2010

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see and be seen.

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LONDON LIFE

Mark’s favourite venues WINE BAR & RESTAURANT Terroirs

Marcel Lapierre’s Vin de Table ‘Les Gallois’

5, William IV Street London WC2N 4DW Tel. +44 (0)207 036 0660 www.terroirswinebar.com

crisp berry fruit and perfect acidity to

(£25.50), a deliciously juicy Gamay full of match the excellent (and reasonably priced) charcuterie board and gambas à la plancha. London’s wine bar renaissance continues relaxed atmosphere and stellar wine list to

and the recent trend for venues specialising

London’s financial district. Bocca di Lupo

in “natural wines” was perhaps the inspiration

and Dehesa offer Italian and Spanish

behind Terroirs, a simple but elegantly

variations on the theme in the West End,

styled bar tucked away behind Trafalgar

while the charming Negozio Classica is a

Square. Owner Eric Narioo is better

vinous haven for visitors to Portobello.

known as the man behind Les Caves de Pyrène, an eclectic wine importer that loves to stray off the beaten track and

28-50 WINE WORKSHOP & KITCHEN

features many natural wines on its list.

140, Fetter Lane

No surprise then, to see many of their best

London EC4A 1BT

selections make an appearance on the

Tel. +44 (0)207 242 8877

(largely French) list at Terroirs.

www.2850.co.uk

28-50

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

in the Square Mile, where 28-50 brings a Paris is renowned for its wine bar scene

Dehesa Charcuterie & Tapas Bar 25, Ganton Street, London W1F 9BP Tel. +44 (0)207 494 4170 www.dehesa.co.uk

Bocca di Lupo

Negozio Classica

Houillon’s Pupillin Rouge from the Jura

12, Archer Street

283, Westbourne Grove

(£42.50) and the clutch of top Beaujolais

London W1D 7BB

London W11 2QA

they feature from messieurs Foillard,

Tel. +44 (0)207 734 2223

Tel. +44 (0)207 034 0005

Matras and Lapierre. In the end I opted for

www.boccadilupo.com

www.negozioclassica.co.uk

Terroirs

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©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

for a lighter style of red, I was tempted by

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28-50 SEPTEMBER 2010

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

It was a warm evening and, in the mood


TOKYO LIFE

Walid's trendy places Greetings! Or as we say in Japan, "Hajime-mashite” (pleased to meet you)! My name is Walid Haddad, I am a FrenchLebanese national and Japan has been my home since 1991. The most exciting part of living in a megapolis like Tokyo is ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

that there are always new stories to tell, new places to discover and interesting people to meet. Walid Haddad

IN GINZA DISTRICT Vinpicoeur

SPANISH ATMOSPHERE

museum. I chose the crêpes aux truffles

Vinuls

d'été, and the sommelier paired it with a

Ginzaya Saketen Bldg 2F 4-3-4 Ginza Chuo Ku Tokyo Tel. + 81 (0)3 3567 4122

2-5-17 Ginza Chuo Ku Tokyo Tel. +81 (0)3 3567 4128

bottle of Mark Kreydenweiss - Andlau Riesling 2007. A perfect match!

The World Cup has been won by Spain: a perfect excuse to check out Spanish tapas, Japan-style, at Vinuls. A truly Spanish atmosphere reigns within the walls of this bodega. I ordered a red B. Agapito Rico 2009 Carchello along with callos a la Catalana and chorizo extra: truly Spanish taste, in the

Summer is here, and what better way to enjoy it than with grilled or barbecued dishes? I followed a tip from a local and tried Vinpicoeur, located on the Champs Elysées of Tokyo’s Ginza district. I was greeted by the delicious aroma of a whole pig being slowly grilled: a feast for the eye and the palate. From a list of 60 wines, I chose a bottle of Carron la Grande Coline 2009 that was served at the ideal temperature.

PARISIAN BISTRO OR WINE MUSEUM? Aux Amis des Vins PV Bldg 1F 2-5-6 Ginza Chuo Ku Tokyo Tel. +81 (0)3 3567 4120 Wanting to explore more of Ginza on my own I stumbled upon Aux Amis des Vins. From outside it looks like a typical Parisian bistro; the interior resembles a wine

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Aux Amis des Vins SEPTEMBER 2010

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Vinpicoeur

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

middle of Tokyo. “VivaVinuls!”

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SHANGHAI LIFE

Shanghai: city of opportunities

By Thomas Magnani

Today, wine is increasingly dethroning baijiu (a traditional alcohol made from rice) among the inhabitants of Shanghai, the Chinese economic capital. Probably the most Westernized city in continental China, modern Shanghai is now home to a wide range of European-style wine bars, restaurants and hotels offering thousands

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of types of wine from both the Old and New World. Expatriates and middle-to-upper-class Chinese alike enjoy quaffing a glass in the city’s numerous wine bars. To satisfy this new popularity, many restaurants and hotels are expanding their wine lists. We

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counted more than 30 bars dedicated to wine, most of them in the Bund (formerly the British district), the Jing’an district and the area of the old French Concession. Some of the most well known include The House of Roosevelt (which has more than 2,500 wines), Dr Wine, Epicure and the Napa Wine Bar & Kitchen.

SEPTEMBER 2010

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Did you know that the Chinese were already drinking wine 9,0 0 0 year s ago? I n f a c t , wine was made in China thousands of years before the first winemakers appeared in what is now France. Wine’s popularity has fluctuated throughout Chinese history, moving from an elite reputation to near invisibility and back. During the Tang Dynasty (618–907 CE), the emperor himself cultivated grapes in the Imperial Palace, offering his wines to his faithful nobles. But the current mania for wine that is sweeping China is mainly due to the European influence in high-society circles that started at the beginning of the 20th century, and the country’s recent trend towards Westernization.


SHANGHAI LIFE

A CHOICE OF 2,500 WINES The House of Roosevelt

But drinking Bordeaux or Rioja in the Far East comes at a price: a glass is between 15% and 100% more expensive than in the wine’s country of origin. Yet apparently the expense is not curbing the appetite for imported wine, at least not when people are drinking out. Some 65% of the wine in Shanghai is sold in cafés/bars, hotels or restaurants - of this, 85% is foreign wine. In contrast, 90% of the wine sold in supermarkets is Chinese. For many Chinese businesspeople, drinking wine is a reflection of high social status and success in business. These drinkers prefer very expensive, prestigious Bordeaux wines. This does not always indicate a sophisticated palate, as tasting and appreciating fine wines is a long learning process. Thus, you sometimes encounter unexpected cocktails such as shots of 1983 Château Lafite Rothschild mixed with the mint liqueur Get 27. So wine culture is on the rise in Shanghai, but may need some time to fully mature. To help wine lovers find their way around Shanghai, we visited two of our favourite places where you can enjoy a glass of wine and take in the diversity to be found in this amazing city. They each have different styles and atmospheres and have accommodated wine culture to local tastes in their own unique way. We would like to thank the bar staff for their welcome and for taking the time to share their passion for the growing wine culture in Shanghai. We hope this will give you a taste of and for the city!

Napa Wine Bar & Kitchen

BETWEEN THE MARRIOTT AND THE CENTRAL PLAZA HOTELS Napa Wine Bar & Kitchen 57, Jiangyin Road Tel. +86 (0)21 6318 0057 Although this wine bar is not the easiest to find, it would be a shame to miss it. Close to the bustling crowds of People’s Square, the Napa Wine Bar, located at the end of an alley between the Marriott and the Central Plaza hotels, provides a comfortable place to enjoy a glass of wine in peace. The bar is in a historic house that was built in 1903 and fully renovated three years ago for the establishment’s opening. It is a perfect place for businesspeople to arrange meetings or relax after work.

With such a wide choice, you are sure to find your pleasure. Driven by Chinese demand, a major section is devoted to France: around 45% of the cellar’s bottles are French wines, and half of these are Bordeaux. Around one-third consists of New World wines, particularly from Australia. There is also a selection of Chinese wines. For those who prefer to taste different wines by the glass, a set menu is available that includes three different wines accompanied by three different plates (including very good duck liver) for 98 yuan.

The wine list is composed of 600 wines, with around 70% from the Old World (almost all of them French) and, as the bar’s name indicates, a good selection of Californian wines. The venue is justly proud to have won two awards for the quality of its wines from the US magazine Wine Spectator.

Finally, saving the best for last, The House of Roosevelt, formerly the headquarters of a British trading firm and the Shanghai Foreign Trade Commission, has one of the best views in Shanghai. Take a trip up to the 9th floor to enjoy your wine as you gaze over the river to Pudong and Shanghai’s emblematic Pearl Tower.

Napa Wine Bar & Kitchen

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The House of Roosevelt

If Shanghai is the city of extremes, The House of Roosevelt couldn’t be a better example. In terms of sheer numbers, this impressive new establishment offers a choice of 2,500 wines (soon to be 2,800), the biggest wine list in Shanghai. But don’t worry, you don’t have to make your selection from an impersonal list the size of a dictionary. Here, you stroll through a massive wine cellar with shelves organised by country to decide on a wine; you just pick the bottle that you want to drink. This handson approach gives you a good overview of the 30,000 bottles in the wine cellar.

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

27, Zhong Shan Dong Yi Road Tel. +86 (0)21 2322 0800

In an original twist, the wine bar has devised a tasting session that allows you to identify the style of wine you prefer, which they call your WineSign. For 260 yuan, you can attend a blind-tasting to identify your wine profile, which will help you select from their wine list, classified according to WineSigns. A tasting of six different wines is also available for between 200 and 350 yuan, or if you’re pressed for time, 30 different wines are available by the glass. Whether for a short visit or an entire evening, you are sure to find a warm welcome at the Napa Wine Bar, one of Shanghai’s top wine spots.

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NEWS

THE ESSENTIAL COMPANION FOR CHAMPAGNE

EXCLUSIVE CHRISTMAS CREATION This holiday season, Maker's Mark is offering a tasteful gift box created by the box-maker Florence Faugier that will see out the year in style! The leather box, designed in the spirit of an antique travel trunk, holds a Maker's Mark Bourbon bottle, a pewter tumbler and a recipe for Mint Juleps. Made from top-quality black leather and hemp, the box makes a stylish and practical gift that can be reused. Maker’s Mark, the original premium Bourbon from Kentucky, has founded its reputation on quality, producing its Bourbon in limited quantities using methods that require considerable human intervention. The Bourbon distillery chose to work with Florence Faugier because both share a passion for craftsmanship,

authenticity, detail and quality. The pewter tumbler not only keeps the cocktail cool and helps to bring out the Bourbon’s flavour, it also has a history intimately linked to that of Maker’s Mark. The brand’s name itself was inspired by the matriarch of the Samuels family, who collected pewter objects by looking for “the mark of the maker” that indicated the finest pieces. The concept seemed appropriate for the image de Maker’s Mark, the oldest Bourbon distillery still in operation in the United States. The box will be available for 60 euros from Lavinia from 15 November 2010. For more information: www.makersmark.com

Filled with your choice of cold water or ice, this Champagne bucket will keep your bottle of Charles Heidsieck chilled to the perfect temperature. This makes it useful. But it was also made to be attractive. The wide-mouthed shape fulfils both requirements: its elegant curved sides allow the Champagne to undergo controlled oxidation, ideal for releasing its complex bouquet. The flared edges help to keep the bottle in place without slipping. The handle design ensures a good grip when the bucket is full. Two different gift box versions are available: Access and High Life. The former contains a Champagne bucket and a bottle of Charles Heidsieck Brut Réserve. The latter adds a special touch of French chic, with a bucket encased in water buffalo leather, a perfect match of elegance and practicality. Access: 75 euros; High Life: 275 euros. Available at selected wine sellers in France or online at www.charlesheidsieck.com

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! To mark 150 years of winemaking, the Ayala Champagne house has created a Blanc de Blancs (“white from white”) from its 2004 grape harvest, made from 100% Chardonnay grapes solely from three grand cru areas: Le Mesnil sur Oger, Cramant and Chouilly (one-third each). The month of August in 2004 was very rainy and cool, which led to fears about the harvest’s maturity. Fortunately, it was followed by a magnificent and sunny September, leading to a record harvest in the region (14,000 kilograms per hectare) and perfect-quality grapes with an average alcohol content of 9.7%. The wine then spent five years aging in a cellar to give it complexity, power and roundness. With a dosage of 7 grams of sugar per litre, the resulting Champagne retains a welcome vigour that is not excessive. This 2004 Blanc de Blancs is the perfect Champagne for an aperitif or to accompany scallop dishes. Retail price 40 euros - For more information: www.champagne-ayala.com

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SEPTEMBER 2010


NEWS

BACK TO THE FUTURE? What if the future of winegrowing, and particularly Champagne, was in the past? The question is not as crazy as it sounds for Champagne De Sousa… and we have to agree after observing the traditional methods they use - and tasting the quality of the results they produce! For some time now, part of Erick De Sousa’s vineyards have been ploughed by horses. Using animals to till is in line with the family’s wish to fully conserve the character of the Champagne appellation, including its environment. Their approach is not only about limiting air and noise pollution: using horses also avoids over-compression and impoverishment of the soil, limits the need for cover planting, and promotes mycorrhizal fungi*, thus establishing a healthy interaction between the presence of the animal and the rich soil that produces such excellent Champagnes. This “innovation”, in fact a return to proven techniques, is part and parcel of Erick De Sousa’s philosophy of prioritising traditional methods over an unbridled race for efficiency. The winemaker’s

methods are fine tuned to his art and include malolactic fermentation, cold stabilization at –4°C, followed by aging in a chalk cellar. The De Sousa family vineyard is in Avize, in the heart of the prestigious Côte des Blancs and its grands crus (Avize, Oger, Cramant and Le Mesnil sur Oger). De Sousa produces crisp Champagnes with a lot

of personality and remarkable aromatic complexity. For more information: www.champagnedesousa.com *Mycorrhizal fungi (from the Greek myco “fungi” and rhiza “root”) form symbiotic associations with grapevine roots in which both organisms benefit from the relationship.

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NEWS

FOR A WELL-ROUNDED WINE Chef & Sommelier, Arc International’s wine-dedicated brand, has reissued the “Grand Finale”, a hand-blown carafe exclusively for decanting fine red wines. Its elegant, circular shape is utterly original, its curves allowing for smooth pouring as the wine gently flows over the decanter’s rounded sides. The Grand Finale embodies master glassmaking and also benefits from the latest Drop Control technology, a treatment applied to the neck of the decanter to allow drip-free pouring. Drop Control is totally invisible and has no negative effects on the wine. www.chefsommelier.fr

G RAND M ILLÉSIME 2000 G RAND ROSÉ G RANDE R ÉSERVE

THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME Maison Gosset has given its classic bottles a modern facelift. The restyled packaging is refined, more up-to-date and integrates a commitment to sustainable development. The company has sought to find the right balance between respect for the environment and tradition, and its new packaging uses the latest technology in the service of environmental responsibility. The boxes and labels come from sustainably managed forests around the world, and the printing process is entrusted to Imprim’Vert® printers (a French certification for environmentally responsible printing), ensuring low environmental impact aligned with high quality. With

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its 426-year history and a tradition that has been passed down over 15 generations, Gosset confirms that the secret to its longevity is constant creativity. Gosset Grande Réserve: 38 euros*; Gosset Grand Rosé: 48 euros*; Gosset Grand Millésime 2000: 56 euros* *Plus delivery charges; offer available only in France. Also available by direct sale: Tél. +33 (0)3 26 56 99 56, or at the Grande Épicerie de Paris, Fauchon, Lafayette Gourmet, Lavinia. For more information: www.champagne-gosset.com

SEPTEMBER 2010


NEWS

TOBERMORY AND LEDAIG: TWO ORIGINAL WHISKIES

AND THE WINNER IS… CHÂTEAU PAVIE DECESSE! Château Pavie Decesse took first-place honours at the twelfth prestigious SaintEmilion Grands Crus Classés Challenge, held for the third time in its history outside France (this year’s challenge was held in Hong Kong, during Vinexpo Asia). The Château Pavie Decesse (owned by the Perse family) came ahead of Château Destieux (Christian Dauriac), the runner-up. The two semifinalists were Château La Couspaude (owned by the Aubert family, and semifinalist in 2002 and 2004) and Château Monbousquet (also of the Perse family). Organised by the Saint-Emilion Wine Council, the competition, held every two years, has 40 Saint-Emilion grands crus classés go head to head in a series of eliminatory rounds in which pairs of wines are compared for overall quality consistency for three consecutive vintages. This year, the vintages were 2005, 2006 and 2007.

Off the west coast of Scotland, between the Isle of Islay and the Isle of Skye, the Isle of Mull is home to one sole whisky distillery: Tobermory. Created in 1798 by John Sinclair, it is also called Ledaig, the name of the largest town on the island. Since it was taken over by Burn Stewart, this Mull distillery has made two premium whiskies with resolutely different but complementary p e r sonalities. Ledaig is distinguished by its subtle peaty character, while Tobermory seduces with its elegant floral, fruity aromas and notes of sea salt. Both single malts have a bottling strength of 46.3° and are non-chill filtered, that is, they are not filtered at cold temperatures. As a result, they should be diluted exclusively with mineral water. Whiskies to discover if you appreciate adventuring off the beaten track. Available from selected wine sellers. Tobermory 10-year-old whisky: around 45 euros; Ledaig 10-year-old whisky: around 42 euros.

PREVIOUS WINNERS • 2008 Château Canon La Gaffelière • 2006 Château Clos des Jacobins • 2004 Château Les Grandes Murailles • 2002 Clos de l’Oratoire • 2000 Château Canon La Gaffelière • 1998 Château Larmande • 1996 Château Angélus • 1994 Château Angélus • 1992 Château La Dominique • 1990 Château Larmande • 1988 Château Guadet Saint-Julien

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

21


NEWS

LOOKS GOOD IN WOOD Château Brane-Cantenac is a second grand cru classé in Margaux that has belonged to Henri Lurton since 1992. To celebrate the festive season, Lurton is offering Château Brane-Cantenac bottles in boxes of exotic wood, like expensive perfumes or precious jewels. The elegant sapele-wood boxes are made by the Bordeaux box-maker MarieLouise and are exclusively sold by Lavinia, located at Boulevard de la Madeleine in Paris (www.lavinia.com). The boxes are available for the vintages 1996, 2000, 2005 and 2006 in 750 ml bottles, and also for 2006 vintage magnums. The 2007 vintage of the château’s second wine, Baron de Brane, is also available in a box. PRICE • 2007 Baron de Brane: 40 euros • 1996 Château Brane-Cantenac (750 ml): 150 euros; 2000: 147 euros; 2005: 95 euros; 2006: 69 euros • 2006 Château Brane-Cantenac (1.5 L): 125 euros For more information: www.brane-cantenac.com

The world leader in sales of French oak casks and an undisputed point of reference in high-quality barrel-making, Seguin Moreau is also a company committed to the environment. Following a review of its carbon footprint, this year the cooperage launched the world’s first CarbonNeutral® casks. This innovation responds to the demand of Australian and New Zealand oenologists under pressure from European retailers to guarantee the lowest possible environmental impact of the wines they carry. To create their carbon-neutral barrels, Seguin Moreau worked with The CarbonNeutral

22

CARBONNEUTRAL® CASKS

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

Company, a recognised global provider of carbon reduction solutions. Seguin Moreau compensates for the emissions from the manufacture of its casks by investing in international programmes for renewable energy development. The cost related to each barrel (around 3 euros) is billed to the client if they choose to take part in the effort to achieve zero carbon. Since February, 3,100 carbon-neutral casks have been sold to markets in the Indian Ocean. For more information: www.seguin-moreau.fr

SEPTEMBER 2010


RECOMMENDED WINES

Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International Selection 91 /100

90 /100

88 /100

87 /100

CÔTES DE PROVENCE LA LONDE A.C. Domaine Saint-André de Figuière Confidentielle rouge 2008 Ve r y d a r k c o l o u r. Concentrated nose of red and black fruit, hint of spice, great elegance. The palate is a fusion of fullness, substance, finesse, freshness. It deploys clear-cut, long-lasting aromas. A superlative wine, just embarking on its long life.

CÔTES DE BERGERAC A.C. Ortus 2007 Deep colour. Rich nose, burnt oak, notes of sloe, blackcurrant and cherry. Dense, full mouthfeel with silky substance. More of the rich aromatics deployed on the nose. Long woody, chocolatey aftertaste. A top of the range wine, still in its early years. BANDOL A.C. Domaine de l'Olivette Rouge 2005 Deep colour, slightly evolved. Open nose reminiscent of ripe fig and p r u n e, u n d e r l a i d w i t h s p i c e . A mature wine on the palate, a melted attack leads into a firmer finish making it a definite food wine, for game.

CHAMPAGNE Guy Tixier & fils Brut 1er Cru Rosissime Deep orangy colour. Fresh nose of red fruit flesh (strawberry, raspberry). Fleshy, soft, crunchy attack, good balance and appealing fruit-driven aftertaste. A rosé equally delicious as an appetiser or with a meal.

90

CHAMPAGNE Simon-Selosse Extra Brut Grand Cru Brilliant light gold. Extremely pure fragrant nose mingling white flowers, fresh hazelnut and ripe apple. The same streamlined style is present on the palate. Fashioned in a natural, fruit forward style showing best with a buffet or with grilled fish.

90

CÔTES DE PROVENCE A.C. Domaine de la Rouillère Grande Réserve Cuvée 2009 Light yellow. A mix of mild spices, herbs and garrigue on the nose. On the palate, a very soft wine with heady, elegant aromas. Length is well above average and provides a real bonus.

88

CÔTES DE PROVENCE A.C. Domaine Saint-Jean de Villecroze Exceptionnel 2007 Deep colour. Initially mineral and smoky on the nose, leading to very ripe fruits and undergrowth. On the palate, wonderful substance, silkiness, melted tannins. The finish is powerful yet remains very well-balanced. Serve with red meat or game.

86

LANGUEDOC A.C. Domaine de Daurion Prestige rouge 2005 Concentrated colour with faint orangy tints. Nose of stewed fruit and undergrowth with underlying vanilla. Ageing aromas are expressed with greater density on the palate. Substance is soft, the tannins are polished. A successful effort, drinking well now.

/100

/100

/100

/100

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

23


Don't miss out!

NEW EDITION • 720 pages • 5 000 wines presented • 280 Bordeaux vintage 2009 • • Exhaustive presentation of the French appellations (AOCs) • DISTRIBUTION: Bookmasters (USA-Canada) - Orca-Vinehouse (United Kingdom - Ireland, East Europa, Japan, China) PUBLICATION DATE: November 2010

W

e are delighted to present the 2011 Gilbert & Gaillard Wine Guide. All the wines featured have been tasted using the same protocol, ensuring a rigorous, impartial selection. The samples sent by producers are blind tasted by Gilbert & Gaillard and their team in the quiet seclusion of a tasting room. A 100 point scale is employed for utmost accuracy. There is no question of marathon tastings as no more than 10-15 samples are tasted per session to maintain fair judgement and analysis. More than 6,000 French wines have been selected, along with commentaries, tasting notes and recommendations on how to serve them. All the classed growths and most prestigious wines are featured, but there are also many smaller, lesser-known wine growers to discover too. Each wine growing region is represented, together with a detailed map and every appellation is closely analysed, with commentaries. The Gilbert & Gaillard Wine Guide is the essential guide to discovering French wines.

SUBSCRIPTION ORDER FORM (may be photocopied) to be completed and returned to Gilbert & Gaillard International - 7, Parc des Fontenelles - 78870 Bailly - France - Fax +33 (0)1 30 80 08 88

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RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

France: The best wines in each appellation The wines presented on the following pages have all been tasted and rated by the editors of Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International. They are the 400 bestrated wines out of the 6,000 we tasted this year - the best of the best - the essential vintages you should

have in your wine cellar.

GOLD CLUB ALSACE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 26 BORDEAUX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27 BURGUNDY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 30 LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON . . . Page 33 PROVENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 34 SUD-OUEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 36 LOIRE VALLEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 37 RHテ年E VALLEY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 38

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

25


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB ALSACE ALSACE GEWURZTRAMINER A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Jean Sipp Cuvée Carole 2008

ALSACE GRAND CRU RIESLING A.O.C. 19.00 €

91/100 Cave du Roi Dagobert Sélection de Grains Nobles - Prestige - 50 cl 2007

26.35 €

91/100 Domaine Claude et Christophe Bléger Sélection de Grains Nobles - 50 cl 2007

25.00 €

90/100 Aimé Stentz Sélection de Grains Nobles 2007

29.00 €

90/100 Domaine Dischler

96/100 Domaines Schlumberger Kitterlé 2005

18.45 €

95/100 Domaine Sylvie Spielmann Kanzlerberg 2004

16.00 €

95/100 Domaine Moritz Moenchberg 2003

13.00 €

95/100 Philippe Gocker Rosacker 2006

12.00 €

92/100 Kuentz-Bas Pfersigberg 2004

17.50 €

92/100 Domaine Jean-Philippe & Jean-François Becker Froehn 2008

11.95 €

91/100 Domaine Rieflé Steinert -

Sélection de Grains Nobles 2007

25.00 €

Bonheur Exceptionnel 2007

13.00 €

91/100 Domaine Roland Schmitt Altenberg

90/100 Domaine Charles Fahrer Sélection de Grains Nobles 50 cl 2007

14.50 €

91/100 Domaine du Moulin de Dusenbach Sporen 2008

90/100 Victor Lorang et Fils Cuvée Luka Sélection de Grains Nobles 2007

25.00 €

ALSACE GRAND CRU GEWURZTRAMINER A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Pierre Frick Steinert 2007

de Bergbieten 2008

17.00 €

91/100 Jean-Baptiste Adam Kaefferkopf -

13.00 € 14.50 €

90/100 Jean-Baptiste Adam Kaefferkopf Vieilles Vignes 2007

16.50 €

90/100 Lucien Albrecht Pfingstberg 2008 15.35

unknown

90/100 Frederic Geschickt Kaefferkopf 2008

12.00 €

90/100 Domaine Joseph Scharsch Altenberg de Wolxheim 2007

10.00 €

16.50 €

90/100 Ruhlmann Muenchberg 2005

10.00 €

91/100 Domaine Saint-Rémy Goldert 2008

15.10 €

90/100 Robert Faller et Fils Geisberg 2005

19.50 €

90/100 Domaine Dopff au Moulin Vorbourg 2008

14.00 €

90/100 Jean-Paul Mauler Schoenenbourg 2008

Vieilles Vignes 2007

9.50 €

90/100 Domaine André Blanck et ses Fils Schlossberg -

ALSACE GRAND CRU GEWURZTRAMINER A.O.C. 92/100 Eblin Fuchs Sonnenglanz 2005

15.00 €

91/100 Cave de Kientzheim-Kaysersberg Furstentum -

15.50 €

ALSACE MUSCAT A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Schaeffer Philippe Fronholz -

10.60 €

Anne Boecklin 2008

Sélection de Grains Nobles - 50 cl 2000

AC ALSACE GRAND CRU

Sélection de Grains Nobles 2005

27.00 €

ALSACE PINOT GRIS A.O.C. 90/100 Jacques Iltis Sélection de Grains Nobles -

Only four grape varieties are permitted for the A.O.C. Alsace Grand Cru: Gewürztraminer, Riesling, Muscat and Pinot Gris. The label must include A.O.C. Alsace Grand Cru and show the locality, the grape variety and the year. Twentyfive localities were selected in 1983. Then in 1992, the National Institute for Appellations

26

d'Origine ratified the definition of 25 new parcels. From that time, Alsace has prided itself on a new appellation made up of 50 Grands Crus. The wines produced in these areas have rare elegance and great finesse, and also power, quality and distinction. The best years give wines that can be laid down for a long time.

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

17.00 €

50 cl 2007

ALSACE RIESLING A.O.C. 90/100 Edmond Rentz Suppler 2004 90/100 Julien Schaal Les 5 Pierres 2008

7.70 € 13.00 €

DIVERS ALSACE A.O.C. 92/100 Cave de Ribeauvillé Clos du Zahnacker 2008

SEPTEMBER 2010

22.10 €


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB BORDEAUX BARSAC A.O.C.

MARGAUX A.O.C.

94/100 Château Coutet Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château de Rolland Millésime 2007

16.50 €

96/100 Château Lascombes Millésime 2005

55.00 €

95/100 Château Rauzan-Ségla Millésime 2007

unknown

95/100 Château Dauzac Millésime 2007

unknown

94/100 Château Lascombes Millésime 2007

43.00 €

94/100 Château Prieuré-Lichine Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Brane Cantenac Millésime 2007

50.00 €

93/100 Château Cantenac-Brown Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Giscours Millésime 2006

50.00 €

92/100 Château Siran Millésime 2009

23.00 €

92/100 Château Marquis de Terme Millésime 2007

unknown

BORDEAUX SUPÉRIEUR A.O.C. 90/100 Château de Reignac Grand Vin Millésime 2008

15.00 €

90/100 Château de Seguin Cuvée Carl 2006

15.00 €

GRAVES A.O.C. 90/100 Château de Chantegrive Henri Lévêque 2007

20.00 €

90/100 Château de Respide Callipyge 2008

10.50 €

HAUT-MÉDOC A.O.C. 93/100 Château La Lagune Millésime 2007

45.00 €

92/100 Château Kirwan Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Cantemerle Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Labégorce Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château La Tour Carnet Millésime 2007

38.50 €

91/100 Château Margaux Pavillon Rouge Millésime 2009

91/100 Château Camensac Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Desmirail Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Belle-Vue Millésime 2009

15.00 €

91/100 Château Monbrison Millésime 2007

30.00 €

90/100 Château de Gironville Millésime 2009

unknown

91/100 Château Mongravey Millésime 2007

21.00 €

91/100 Château La Tour de Mons Milésime 2007

17.00 €

LALANDE DE POMEROL A.O.C.

108.00 €

90/100 Château de Musset Cuvée Première 2006

12.00 €

90/100 Château du Tertre Millésime 2006

36.00 €

90/100 Château Fleur de Jean Gué Réserve 2007

25.00 €

90/100 Château d'Angludet Millésime 2007

unknown

92 /100

HAUT-MÉDOC A.C. Château La Tour Carnet 2007 Deeply coloured. Delicate nose of ripe red fruit, roasted coffee and toast. Soft, fleshy, polished fruit-driven attack, refined tannins. Wood is noticeable on the finish but will almost certainly mellow. Lovely overall.

91 /100

MARGAUX A.C. Château Tour de Mons 2007 Relatively deep colour. Refined nose mingling red fruit and delicate, slightly toasted wood. Ethereal mouthfeel with extremely refined tannins. Although the aromas are still backward, finesse and length are already apparent. A stylish Margaux.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

27


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB BORDEAUX PAUILLAC A.O.C. 96/100 Château Lynch-Bages Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Larrivet Haut-Brion Millésime 2007 92/100 Domaine Clarence Dillon Clarence

95/100 Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse

de Haut-Brion Millésime 2009 de Lalande Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Brown Millésime 2007

120.00 € 20.00 €

93/100 Château Pontet-Canet Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Saint Eugène Millésime 2007

93/100 Château Pichon Longueville Baron Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Le Sartre Millésime 2007

15.00 €

144.00 €

90/100 Château Le Sartre Millésime 2008

15.00 €

92/100 Les Forts de Latour Millésime 2009 92/100 Château Clerc Milon Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Pédesclaux Millésime 2005

35.00 €

91/100 Château Grand-Puy Ducasse Millésime 2007

25.00 €

90/100 Château d'Armailhac Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Carruades de Lafite Millésime 2009

216.00 €

PESSAC-LÉOGNAN A.O.C. 94/100 Château Malartic-Lagravière Millésime 2007

40.00 €

94/100 Château Carbonnieux Millésime 2008

unknown

93/100 Château Les Carmes Haut-Brion Millésime 2007 92/100 Château Olivier Millésime 2005

90 /100

90 /100

8.10 €

POMEROL A.O.C. 99/100 Château Trotanoy Millésime 2009 98/100 Château l'Eglise-Clinet Millésime 2009 98/100 Pétrus 2009

unknown

437.00 € unknown

98/100 Vieux Château Certan Millésime 2009

258.00 €

98/100 Château Clinet Millésime 2009

162.00 €

97/100 Château l'Evangile Millésime 2009

300.00 €

97/100 Château La Fleur-Pétrus Millésime 2009 96/100 Château Le Pin Millésime 2009

unknown

1 675.00 €

95/100 Château Le Gay Millésime 2009

102.00 €

40.00 €

95/100 Château Nenin Millésime 2009

51.00 €

27.00 €

95/100 Clos l'Eglise Millésime 2009

PESSAC-LÉOGNAN A.C. Château Saint-Eugène 2007 Deep red with slightly open highlights. The nose evolves with fruity notes leading to pleasant mineral and woody fragrances. A suave wine on the palate with polished tannins which gradually becomes more powerful. Wonderful length of fruit. A great find.

PESSAC-LÉOGNAN A.C. Château Le Sartre 2008 Light yellow. Delicate, crunchy nose of fresh grape, grapefruit ove r a f l o r a l b a c k g r o u n d . Seductively pure aromas on the palate with a core of fruit. Fat on the attack turns to a fresher mid palate with a pronounced acidulous character.

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

204.00 €

94/100 Château La Fleur de Gay Millésime 2009

78.00 €

93/100 Château Gazin Millésime 2009

73.00 €

93/100 Château Certan de May Millésime 2009

41.00 €

93/100 Château Beauregard Millésime 2009

36.00 €

93/100 Château Le Bon Pasteur Millésime 2009

65.00 €

93/100 Château Plince Millésime 2007

22.00 €

92/100 Château Montviel Millésime 2007

30.00 €

92/100 Château Petit Village Millésime 2009

49.00 €

90 /100

POMEROL AC Château Mazeyres 2007 Deep, young red. Expressive nose marrying focused fruit and noble wood. Lovely velvety mouthfeel, clean expression and length. A soft, charming Pomerol. A true crowd-pleaser.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

28

25.00 €

SEPTEMBER 2010


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

92/100 Clos de la Vieille Eglise 2007

44.50 €

90/100 Château La Haye Millésime 2007

92/100 Château La Croix de Gay Millésime 2009

29.00 €

90/100 Château Petit Bocq Millésime 2007

16.00 €

92/100 Château Beau Soleil Millésime 2008

20.00 €

90/100 Château Tronquoy-Lalande Millésime 2006

unknown

90/100 Château Mazeyres Millésime 2007

21.50 €

90/100 Vieux Château Ferron Millésime 2006

36.00 €

90/100 Château Vieux Maillet Millésime 2007

25.00 €

SAINT-EMILION GRAND CRU A.O.C.

18.00

SAINT-JULIEN A.O.C. 96/100 Château Léoville Barton Millésime 2007

unknown

95/100 Château Gruaud Larose Millésime 2007

unknown

95/100 Château Léoville Poyferré Millésime 2007

unknown

94/100 Château Branaire-Ducru Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Saint-Pierre Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Dassault Millésime 2007

32.00 €

92/100 Château Cap de Mourlin Millésime 2007

27.50 €

91/100 Château Cadet-Bon Millésime 2007

24.20 €

91/100 Château Fonroque Millésime 2007

24.00 €

93/100 Château Saint-Pierre Millésime 2006

unknown

91/100 Château Laroze Millésime 2005

27.00 €

93/100 Château Beychevelle Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Laroque Millésime 2005

32.00 €

93/100 Château Talbot Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Lagrange Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Gloria Millésime 2006

unknown

90/100 Château Haut Troquart La Grâce Dieu Cuvée Passion 2007

18.00 €

90/100 Château Pipeau Millésime 2006

17.00 €

90/100 Château Grand Corbin Millésime 2007

19.00 €

90/100 Château Franc Mayne Millésime 2007

28.00 €

96/100 Château de Rayne Vigneau Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château La Clotte Millésime 2007

35.00 €

96/100 Château Guiraud Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Fleur Cardinale Millésime 2006

32.00 €

96/100 Château Climens Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Franc la Rose 2007

17.80 €

95/100 Château de Fargues Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château La Fleur Millésime 2007

36.00 €

unknown

23.00 €

95/100 Château La Tour Blanche Millésime 2007

90/100 Château Grand-Pontet Millésime 2007

25.00 €

94/100 Château Sigalas-Rabaud Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Berliquet Millésime 2007

94/100 Château Doisy Daëne Millésime 2007

33.50 €

93/100 Château Romer du Hayot Millésime 2007

19.00 €

93/100 Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Nairac Millésime 2007

unknown

93/100 Château Caillou Millésime 2004

34.00 €

92/100 Château Haut-Bergeron Millésime 2007

23.00 €

SAINT-ESTÈPHE A.O.C. 97/100 Château Montrose Millésime 2006

60.00 €

93/100 Château Haut-Marbuzet Millésime 2008

27.00 €

93/100 Château Lafon-Rochet Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Lilian Ladouys Millésime 2009

15.00

SAUTERNES A.O.C.

91/100 Château Phélan Ségur Millésime 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Filhot Millésime 2007

24.00 €

91/100 Château L'Argilus du Roi Millésime 2008

13.50 €

92/100 Château Lamothe Millésime 2006

23.00 €

90/100 Château de Pez Millésime 2007

unknown

91/100 Château Bastor-Lamontagne Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Pomys Millésime 2007

unknown

90/100 Château Haut Bommes Millésime 2007

20.00 €

90 /100

SAINT-ESTÈPHE A.C. Château Tronquoy-Lalande 2006 Deep colour. Profound nose of black fruits, notes of spices and slightly roasted wood. On the palate, an elegant, well-crafted wine with racy wood and intense, long-lasting fruit. A full, extremely promising wine. Most certainly an up-and-coming château.

90 /100

SAINT-JULIEN A.C. Château Langoa-Barton 2009 Intense colour, crimson highlights. Huge extraction on the palate with very firm tannins still. An austere wine that can only be marked on its potential.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

29


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB BURGUNDY ALOXE CORTON A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine Nudant Clos de la Boulotte 23.00 €

Monopole 2007

91/100 Louis Michel & fils Vaudésir 2007 91/100 Domaine Jean Collet & fils Valmur élevé en fûts de chêne 2008

29.00 € 25.00 €

BEAUNE A.O.C. CHABLIS PREMIER CRU A.O.C.

93/100 Domaine SeguinManuel 1er Cru Clos des Mouches 2008

40.00 €

91/100 Domaine Jean-Marc & Hugues Pavelot 1er cru Les Bressandes 2007

unknown

BONNES MARES GRAND CRU A.O.C. 95/100 Domaine Fougeray de Beauclair Millésime 2008

94.50 €

CHABLIS A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Hamelin 1er Cru Beauroy 2008

12.00 €

CHAMBOLLE MUSIGNY A.O.C. 92/100 Jean-Claude Boisset 1er Cru Les Charmes 2008 91/100 Domaine Philippe Leclerc Les Babillaires 2005

34.95 €

95/100 Domaine de la Vougeraie Les Mazoyères 2007 90/100 Château de Melin Chemin de la Justice 2008

95/100 Domaine Christian Moreau père & fils Les Clos Clos des Hospices dans les Clos 2008

unknown

92/100 Domaine Guy Robin & fils Vaudésir 30.00 €

Vieilles Vignes 2008 91/100 Domaine William Fèvre Bougros 2008

38.90 €

91/100 Domaine Long-Depaquit Les Vaudésirs 2008

33.80 €

91/100 Raoul Gautherin & fils Grenouilles 2008

unknown

95 /100

92 /100

44.50 € unknown

BONNES MARES GRAND CRU A.C. Domaine Fougeray de Beauclair 2008 Dark colour. Profound nose mingling ripe fruit and toasted oak notes. Seductive volume, melted texture and superb freshness enhancing very pure fruit. Superlative elegant, subtle ageing.

CHABLIS GRAND CRU A.C. Domaine Guy Robin & fils Vaudésir Vieilles vignes 2008 L i g h t y e l l o w, g r e e n i s h t i n t s . Wonderfully promising nose, mineral, honeyed note. Full, concentrated, racy palate. A powerful wine revealing a pronounced sense of place, fresh, harmonious. Leave to develop for 6-8 years before setting it alongside lobster.

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

68.00 € 18.50 €

LADOIX A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Edmond Cornu & fils 1er Cru La Corvée 2008

20.00 €

MAZY-CHAMBERTIN GRAND CRU A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Henri Rebourseau Millésime 2002

91 /100

91 /100

unknown

CHABLIS GRAND CRU A.C. Valmur Fûts de chêne 2008 Light yellow. Expressive nose, predominant white flesh fruit and late-picked citrus over a slightly toasted background. Full, supple and rich, clearlydelineated fruit. Already extremely approachable, the stage is set for continued improvement over time. CHAMBOLLE MUSIGNY A.C. Les Babillaires 2005 Deep, reasonably young red. Very open nose of undergrowth, humus, dried vegetal. The palate retains pleasant harmony, constantly framed by power. A highly expressive wine pairing well with roast poultry or game.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

30

15.00 € 14.00 € 16.00 € 10.70 €

CHARMES-CHAMBERTIN GRAND CRU A.O.C.

CHABLIS GRAND CRU A.O.C. 95/100 Simonnet-Febvre Les clos 2007

91/100 Domaine Guy Robin & fils Montée de Tonnerre Vieilles Vignes 2008 90/100 Domaine Alain Geoffroy Beauroy 2007 90/100 Louis Michel & fils Montée de Tonnerre 2008 90/100 Domaine de la Mandelière Mont de Milieu 2008

SEPTEMBER 2010


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

MERCUREY A.O.C.

LADOIX A.O.C.

91/100 Château d'Etroyes Cuvée Vieilles Vignes

90/100 Domaine Edmond Cornu & fils 13.50 €

des Ormeaux 2008

20.00 €

1er Cru La Corvée 2008

90/100 Domaine Michel Juillot 1er Cru Clos 22.00 €

des Barraults 2007 90/100 Domaine Theulot Juillot 1er Cru La Cailloute -

MAZY-CHAMBERTIN GRAND CRU A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Henri Rebourseau Millésime 2002

unknown

15.00 €

Monopole 2008

MERCUREY A.O.C. MEURSAULT A.O.C.

91/100 Château d'Etroyes Cuvée Vieilles Vignes

93/100 Domaine Alain Patriarche 55.00 €

1er Cru Genévrières 2008 92/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Limozin 2007

28.00 €

92/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Les Narvaux 2007

28.00 €

92/100 Domaine Albert Grivault 1er Cru Perrières 2008

43.00 €

92/100 Bader-Mimeur Millésime 2008

20.00 €

90/100 Domaine Guy Bocard 1er Cru Charmes 2007

35.00 €

90/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Les Grands Charrons 2007

25.00 €

90/100 Château Labouré-Roi Clos de la Baronne 2008

19.50 €

13.50 €

des Ormeaux 2008 90/100 Domaine Michel Juillot 1er Cru Clos

22.00 €

des Barraults 2007 90/100 Domaine Theulot Juillot 1er Cru La Cailloute -

15.00 €

Monopole 2008

MEURSAULT A.O.C. 93/100 Domaine Alain Patriarche 55.00 €

1er Cru Genévrières 2008 92/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Limozin 2007

28.00 €

92/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Les Narvaux 2007

28.00 €

92/100 Domaine Albert Grivault 1er Cru Perrières 2008

43.00 €

92/100 Bader-Mimeur Millésime 2008

20.00 €

90/100 Domaine Guy Bocard 1er Cru Charmes 2007

35.00 €

23.00 €

90/100 Domaine Guy Bocard Les Grands Charrons 2007

25.00 €

18.50

90/100 Château Labouré-Roi Clos de la Baronne 2008

19.50 €

NUITS SAINT GEORGES A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Remoriquet 1er Cru Les Damodes 2008

27.00 €

PERNAND-VERGELESSES A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine père & fils 1er Cru Ile des Vergelesses 2007 90/100 Château de Melin Chemin de la Justice 2008

95

CLOS DE VOUGEOT GRAND CRU A.C. Maison Jessiaume Millésime 2007 Medium intensity red. Pronounced toasted wood on the nose set against a more open, animal background. Seductively full, powerful mouthfeel, clean. Beneath the fieriness of youth lie the makings of a great wine.

92

MAZY-CHAMBERTIN GRAND CRU A.C. Domaine Henry Rebourseau 2002 Colour revealing brick-red shades. Open nose combining jammy red fruit, dried fruit, notes of undergrowth and game. Seductive volume on the palate, delicate substance with well-integrated components. A wine both present and ethereal to be decanted.

/100

/100

92

MEURSAULT A.C. Domaine Guy Bocard Limozin 2007 Limpid pale yellow. After swirling, the nose unveils toasted notes over a backdrop of late-picked lemon. Soft, closely-integrated, silky mouthfeel boasting great length and lots of freshness. A well-crafted Meursault.

95

POUILLY-FUISSÉ A.C. Domaine Auvigue Cuvée Hors Classe 2008 Deep, golden yellow. Layered nose exhibiting subtle fragrances of liquorice, menthol, lemon… Remarkable harmony between fat, power and freshness with just a hint of perfectly-controlled maturing. A gold standard wine !

/100

/100

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

31


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB BURGUNDY POUILLY-FUISSÉ A.O.C.

NUITS SAINT GEORGES A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Remoriquet 1er Cru Les Damodes 2008

27.00 €

PERNAND-VERGELESSES A.O.C.

17.00 €

93/100 Domaine Auvigue Le Clos 2008

14.00 €

91/100 Château de Pouilly Cru du Roy 2007

23.00 €

91/100 Nadine Ferrand Prestige 2008

16.50 €

90/100 Domaine du Chalet Pouilly Elevé en fût de chêne 2008 15.20 €

90/100 Domaine Dubreuil-Fontaine père & fils 1er Cru Ile des Vergelesses 2007

95/100 Domaine Auvigue Cuvée Hors Classe 2008

23.00 €

PULIGNY-MONTRACHET A.O.C. 92/100 Henri Prudhon & fils Les Enseignières 2007

19.00 €

POMMARD A.O.C. 93/100 Domaine Jean-Luc Joillot Les Noizons 2008

22.00 €

92/100 Château de Pommard Millésime 2007

50.00 €

SAINT-AUBIN A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Joël Rémy 1er Cru Le Sentier du Clou 2008 15.00 € 90/100 Bader-Mimeur 1er Cru “En Rémilly” 2008

92/100 Domaine Coste Caumartin 1er Cru Le Clos des Boucherottes - Monopole 2008

27.90 €

92/100 Domaine Albert Grivault 1er Cru Clos Blanc 2008

25.00 €

91/100 Domaine Lejeune 1er Cru Les Argillières 2008

24.00 €

90/100 Domaine Rebourgeon-Mure 1er Cru Clos des Charmots 2008

14.90 €

SAINT-VÉRAN A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine des Poncetys Le Clos du Château 2008

8.80 €

SAVIGNY LES BEAUNE A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Michel et Joanna Ecard

20.00 €

Domaine Michelet Joanna Ecard 1er Cru Serpentières - Vieilles Vignes 2007

unknown

VOLNAY A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Réyane & Pascal Bouley

AC NUITS SAINT-GEORGES Overview: this appellation covers both Nuits-SaintGeorges and Prémeaux-Prissey. Stretching over a 6km strip, the area is split into two parts, one located north of the town, the other in the far south of NuitsSaint-Georges. Middle Jurassic limestone and marl soils are home to the vines here. The red wines are made from Pinot noir whilst a clutch of whites are produced from Chardonnay.

32

Wine styles: Nuits-SaintGeorges is a generous, wellconstituted, robust wine with a strong framework and a powerful, complex bouquet. On the nose, it is fruity with notes of blackcurrant, cherry, prune stones, truffle and leather with nuances of undergrowth. It conjures up earthy, even gamey notes. Nuits-Saint-Georges can be served with roast red meat, Brie or Pont l’Evêque cheese.

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

1er Cru Clos des Chênes 2007

23.50 €

91/100 Château de la Crée 1er Cru Clos des Angles 2007

35.00 €

90/100 Domaine Poulleau Père & Fils 1er Cru 2008

22.60 €

90/100 Arthur Barolet & Fils 1er Cru Le Ronceret 2007

unknown

VOSNE ROMANÉE A.O.C. 98/100 Domaine Michel Gros 1er Cru Clos des Réas Monopole 2004

unknown

VOUGEOT A.O.C. 93/100 Domaine de la Vougeraie 1er Cru Le Clos Blanc de Vougeot - Monopole 2007

SEPTEMBER 2010

59.00 €


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB LANGUEDOC-ROUSSILLON MAURY A.O.C.

BANYULS A.O.C. 90/100 Les Clos de Paulilles Cap Béar 2006

unknown

90/100 Domaine Fontanel Millésime 2007

13.00 €

90/100 Domaine Arguti Ugo 2007

15.00 €

BANYULS GRAND CRU A.O.C. 94/100 Cave de l'Abbé Rous Cuvée Christian Reynal 1998 30.50 €

91/100 Domaine Pierre Fil Cuvée Orebus 2008

93/100 Cellier des Templiers Cuvée Président 35.50 €

Henry Vidal 2000

MINERVOIS A.O.C. 10.00 €

90/100 Julien Château Villerambert Julien 16.00 €

Millésime 2006

CORBIÈRES A.O.C. 92/100 La Grande du Bouïs Cuvée Roméo 2007

32.00 €

91/100 Château de Lastours Réserve 2006

18.00 €

RIVESALTES A.O.C. 95/100 Domaine de Rancy Ambré 1993

18.50 €

90/100 Vignerons Catalans en Roussillon Ambré

90/100 Cave Coopérative de Castelmaure Grande Cuvée 2008

10.20 €

15.00 €

Hors d'Age 1988 90/100 Château Dona Baissas Ambré - Hors d'âge

12.50 €

FAUGÈRES A.O.C. 90/100 Abbaye Sylva Plana Le Songe de l'Abbé 2007

13.80 €

SAINT-CHINIAN A.O.C. 93/100 Château Saint Martin des

LANGUEDOC A.O.C.

Champs Cuvée Mathieu 2004 90/100 Domaine des Jougla Viels Arrasics 2007

91/100 Domaine Saint-Jean du Noviciat Mas 90/100 Mas des Dames La Dame 2008

unknown

90/100 Domaine de la Grange Castalides - Icône 2008

26.90 €

LANGUEDOC GRÈS DE MONTPELLIER A.O.C. 90/100 Château de Flaugergues Cuvée Colbert 2006

12.00 €

LANGUEDOC LA CLAPE A.O.C. 93/100 Château des Karantes Diamant 2006

39.00 €

LANGUEDOC PIC SAINT-LOUP A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine Devois du Claus Millésime 2007

/100

unknown

9.80 €

du Novi Prestige 2006

90

45.00 €

unknown

LANGUEDOC GRÉS DE MONTPELLIER A.C. Château de Flaugergues Cuvée Colbert 2006 Intense colour, deep purple highlights. Delicate, concentrated nose blending black fruit, mild spices and notes of fresh oak. Full, fat, finely-woven, harmonious substance. Wonderful mouth-coating volume, great harmony and nice length. Great potential.

VIN DE PAYS D'OC 92/100 Laurent Miquel Viognier - Vérité 2008

16.00 €

AC MAURY Overview: this region covers 5 villages in Pyrénées-Orientales. Although the climate is Mediterranean, the vines also enjoy occasional Atlantic influences. Soil type is predominantly black shale which retains heat during the day and releases it by night. The fruit is destemmed and whole berries are macerated to make Maury. Traditionally, neutral spirit is added with the pomace still in the tanks. Skin contact then lasts for two weeks or more, extracting greater aromas, colour and tannins. A quarter of the wines are aged traditio-

nally in oak and the remaining three quarters in concrete tanks. They remain in the cellar until the first September of the second year after the harvest. Wine styles: Maury is a fruity, complex red dessert wine. It is drawn primarily from Grenache and Macabeu. On the palate, it shows concentrated aromas of red or black fruit, vanilla, spices, dried figs, beeswax, cocoa and mocha. It is a robust, fleshy wine with a mellow softness derived from its sweetness. It makes an ideal appetiser, or can be served with foie gras or a chocolate dessert.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

33


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB PROVENCE BANDOL A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine La Bastide Blanche Cuvée Estagnol 2006

92/100 Domaine de la Bégude Millésime 2006

20.00 €

90/100 Domaine de la Laidière Millésime 2009

14.00 €

90/100 Domaine La Suffrène Millésime 2009

10.00 €

COTEAUX D'AIX EN PROVENCE A.O.C. 19.00 €

CÔTES DE PROVENCE A.O.C. 91/100 Château Minuty Prestige 2009

16.00 €

90/100 Domaine Saint-André de Figuière Réserve 2007

20.24 €

90/100 Domaine du Jas d'Esclans Cuvée du Loup 9.50 €

90/100 Château La Jeannette Baguier 2007

11.50 €

90/100 Château de Saint-Martin Grande Réserve 2009

12.10 €

90/100 Château Barbeiranne Cuvée Charlotte 2007

16.25 €

90/100 Château l'Arnaude Cuvée Thérèse 2009 90/100 Château Minuty Prestige 2009

9.50 € 16.00 €

90/100 Château de l'Aumérade Cuvée Seigneur de Piegros 2009 90/100 Château de Brégançon Cuvée Prestige 2009

12.80 €

Cuvée fût de chêne 2009

12.10 €

90/100 Domaine de la Croix Eloge 2009

13.00 €

CÔTES DE PROVENCE LA LONDE A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine Saint-André de 91/100 Domaine de l'Angueiroun Prestige 2008

24.00 € 15.00 €

CÔTES DE PROVENCE SAINTE VICTOIRE A.O.C. 90/100 Château Grand'Boise Millésime 2009

7.50 €

90/100 Domaine Sainte Lucie Made In Provence Premium 2007

34

LES BAUX-DE-PROVENCE A.C. Château Dalmeran MMV Deep red. Intense fruity nose with predominant aromas of fresh fig, wild mint and pepper with notes of liquorice. The palate offers a structure of incredible quality and tannins, with the same remarkable aromatic range. A superlative wine.

/100

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

LES BAUX DE PROVENCE A.O.C. 92/100 Mas de la Dame Coin Caché 2007

20.00 €

92/100 Domaine Dalmeran MMV

17.50 €

90/100 Château Romanin Millésime 2005

17.00 €

90/100 Domaine Dalmeran MMIII

16.80 €

9.30 €

90/100 Domaine de la Rouillère Grande Réserve -

Figuière Confidentielle 2008

92

/100 18.00 €

Rosé de saignée 2009

BANDOL A.C. Domaine La Suffrene Les Lauves 2007 Beautiful dark colour. The nose gradually unfurls to aromas of black olive, prune, truffle, liquorice. On the palate, a rich wine, both powerful and harmonious with seductive aromatic complexity and already imposing length.

unknown

92/100 Domaine La Suffrène Les Lauves 2007

90/100 Château Vignelaure Millésime 2005

92

12.00 €

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

AC CÔTES DE PROVENCE Overview: the Côtes de Provence appellation area covers a vast swathe of land, stretching from Marseilles across to the Alpes-Maritimes department and embracing 84 towns and villages (68 in Var, 15 in Bouches-du-Rhône, and just one in Alpes Maritimes, Villars-sur-Var). Such an extensive area is naturally home to a comprehensive range of ‘terroirs’. The Maures mountain range and coastal region share highly similar characteristics, primarily granite and shale soils. Between Toulon and Saint-Raphaël, the soil is clayey

SEPTEMBER 2010

sand, whilst the plateau and hills of Provence are mostly formed of limestone. As a whole, the region is fragmented and made up of individual parts. The vines grow chiefly on terraced sites and the climate throughout the region is Mediterranean, with long, hot, dry summers and rainfall in the spring and autumn. 2005 saw the advent of two site-specific appellations: Côtes de Provence Sainte-Victoire, east of Aix-en-Provence, and Côtes de Provence Fréjus, on the far side of the area, between SaintRaphaël and Trans en Provence.


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB SUD-OUEST COGNAC A.O.C.

ARMAGNAC A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine de Magnaut Millésime 1984

47.00 €

BAS ARMAGNAC A.O.C. 94/100 Castarède Hors d'Age - 20 ans d'âge

60.00 €

BORDERIES A.O.C. 91/100 Camus Cognacs Borderies XO

110.00 €

100/100 Pierre Ferrand Millésime 1914

950.00 €

95/100 Château de Beaulon Extra Rare

363.00 €

95/100 Cognac Otard 1795 Extra

275.00 €

94/100 Château de Beaulon XO Millésime 1975

unknown

94/100 Cognac Hennessy XO

unknown

92/100 Cognac Otard XO Gold

unknown

90/100 Caves Charlemagne XO

70.00 €

CÔTES DE BERGERAC A.O.C.

CAHORS A.O.C. 92/100 Château Eugénie Haute Collection 2007

unknown

92/100 Château Haut-Monplaisir Pur Plaisir 2007

19.50 €

91/100 Château du Cèdre Le Cèdre 2007

28.00 €

91/100 Château Pineraie L'Authentique 2007

20.00 €

90/100 Château de Chambert Origine 2007

7.00 €

90/100 Château de Mercuès Malbec 2007

13.00 €

90/100 Château Bélingard Ortus 2007

CÔTES DE GASCOGNE I.G.P. 90/100 Domaine Chiroulet Vent d'Hiver - 50 cl 2007

unknown

FINE CHAMPAGNE A.O.C. 94/100 Cognac Courvoisier Napoléon

90/100 La Bérangeraie La Gorgée

14.75 €

78.00 €

16.00 €

de Mathis Bacchus 2007

GAILLAC DOUX A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine de Labarthe Les Grains d'Or -

AC CAHORS Overview: the Cahors region is located in the Lot department. The soils lay on a bed of ancient alluvium shaped into terraces or gently rolling hills. They are meagre, laden with quartz pebbles and siliceous gravel, interspersed with red clay and iron-rich sand. Along the plateau, the soil is more limestone. The valley enjoys an extremely unusual microclimate. The area is prone to some treacherous frost in the winter, though it is not particularly wet and autumn is usually sunny which promotes ripening. Wine styles: Cahors only produces red wines from the Auxerrois grape variety (also

known as Cot or Malbec). Occasionally, Merlot is added to the blend to soften the wines. Often dubbed ‘black wine’ because of its extremely dark hue and highly-present tannins, it is fruity and fleshy when young. Over the first two to three years, it remains closed before subsequently acquiring fullness and roundness. Predominant aromas are mushroom, spices, strawberry, prune, mineral notes and slightly toasted fragrances. In the early years, Cahors pairs extremely well with foie gras, duck confit or a leg of mutton. A few years down the line and it can be enjoyed with truffle croustade, ribsteak with ceps or game.

élevé en fûts de chêne 2009

10.80 €

95

COGNAC A.C. Château de Beaulon - Extra Rare Deep mahoghany. Clean, expressive, straightforward nose with perfumes of spice, orange peel and candied fruit. Wonderful smoothness, gradually gaining in power whilst losing none of its harmony. Extraordinary length on the finish. A great achievement !

90

GRANDE FINE CHAMPAGNE Drouet et Fils V.S.O.P. Coppery, orangy hue. Expressive nose showing abundant charm, mingling floral notes, spices, dried fruits. On the palate, a full Cognac revealing the same dynamic character. A fresh, classic style with very long-lasting fragrances. A stellar Cognac.

/100

/100

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

36

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GRANDE CHAMPAGNE A.O.C.

JURANÇON A.O.C. 415.00 €

99/100 Cognac Frapin Extra 96/100 Thomas Hine & cie Antique XO Premier Cru

unknown

95/100 Cognac Frapin Multimillésime 1982-1983-1986

unknown

95/100 Cognac Frapin Multimillésime 1979-1983-1985

150.00 €

92/100 Thomas Hine & cie Millésime 1975

92/100 Domaine Cauhapé Noblesse du Temps 2007

28.50 €

92/100 Vignau la Juscle Vendanges Tardives 2007

25.00 €

90/100 Domaine Bru-Baché La Quintessence 2006

22.00 €

unknown

92/100 Cognac Delamain & cie Millésime 1979

250.00 €

PACHERENC DU VIC BILH A.O.C. 9.90 €

90/100 Château Laffitte-Teston Rêve d'Automne 2008

GRANDE FINE CHAMPAGNE A.O.C. 31.00 €

90/100 Domaine Drouet & fils V.S.O.P.

PINEAU DES CHARENTES A.O.C.

HAUT-MONTRAVEL A.O.C. 90/100 Château Dauzan La Vergne 13.50 €

Elevé en fût de chêne - 50 cl 2001

95/100 Domaine Drouet & fils Vieux Gabriel

15.00 €

92/100 Château de Beaulon 50 cl 1995

unknown

GOLD CLUB LOIRE VALLEY ANJOU A.O.C. 90/100 Château de Fesles La Chapelle 2007

12.00 €

BONNEZEAUX A.O.C. 93/100 Château La Varière Les Melleresses - 50 cl 2007

6.60 €

92/100 Couly-Dutheil Clos de L'écho 2005

16.50 €

91/100 Château de la Grille Millésime 2005

18.00 € 5.70 €

COTEAUX DE L'AUBANCE A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine de Montgilet Les Trois Schistes 2008

16.50 €

MUSCADET SÈVRE ET MAINE A.O.C. 90/100 Vignoble Poiron-Dabin Grande Réserve 2004

45.00 €

90/100 Domaine Laporte La Vigne de Beaussoppet 2008

17.70 €

QUARTS DE CHAUME A.O.C.

CHINON A.O.C.

90/100 Domaine des Bouquerries Cuvée Royale 2009

91/100 Château de Tracy Haute Densité 2005 unknown

BOURGUEIL A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine des Chesnaies Cuvée Prestige 2005

9.00 €

91/100 Domaine Chauveau Cuvée Sainte Clélie 2008

7.00 €

POUILLY-FUMÉ A.O.C. 94/100 Château de Tracy 101 Rangs 2008

60.00 €

91/100 Henri Bourgeois La Demoiselle de Bourgeois 2008

19.00 €

95/100 Château La Varière Les Guerches - 50 cl 2008

33.00 €

93/100 Château Bellerive Millésime 2007

32.50 €

92/100 Domaine des Baumard Millésime 2007

32.30 €

AC QUARTS DE CHAUME Overview: this area is located in Rochefort sur Loire and in Chaume, around the Layon river. The name of the appellation is a throwback to Mediaeval times when a lord would rent his land to an abbey in exchange for a quarter of the harvest. The noble-rotted grapes are picked in batches as they ripen. The vines are planted on shale soils covering 50 hectares on a south-facing hillside.

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

Wine styles: the wines are sweet, racy, firm, silky, delicate and rich. They have a full mouthfeel and are long on the palate, with a great propensity for ageing. Their well-defined structure and a certain austerity in their early years sets them apart from other Layons. They display a golden hue and reveal fragrances of wax, linden, candied fruits, honey, verbena and quince.

SEPTEMBER 2010

37


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

GOLD CLUB LOIRE VALLEY SAINT-NICOLAS-DE-BOURGUEIL A.O.C. 90/100 Frédéric Mabileau Eclipse “N° 8” 2008

SAVENNIÈRES A.O.C. 18.00 €

SANCERRE A.O.C.

93/100 Domaine FL Le Parc 2007

15.60 €

91/100 Château d'Epiré Le Hu Boyau 2008

12.50 €

90/100 Domaine du Closel La Jalousie 2008

12.00 €

91/100 Domaine Henry Natter Cuvée François de la Grange de Montigny 2007

TOURAINE A.O.C. unknown

90/100 Domaine de la Perrière Mégalithe 2008

18.80 €

91/100 Domaine Joël Delaunay La Voute 2009 90/100 Domaine Joël Delaunay Sauvignon 2009

5.30 €

90/100 Famille Gaillard Sauvignon 2009

6.20 €

SAUMUR A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine de la Paleine Casta Diva 2008

25.00 €

90/100 Domaine de la Paleine Pamina 2007

12.50 €

90 /100

SAUMUR CHAMPIGNY A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine de Nerleux Les Loups Noirs 2008

13.50 €

90/100 Domaine de la Perruche Clos de Chaumont 2006

14.00 €

unknown

TOURAINE A.C. Famille Gaillard Sauvignon 2009 Pale yellow, beautiful appearance. Expressive, crunchy nose suggestive of citrus with a mineral and floral background. Seductive freshness and aromatic focus on the palate. A precise, tense Sauvignon for pleasure. A top-flight wine.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

GOLD CLUB RHÔNE VALLEY BEAUMES DE VENISE A.O.C. 92/100 Domaine Beauvalcinte Les Trois Amours 2007

9.90 €

92/100 Domaine Moulin-Tacussel Millésime 2008

22.00 €

92/100 Domaine de la Mordorée La Reine des Bois 2008

38.00 €

91/100 Château de la Gardine Millésime 2007

29.00 €

91/100 Domaine Duclaux Millésime 2006

19.00 €

16.00 €

91/100 Vignobles Mayard La Crau de Ma Mère 2007

27.00 €

94/100 Domaine Juliette Avril Cuvée Maxence 2008

37.40 €

91/100 Domaine du Père Pape Millésime 2007

22.00 €

93/100 Domaine Paul Autard Juline 2008

unknown

22.80 €

91/100 Château Husson Les Saintes Vierges 2008

18.50 €

93/100 Château Mont-Redon Millésime 2007

91/100 Domaine Juliette Avril Millésime 2009

16.00 €

31.50 €

91/100 Domaine de Saint Paul Millésime 2008

18.00 €

62.00 €

90/100 Château Saint Jean Millésime 2008

16.00 €

CHÂTEAUNEUF DU PAPE A.O.C. 95/100 Château Mont-Redon Millésime 2008

18.60 €

95/100 Domaine du Vieux Lazaret Cuvée Exceptionnelle 2006

93/100 Domaine Bosquet des Papes Chante le Merle Vieilles Vignes 2004 92/100 Château La Nerthe Cuvée des Cadettes 2005

38

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SEPTEMBER 2010


RATED WINES 90/100 AND MORE

90/100 Domaine de Nalys Réserve 2007

24.00 €

90/100 Domaine de la Présidente Grands Classiques 2009

18.70 €

90/100 Clos du Calvaire Millésime 2007

17.50 €

90/100 Château Beauchêne Grande Réserve 2007

unknown

GIGONDAS A.O.C. 90/100 Arnoux et Fils Seigneur de Lauris 2007

HERMITAGE A.O.C. 97/100 Domaines Paul Jaboulet Ainé

90/100 Vignobles Diffonty Cuvée du Vatican Réserve Sixtine 2008

La Petite Chapelle Millésime 2006 unknown

90/100 Lavau Millésime 2009

17.90 €

90/100 Domaine des 3 Cellier Privilège 2008

35.00 €

94/100 Domaine Michelas - St Jemms Terres d'Arce 2008

95/100 De Boisseyt-Chol Les Corbonnes 2009

24.00 €

93/100 Domaine Farjon Millésime 2008

unknown

93/100 Domaine Pichat La Caille 2008

unknown

92/100 Pierre Gaillard Millésime 2008

31.00 €

91/100 Domaine Mouton Côte Chatillon 2009

26.00 €

69.00 € 35.00 €

92/100 Domaines Paul Jaboulet Ainé Le Chevalier de Sterimberg Millésime 2007 91/100 Skalli Grand Vin du Rhône Roc des Monges 2006

CONDRIEU A.O.C.

14.95 €

53.00 € unknown

LUBERON A.O.C. 90/100 Château Fontvert Millésime 2009

10.00 €

SAINT-JOSEPH A.O.C. 90/100 Domaine Jean-Claude Marsanne Millésime 2006

14.00 €

CORNAS A.O.C. 96/100 Domaine Courbis Les Eygats 2007

31.00 €

VACQUEYRAS A.O.C. 90/100 Le Clos de Caveau Lao Muse 2006

27.00 €

COSTIÈRES DE NÎMES A.O.C. 92/100 Château de la Tuilerie Eole Rouge 2007

30.80 €

90/100 Château d'Or & de Gueules La Bolida 2008

22.00 €

VIN DE PAYS DES COTEAUX DE L'ARDÈCHE 92/100 Château de la Selve Florence 2007

40.75 €

CÔTE RÔTIE A.O.C. 93/100 Domaine Gilles Barge Cuvée du Plessy 2007

26.00 €

93/100 Benjamin et David Duclaux Maison Rouge 2008

45.00 €

91/100 Skalli Grand Vin du Rhône Prince de Monvert 2006

unknown

91/100 Vignobles Levet Cuvée Améthyste 2007

22.00 €

90/100 Domaine de Rosiers Millésime 2008

25.00 €

90/100 Domaine Corps de Loup “Corps de Loup” 2007

24.00 €

95

CHÂTEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE A.C. Domaine du Vieux Lazaret-Cuvée Exceptionnelle 2006 Deeply-coloured. Subtle, evolving nose intermixing ripe black fruit, dried fig, cocoa and liquorice. Oustanding qualities on the palate : fullness, expression, silkiness, complexity. The aftertaste leaves no trace of heaviness. A superlative wine.

93

CÔTE-RÔTIE A.C. Domaine Gilles Barge Cuvée du Plessy 2007 Fairly deep colour. The nose is initially floral then develops ripe red fruit, spice and leather aromatics and a mineral dimension. Nicely harnessed power and concentration on the palate that shows seductive refined substance, freshness and persistency.

/100

CÔTES DU RHÔNE-VILLAGES PLAN DE DIEU A.O.C. 91/100 Domaine des Pasquiers L'Envol 2007

19.00 €

CROZES-HERMITAGE A.O.C. 92/100 Domaines Paul Jaboulet Ainé Domaine de Roure Millésime 2007

31.80 €

90/100 Philippe et Vincent Jaboulet Nouvelère 2007

14.00 €

90/100 Domaine des Remizières Cuvée Christophe 2008

14.00 €

/100

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

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SEPTEMBER 2010

39


STARS & WINE

www.gilbertgaillard.com

Julia Roberts: wine lover and gourmet

How would you summarise “Eat, Pray,

good wine are one of the keys to relieving

Love”, the best-seller by Elizabeth

the pressure that she's been putting on

Gilbert that Ryan Murphy has recently

herself all her life! In eating this meal,

made into a film?

she finally begins to take care of herself.

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

It was at the Ritz-Carlton in Cancun under the blazing Mexican sun that we had the privilege of meeting Julia Roberts. The star of “Pretty Woman” is back in Ryan Murphy's recent film “Eat, Pray, Love”. This autobiographical story is about a 40-something American woman who rediscovers happiness by, among other things, eating in restaurants in Rome and sampling the local wines.

Julia Roberts

It's the story of a woman in her 40s who is lost and can no longer stand the routine

How many times did you film the scene?

that I keep in a wine cabinet! It's practical

of her life or the fact that her future is all

At least ten times! Since the pasta was

and preserves the wine well, but it doesn't

mapped out for her. Overnight, she decides

delicious, I managed to finish the plate

have the same charm as a vaulted cellar.

to walk out on everything. Her city, her

several times. Same for the wine. It was so

husband, her friends, her job! She packs

amazing that I couldn't spit it out! By the

What was the last wine that you drank?

her bags and decides to travel the world.

end of the day, I was pretty perky!

A Burgundy! A Chablis to be exact. It was

Her

rites-of-passage

trips

to

India,

last night! Unfortunately, I was drinking

Indonesia and Rome allow her to think

And the importance of wine for you

it during a discussion that made me feel

about herself, open up to others, and to

personally?

nauseous - the BP oil spill. What's happened

discover unconditional love and the

I will never understand people drinking

in the Gulf of Mexico made me lose my

pleasures of eating and drinking.

water when enjoying good meat. Wine is

appetite.

the yin! Fish, shellfish, pasta, a good There is a lovely scene in the film where

stew…the yang! They are inseparable.

Exactly 20 years ago, you became an

we see your character go into raptures

While on the subject, I remember a visit

international star with “Pretty Woman”.

over a superb plate of spaghetti served

to Paris that was eye-opening. Sitting

Do you have good memories of the

al dente in an Italian restaurant. For

behind me, there was a young American

shoot?

you, are a good meal and a fine wine

couple who were eating a roast chicken

Not exclusively, but generally, I do, yes.

also the key to happiness?

with cola! I couldn't stop myself from

We filmed at the Beverly Wilshire, one of

There's no question about it! Especially

calling over the sommelier and telling

the most highly rated luxury hotels on

in Italy, and even more so in Rome. It was

him, “See the people at that table over

the west coast of the US. Richard [Gere]

the third time that I'd been to the city,

there? Could you bring them a Côte de

and I became buddies with the sommeliers,

and each time, it works its charm. The scene

Brouilly and tell them it's on the house?

so we were able to enjoy vintage wines

that you mention is really a metaphor.

Put the bottle on my bill, of course.”

from well before I was born.

With the plate of pasta, we wanted to

40

show Elizabeth finally letting herself go.

Do you have a wine cellar, Julia?

A mouth-watering spaghetti paired with a

Let's say that I have a few bottles of wine

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SEPTEMBER 2010

Interview in Cancun, Mexico by Frank Rousseau


STARS & WINE

George Clooney: a gentleman and epicurean

George Clooney Why did you choose Italy as your second home? For its prosciutto that melts in your mouth and the quality of its wines, because I'm a professional drinker. I encourage my fellow Americans to travel outside the States more often and to try something besides cheeseburgers when they visit a country where you can eat such incredible food. I also try to dissuade them from wearing socks with their sandals, flowery shorts and T-shirts labelled with beer brands. How well do you know your wine? A little? A lot? Obsessionally? For a long time I pretended to be a real connoisseur. When I drank vintage wine with friends who were self-proclaimed wine experts, I faked it to save face. How many times in the course of an evening I came out with wine terms that I had heard or read somewhere. Until the day I found myself invited to a meal organised by some Italian notables. I was surrounded

by epicureans - among them, owners of hundreds of hectares of vineyards. That day, I can assure you that I didn't try to show off! Being kindly put in my place by these undisputed specialists taught me some humility, so I took some oenology courses to train my palate to make the distinction between a good wine and an exceptional one. That took me a good ten years. What wines might we find in your cellar? I recently bought several cases of Montepulciano. It's a deep red wine that I find very tannic and generous in the mouth. I also love going to the village, especially on an Indian [a vintage motorcycle from the 1950s]. The winding roads are dangerous, but once you arrive in this amazing place, you feel like you've gone back in time. Not long ago I discovered a white wine from there that I didn't know: Le Trebbiano. It's a knock-out with chioccioloni alla crema! Do you remember the first fine wine you drank that really woke up your taste buds? Yes! I was with a very beautiful woman... I can't reveal her identity. However, I can tell you the name of the wine. It was a bottle of Barolo 1959.

You once said that anyone could be an actor. Was that one of your jokes? Not at all! Anyone could do this job. You just need a decent memory and to avoid spilling red wine down the shirt of influential producers. I'm not the type of actor that internalises his role for weeks. Don't count on me to kill my parents before playing a murderer. I know my limitations. Now, I want to be clear, to be actor in order to feel immortal is fine for five minutes, but not more. Like most of us, as far as I'm concerned, I do this job because I'm less bad at it than anything else. Is it true that you were once kicked off a film by Francis Ford Coppola because you thought his wine tasted of cork? No, Francis Ford Coppola's wine is excellent. The reason he dismissed me is because I had auditioned for his film Dracula, and to get noticed I put on the accent of a Kentucky farmer. Judging that I had wasted his time, Coppola called my agent and asked him if my neurons were working correctly. As a result, my agent got rid of me! Interview by Frank Rousseau in Los Angeles

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©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

We know the silver-haired actor for his sharp sense of humour. What else? Ah, yes… his smooth performances for Nespresso. But did you know that George Clooney has also fallen under the spell of Italian wines? During the promotion of his latest film “The American”, the star spoke to us about his love affair with vintage wines.

41


FRANCE

HISTORY OF THE VINEYARDS

Provence

2,600 YEARS OF WINEMAKING

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

BY SYLVAIN PATARD

The ancient Greek colony of Massilia was founded in 600 BC by the Phocaeans, who planted the first vineyards on the surrounding slopes. The original cultivation was likely for local use rather than for trade, however, the settlement that later became Marseille quickly grew into a crossroads for the wine trade with Italy, as the number of wine vessels (dating from 500 BC) discovered there and on the nearby seabed attest. Winegrowing in the area further developed with the Roman conquest.

A

s in many other French regions, viticulture in Provence became more structured at the beginning of the Middle Ages with the Christian expansion. In 1437, René d’Anjou became the Count of Provence and contributed to bringing prosperity to a region ravaged by the Hundred Years' War. It became part of the kingdom of France in 1481.

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Between the 17th and 18th centuries, the winegrowing area increased, taking the place of wheat fields, despite the fact that famine threatened and the Crown had taken measures to restrict wine cultivation. By the late 1800s, Provence's vineyards were beating historic records of production, before being destroyed by the phylloxera epidemic that swept the continent. SEPTEMBER 2010


HISTORY OF THE VINEYARDS

1960S RENAISSANCE When winegrowing was re-established in Provence, old grape varieties such as Mourvèdre were abandoned (except in Bandol) to make way for more productive varieties such as Aramon. As in neighbouring Languedoc-Roussillon, this resulted in overproduction leading to a drop in sales and triggering the wine crisis of 1907. A return to quality and the rebirth of the Provence wine tradition began only in the 1960s, encouraged by the steady growth of tourism in this region with its idyllic climate. In 1977, the emblematic appellation of the region, Côtes de Provence, achieved recognition as an AOC (appellation d’origine contrôlée). Today, after 40 years of effort, Provence has regained its noble roots and now proposes excellent wines from all its appellations, such as Coteaux d’Aix en Provence, Les Baux de Provence, Bandol, Cassis, Coteaux Varois and Côtes de Provence.

THE SUCCESS OF CÔTES DE PROVENCE This appellation is the region's most extensive, consisting of five distinct winegrowing areas spread over the Bouches-du-Rhône, the Var and the Alpes-Maritimes. Although the appellation's identity rests on rosé wines, its reds are worth discovering. Created from the same grape varieties, the resulting wines have a variety of expressions. A grape variety such as Carignan produces excellent wines with carbonic maceration, which gives the wine a lot of aroma and freshness. These wines should be drunk rather young. Other Côtes de Provence reds are aged in casks for greater tannin extraction and are then finished by maturation in oak; these are more robust and should be matured in the bottle for one or two years. In good years, these deep and complex wines are suitable for aging. Côtes de Provence whites represent a much smaller part of production (around 5%). They are by turns floral or fruity, with citrus or mineral hints. The chosen terroir for Provence whites is near Cassis, which gave its name to the appellation in 1936. Their specific blend gives Cassis wines distinctive aromatic characteristics (thyme, sage, wild mint) and a delicious contrast between richness and liveliness.

Carignan also feature. Bandol reds are full-bodied but balanced, aged for at least 18 months in oak barrels (often in very large foudres), which gives them structure, depth and fullness. When young, their aromas are fruity, floral (violet) and spicy (pepper, liquorice); after aging they become more expansive and their soft bouquet can evoke leather, mushroom and undergrowth. The rosés also have character -they can often be aged for several years due to the anti-oxidising properties of Mourvèdre.

WINES AND GASTRONOMY It is also important to mention the Coteaux d’Aix-en-Provence appellation, which in 1995 saw its western area become its own appellation of Les Baux-de-Provence. The latter is located in the impressive setting of the Alpilles around the superb fortified village of Baux-de-Provence. The red wines are interesting and structured and require prolonged maturing to achieve balance. The good vintages are suitable for aging, as are the wines from the Coteaux Varois appellation. Apart from its vineyards, Provence has much else in its favour, particularly its fresh and aromatic cuisine that shows off its wines to their best advantage. Its whites are perfect for an apéritif as well as an excellent accompaniment for classic regional fish dishes such as bourride and bouillabaisse, its rosés go well with grilled lamb with herbs and sea bass grilled with fennel (delicious with a Bandol rosé). Its reds are a good match for beef casserole, stuffed breast of lamb, or the speciality of Marseille, pieds-paquets (tripes and trotters). Marseille, symbolic city of the south of France, gives us a fitting conclusion in the words of one of its most famous residents, Marcel Pagnol: “When the wine is poured, it must be drunk, especially if it is good.” What more is there to say?

CÔTES DE PROVENCE

BANDOL, THE KNIGHT OF PROVENCE

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Another major Mediterranean wine is Bandol. Here, the Mourvèdre grape variety (which, it is claimed, only reveals its true worth when it is near the sea) is practically a religion. Grenache, Cinsault, Syrah and, to a lesser extent, SEPTEMBER 2010

43


HISTORY OF THE VINEYARDS

Provence rosés come of age Long considered as a minor wine by winemakers themselves, the rosés of Provence have recently acquired a much more respectable reputation. Changes in production methods, the types of grape varieties grown and the progressive hierarchical organisation of terroirs have gone a long way to improve quality. The significant variations in the region's terroirs have recently led to the demarcation of distinct geographic sub-areas within the Côtes de Provence appellation. In 2005, Sainte-Victoire and Fréjus became appellations of their own, then La Londe in 2008, and next, no doubt, Pierrefeu.

R

With nearly 21,000 hectares spreading from Aix-en-Provence in the interior to Saint-Raphaël on the sea, Côtes de Provence is the largest, and thus the most heterogeneous, appellation in the region. The initiative to recognise its specific terroirs is a response both to its diversity as well as to the desire of its winemakers to highlight their wines' particular characteristics. The imposition of stricter production conditions and more highly defined terroir boundaries has created the need for different denominations to promote winemakers' efforts.

THE APPELLATION OF 32 WINDS From 2005, the westernmost area of the appellation, which extends up the slopes of the Sainte-Victoire Mountain, was officially recognised as the specific appellation Côtes de Provence-Sainte-Victoire. This new appellation is more restrictive, as only 1,700 out of 3,000 hectares of the region's vines are accepted, and only for the production of red wines and rosés. This was followed by another new appellation, taking the name of the city of Fréjus. It consists of the Argens Valley, a large natural bowl facing the sea, bordered on one side by the Maures massif and on the other by the Estérel massif. The vineyards stretch some 15 kilometres into the interior, benefitting from

44

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osé wine is inseparable from the image of the Côtes de Provence appellation, representing 80% of its total production. Contrary to the reputation it has long had, rosé is not a wine without identity - there are notable differences in taste according to terroir. For this reason, in 1999 the region of Provence created the world's first research centre dedicated to studying rosés and defining its different characteristics.

HERVÉ LIMON OF DOMAINE DE LA JEANNETTE both the influence of the Mediterranean, which avoids the risk of spring frosts, and an exceptional geographical setting swept by no fewer than 32 different winds. Well-ventilated by the sea breeze, the Mistral, a wind from the east known as the Nice Mistral and winds from the mountains, the vines are protected from mould and rot. ”I am lucky to have vineyards in SainteVictoire as well as in Fréjus,” explains Jérôme Paquette, consultant oenologist and winemaker. “The two terroirs are not suitable for exactly the same grape varieties. The former is more adapted to Grenache and Syrah, while the latter is best for Grenache and Tibouren. With modern rosé production methods, today we can emphasise these differences in soil and grape varieties.” SEPTEMBER MAY 2010 2010


HISTORY OF THE VINEYARDS

PROMOTING EXCELLENCE

SAINTE-VICTOIRE

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Côtes de Provence winemakers do not plan to leave it at that, and are already planning a further division of the La Londe appellation, a terroir that even in the heat of the summer benefits from morning dew. “La Londe enjoys the presence of winemakers with an excellent reputation that will not only draw attention to the future appellation, but will also oblige other winemakers to follow suit,” says Hervé Limon of Domaine de la Jeannette. “Grouping winemakers of the same terroir together in a more homogenous appellation will greatly help our marketing efforts, in addition to the fact that as a group we will be able to reach a wider audience. Thanks to the collective presentation of our wines over the last three years, we have already been able to build a significant local reputation.”

LA LONDE

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FREJUS

These quality initiatives are steps in the right direction to allow Provence rosé, the flagship of the region's winemaking, to regain its nobility.

SEPTEMBER 2010

45


WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

www.masdesdames.fr

Lidewij van Wilgen of Mas des Dames: Dutch Angles

S

itting on the terrace that overlooks her vineyards, it is not difficult to see why Lidewij van Wilgen decided that there was more to life than making PowerPoint presentations.

Weary of the advertising industry, she came to France in 2002 and made her home in an eighteenth century farmhouse near Béziers: “I always loved to drink wine and I heard of this region as the New World of France, so it would be easier to fit in here. And it’s close to the sea - I love sailing.” A contiguous 14-hectare vineyard that lies in an amphitheatreshaped valley surrounds the house. “The previous owner knew that as a whole estate it was rare and wanted a lot of money for it”, remembers Lidewij. “An American bought it but then pulled out.” The buildings and vineyard were in poor shape when she moved in. “It was badly managed over the last 20 years”, she says. “The farmhouse still had sand floors. Even the villagers were upset by it.” After its purchase by Lidewij, a team from the University of Bordeaux inspected the estate’s terroir thoroughly. One of the technicians ate (sic) some soil and declared that he had tasted something similar at Pétrus. It took “at least four years” to renovate the vineyards, which are now farmed organically: “It’s very easy to be organic here. There is a natural eco-system.”

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Lidewij studied for two years at a winemaking school in Béziers. It is not easy for a Dutch woman to be judged by Frenchmen on her tractor-driving skills: “With wine you start at zero, minus ten even, because you’re Dutch and you’re a woman. But it’s healthy in life to let something go and start again.” She was studying fulltime whilst trying to bring up three young

“WITH WINE YOU START AT ZERO, BECAUSE YOU’RE DUTCH AND YOU’RE A WOMAN”

children alone. “In the beginning it was really hard”, she admits.

46

“I would ask a local to plough the vineyards and he would call my

much. Our way of winemaking is common sense, really.” Things

ex-husband in Holland to ask if he should do this. I was really

are kept simple and honest: minimal use of sulphur, pigeage

alone.”

rather than remontage, and no new oak.

She makes just the four wines, with the emphasis on clean, pure

The tiny winery “means that I can make the quality of wine that I

fruit. She asserts, “If you have clean grapes you don’t need to do

want to make. You can do everything by hand.” Rather than use

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SEPTEMBER 2010


©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

“I USE REALLY HIGH-QUALITY OLD VINEYARDS SO THE WINE IS EXPENSIVE TO MAKE”

agents, she sells direct to merchants and restaurants. About 30,000 bottles are made of Mas des Dames and another 20,000 or so of unlabelled wines for airlines and the like. Mas des Dames blanc is 100% white Grenache, labelled as Vin de Pays d’Oc because the Coteaux du Languedoc appellation does not permit monovarietal Grenache. The rosé is made from Grenache, Mourvèdre and Syrah. “I didn’t like rosé before I became a winemaker but I wanted to make one ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

in the south”, Lidewij reveals. “I use really high-quality old vineyards so the wine is expensive to make. I sell it at a cost price.” The unoaked La Dame is less structured than La Diva, the deep colour of which comes from old, low-yielding Alicante. The twoor three-year old barrels used for La Diva are sourced from Burgundy and Côtes du Rhône.

THINGS ARE KEPT SIMPLE AND HONEST: NO NEW OAK

Unlike many other femmes du vin, Lidewij was not born into

The early days were a struggle but even now “there’s always

wine; instead, she chose it. Mas des Dames’s name comes from

something, a fire in the vineyard or the pump that doesn’t work.”

Lidewij and her three daughters, who are the most recent in a long

But Lidewij still relishes her life: “To have 14 hectares of the world

line of female owners and residents at this property. Perhaps a

that are your responsibility is a good feeling.”

winemaking dynasty has been established.

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Stuart George

SEPTEMBER 2010

47


WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

www.champagne-philippe-gonet.com

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Chantal Brégeon-Gonet of Champagne Philippe Gonet: Gone to Earth

JOINING THE COMPANY IN 2001, CHANTAL IS THE SEVENTH GENERATION OF HER FAMILY TO WORK IN CHAMPAGNE

S

ituated on rue Clément, Chantal Brégeon-Gonet’s Point

Joining the company in 2001, Chantal is the seventh generation of

Bulles Restaurant à Champagne was opened in May

her family to work in Champagne. The eighth generation of the

2010. Saint-Germain-des-Prés is the spiritual home of

Gonet family looks assured: “My children are young but they already

Existentialism; it is not difficult to imagine Jean-Paul Sartre and

have lots of character! My daughter’s destiny is Champagne, I think.”

Simone de Beauvoir sat on the terrace of rue Clément’s market arcade, sharing a bottle of something or other while discussing

Chantal lived in Singapore for three years when her husband was

how and why l'existence précède l'essence.

working on the construction of the Mass Rapid Transit railway’s signalling system, which was “how I started to sell my wine in Asia.”

The restaurant was named “Point Bulles” rather than “Gonet” so

Gonet’s top export markets are Belgium, Japan, Italy and Germany.

as to allow other wines to be listed. The wine list is French-only

48

but diverse. In addition to Champagne, there are bottles from

Based in Le Mesnil-sur-Oger, Gonet is next door to Salon and

Alsace, Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Loire, Provence and the Rhône.

Delamotte. But as a small, family-owned estate that makes very

Chantal enjoys a wide range of wines: “I like Mosel Rieslings,

good and reasonably priced wines it has little in common with its

Priorat and Tuscany. I have tasted good Cava. I love New Zealand

more glamorous (and expensive) neighbours. Scarcity, prestige and

wines for their freshness.”

vaunted prices are not what Champagne Gonet represents.

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WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

Gonet has 19 hectares of vineyards spread across Le Mesnil, Vertus, Rilly-la-Montagne, the Marne and the Aube. Seven wines are made, ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

with the house style based predominantly on Chardonnay and low dosages. The wines are intensely mineral and acidic, needing time to develop balance and complexity. The Réserve Brut NV combines the Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier and

BASED IN LE MESNIL-SUR-OGER, THIS SMALL, FAMILY-OWNED ESTATE MAKES VERY GOOD AND REASONABLY PRICED WINES

Chardonnay triumvirate to create what Pierre Gonet, Chantal’s brother and the house’s winemaker, calls une expression de la maison plus qu’une expression de terroir. The Rose Brut NV is deliciously

smooth and fruity; its Pinot is sourced from Premier Cru vineyards in Vertus and its Chardonnay from the Côte des Blancs. The Blanc de Blancs NV is uncomplicated and enjoyable but the Blanc de Blancs Millésimé 2002 is magnificent, with a superb texture. Like the rugby player Sébastien Chabal, Roy Soleil NV is big and intense. A pure Le Mesnil Chardonnay aged in 600-litre demi-muids is always likely to be an imposing wine. Belimnita 2004, Gonet’s only single vineyard wine, is “very mineral and very, very young”, thinks Chantal. This is “a selection of our best vineyard in Le Mesnil-sur-Oger. Haut Mesnil and Bas Mesnil are very, very different. I think there is no better wine than a super selection but you cannot make big quantities, which is why it is expensive and so difficult to make.” Extra Brut 3210 NV comes from the Aube rather than Le Mesnil because, as Chantal explains, “Le Mesnil as Extra Brut is sometimes too mineral.” Chantal remains ambivalent about the recent trend for highly priced single vineyard Champagnes: “It’s possible to make a vin de terroir by using small parcels. If you blend you make a standard wine, you give a signature but no singularity. It is the best that can ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

happen to Champagne but the négoçiants do not like it because

“BELIMNITA 2004, GONET’S ONLY SINGLE VINEYARD WINE, IS A SELECTION OF OUR BEST”

there is no volume and no regularity.” For Chantal, life is all about vive la différence: “Every year is different and each generation has done something different. That’s what makes it interesting.” Stuart George and Amanda Regan

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WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

www.domaine-galevan.com

Coralie Goumarre of Domaine Galévan: Spirit of Wine

T

he famed US wine critic Robert Parker was in Châteauneuf-du-Pape in late August 2010. But he has yet to visit Domaine Galévan, nowadays overseen by

Coralie Goumarre, the ninth generation of her family - and the first woman - to make wine at the family estate near Courthézon. Galevan’s farmhouse is next to the A7 motorway, the west side of which forms the north-eastern boundary of the Châteauneuf appellation. Even though its vineyards are cheek by jowl with those of Château de Beaucastel, not lying inside Châteauneuf itself has perhaps condemned Galévan to be sometimes overlooked. Galévan’s Châteauneuf, Côtes du Rhône and Côtes du Rhône Villages vines are spread across two parcels, one on sandy argilo sableux and the other, which is 90% of the total, on the classic Châteauneuf terroir of argilo calcaire and galets roulés. The vineyards are biodynamic and will be certified as such by the

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

2011 vintage. Until Coralie’s father built the winery in 1967, Galévan’s grapes went to the local Cellier des Princes cooperative. Some of the

CORALIE GOUMARRE, THE FIRST WOMAN TO MAKE WINE AT THE FAMILY ESTATE Côtes du Rhône is sold as bulk wine but Coralie aspires to bottling all her own wine. Galévan’s maximum potential production from its 49 hectares of vines is 330,000 bottles. The estate’s average vine age is about 50 years, with the oldest vines a parcel of Grenache that is 94 years ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

old. Syrah is trained to Cordon de Royat, the other varieties to

THE SMALL WINERY IS AS SIMPLE AS IT GETS: ““I TASTE THE WINE AND MAKE IT LIKE THAT” 50

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gobelet. The small winery is as simple as it gets: the red wines are made in concrete tanks, the whites in steel. “I don’t work by the book”, explains Coralie. “I taste the wine and make it like that.” Seven wines are made. The Côtes du Rhône rosé is clean, fresh and SEPTEMBER 2010


WINE GROWER PORTRAITS

simple, all “fruit, fruit, fruit!” as Coralie puts it. The Grenache

Despite Parker’s enthusiasm for Châteauneuf, she remains ambivalent

juice is saignée but the Cinsault, Mourvèdre, Clairette and

about him: “I don’t say that I like his influence but it is a necessity.

Carignan are pressurages followed by macération pelliculaire

If you have a good score it is easier to sell in the USA.”

(skin and juice macerated together before pressing). As the first, but perhaps not the last, female member of her family The Côtes du Rhône blanc is atypical for its high percentage of

to make wine, she finds her work “interesting but difficult. There is

Clairette. “I like white wines with beautiful acidity”, asserts

not only the winery and the vineyard; there are the customers and

Coralie. “I don’t like flabby wines.”

the banks. There is always something to do. The bad side of the job is not having enough time for myself, to play sports and go running.

Two red Côtes du Rhône are made: the unoaked Paroles de

But I like my job a lot. Watching TV at home is not for me.”

Femme and the more elegant, darker flavoured and punningly

Stuart George

named Esprit Devin, which is made from a rockier terroir and older vines than the Femme. It used to be bottled in a heavy bottle but with the move towards biodynamics it became important to consider more conscientious transportation methods and costs. The Châteauneuf-du-Pape blanc is part-fermented in new oak barrels and aged on its lees for up to nine months. The 2007 is drinking beautifully at the moment, retaining the clean acidity that Coralie strives for. Galevan’s grand vin Châteauneuf-du-Pape is mostly Grenache with a seasoning of Mourvèdre. Aged in 500-litre casks and some 1-year old barriques that were used for the white wine, the 2008 is a good effort for that unloved vintage. “I made a big selection in 2008, to make a good wine”, explains Coralie. She admits that such conscientiousness “is difficult economically.” In 2009, the Châteauneuf-du-Pape cuvée “Saint Georges” was made for the first time from rented vineyards in and around Courthézon, specifically the lieux dits of St-Georges and Beaucastel.

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Galévan exports to Canada and the USA and has recently sold wine in China. Coralie is open-minded about wines away from the Rhône méridional: “I like Burgundy and some Italian wines. I had Château Kefraya a few years ago and it was superb. It’s important to taste different wines. You don’t have the same analysis with these as you do with tasting another Châteauneuf or Côtes du Rhône.”

THE CHÂTEAUNEUF TERROIR OF ARGILO CALCAIRE AND GALETS ROULÉS

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ORGANIC NEWS

Sulfites and organic wine European wines have been required to state on the label if they contain sulfites since 25 November 2005. This consumer-information measure is similar to the American “Government Warning” label required for wine that contains sulfites. Although the levels of sulfur dioxide in wine have never been so low, this labelling has had the effect of worrying consumers, perhaps realising for the first time that the wine they drink contains sulfites. Here we will take an objective look at sulfites to understand why they are used and the issues at stake.

1. THE VAST MAJORITY OF WINES CONTAIN SULFITES

a pure gas or a concentrated solution, and also for those who consume it, for whom it can

Sulfur dioxide has been known and used since ancient times.

cause

The Ancient Greek writer Homer referred to it as a disinfectant

headaches

around 800 BC. In the 15th century, it was mentioned in reference

insufficiency. Medically speaking,

to winemaking in several different documents. By the end of the

it is not, however, considered an

18th century, its uses in winemaking were described more

allergen as it does not lead to the

specifically. At this time, winemakers recognised that sulfur

formation of immunoglobulin.

dioxide:

Beyond

• stopped fermentation

concerns, both winemakers and

• avoided deterioration

lawmakers have also sought over

• prevented 'cloudiness'

time to limit the use of chemical

• prevented 'turning'

products out of respect for the environment and a growing

and

these

irritation, pulmonary

direct

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sneezing,

health

Jean Natoli

demand for the most natural products possible. In those days, the role of yeasts, bacteria and chemistry in winemaking were not yet fully understood… it would not be

3. ARE SULFITES FOUND ONLY IN WINE?

until the beginning of the 20th century that the science and practical applications of sulfur dioxide would be explained.

Far from being restricted to wine, sulfur dioxide is found in

Today we know that sulfur dioxide essentially curtails the

many food products: fresh, dried, frozen and tinned fruits,

growth of undesirable yeasts, allowing desirable yeasts to

vegetables and fish, flour, pasta, condiments, dried herbs,

thrive during fermentation; it limits damage to grape harvests

different types of sugars, and fermented drinks (eg. cider, beer

due to mildew or rot; it aids colour extraction; it acts as a

and wine). It is one of the main food preservatives (labelled as

preservative; and it slows down oxidation. So sulfites have

E220 and E228 on food products).

many advantages in winemaking.

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2. IN THAT CASE, WHY LIMIT THEIR USE?

4. IS IT POSSIBLE TO ELIMINATE SULFITES IN WINEMAKING?

The downside of sulfur dioxide is that it can be toxic when inhaled

Completely avoiding sulfur dioxide in wine production is difficult

or ingested. Both for those who use and handle it, as it is supplied as

because it plays an important role in ensuring the quality of wine.

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ORGANIC NEWS

Winemakers who manage to avoid sulfites must harvest grapes in perfect condition, limit any unnecessary oxidation in the production process, control the activity of yeasts and bacteria, and ensure effective clarification. These are the most fundamental aspects of winemaking and must be implemented meticulously. An absolutely perfect mastery of this without sulfites is very difficult, and those who achieve it successfully - and ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

consistently - are rare.

5. IS IT POSSIBLE TO REDUCE SULFITES AND MAINTAIN QUALITY? Sulfites are basically used at four stages in the winemaking process, each with its own issue at stake:

SULFUR DIOXIDE HAS BEEN USED SINCE ANCIENT TIMES

• at harvest (the condition of the grapes) • at the end of fermentation (yeast and bacteria control) • during preservation and aging (cellar hygiene) • at the time of bottling (consumer satisfaction).

7. IS ELIMINATING SULFITES AN END IN ITSELF? Today, there is a prevailing view that an absence of sulfites is a sign

Depending on the winemaker's priorities, the sulfites could be reduced at any one or all of these stages - the most stringent could opt for very low amounts or none at all. However, as we have seen, the process of transforming grapes to wine begins

of quality. However, many professionals, even in the organic movement, recognise recurrent flaws in sulfite-free wine: for example, oxidation, animal characteristics and the continuation of fermentation after bottling.

with the vine itself. The entire cycle of winemaking from the very initial stages has to be considered in the quest for purity.

6. WHAT IS THE POSITION OF ORGANIC WINEMAKERS REGARDING SULFITES? Reducing sulfites is a concern shared by the majority of winemakers, both organic and non-organic. However, the constraints on organic winemakers are greater as they are bound to a charter restricting chemical additives. There are as many positions on sulfites as there are schools of thought in the organic sector, from biodynamics to 'natural' wines. To date, there is no regulation in the strict sense of the term for the use of sulfites in organic wines. The recognised guidelines advocate a more or less radical reduction of sulfites. For dry red wines, the maximum authorised level varies between 70 and 120 mg/litre (depending on the organic guidelines), while European regulations allow 150 mg/litre. Considering that winemaking documentation from the 1900s indicates that the levels then were 400 mg/litre, it is clear that much progress has already been made. Incidentally, yeasts can also produce, completely naturally, considerable amounts of sulfur dioxide during fermentation.

Why impose health criteria at the expense of taste? The consequence will be to restrict wine to a canon of beauty that is difficult to achieve with consistent results and to fall into a trap already encountered in previous times.

8. CONCLUSION To entrust the transformation of grapes to nature alone is to produce, almost inevitably, vinegar, the ultimate phase of their evolution. Over the centuries, winemakers have sought to stabilise this process, halting the transformation when grapes turn to wine. First they used traditional methods, and later they discovered the principles of oenology. This science is relatively recent at just over a century old. It has been, and will continue to be, responsible for many advances, including the issue of reducing or eliminating sulfites. The quest for improving winemaking motivates winemakers, oenologists and researchers alike and is driven by their passion for their product. The ultimate goal is, as it should be, to produce healthy wine that is a pleasure to drink. Jean Natoli Consultant oenologist and organic winemaker President of Vino Latino

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QUALITY FACTORS

SPAIN

Catalonia

A SPANISH GIANT

Š NITO - FOTOLIA.COM

BY CHRISTOPHE CHAPILLON

Today, it would be impossible - and indeed unthinkable - to overlook Spanish wines. Spain can boast the largest wine-producing area in the world, and over the last thirty years has instigated an unprecedented quality revolution spearheaded by Rioja and, more significantly, Catalonia. This revolution is gradually spreading to formerly unknown estates, demonstrating an aspect of the Spanish wine industry which remains an open secret: its extreme diversity.

W

ith 1.16 million hectares of land in use for wine production, Spain has the largest area of vineyards in the world. However, area does not equal quantity, and the arid climate - which works against high plantation density - combines with frost and steep slopes to return poor natural yields, and a remarkable diversity of soil types and grape varieties should also be taken into consideration. Even so, the potential for quality is clearly immense, although far from fully realised. The early 1980s revealed the ability of some growers to get the best out of land which had until then been neglected, or even abandoned. Perhaps the most spectacular evidence of this revival can be found in the Priorat vineyards of Catalonia. In the space of ten years, this mountainous region rose from the depths of crisis to the top of the Spanish wine pile, obtaining the country's second DOC classification (Rioja was the first) in 2001. And although the essentially inward-looking French wine market may not yet have woken up to the sheer scale of this phenomenon,

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wine-lovers in other countries are well aware that Spain is now capable of going head-to-head with the best wines in the world.

CATALONIA: IN THE VANGUARD From a wine-lover's point of view, Catalonia is one of Spain's most interesting regions. A real open-air wine laboratory, the area has undergone unprecedented changes since the 1970s. The effects of this have been particularly spectacular in Priorat, which has developed into Catalonia's star region and the subject of much envy from elsewhere. Only a short time ago, the region was suffering heavily from rural depopulation. A handful of talented wine-growing oenologists recognised the potential to be found here, and the whole surrounding area was propelled into an upwards spiral. For the gourmet, Catalonia holds all the aces: an astonishing diversity of terroirs and preparation methods, top-level oenologists, SEPTEMBER 2010


QUALITY FACTORS

and a passion for research and innovation which motivates all producers, from the industrial bodegas down to the smallest, most selective vineyards. Local grape varieties such as the red Garnatxa Negra (Grenache Noir), Carinyena (Carignan) and Ull de Llebre (Tempranillo) grapes and the white Macabeu, Garnatxa Blanca, Xarel-lo and Parellada grapes nestle alongside the nobler, more recently-added French varieties (Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Chardonnay). The latter grapes, planted over thirty years ago, now feature in the great internationally-styled wines, and are responsible for the current high standing of Catalan wines.

However, we should not overlook the influence of terroir on wine quality. In particular, Priorat has the sort of potential which required only the touch of a human hand to become apparent. In a land of steep hillsides rising to a height of 250-600 metres, surrounded by a range of mountains, the vines grow on schistose scree slopes known as llicorella. The rapid drainage of the soil in these parts obliges the vines to grow deep for water, producing extremely low yields; and old Garnatxa vines growing in this area produce a wine which is rich in extraction and high in alcohol. The architect of Priorat’s renaissance is René Barbier, whose family also founded the bodega of the same name. In 1979, he began restoring Clos Mogador and was soon being copied by a number of friends and acquaintances, including Alvaro Palacios. Today, major investors such as Miguel Torres and the Codorniu group are also showing an interest in the region.

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However, more prestigious oenologists such as Miguel Torres, the Albet i Noya brothers or Jose Luis Perez, who use such worldrenowned varieties themselves, are well aware of the extraordinary potential of the local grapes, and are producing experimental quantities of thirty or so varieties currently facing extinction. Who knows, perhaps one of these will produce a great Spanish wine of tomorrow... In this respect, growers' experiences with Garnatxa Negra - a traditional Priorat variety - have been of great interest. Indeed, it was this very grape - overlooked until fairly recently

because of its tendency to oxidise - which was used in the creation of Alvaro Palacios' L'Ermita, which is now Spain's most expensive wine. Here, in this co-existence of tradition and cutting-edge technology, is the key to the present and future richness of the vineyards of Catalonia, which are a source of infinite discoveries.

WITH 1.16 MILLION HECTARES OF LAND IN USE FOR WINE PRODUCTION, SPAIN HAS THE LARGEST AREA OF VINEYARDS IN THE WORLD GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

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QUALITY FACTORS

Catalonia comprises ten wine regions, nine of which have their own DO: Empordà, Alella, Pla de Bages, Tarragona, Terra Alta, Costers del Segre, Conca de Barberà, Montsant and Penedès. As we have seen, the tenth, Priorat, is one of Spain’s only two DOCs (Denominación de Origen Calificada), along with Rioja. Despite all its successes, Catalonia is still far from realising its full potential, and there will probably be many pleasant surprises to come over the next few years. Here is an overview of each of these DOs, with information on a few selected wine estates:

• PENEDÈS

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This region south of Barcelona lies between the foothills of the Serralada mountain range and the Mediterranean Sea. It is home to the largest winemaking area in Catalonia, where vineyards stretch across a broad coastal valley before climbing hillsides to reach altitudes that are among the highest in Europe for winegrowing. One of Catalonia's nine Denominación de Origen (DO) regions, this 26,000-hectare winegrowing area is divided into three zones: the upland Penedès Superior, the valley of the Penedès Central and the lowland Penedès Baix. The average p l a n ting density is 2,300-3,000 vines per hectare, although some varieties such as Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are trellised at up to 5,000 vines per hectare, resulting in lower yields but superior quality. The majority of the region's vineyards are relatively small, with most winemakers using their own grapes to produce their wines.

MAS VILELLA CELLARS FOCUS ON: JANÉ VENTURA This winery, located in the Baix Penedès region, dates back to 1914, when Josep Jané first began selling his wine locally. In 1930, his son Albert created the vineyard's first cellar. In turn, his son Benjamí began bottling white and rosé wines in 1985, followed by cavas in 1990 and red wines in 1991, with the aim of improving quality. Two of his five sons, Albert and Gerard, today join him in this goal, s t r i ving to make unique, high-quality w i n e s t h a t t r a n s m i t t h e i r p a s sion for their land and their respect for the environment. The family owns two estates at different altitudes in the Baix Penedès region. Each has a distinct microclimate and terrain.

SOME OF THE WINERIES AGUSTÍ TORELLÓ, ALBET I NOYA, MAS COMTAL, CAN BONASTRE, SUMARROCA, CAN RÀFOLS DELS CAUS, PARÉS BALTÀ, CORDONÍU

FINCA ELS CAMPS ESTATE This 8-hectare vineyard is located at an altitude of 450 metres near the town of Juncosa del Montmell. The 16 small plots are planted in terraces down a slope of loose calcareous soil: optimal conditions for its Ull de Llebre (Tempranillo) and Macabeu grape varieties. The vines of the latter are over 50 years old.

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

MAS VILELLA ESTATE

SOME EXAMPLES OF DIFFERENTS SOILS

This 7-hectare vineyard lies at an altitude of 250 meters near the town of La Bisbal del Penedès. The sandy calcareous soil supports vines of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Garnatxa Negra (Grenache) and Subirat Parent. The terrain is particularly harsh. When the first Cabernet Sauvignon vines were planted in 1986, over 500 truckloads of stones had to be removed from an area of 3.5 hectares. continued on page 58

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QUALITY FACTORS

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Interview with Gerard Jané Gerard Jané

Winery director, oenologist and fourth-generation winemaker in the Jané Ventura family

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: What do you think makes Jané Ventura wines stand out? GERARD JANÉ : Above all, we aim to create unique wines. We believe that one of the ways to achieve this is to work with traditional grape varieties that faithfully reflect our terroir; these play an increasingly important role in our winemaking. Alongside classic varieties such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah, we are experimenting with Macabeu, Xarel·lo, Subirat Parent, Garnatxa Blanca and Garnatxa Negra, Carinyena (Carignan), Ull de Llebre and Sumoll, but we do not rule out any varieties. We currently use Ull de Llebre as the base for three of the four reds we produce. Our two whites and our cavas are based entirely on traditional grape varieties. Experience has shown us not to assume that a particular grape variety does not have the potential to make a great wine until given the chance to do so. GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: With so many grape varieties, how do you ensure quality? GERARD JANÉ : In the lead up to harvest, we monitor each vineyard closely to determine optimal ripeness. We consider each plot's characteristics and make any necessary adjustments if the ripening process has been irregular. We make the decision to begin harvesting when the skin of the grape has reached maximum phenolic ripeness. This is determined by tasting the skin as well as other standard tests (for sugar, acidity, berry weight, etc). The first stage of grape selection takes place in the vineyard. We believe that this is the best place for selection, so we can judge the appearance of the vine. If all the clusters have not ripened consistently, we initially harvest only the grapes that are ready, leaving the others to ripen fully. During the 2001 harvest at Mas Vilella, three of us worked for eight days to separate some 2,000 kilograms of grapes, selecting them cluster by cluster. All our grapes are picked by hand. G ILBERT & G AILLARD W INE I NTERNATIONAL : What is your winemaking process? GERARD JANÉ : The second stage of selection takes place just after picking and is done manually in a small hopper. This allows us to inspect the grapes closely, sorting them for quality and removing leaves. During the 2001 harvest, three of us spent two hours sorting 1,000 kilograms of Subirat Parent grapes, removing each one that had been pecked by birds! We believe it is essential to separate grapes with different characteristics, and for this reason we use

small batches of grapes for winemaking, the average being 3,000 kilograms. During the 2002 harvest, we made wine from seven different 500-kilogram batches. Our winemaking process is aimed at expressing the character of our vines to the fullest. To extract the full aromatic and phenolic elements of the grape, we carry out pellicular maceration at cold temperatures for our whites and employ a longer maceration period (25-40 days) for our reds. Subsequently, in the phase prior to bottling, we filter the wines carefully to remove any sediment while retaining the wine's natural characteristics as much as possible. GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: How are your wines aged? GERARD JANÉ : We believe that barrel ageing is very important as it has such an influence on the final characteristics of the wine. We use a variety of barrels and currently have more than 20 types made by 10 or 11 different coopers. To choose the best cask for a wine, we consider where the oak is from, how it was dried, how it was toasted, etc. The majority of our casks are French oak (90%), and the remainder come from Hungary and the United States. Most are either new or one year old and we keep them for a maximum of three years. We prefer new casks to better express the characteristics of our terroir and achieve a balance between complexity and elegance. GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: Finally, what can you tell us about your cavas? GERARD JANÉ : Our philosophy is that our cavas should be as natural as possible: meaning that their character should derive purely from the base wine and the ageing process. We do not add any liqueur d'expédition - a wine/sugar solution - to 95% of our cavas, only to our Cava Brut, at a ratio of 4 grams per litre. We do not think that dosage with sweetened wine results in higher quality or imparts greater character to a Cava. On the contrary, using dosage liquor gives the cava flavours and aromas that are not natural to it. Our belief is that the base wine and the yeast on their own give the cava a more authentic taste. We use three traditional grape varieties (Macabeu, Xarel·lo and Parellada) to make our cavas, resulting in a sparkling wine with a distinct personality that differentiates them from others around the world. The minimum ageing period is 20-24 months for Brut Nature and 30-42 months for our Gran Reserva.

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QUALITY FACTORS

• ALELLA The smallest DO region in Catalonia, and one of the smallest in Spain, Alella is situated 20 kilometres north of Barcelona. The area has only around 500 hectares of vineyards. On the coast, the appellation's climate is typically Mediterranean, with hot and dry summers and mild winters. The average annual temperature is 15ºC and it receives little rainfall (around 600 mm per year), which occurs mainly in autumn and spring. The vineyards stretch from the sea up the hillsides of the coastal foothills. Dry and semi-dry whites are the principal wines produced here. The character of Alella whites is largely determined by the Xarel·lo grape variety. They are soft, pale, elegant and perfumed, with a pleasant palate. The region's rosés and reds are also fragrant and well balanced. WHITE VARIETIES: Pansa Blanca, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Garnatxa Blanca, Picapoll, Parellada, Macabeu RED VARIETIES: Syrah, Merlot, Garnatxa Negra, Ull de Llebre, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Mataró, Pansa Vermella, Sumoll SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES PARTXET

• CONCA DE BARBERÀ This Catalonian DO extends over 9,000 hectares in northern Tarragona. Grapevines may have been cultivated here by Roman settlers and were certainly present by the time of the monasteries founded in the Middle Ages. Its climate, history and traditions all stamp their identity on the region's excellent wines and cavas.

• COSTERS DEL SEGRE The Costers del Segre DO wine region spreads over more than 4,000 hectares across the valley of the River Segre in the Catalan province of Lleida. Located further inland than most of Catalonia's wine areas, its different sub-areas are subject to a continental climate with significant temperature differences and scarce rain. The region receives approximately 2,800 hours of sun a year. The sandy, limestone soil is poor, however each sub-area has variations in climate and soil. This diversity and the fact that the DO is young (it was created in 1988) contribute to the fact that it is now recognised as one of the most innovative and upcoming of Catalan wine regions. SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES RAIMAT, CASTELL DEL REMEI

FOCUS ON: TOMÀS CUSINÉ This estate near the village of El Vilosell produces exemplary DO Costers del Segre wines. It is located on the north face of the Sierra de la Llena ridge at an altitude of between 700 and 740 metres. The mainly calcareous and permeable soil and moderate climate create ideal conditions for relatively late grape harvests that give the wines their smooth tannins and intense colour. In recent years, the winery has planted 29 hectares with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc, Garnatxa, Carinyena, Marselan, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc, among other varieties. It also buys grapes grown under its supervision from other vineyards in the area. The vines are planted at a density of 5,000 vines per hectare and trained on posts. The estate's philosophy is to conserve traditional rural architecture and look after the countryside. Its first harvest from its own vineyards was in 2006, producing very encouraging results.

SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES CLOS MONTBLANC, MIGUEL TORRES

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©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The climate here is transitional, between the mild Mediterranean climate typical of Tarragona, given its relative proximity to the sea, and the more extreme continental climate of the Lleida region, with its cold winters and hot summers. Lower altitudes are influenced by warm, humid sea winds, but there is a risk of frost of higher altitudes. There is a noticeable temperature difference between night and day. The annual average temperature is 14ºC, with summer highs that can exceed 35ºC, and winter lows that are frequently below 0ºC. The annual rainfall is 450-550 mm, with most rain falling in autumn and spring.

TOMAS CUSINE USE 225-LITRE FINE GRAINED FRENCH OAK BARRELS SEPTEMBER 2010


©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

QUALITY FACTORS

Interview with Tomàs CusinéTomàs Cusiné

Winery director and winemaker

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: tell us about your estate? TOMÀS CUSINÉ : The estate is located on the north face of the Sierra de la Llena ridge, at an altitude of 700 - 740 metres above sea level. This area falls within the DO of Costers del Segre, and borders the province of Tarragona and the comarcas of Conca de Barberà and Priorat. The different plots mainly lie on north and north-east facing slopes, with differing soil types and degrees of exposure. These are mainly calcareous soils, containing varying amounts of gravel that have straightforward structures and tend to be fresh and limey with a good degree of permeability. The local climate is moderate, but with a large diurnal temperature range and with annual rainfall of 380 - 600 mm per year. These conditions guarantee gradual maturing with quite late grape harvests that are responsible for the wines smooth tannins and very intense colour. GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL: You've recently replanted some plots; tell us about this, and the way you make your wines. TOMÀS CUSINÉ : In recent years, the winery has planted 29 hectares of its land with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet

Franc, Garnacha, Cariñena, Marselan,Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The winery has also acquired grapes grown under its supervision from other vineyards in the local area. 2006 was the first harvest from our own plantations, and the results are encouraging, leading us to strive constantly for increasing quality. We have opted for obtaining degrees of maturity that maintain a careful equilibrium between the phenolic and acidic components of our wines. We thus avoid over-maturing our wines or producing excessive levels of tannins, and ensure that our wines are elegant, complex, fresh and longer lasting. At harvest, the grapes are collected in 200 kg boxes and refrigerated before they are sorted. There is then a cold pre-maceration in tank, followed by a slow fermentation at a constant low temperature, with the aim of conserving both the rich taste of the fruit and the freshness of the harvest. Once taken from the vats, the wines undergo malolactic fermentation and are then aged in 225-litre, fine-grained French-oak barrels that are carefully chosen from the stock of leading barrel-makers as François Frères, Nadalie, Seguin Moreau, Demptos, Sylvain and Boutes.

• EMPORDÀ This 2500-hectare DO region lies along the Costa Brava just south of the French border. Empordà consists of two geographically distinct areas: Alt Empordà, stretching from the Mediterranean up the slopes of the Pyrenees, and Baix Empordà, along the coast to the south. The sandy soil is ideal for winegrowing, and the sea breezes and Tramontane, a strong northerly wind, keep the vines disease-free. The mild winters and hot summers make it well suited for relatively long growing seasons and grape varieties that produce naturally sweet wines.

RED VARIETIES: Samsó, Garnatxa Tinta, Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Monastrell, Ull de Llebre, Syrah, Garnatxa Peluda

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

WHITE VARIETIES: Garnatxa Blanca, Macabeu, Moscatel d'Alexandrie, Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer, Malvoisie, Muscat à Petits Grains, Picapoll, Sauvignon Blanc, Xarel·lo

THREE WINES PRODUCED BY TOMAS CUSINÉ IN CATALONIA.

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QUALITY FACTORS

SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES CELLER CAPÇANES, CELLER LAURONA, CELLERS JOAN D'ANGUERA, MAS PERINET

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• PLA DE BAGES

TOMÀS CUSINÉ DEDICATED TIME AND EFFORT TO THE VINEYARDS

RED VARIETIES: Ull de Llebre, Merlot, Cabernet France, Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Garnatxa Negra, Sumoll

SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES OLIVER CONTI, ESPELT VITICULTORS, TERRA REMOTA

WHITE VARIETIES: Chardonnay Macabeu, Picapoll, Gewürztraminer, Sauvignon Blanc

• MONTSANT

SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES ABADAL, OLLER DEL MAS

Previously a sub-appellation of DO Tarragona, the Montsant wine region was created as a separate DO in the early 2000s. Currently covering an area of 2,000 hectares, Montsant has experienced spectacular growth over the last decade. When it was created, it consisted of 28 wineries; it now has over 50. Nearly 70% of Montsant's wine is exported, mainly to Germany and the United States. The region is known for its powerful reds, but white wines, rosés and sweet red wines are also produced.

WHITE VARIETIES

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One of the smallest DOs in Spain, the vineyards of Pla de Bages cover only 600 hectares in the fertile plain of the semi-mountainous landscape that includes Montserrat, northwest of Barcelona. Situated inland, the climate, although influenced by the Mediterranean, has the significant temperature variations of a continental climate. The extreme temperatures, scant rain and calcareous clay soil result in the concentrated grapes typical of lower yields. The wines have aromatic hints of lavender, thyme and rosemary, the wild plants native to the Mediterranean landscape surrounding the vineyards.

RED VARIETIES

RECOMMENDED

RECOMMENDED

• Garnatxa blanca o lledoner blanc • Macabeu or viura • Moscatell of d'Alexandria

• Samsó • Garnatxa tinta

AUTHORISED

AUTHORISED

• Chardonnay • Gewürztraminer • Malvoisie • Muscat à Petits Grains • Picpoul Blanc • Sauvignon blanc • Xarel·lo

• Cabernet sauvignon • Cabernet franc • Merlot • Monastrell • Tempranillo • Syrah • Garnacha Peluda

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• TARRAGONA This long-standing - and upcoming - DO covers 7,300 hectares, with vineyards extending inland from the Mediterranean coast and across the small plateaus near the banks of the River Ebro. It is divided into two principal sub-areas: Camp de Tarragona and Ribera d´Ebre. The former has mainly calcareous soil from the Miocene era and an essentially Mediterranean climate with an annual rainfall of 500 mm. The Ribera d’Ebre region has calcareous, stony, alluvial soil and is drier, with more extreme seasonal variations. Traditionally known for its sweet red wines, the region now produces a significant proportion of whites as well as reds, rosés and cavas. RED VARIETIES: Ull de Llebre, Carinyena, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sumoll, Garnatxa, Syrah, Pinot Noir WHITE VARIETIES: Macabeu, Parellada, Xarel·lo, Chardonnay, Moscatel de Frontignan, Moscatel d'Alexandrie, Sauvignon Blanc, Garnatxa Blanca SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES DE MULLER, BODEGAS JM BACH

SEPTEMBER 2010


QUALITY FACTORS

FOCUS ON CATALONIA, SPAIN Catalonia has ten Denominación de Origen (DO) wine-producing regions. For many years, Catalonia’s viniculture was based mainly on its production of cava sparkling wine and white wines from Penedès. However, the ongoing revolution in Spanish wine has not left this region untouched. Today, Catalan wines prove that its best winemakers are adept at retaining longstanding traditions while making innovations that constantly raise quality.

FACTS AND FIGURES In 2009, 52 million bottles of wine from Catalan DOs were sold. The region's ten DOs are Pla Bages, Priorat, Empordà (Ampurdán–Costa Brava), Tarragona, Montsant, Penedès, Terra Alta, Alella, Costers del Segre and Conca de Barberà. The generic appellation DO Catalunya was created in 1999 to encompass quality winemakers who are outside of these specific DOs. This recognition has helped Catalan winemakers assert their wine's singularity and excellence and has been key in changing the status of Catalan wine.

PRODUCTION AREA Catalonia is situated in northeast Spain, between the Mediterranean Sea and the Pyrenees. DO Catalunya consists of approximately 60,000 hectares of vineyards, many located near villages, where vineyards have traditionally been cultivated.

GRAPE VARIETIES Over 2,000 years of winegrowing have endowed Catalonia not only with a wide range of traditional varieties, but also grapes from other regions that are well adapted to its soils and climate. DO Catalunya has 27 authorised grape varieties for winemaking. White varieties include: Chardonnay, Chenin Blanc, Garnatxa Blanca, Gewürztraminer, Macabeu, Malvasia, Malvasia de Sitges, Moscatel, Parellada, Pedro Ximénez, Picapoll, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Xarel·lo Red varieties include: Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Garnatxa Negra, Garnatxa Peluda, Garnatxa Tintorera, Merlot, Monastrell, Pinot Noir, Samsó (Carinyena), Sumoll, Syrah, Trepat, Ull de Llebre

VINEYARDS Newer vineyards are often trellised, using the Guyot or Royat pruning systems, but older vineyards still use traditional spur pruning, leaving four to six two-bud spurs. The vines are typically planted at a density between 1,800 and 4,500 vines per hectare, with an average of 2,500 vines per hectare, or 3,000 vines per hectare in newer plantations. The maximum permitted production per hectare in DO Catalunya is 10,000 tonnes for red grape varieties and 12,000 tonnes for white grape varieties.

CLIMATE The area has a Mediterranean climate and receives over 2,500 hours of sunlight per year. On the coast, the climate is mild, with temperatures increasing and rainfall decreasing as you travel southwards. The inland area has a mixed continental and Mediterranean climate, with cold winters and very hot summers. The annual mean temperature is around 14–15 ºC. Spring and autumn tend to receive the most rain, with 350 mm per year falling in the driest areas, and more than 600 mm per year in the wettest.

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QUALITY FACTORS

JANÉ VENTURA HAS TWO ESTATES IN THE BAIX PENEDÈS • TERRA ALTA As its name suggests, the vineyards of this DO in the far southwestern corner of Catalonia grow on plateaus and valley floors surrounded by jagged mountains. The region was originally known for its white wines, but today it produces a wide selection of both traditional and foreign grape varieties, and its red wines are receiving increasing attention. WHITE VARIETIES: Garnatxa Blanca, Macabeu, Parellada, Chardonnay, Moscatel de Frontignan, Moscatel d'Alexandrie, Chenin Blanc, Pedro Ximénez, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier

WHITE VARIETIES RECOMMENDED

RED VARIETIES RECOMMENDED

• Garnacha blanca

• Garnacha negra

• Moscatel de Frontignan

• Garnacha peluda

• Parellada

• Samsó (Carinyena)

AUTHORISED

AUTHORISED

• Chardonnay

• Syrah,

• Moscatel de Frontignan

• Merlot

• Moscatel de Alejandria

• Cabernet sauvignon

• Chenin blanc

• Tempranillo

• Pedro Ximénez

• Cabernet franc

• Sauvignon blanc

• Garnacha tintorera

• Viognier

• Morenillo

RED VARIETIES: Ull de Llebre, Carinyena, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Garnatxa Negra, Garnatxa Peluda, Samsó, Syrah, Morenillo, Cabernet Franc

TOMAS CUSINÉMACABEU 2009 62

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SOME WELL-KNOWN WINERIES CELLER XAVIER CLUA, CELLER PIÑOL, CELLER MAS BLANCH SEPTEMBER 2010


U S A

QUALITY FACTORS

California • Oregon • Washington

USA DOES TERROIR!

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BY RICHARD CRAIG

With domestic consumption of American wines never greater, we take a look at the country’s major wine regions of California, Oregon and Washington.

C

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urrently, 44% of the US adult population does not consume alcohol, and 25% of the remainder enjoys beer and spirits, not wine. We are currently locked into a prolonged period of recession or at the very best, very slow economic growth, where disposable income is declining and the anti-alcohol lobby, parts of the medical profession and Richard Craig some politicians are also determined to make it as difficult as possible to sell wine responsibly.

Despite all this, wine consumption in the US has risen to 9.7 litres per capita and this figure has been increasing gradually for the last 15 years. This is due to the adoption of wine in early adulthood by the large millennial generation, the availability of quality wine at all price levels, the acceptance, by many, that moderate wine consumption is compatible with a healthy lifestyle, and the increase in sustainable and organic producers. Wine imports from Europe, Australasia and South America have remained static and it has been the domestic producers, principally in California, Oregon and Washington, that have stepped up to the plate to increase their market share.

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QUALITY FACTORS

CALIFORNIA California produces 90% of all US wine. There are 2,972 wineries, 4,600 grape growers, 531,000 acres of wine grapegrowing vineyards, producing 3.7 million tons of fruit, selling 197 million cases of wine to the U.S market.

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If California was a single country, it would be the fourth largest wine producer in the world behind France, Italy and Spain. It has 93 of the 168 AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) established by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms to help promote the specific qualities of

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IF CALIFORNIA WAS A SINGLE COUNTRY, IT WOULD BE THE FOURTH LARGEST WINE PRODUCER IN THE WORLD BEHIND FRANCE, ITALY AND SPAIN SEPTEMBER 2010


QUALITY FACTORS

American vineyards. Unlike most other appellation of origin systems, AVAs do not delimit the type of grapes grown, the methods of vinification or the crop yield, allowing the American vintner the freedom to be at the forefront of quality wine production, and for change and innovation to occur rapidly, unconstrained by reams of bureaucracy and regulations.

PAUL HOBBS FOCUSES ON SINGLE VINEYARD WINES

Paul Hobbs was one of the first Californian Winemakers to focus

of grapes. The vineyard name, To Kalon, comes from the Greek

on single vineyard wines and he now either owns or works with

meaning “the highest good” and was the source of Beaulieu

the owners very closely, across 10 vineyards in Napa and Sonoma.

Vineyards legendary Georges de Latour wines, made by the famed

His Beckstoffer To Kalon Vineyard in Napa is planted to

winemaker André Tchelistcheff. Paul seized on this rare opportunity

three clones of Cabernet Sauvignon. It was originally planted in

to work with this historic site and to continue the tradition of fine

the mid 19th century and at the time was known as the best source

winemakers on this vineyard.

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Kathleen Inman of Inman Family Vineyards, Russian River Valley is an example of such innovation. She is at the cutting edge of organic and sustainable practices in the vineyard and the winery, using an organic fertilizer called Four-Course Compost, derived from table scraps at high-end San Francisco hotels and restaurants, worm cast teas and organic pesticides. Along with many other quality vintners, she rightly claims that her wines are created in the vineyard and not in the winery.

CALIFORNIA HAS 531,000 ACRES OF WINE GRAPE-GROWING VINEYARDS GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

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QUALITY FACTORS

WASHINGTON STATE Washington is the second-largest wine region with more than 32,000 acres of vines, across 11 AVAs with more than 650 wineries producing 160,000 tons of grapes.

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Yakima Valley was the first AVA to be created in 1983 and Colombia Valley is the largest. At 11 million acres it represents one third of Washington State’s land mass. Fortunately, smaller AVAs such as Red Mountain, Yakima Valley, Rattlesnake Hills, Horse Haven Hills and Snipe Mountain are included within the boundaries of the Colombia Valley AVA. One wonders why Colombia Valley has an all-encompassing AVA at all, given the number of smaller AVAs in the region. Quality Washington producers include Andrew Will Winery, Facelli Winery, Fall Line Winery, Snoqualmie Winery, North Star, Apex Cellars, 37 Cellars, Rainier Ridge, Tagaris Winery, Tanjuli, Walla Walla Vintners, Woodward Canyon Winery and Yakima River Winery.

WASHINGTON IS THE SECONDLARGEST WINE REGION WITH MORE THAN 32,000 ACRES OF VINES

Snoqualmie Wines are made by Joy Andersen with the help of oenologist Meryl Rickey. Snoqualmie was one of the first Washington wineries to craft wines from USDA-certified organically grown grapes. 378 acres are currently certified and a further 133 are in the process of certification. Her vines are grown on their own root stocks, and are phylloxera-free. She plants pesticide-free cover crops to reduce soil erosion. SEPTEMBER 2010


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QUALITY FACTORS

OREGON STATE

Willamette Valley is the major AVA, 150 miles long and 60 miles wide. It runs from the Colombia River in Portland, south through Salem to the Calapooya Mountains outside Eugene. It has 200 wineries with 12,000 acres of wine grapes. Within Willamette Valley AVA, six sub-appellations have been identified: Dundee Hills, Eola-Amity Hills, McMinnville, Ribbon Ridge, YamhillCarlton District, and the recently approved Chehalem Mountains.

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Oregon’s wine region has 16 AVAs and covers 19,400 acres. It contains 387 wineries and produces 40,200 tons of grapes, of which over half are Pinot Noir. Pinot Noir is king with 11,523 acres in production in 2009, followed closely by Pinot Gris at 2,829 and interestingly, only 583 acres of Cabernet Sauvignon.

OREGON’S WINE REGION COVERS 19,400 ACRES

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QUALITY FACTORS

In 2007, after 25 years at the helm, Rex Hill Winery founders Paul Hart and Jan Jacobsen decided to

W I N E S TA S T E D

retire. Rather than selling to a big wine conglomerate, they handed the keys to another Oregon familyowned winery, A to Z Wineworks,

ANDREW MURRAY

Francis and Sam Tannahill. Rex

Roussanne/Marsanne Camp 4 Vineyard 2009 60% Roussanne, 40% Marsanne (Santa Ynez Valley)

Hart, after the founders. It is located

ANDREW MURRAY

on a warm, south-facing slope of

Syrah Tous les Jours 2007 95% Syrah, 5% Grenache (Santa Barbara/Paso Robles)

Chehalem Ridge, and the fruit from this 27 acre vineyard - 95% Pinot Noir - is harvested a week or

two before other Rex Hill Vineyards. The soils are both volcanic and sedimentary. In places it is so rocky that the vines were planted using a pickaxe and a shovel and it cannot be farmed

Esperance 2007 70% Grenache, 25% Syrah, 5% Mourvedre (Paso Robles/Santa Ynez Valley)

86/100

£16.77

86/100

£11.97

83/100

£16.77

87/100

£17.35

89/100

£16.27

92/100

£21.47

OJAI VINEYARDS Sauvignon Blanc 2009 McGinley Vineyard

and sustainable practices. This is true terroir…

OJAI VINEYARDS Syrah 2007

Vineyards, Erath Vineyards, Ponzi Vineyards, Beaux Frères,

PRICE

ANDREW MURRAY

with a tractor. The wines are created in the vineyard using organic

Other quality producers to look out for include Elk Cove

SCORE

CALIFORNIA SANTA BARBARA

under Bill and Deb Hatcher, Cheryl Hill’s top vineyard is called Jacob-

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

WINES

OJAI VINEYARDS Syrah Hawk Vineyard 2005

Domaine Drouhin, Domaine Serene, and Scott Paul Wines. There is huge variation and diversity in the site, topography, soil and climate of the 163 AVAs, which this article cannot go into in detail. However, it is clear that the producers of high quality wines work with the land and the vines. Wine is

CALIFORNIA SANTA LUCIA HIGHLANDS MORGAN Chardonnay Double L Vineyard 2007

89/100

£23.52

90/100

£30.19

MORGAN Pinot Noir Double L Vineyard 2007

indeed made in the vineyard. Every plot of land, row of vines and individual grape has been studied to the Nth degree. Viticulture and vinification have developed rapidly to create

CALIFORNIA CENTRAL COAST

wines of truly world class quality. Sustainable viticulture has

MARMESA CABRILLO PEAK

had a huge part to play in the quality programme and it is no

Pinot Noir 2007

coincidence that the best wines of the nation come from wineries and vineyards that are seriously adopting these practices and

89/100

£12.95

87/100

£8.25

MARMESA CABRILLO PEAK Cerro Romauldo Syrah

indeed, going further.

CALIFORNIA MOUNT HARLAN The future is bright for the US wine producers as quality is on

CALERA DE VILLIERS

the rise. The market for quality wine in China and the Far East

Pinot Noir 2007

is being satisfied to a large extent by France and then

CALERA RYAN

Australia. The Americans need to be there too. Exports and indeed domestic sales need to be encouraged, not the opposite, by the authorities at local, national and international levels for the preservation of the environment, not to mention

Pinot Noir 2006

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£22.94

89/100

£25.48

90/100

£37.23

93/100

£48.00

CALERA MILLS Pinot Noir 2000

CALERA JENSEN Pinot Noir 2000

the balance of payments.

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86/100

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QUALITY FACTORS

SCORES AND RETAIL PRICES WINES

SCORE

PRICE

CALIFORNIA SONOMA MOUNTAIN LAUREL GLEN 86/100

Counterpoint Cabernet Sauvignon 2005

£16.77

WINES

SCORE

CALIFORNIA DRY CREEK VALLEY DRY CREEK VALLEY The Mariner 2006

DELICATO FAMILY 84/100

Vineyards Brazin Zinfandel, Monte Rosso Vineyard 2007

£22.93

PRICE

92/100

£25.61

92/100

£18.00

50% Cabernet Sauvignon, 32%Merlot, 8% Malbec, 6% Cabernet Franc, 4% Petit Verdot

CLAY STATION 89/100

Late Harvest Viognier 2008 37.5cl

£11.47

DRY CREEK VALLEY Somers Ranch Zinfandel 2007

CALIFORNIA NAPA VALLEY CORISON Cabernet Sauvignon 2006

92/100

£41.64

86/100

£19.61

87/100

£39.68

90/100

£20.68

FORMAN Chateau La Grande Roche 2007

FORMAN

CALIFORNIA ANDERSON VALLEY ROEDERER ESTATE Quartet Brut NV

90/100

£18.21

90/20

£10.21

89/100

£10.40

89/100

£17.35

89/100

£9.52

86 /100

£11.77

86/100

£13.54

93 /100

£23.03

70% Chardonnay, 30% Pinot Noir

Cabernet Sauvignon 2007

BACIO DIVINO Prazzo 2007 74% Sangiovese, 8% Syrah, 6% Petit Syrah, 6% Cabernet Sauvignon, 6% Viognier

OREGON A TO Z WINEWORKS

BACIO DIVINO

Riesling 2007

87/100

Cabernet Sauvignon 2006 Merlot, Sangiovese, Petit Syrah, Syrah

£47.02

A TO Z WINEWORKS Chemin de Terrre 2006

PHILIP TOGNI Tanbark Hill Cabernet Sauvignon 2007

83/100

£28.91

94/100

£60.63

86/100

£23.03

PHILIP TOGNI

44% Merlot, 17.5% Cabernet Sauvignon, 17.5% Syrah, 9% Cabernet Franc, 6% Sangiovese,

Tanbark Hill Cabernet Sauvignon 2007

MICHAEL MONDAVI Emblem Cabernet Sauvignon 2007

4% Grenache, 2% Pinot Noir

REX HILL VINEYARDS Willamette Valley Pinot Noir 2008

MICHAEL MONDAVI Cabernet Sauvignon, Orso Vineyard 2006

90/100

£40.95

94/100

£193.90

87/100

£44.29

M BY MICHAEL MONDAVI Cabernet Sauvignon 2006

WASHINGTON

STAGLIN FAMILY Vineyard Chardonnay 2008

STAGLIN FAMILY

Wines Columbia Valley Eve Chardonnay 2008

Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon Salus 2008

90/100

£52.90

94/100

£98.92

STAGLIN FAMILY Vineyard Cabenet Sauvignon 2006

CHARLES SMITH CHARLES SMITH Boom Boom Syrah 2008 99.5% Syrah, 0.5% Primitivo

CHARLES SMITH

CALIFORNIA RUSSIAN RIVER VALLEY INMAN Pinot Gris 2008

88/100

£16.18

92/100

£19.90

INMAN Pinot Noir 2006

Chateau Smith 2007 96.5% Cabernet Sauvignon 3.5% Malbec

K VINTNERS K Syrah Clifton Vineyard 2008

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NEW YORK LIFE

Harlem’s wine renaissance Cabernet, Bordeaux, Malbec: which wine is most popular right now in New York? That’s hard to determine in a city with 508 wine shops and 240 wine bars (and counting). How do you identify a trend in a city of eight million souls living in five diverse boroughs, where 170 different languages are spoken? The task is daunting. If there seems to be a fondness for red wines downtown, uptown appears to have developed a soft spot for whites. That is, uptown, not as in the Upper West Side: uptown as in Harlem.

T

So which wines are most popular in Harlem? I visited two wine stores to find out: Harlem Vintage and The Winery. These specialist vintners are giving wine a new and welcome accessibility in the neighbourhood. In answer to an enquiry about what is popular with her clientele outside of domestic wines, Jai Jai Greenfield, co-owner of Harlem Vintage, explains, “The mindset of most of our customers is wines from South America, Australia even South Africa. France is there, but most people are very focused on New

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he gentrification of Harlem has seen upmarket wine stores and wine bars springing up in the neighbourhood at a frenetic pace over the last eight years. Courvoisier and Hennessy cognacs have been popular for some time with New York’s AfricanAmerican community, but today a new trend is on the rise, for Côtes du Rhône and Shiraz wines. This growing taste for wine is still in its early stages. Like any newcomers to wine, the concepts of bouquet, tannins, structure and acidity are in development, so most drinkers aren’t yet setting their sights on a 2005 Château Cos d’Estournel or a 1993 Puligny-Montrachet Premier Cru Les Demoiselles.

GANT LUXTON OF THE WINERY: “MANY CUSTOMERS CHOOSE BASED ON PRICE” World wines” She adds, “Organic is very big. They are very interested in organic wines.” GW Gant Luxton of The Winery, which is located in the heart of ‘Little Senegal”, an area with many African immigrants, says price is also an issue. “Between $9 and $12 is a popular price

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range. Many customers choose based on price … a lot of people ask for the cheapest wine.” The Winery carries some 300 wines, but the subtler ones are a harder sell. “People like big, full-bodied wines like Malbec and Cabernet. Also, fresh wines like Sauvignon Blanc; Vinho Verde is extremely popular here.” In terms of buyers’ regional preferences,

SEPTEMBER 2010


NEW YORK LIFE

THE WINERY IS LOCATED IN THE HEART OF “LITTLE SENEGAL”

The wine sellers note that the trends are seasonable. “In the summer, Harlemites are looking for very fresh, light, lively, zippy wines,” explains Greenfield of Harlem Vintage. “Last summer we focused on Riesling, and this year on Sauvignon Blanc and Portuguese Vinho Verde. As we move into fall and its heartier and richer meals, our customers are looking for wines with more structure,

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sellers are Argentina’s 2009 Tilia Malbec (under $11), redolent of black fruits and spices with soft tannins, and the Italian wine Cantina Gabriele Dolcemente 2008.

ERIC WOODS AND JAI JAI GREENFIELD OF NECTAR AND HARLEM VINTAGE

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they go out, but may not buy it to drink at home. “At Nectar, you can experiment without having to buy a bottle unsure of what you’re going to get,”explains Greenfield. “That’s the essence of a wine bar - it’s somewhere you can go to sample. Customers are encouraged to test things they might not otherwise have tried.” Pascal Giberné

JAI JAI GREENFIELD OF HARLEM VINTAGE: “IN THE SUMMER, HARLEMITES ARE LOOKING FOR VERY FRESH, LIGHT, LIVELY, ZIPPY WINES”

The Winery 257, West 116th Street (at 8th Avenue) New York, NY 10026 Tel: +1 212 222 4866 www.thewineryonline.com info@thewineryonline.com

Harlem Vintage Luxton says, “Wines from North and South America are very popular. In the French section, customers tend to find a favourite and stick with it: for example, Côtes du Rhone or affordable Bordeaux. They also love sweet wines.” Some names stand out. California’s Hacienda Chardonnay with its typical buttery taste is a favourite (under $9). The Sicilian 2008 Emperor Nero d’Avola (under $11) with its smooth tannins and notes of blackberry and plum is also very popular. Other top

tannins and acidity. They gravitate more toward dinner wine as opposed to sipping wine.”

2235, Frederick Douglass Blvd (at 121st Street) New York, NY 10027 Tel: +1 212 866 9463 Both stores offer weekly tastings to www.harlemvintage.com educate their customers’ palates and expand their wine knowledge. To give aficionados another way to experience wine, Harlem Vintage has also opened a sleek and contemporary wine bar next d o o r : N e c t a r . A l t h o u g h t h e t wo e s t a blishments share some of the same clientele, Nectar tends to attract a younger crowd that likes to drink wine when

Nectar 2235, Frederick Douglass Blvd (at 121st Street) New York, NY 10027 Tel: +1 212 961 9622 www.nectarwinenyc.com info@nectarwinenyc.com

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EXPORT

The United States: a growing market for wine In 2008, 4.4 billion 750-ml bottles of wine were sold in the United States. Of these, around 80% were domestic (mainly from California, Washington, Oregon and New York) and 20% were imported.

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must sell to a distributor, who then must sell to a retailer, and only retailers can sell to end customers. There are more than 10,000 importers, but 55% of the imports are controlled by only seven companies: WJ Deutsch & Sons, Foster’s Group, Banfi Vintners, E & J Gallo Winery, Palm Bay International, Constellation Brands and Shaw-Ross International Importers. These importers all focus on brands. There are some specialist importers, such as Stacole Fine Wines, DB Wine Selection, Frederick Wildman & Sons, Kermit Lynch Wine Merchant and Martine’s Wines, that focus on smaller estates.

Pierre Courdurié

A

lthough the United States is one of the top wine-producing countries in the world, its annual wine consumption is only around 9 litres per person, which is less than in most European countries, Australia and Argentina. However, with a population of 308 million, the US market is the world's second largest, a ranking that is set to continue since wine consumption is on the increase. US law on imported alcohol, including wines, is very strict. It is based on a 'three-tier' distribution system (the three tiers are producers/importers, distributors and retailers). The importer

72

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The story is similar on the distribution side: 50% of the volume is distributed by seven companies: Southern Wine & Spirits, Charmer Sunbelt Group, Republic National Distributing Company, Glazer’s, Young’s Market Company, Wirtz Beverage Illinois and Martignetti. The majority of wine (around 70%) is sold through the off-trade retail channel, with supermarkets and clubs (eg Costco, Walmart and Trader Joe’s) accounting for 55% of sales, and wine shops (Total Wine & More, ABC and Spec's) accounting for 45%. Supermarkets tend to have a small selection of wine with well-known brands such as Yellow Tail, Arrogant Frog and Concha y Toro, whereas specialty wine stores offer customers a wider choice. In the latter, 70% of the wines are domestic, but you also find French wines from family estates, such as Domaine Roux Père & Fils, Domaine Manuel Olivier, Château de Fontenille, Château Patache d’Aux, Château Bonnet, Château Sainte Barbe, Château Liversan, Château Larose Trintaudon, Château Bertinerie, Domaine Galevan, Château du Cèdre, Château Jolys and Lionel Osmin & Cie. Most of these retail for under 20 dollars. The internet currently represents around 5% of the market, but is growing rapidly. In the on-trade market (eg, bars and SEPTEMBER 2010


Š KARIN LAU - FOTOLIA.COM

EXPORT

ALTHOUGH THE UNITED STATES IS ONE OF THE TOP WINE-PRODUCING COUNTRIES IN THE WORLD, ITS ANNUAL WINE CONSUMPTION IS ONLY AROUND 9 LITRES PER PERSON

restaurants), restaurants represent around 25% of sales. Despite the growth potential of the US market, French wines remain difficult for US customers to understand. French wine has a traditional, historical, perhaps even stuffy, image and can intimidate customers who perceive it as a premium product. Even if customers are knowledgeable about varietals (eg, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier), the fact that French AOC wines do not indicate the grape varieties on the bottle's front label makes choosing a French wine a rather esoteric art. The impact of the recent economic crisis on the US wine trade has been a decrease in the price, but not in the volume sold. Instead of buying wines with a 20 dollar retail value, customers are buying cheaper wines, under 15 or 10 dollars. As a result, French wines are suffering on the US market. Although importers say that France offers the best-value wines, French

wines are up against the low production costs of wines from Chile and Argentina. This has led to a decline in the US market share of French wines from 21% in 2001 to 12% in 2008. Nonetheless, although the short-term situation is not easy, a longer term outlook indicates positive signs for French wines in the United States. The progressive establishment of American Viticultural Areas (AVAs) to designate the geographical area of a wine may aid American consumers to better understand the French appellation system. Also, US customers are very open to new discoveries and to tasting different wines. Most importers claim that once customers taste a good wine and find out more about the winemaker, a link can be created. But as in making a fine wine, building this relationship will take time...

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

Pierre CourduriĂŠ

SEPTEMBER 2010

73


FAMILY BUSINESS

www.chateau-figeac.com

Château Figeac: a hard act to follow When Comte Eric d’Aramon married Laure Manoncourt, he swapped the world of yogurt for the world of wine. Understandably he remains delighted with the change. “Tasting wine is way more interesting than tasting yogurt!” he says.

D

’Aramon arrived at Figeac in 1988, which was already Thierry Manoncourt’s 41st consecutive vintage. “Thierry Manoncourt’s first vintage was

actually 1943,” explained d’Aramon. “He returned to France from Germany where he was a prisoner of war when his grandmother died. He then went to Paris to study at the INA (Institut National Agronomique) before returning to Figeac in December 1946. From 1956 Thierry Manoncourt has lived full time at the property. In those days it was unusual for an estate’s proprietor to be in situ and adopt such a hands on approach.”

footsteps of Manoncourt. “In 1989 I went off to study winemaking and tasting at the Faculty of Bordeaux. I took over the commercial side in 1992 but was not really in charge of the wine until 1995.” Eric d’Aramon “The two most important things I have learnt from my father-

INTERVIEW OVER WE TASTE THE 2000 VINTAGE

in-law is his knowledge - knowing how to approach things, where to look for information and who to ask - and, although he is directive, he has allowed me make mistakes, so that I can

“In 1892 André Villepigue, Manoncourt’s grandfather, bought

learn. Often they are mistakes that he had also made and he’ll

Figeac, which has subsequently been passed on through the

point me to a wine from the 1950s for example where he had a

female side of the family,” continues d’Aramon.

similar problem.” Figeac is at the far west of the Saint-Emilion appellation close to

74

Prior to the 19th century Figeac was a very large estate with a

Pomerol. Its soil is gravel and sandy, which is why it is planted

settled ownership. It then went through a very rocky period

with an atypical proportion of grape varieties. Whereas much of

with seven changes of ownership in 50 years and various parts

Saint-Emilion is dominated by Merlot, Figeac’s 40 hectares of

of the estate were sold off - most notable being the sale of

vines are planted with 70% Cabernet - half Franc, half Sauvignon -

Cheval Blanc in 1838.

as it is particularly suited to gravel and just 30% Merlot.

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©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

It must have been daunting for d’Aramon to follow on in the


©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

FAMILY BUSINESS

FIGEAC IS AT THE FAR WEST OF THE SAINT-EMILION APPELLATION. ITS SOIL IS GRAVEL AND SANDY, WHICH IS WHY IT IS PLANTED WITH AN ATYPICAL PROPORTION OF GRAPE VARIETIES “During my time in charge,” explains d’Aramon., “the wines have evolved - a process of evolution rather than revolution. After all it was the same for Thierry Manoncourt - the style of wine he made changed over time: 1959 wasn’t the same of 1947 and 1975 was different again. Wine adapts to new consumers and to new ways of drinking wine.” “Today fine bottles of wine are drunk in less formal occasions. People drink a glass of good wine before going out for the evening. There is less fine dining in the traditional French manner. Now it is less serious and subdued - more convivial. Our wines have to be more fruity and ready to drink sooner - people no longer want to lay wines down for 15 years. But our aim is to continue to make elegant wines with finesse that have the capacity to age.” Interview over, we taste the 2000 vintage. “Not quite ready,” observes d’Aramon. Perhaps not but it certainly shows the silky

THIERRY MANONCOURT: 22 SEPTEMBER 1917- 27TH AUGUST 2010 ND

Thierry Manoncourt died peacefully at his home on 27th August just a few days before his 93rd birthday. He remained actively involved in Figeac and its wine up until his death. Had he lived, 2010 would have been his 63rd consecutive vintage. It is rare even in wine, known for the longevity of some of its producers, for someone to make or be involved in over 60 vintages. Manoncourt was one of the grand old characters of Bordeaux widely respected and loved. “He was one of the last of his kind in Bordeaux. Always polite and welcoming and he spoke the most perfect French,” said John Salvi MW. It was characteristic of Manoncourt that his request to have Figeac promoted to Premier Grand Cru Classé (A) to join Ausone and Cheval Blanc was rejected not on the grounds of quality but because he did not charge enough for his wine. Manoncourt wanted people to be able to drink and enjoy Figeac rather than it being a trophy bottle locked in a vault.

texture and elegance that d’Aramon and Manoncourt worked together to achieve in Figeac.

Jim Budd

(The above article is based on an interview with Comte Eric d’Aramon a few days before Thierry Manoncourt’s death.)

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75


FAMILY BUSINESS

www.chateaulavariere.com

Jacques Beaujeau - Château la Varière and Domaine de la Perruche: From generation to generation

J

acques Beaujeau knew when he was just six years old

of Cabernet Franc for Saumur-Champigny and 3 hectares of

that he would be a vigneron. His father was tragically kil-

Chenin Blanc for Saumur.

led by a friend in a hunting accident and he was brought

up by his grandfather.

This year will be Beaujeau’s 40th vintage at the immaculatelykept Château la Varière, which is just across the road from the

”My maternal grandfather was called Georges Martin and he told

imposing renaissance Château de Brissac. With its gravelled

me after my father died that I would succeed him. The family had

driveway and beautifully-kept barn and other outbuildings this

been vignerons in Champs-sur-Layon since the Revolution. My

estate is one of the showpieces of Anjou. The property dates

grandfather had 35 hectares of vines. My father’s family were also

from the 15th century and the barn, one of the oldest buildings,

vignerons - they had vines at La Fosse-de-Tigné, close to Tigné.

serves as the red wine barrel chai, while a slightly more recent building is used for the whites - dry and sweet.

“My grandfather Georges taught me the importance of terroir, in particular getting to know your vineyards and soil really well.

Château la Varière makes the customary range of Anjou wines in

I learnt viticulture from him and the need to look after and respect

all three colours including a very good Anjou Villages La

the vines.”

Chevalerie from 100% Cabernet Sauvignon. “At Varière we have 65 hectares of Cabernet including 15 of Cabernet Sauvignon,”

All of the Beaujeau vineyards are grassed over in the centre of the

explains Beaujeau, “then 5 hectares each of Gamay and

rows with weedkiller used under the vines. “This may change in

Grolleau, and 30 of Chenin Blanc. Our annual production from

the future,” explains Beaujeau. “We are always considering what

the Domaine de la Perruche is around 250,000 bottles and

changes we should make, so in the future we may harrow under

600,000 from Varière.

the vines.” In 2004 their daughter Marie joined them. Her studies were “I took over at Château la Varière, which has been owned by my

not in wine but instead in literature and included time at

wife Anne’s family since 1850, in 1970. We regrouped all the

Cambridge University in the UK. Marie is working on the

production here with around 45 hectares of vines.”

commercial side of the business with her mother. Her responsibilities include going to wine fairs such as the

Since then Anne and Jacques Beaujeau have more than doubled

recent Vinexpo in Hong Kong.

the size of the vineyards in Anjou. They now have 100 hectares

76

of vines including holdings in Bonnezeaux and Quarts de

“Most of our sales are in France - about 80-85% are here. Our

Chaume. In addition in 2002 they bought the 45-hectare

main export markets are Belgium, the UK and the USA, while

Domaine de la Perruche in Montsoreau, which has 42 hectares

China is a growing market,” says Beaujeau.

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SEPTEMBER 2010


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FAMILY BUSINESS

“MY GRANDFATHER GEORGES TAUGHT ME THE IMPORTANCE OF TERROIR, IN PARTICULAR GETTING TO KNOW YOUR VINEYARDS AND SOIL REALLY WELL” Marie is now also studying viticulture and vinification. “Like many women she is a very good taster,” says Beaujeau.“

In

addition to her studies I gave her a vineyard to plant, so Marie had to make all the decisions: what variety to plant, what rootstock etc. She chose Cabernet Franc.” Jacques Beaujeau reflects briefly and then take over from us.”

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

adds: “It is my dearest wish that she will Jim Budd Jacques Beaujeau GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

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77


FAMILY BUSINESS

www.louislatour.com

Keeping it in the family Wine certainly flows in the Latour family veins. Run today by the seventh generation, Maison Louis Latour is a grower, merchant and producer based in Burgundy’s Côte de Beaune region.

F

ounded in 1797, Maison Latour

Famous amongst Latour wines is their

is one of the area’s key players,

Corton-Charlemagne, and the business

producing around eight million

has an excellent reputation as a traditional, Burgundy-based, négoçiant-éléveur.

bottles of wine per annum.

However, in more recent times the company Renowned worldwide for the quality of

has branched out and now m a k e s

its wines, the company has acquired its

w i n e i n t h e A r d è c h e a n d Coteaux

reputation over more than two centuries.

de Verdon regions of southern France.

Viticulteurs since the 17th century, the The Latour family’s involvement with

of 50 hectares, including the largest holding

wine can be traced back to 1731.

of grand cru vineyards in the Côte d’Or

Owners of vines in the Côte de Beaune,

appellation. The vineyards stretch from

they settled in the village of Aloxe-

Chambertin in the north to Chevalier-

Corton in 1768, buying up vineyards in

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Latours slowly accrued a unique estate

Montrachet in the south, and are planted with two noble Burgundian grape varieties, Pinot Noir and Chardonnay; these grapes are vinified and aged in the

Louis-Fabrice Latour

this famous appellation and gradually establishing a large domaine, acquiring parcels of Corton “Clos de la Vigne au Saint", "Bressandes", "Grèves" and

Aloxe-Corton "Les Chaillots.”

winery of Château Corton Grancey, in Aloxe-Corton.

In 1797 Louis Latour created his brokerage business and in 1867, he purchased premises in Beaune where the company is still based; it was in 1891 that the Latours acquired Château Corton Grancey, the jewel in their crown. Shipper and owner of premium vineyards, the third Louis Latour provided wine for nobility including the Thurn-und-Taxis

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

family, the court of Bavaria and the future King of Bulgaria. At

THE LATOUR FAMILY’S INVOLVEMENT WITH WINE CAN BE TRACED BACK TO 1731 78

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the turn of the century these prestigious clients were replaced by luxury hotels and restaurants including the Hotel de Paris in Monte Carlo, Geneva's Le Beau-Rivage and the Ritz in Paris. From the mid 1800s onwards Maison Latour sold wines far and wide, from Buenos Aires to Bucharest. The wines were delivered in barrel until the end of the 19th century, and subsequently in SEPTEMBER 2010


FAMILY BUSINESS

bottle; the labels, designed by Louis Latour, have remained unchanged. Catastrophe struck when the vineyards of France were almost completely destroyed by phylloxera, which spread rapidly from 1860 onwards. Louis Latour replanted the devastated vineyards, but it was his son, the young agricultural engineer Louis-Noël ©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Latour, who distinguished himself by stating that the grafting of Pinot Noir onto resistant American root-stocks would produce wines of high quality. More recently, in a quest for modernization, the sixth Louis Latour built new facilities on the outskirts of Beaune and set up sister companies in London and New York, while Maison

RENOWNED WORLDWIDE FOR THE QUALITY OF ITS WINES, THE COMPANY HAS ACQUIRED ITS REPUTATION OVER MORE THAN TWO CENTURIES

Latour has pioneered the production of fine wines outside the confines of Burgundy, growing Chardonnay in the Ardèche (350 kilometres south of Beaune) since the 1980s and Pinot Noir in the Var département since 1989. The company celebrated its bicentenary in 1997, passing into the hands of Louis-Fabrice Latour two years later. An unwritten Latour family rule stipulates that each generation must bequeath

significant contribution to the business by purchasing the Simonnet-Febvre (Chablis) and Henry Fessy (Beaujolais) estates, thus strengthening the Latour presence throughout Burgundy. When the time comes, his legacy will be more than two hundred years’ devotion by one family to the fruit of Burgundy’s greatest vineyards.

Louise Hurren

©ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

something new to the next. Forty-five year-old Louis-Fabrice’s

children are still young, but their father has already made a

FOUNDED IN 1797, MAISON LATOUR IS ONE OF THE AREA’S KEY PLAYERS, PRODUCING AROUND EIGHT MILLION BOTTLES OF WINE PER ANNUM GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

79


WINE AND FOOD

© VINCENT BOYER - L'INTÉGRAL

Alain Passard: putting emotion into cooking

A

lain Passard’s culinary creations have the mystery of poetry and the simplicity of an enigma. He declares himself a "sculptor of fire" who excels in finding the exact heat, from gentle to searing, that a food requires. The chef readily admits that his first approach to a fresh vegetable is visual, by observing its appearance and colour. "Mauve, yellow, mother-of-pearl, celadon green, orange - the colours give me inspiration. I build on that bit by bit. The cooking technique comes after". L’Arpège is Alain Passard’s workshop, where his raw materials are vegetables, fish, poultry, herbs and spices. The chef isn’t interested in innovation for its own sake. He creates a few new recipes each year, enough to stay creative, while letting previous dishes live on.

80

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The presentation of the food owes nothing to chance: the chef considers that enjoying a meal, just as preparing it, is an art. "I work on everything: I cut, I peel, I cook, I season, I braise, I singe. I try to feel the vibes of the vegetables. I am totally intoxicated by their colours and scents".

NO MISUSE OF FLAVOURS! The watchword is: no misuse of flavours! Passard selects and then masters the raw material by purifying and refining, focusing on its essential features. This recipe, marked by its simplicity, is a perfect illustration of Alain Passard’s art, arising from authentic flavours and diverse ingredients judiciously combined to delight your palate SEPTEMBER 2010


RECIPE

Onion Gratin with Parmigiano Reggiano Ingredients (serves 4): ● 2 sweet onions (eg. “Oignon doux des Cévennes”). ● 40 gr of salted butter ● grated Parmigiano Reggiano cheese ● black ground pepper

Method: Mince the onions. Let them smoke in the salted butter in a pan without colouring (approximately 3 minutes). Then divide it in four small gratin dishes. Put them under a grill with grated parmesan cheese and pepper during approximately 3 minutes. Serve immediately. L'Arpège 84, rue de Varenne - 75007 Paris Individual or group booking: Tel.+33 (0)1 47 05 09 06 arpege.passard@wanadoo.fr

© AURORE DELIGNY

Open from Monday to Friday for lunch and dinner. No valet

BEST WITH Provence rosés, particularly from Bandol

The Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International Selection is:

85 /100

BANDOL A.C. La Cadiérenne - Cuvée Grande Tradition rosé 2009 Light pink. Intense nose of citrus with a mineral edge. On the palate, fullness, freshness and length are noticeable features. A wine that shows its class. A gastronomic rosé, ideal with Mediterranean fish.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THIS ESTATE CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

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81


WINE QUOTATIONS

Rhône wines - a class of their own Why do we talk about Rhône Valley wines as if the region were uniform, comparable to Burgundy, Bordeaux or Rioja? Apart from the river that shapes its sloping vineyards, there are few similarities between the northern and southern Côtes du Rhône. Some 100 kilometres separate the two winegrowing areas, but that's not the only difference. The geology, climate and the style of wines vary considerably.

T

here is one aspect that unites the wines of the Rhône Valley: the extreme pleasure they bring in drinking them. I love these wines. The stars of the north are Hermitage and Côte Rôtie. In the south, Châteauneuf-du-Pape and, to a lesser extent, Gigondas. The former are virtually single varietal wines made from Syrah. They are big, rich and elegant, with an intense bouquet of blackcurrant, focused and made to last. The latter are blends of up to thirteen grape varieties. They are full-bodied, generous, rich and can be kept for a long time. It is said that these wines can be aged for 25–30 years, and sometimes for much longer.

THE VINTAGES The best vintage years before 2000 are: 1945, 1949, 1961, 1978, 1985, 1990 and 1998.

THE BIG NAMES

© SODIVIN

In the northern Rhône, Marcel and Philippe Guigal, Jean-Louis Chave and the houses of Chapoutier and Jaboulet. In the southern Rhône, the estates of Beaucastel, Rayas, La Nerthe, La Mordorée, Clos des Papes, Vieille Julienne and Bonneau. Several years ago, Patrick Brunel of Château de la Gardine in Châteauneuf-du-Pape gave me the honour of inviting me to discover some of the estate's older bottles: 1986, 1984, 1979, 1978, 1969, 1962 and 1952. All the wines were still excellent, and the 1978 was extraordinary: rich, fat, soft, perfect. The 1952 vintage (a year that is dear to me), though slightly dulled, was still nuanced and voluptuous. Philippe Roux

PHILIPPE ROUX IS A SPECIALIST IN THE NICHE MARKET OF RARE VINTAGE

© SODIVIN

Please contact us for further information: www.gilbertgaillard.com

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Level BN SL TS TS (-) MS LS

base of neck slightly low top shoulder top/mid shoulder mid shoulder low shoulder

SEPTEMBER 2010

Label SD FD HD

slightly damaged fairly damaged highly damaged


WINE QUOTATIONS RHÔNE VALLEY WINES YEAR

CHÂTEAU

APPELLATION

RANK

1943

BOUCHARD AINE ET FILS

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

188.13

1947

BOUCHARD AINE ET FILS

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

165.55

1950

BERARD PERE ET FILS

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

165.55

1964

NAIGEON

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

79.43

1967

DU PELOUX

Gigondas

0.75 l

57.69

1971

CHANTE PERDRIX

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

66.05

1973

GARDINE (LA)

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

62.71

1977

JABOULET (PAUL) AINE La Chapelle

Hermitage

0.75 l

137.96

1978

JABOULET (PAUL) AINE La Chapelle

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

132.94

1981

JABOULET (PAUL) AINE La Chapelle

Hermitage

0.75 l

116.22

1985

GUIGAL La Landonne

Cote Rotie

La Landonne

0.75 l

811.04

1985

GUIGAL La Mouline

Cote Rotie

La Mouline

0.75 l

835.28

1987

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

La Turque

0.75 l

250.00

1988

GUIGAL La Landonne

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

542.64

1988

MONT THABOR

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

35.12

1988

MONT THABOR

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

35.12

1989

CHAVE (JEAN-LOUIS) Rouge

Hermitage

0.75 l

333.61

1990

GUIGAL

Hermitage

0.75 l

107.86

1990

RAYAS Blanc

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

222.41

1991

GUIGAL La Landonne

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

514.21

1991

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

500.00

1994

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

246.66

1994

GUIGAL La Mouline

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

275.08

1994

GUIGAL La Landonne

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

250.00

1995

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

0.75 l

333.61

1995

RAYAS - PIGNAN

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

158.03

1996

NERTHE (LA) Les Cadettes

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

62.71

1997

CHAVE (JEAN-LOUIS) Rouge

Hermitage

0.75 l

207.36

1997

JABOULET (PAUL) AINE La Chapelle

Hermitage

0.75 l

71.07

1997

REMIZIERES Cuvée Emilie

Hermitage

0.75 l

74.41

1998

JANASSE (DE LA) Vielles Vignes

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

82.78

1998

NERTHE (LA) Les Cadettes

Chateauneuf du Pape

1998

RAYAS Rouge

Chateauneuf du Pape

1999

CHAVE (JEAN-LOUIS) Blanc

1999

Réservé

La Turque

Réservé

VOL PRICE

VAT EXCL.

0.75 l

82.78

0.75 l

238.29

Hermitage

0.75 l

141.30

FONT DE MICHELLE

Chateauneuf du Pape

0.75 l

49.33

1999

GUIGAL La Mouline

Cote Rotie

La Mouline

0.75 l

497.49

1999

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

La Turque

0.75 l

497.49

1999

GUIGAL La Turque

Cote Rotie

La Turque

0.75 l

497.49

2000

CHAVE (JEAN-LOUIS) Rouge

Hermitage

0.75 l

183.11

2000

CHAVE (JEAN-LOUIS) Blanc

Hermitage

2000

GUIGAL La Mouline

Cote Rotie

2000

JABOULET (PAUL) AINE La Chapelle

Hermitage

2000

MORDOREE Magnum

Chateauneuf du Pape

Réservé

La Mouline

Magnum

0.75 l

166.39

0.75 l

166.39

0.75 l

66.05

1.50 l

208.19

0.75 l

63.55

Cuvée de la Reine des Bois 2000

VILLARD FRANCOIS La Brocarde

Cote Rotie

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83


TRAVEL

T

he exceptional brandy known as Cognac is the product of an extraordinary wine-growing region north of Bordeaux. The area is not home to just one Cognac, but many, each with its own distinctive style arising from the skill of its producers, its specific terroir and the blending art of its master taster - these all play a role in creating this most heavenly of spirits. A visit to the home of Cognac in lush and peaceful Charente is the key to revealing its secrets. To give honour where honour is due, it is necessary to start with this wine-growing region’s capital, the medieval town of Cognac. There is much to discover in this charming and historic town: its slow-moving river, the vital artery that so contributed to the town’s economic development, described by King Henri IV as the loveliest river in his kingdom, to the narrow cobbled streets and richly decorated buildings of this birthplace of King François I. Scattered around the town, you will find world-famous Cognac houses, each outdoing the next with their impressive sites and captivating guided visits. The town is lovely by day and by night, with its fine restaurants, market, museum of art and history, town hall and gardens.

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© BNIC - GÉRARD MARTRON

© BNIC - STÉPHANE CHARBEAU

A visit to Cognac country

Nearby, don’t miss the town of Jarnac, the heart of Cognac production, where many of the most famous Cognac houses are located (including Thomas Hine & Co, Delamain and Courvoisier). Jarnac also happens to be the birthplace of another famous French leader (this one, of the 20th century), François Mitterrand. Travel south to the delightful village of Segonzac, at the centre of the acclaimed appellation of Grande Champagne with its sea of grapevines punctuated by Romanesque churches. Here you will find top-name Cognac houses such as Frapin, with its elegant Château de Fontpinot surrounded by 300 hectares of Cognac premier cru vines. Not far away is Salles d’Angles, a very pleasant village where you should not miss stopping by the estate of Patrick Drouet to taste his remarkable Pineau des Charentes (fortified wine) and Cognacs. Alternatively, if you prefer to let someone else organise your visit, we have created a programme with our partner Wine Tour in France so you can simply sit back and take it all in! Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International SEPTEMBER 2010


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For further information, please contact us: WINE TOUR IN FRANCE www.gilbertgaillard.com

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The big three: Bourgueil, Chinon and Vouvray

© PASCAL GIRAULT

These are Touraine’s three top appellations with Bourgueil and Chinon producing some of the world’s greatest pure Cabernet Franc wines, and Vouvray some of the greatest Chenin Blancs. All three are among the oldest appellations in France: Vouvray was recognised in December 1936, while the other two had to wait until July 1937.

FRANÇOIS RABELAIS, CHINON’S MOST FAMOUS SON, WAS BORN NEARBY AND HIS FAMILY ONCE OWNED THE CLOS DE L’ECHO, CHINON’S BEST-KNOWN VINEYARD 86

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THE VERY FAMOUS "CLOS DU BOURG" (AC VOUVRAY), WHICH BELONGS TO DOMAINE HUET, ONE OF THE BEST OF THE APPELLATION

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coming from sandy soils and the most structured and long-lived from the limestone slopes. Top wines from good vintages benefit from being kept for a good four or five years and should easily last 25 with exceptional vintages such as 1964, 1989 and 2005 continuing to drink well even longer.

hinon and Bourgueil, along with neighbouring Saint-Nicolas-de-Bourgueil and Saumur-Champigny a little further west, form the heart of the kingdom of Cabernet Franc. There is nowhere else in the world that produces the same volume and quality of pure Cabernet Franc. Although Bordeaux is Franc’s birthplace the reds are invariably blends and it is rare to find Cabernet Franc as a majority component. Château Ausone and Cheval Blanc are two rare and distinguished exceptions to this rule. Cabernet Franc is one of the parents of Cabernet Sauvignon, which is a permitted variety in both Chinon and Bourgueil but only up to 10%. In practice the vast majority of the wines are pure Franc, which ripens earlier than Cabernet Sauvignon and so is better adapted to a region at the northern limits of successful red wine production. Cabernet Franc is less powerful and tannic than Cabernet Sauvignon, with greater delicacy and finesse. When ripe, Franc has lovely aromas of violets, red and black fruits, and sometimes coal tar. Picked unripe, it can be aggressively stalky with harsh aromas of unripe capsicum.

Chinon tends to be better known than Bourgueil, especially in English- speaking countries as it is easier to pronounce. Chinon also tends to be softer and less tannic when young than Bourgueil. Furthermore it has the advantage of a close association with François Rabelais, Chinon’s most famous son, who was born nearby and whose family once owned the Clos de l’Echo, Chinon’s best known vineyard, as well as having a picturesque town nestling between the château and the River Vienne.

Bourgueil and Chinon share a diversity of soils - sand, gravel and limestone - making three different styles of wine, the lightest

There are 2400 hectares in production. Of these, just some 35 are planted with Chenin Blanc-making dry whites, which should be

These are versatile reds. None should be served at more than 18°C. The lighter cuvées should be served chilled, especially in summer, and are ideal for summer lunches and picnics. They can also be delicious with fish.

AC CHINON

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planted on clay-limestone rather than gravel soils. Otherwise red wines dominate, although around 10% of the production is rosé. The appellation stretches from Crouzilles in the east to Savigny-enVéron in the west and both banks of the River Vienne, although the majority of the vineyards are sited on the north bank. The commune of Cravant-les-Coteaux accounts for some 40% of the appellation’s vines. Around Savigny-en-Véron, close to the confluence of La Loire and the Vienne, the soils are very sandy and much of the Chinon from here is for early drinking. The gravel soils, which tend to produce medium-bodied wines, are on the flat valley floor of the Vienne. Most producers have vines on at least two of the different types of soil and make a number of different cuvées to reflect this. Take Philippe Alliet, for instance. From his original gravel vineyards on the flat Philippe makes his Domaine and Vieilles Vieilles. These are Alliet’s lightest wines, although being Alliet these can be as structured as many top limestone cuvées from other producers. Then from the steep south-facing, clay-limestone slopes he has Coteau de Noiré and l’Huisserie. Some leading producers: Philippe Alliet, Bernard Baudry, Baudry-Dutour, Château de Coulaine, Couly-Dutheil, Pierre and Bertrand Couly, Domaine Charles Joguet, Domaine de la Noblaie.

AC BOURGUEIL The vineyards of Bourgueil run in a great, south-facing arc from Saint-Patrice through to Saint-Nicolas-de-Bourgueil. They are less sheltered than those of Chinon and this may be one reason why the wines tend to be a little more tannic when young - why they tend to be more ‘masculine’, and those of Chinon more ‘feminine’. The Bourgueil vineyards are protected from north winds by forests to the north. There are 1400 hectares of vines planted across eight communes from Saint-Patrice in the east to Chouzé-sur-Loire in the west. Some 5% of the production is rosé. Although a small proportion of the vines are planted on sandy soils close to the Loire, most of the vineyards are on the gravel terrace, which is intersected by the main road from Saint-Patrice to Saint-Nicolas and then on the limestone coteaux. As in Chinon, producers tend to make a number of cuvées that correspond to the different soils and the different ages of the vines. Just at the top of the limestone coteaux before the start of the forest, there are a series of remarkable caves cut into the tuffeau (local limestone). Often they would have been where the local stone was quarried to build houses. Now they serve as ideal places for the vignerons to age their best cuvées and to store their wine.

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Some leading producers: Yannick Amirault, Audebert, Domaine de la Butte, Domaine de la Chevalerie, Jean-Jacques Druet, Lamé Delisle Boucard, Nau Frères. SEPTEMBER 2010


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THE VINEYARDS OF TOURAINE START IN BLOIS AND STRETCH ALL THE WAY TO THE OUTSKIRTS OF SAUMUR GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

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River Brenne by the villages of Vernou and Reugny. The most famous producers, however, are at Vouvray, usually with vineyards on the première côte overlooking the Loire. The climate in Vouvray is noticeably more continental than in Bourgueil and Chinon, even though they are only some 45 kilomtres further west. During the winter it is quite common to find snow in Vouvray but none in Chinon, as the temperature is several degrees higher. Bud break and flowering occurs later here, © STEVENS FRÉMONT

meaning that, while it is possible to produce sweet wines virtually

BOURGUEIL AND CHINON PRODUCE SOME OF THE WORLD’S GREATEST PURE CABERNET FRANC WINES

every year in Anjou, it is only possible in Vouvray in favourable vintages. Some 65% of Vouvray is sparkling of variable quality with only 35% still wine, although the appellation’s high reputation is largely attributable to the still wines. Part of the attraction is that yields of 65 hl/ha are allowed for sparkling wines, whereas it is only 52 hl/ha for still. There is also a reduced risk as the grapes can be

AC SAINT-NICOLAS DE BOURGUEIL This appellation is the western continuation of Bourgueil, with around 1080 hectares in production. Although Saint-Nicolas has

picked earlier. The most interesting sparkling wines tend to be the pétillants, a local Touraine speciality with only 2,5 atmospheres of pressure, compared to around 5 for fully sparkling.

a higher proportion of its vines planted on gravel, there are also

Vouvray can vary from being bone dry to lusciously sweet,

vineyards on the limestone coteaux. The differences between

depending upon the vintage and when the grapes are picked. This

producers are greater than those between the two appellations. The

range of styles can be bewildering, especially if the producer

story goes that when the appellations were created the then Mayor

doesn’t indicate the level of sweetness on the label. Demi-sec is the

of Saint-Nicolas-de-Bourgueil insisted that his village deserved its

most classic style.

own appellation. Here only 2% of the production is rosé. SOME LEADING PRODUCERS: Yannick Amirault, Francis and François Jamet, Frédéric Mabileau, Mabileau-Réze (Vignoble de la Jarnoterie), Joël Taluau and Thierry Foltzenlogel, Gerard Vallée.

AC VOUVRAY

It does, however, mean that Vouvray can be paired with a wide range of dishes. The sec as an aperitif, with fruits de mers, grilled fish or with charcuterie; demi-sec again as an aperitif, but it will also match fish in a cream or butter sauce as well as scallops, pork and chicken dishes plus various cheeses. Moelleux, if not too rich, will match blue cheeses as well as foie gras. Pairing even the

Top Vouvray is one of the world’s great white wines, with bottles

sweetest Vouvray with desserts can be difficult. Fruit desserts can

from exceptional vintages almost immortal, having a capacity to

work but most other desserts, especially chocolate ones, should be

age for 100 years or more.

avoided. A sweet Vouvray, especially one with some age, is best

Vouvray is on the northern bank of the Loire just to the east of

enjoyed on its own at the end of a meal.

Tours. It is at the eastern limit for producing great wine from

Montlouis on the south bank of the Loire is obliquely across from

Chenin Blanc. There are 2000 hectares of vines in production

Vouvray. A much smaller appellation (370 ha), it produces a similar

across seven communes. Chenin Blanc is the principal grape

range of wines from vineyards that stretch from the Loire

variety, although Menu Pineau is also allowed but in practice is

southwards to the Cher Valley.

little used. The appellation centres on Rochecorbon and the small town of Vouvray with vineyards that face due south. To the east of Vouvray the vineyards turn to the north east following the course of the

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SOME LEADING VOUVRAY PRODUCERS: Domaine des Aubuisières, Philippe Foreau, Didier and Catherine Champalou, Château Gaudrelle, Domaine Huet, François Pinon. Jim Budd SEPTEMBER 2010


Coteaux du Cher

A TERROIR TO DISCOVER

Š GILBERT & GAILLARD

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In Touraine, part of the Loire Valley wine region, vineyards stretch almost continuously over the hillsides along the River Cher from Chenonceaux to Noyers-sur-Cher. Overhanging the river, the vines gently follow the undulating landscape. It is a little-known winemaking area whose assertive wines hold some very pleasant surprises.

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his region’s winemaking has come a long way with very little help: it lacks large estates, and there are only three

outbreak. The low-price ordinary and sparkling wines were traded through a merchant who distributed mainly to local consumers.

wine cooperatives, all dating from after 1950. Viticulture

is a long-standing tradition in the Cher Valley, but until recent

A REGION IN TRANSFORMATION

decades it was carried out by small, individual producers making

A visitor to the region today would find it difficult to imagine this

everyday wines from hybrid grape varieties - for example, Oberlin,

quite recent past. The vineyards are still omnipresent, in places

Terrasse, Meslier and Seibel - planted after the phylloxera

offering magnificent views over the Cher Valley. However, the

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AOC TOURAINE IS IRRIGATED BY THE LOIRE AS WELL AS THE RIVER CHER, ONE OF THE LOIRE’S MAIN TRIBUTARIES hybrids have disappeared, replaced by noble grape varieties such

label Terra Vitis) and organic winegrowing have many followers

as Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Gamay, Cabernet, Pinot Noir and

here. The valley’s organic winemakers (Didier Barrouillet of Clos

Pineau d’Aunis (Chenin Noir).

Roche Blanche, Bruno Allion and around 20 others) have founded an organisation that holds a show the first weekend of each

Tasting rooms have appeared in villages to showcase the work of

December where organic winemakers can share their experiences

dynamic family-run vineyards inviting you to discover their wines.

and present their wines for tasting.

Modern wine facilities are being constructed to replace narrow and inconvenient cellars carved out of the local tuffeau limestone, and winemakers are investing in high-performance equipment such as refrigerated stainless steel tanks and pneumatic wine presses. In Bourré, the estate of Domaine Levin has even ordered a purpose-built wine storehouse from Australia. Alongside this progress, environmental issues are not absent from winemakers’ concerns. Sustainable viticulture (indicated by the

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SPOILED FOR CHOICE? Today, a visitor needs time to discover the diversity of wines in the region. Each winemaker offers an impressive range: Sauvignon (some make up to three different types of Sauvignon), Gamay, Cot (Malbec), Cabernet, blended reds, occasionally Pinot Noir, and sparkling Touraine Brut (recently rebaptised under the enticing name ‘Fines Bulles de Touraine’). The Sauvignons, with their character, subtlety and diversity, are unquestionably the most SEPTEMBER 2010


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remarkable, with a special mention to La Voûte from Domaine Joël Delaunay, which we willingly rank among the grand cru of Coteaux du Cher. However, certain winemakers should take care not to overdo the current trend of leaving a bit too much residual sugar in their wines, claiming that the British market prefers it. In our opinion, this detracts from the wine’s freshness and expression. As for the reds, the results are more uneven. The wines are likeable, earthy and fragrant, but have a rustic character. There are of course exceptions, such as the Pinot Noirs, which were a pleasant surprise. Our favourite was the 2007 Pinot from Claude Duguet’s Le Chai des Varennes located in Thésée. But might this diversity, seemingly positive, be a handicap for the region? Given the modest means of the largely family-run vineyards, will they be able to make the progress required in today’s competitive market as well as offer six, seven or even ten types of wines as different as Sauvignon, rosé Pineau d’Aunis, Cot, Gamay, Cabernet and sparkling Touraine Brut?

A NEW SUB-APPELLATION “TOURAINE-CHENONCEAUX” IN VIEW If the Cher Valley wants to reach the heights of which it is capable, perhaps it would be worth its top producers concentrating on fewer grape varieties: definitely Sauvignon, for which the region’s clay and sandy silex soil and limestone subsoil are ideal; as well as Pinot Noir, which, even if it currently makes up only a small percentage of the valley’s grapes, seems to us to offer very promising results. With the creation of a regional AOC ‘Touraine Coteaux du Cher’ or ‘Touraine-Chenonceaux’ under discussion, these steps would help to give the region a strong identity and

SOME WINEMAKERS TO WATCH:

bring it the attention it deserves.

SAUVIGNON – A NEWCOMER This grape variety, which made the fortunes of winemakers in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé, is currently in vogue in the Cher Valley. Yet Sauvignon was not grown here until after World War II, perhaps because its yield per hectare was considered too low compared to the predominant hybrids of the time. (Another name for Sauvignon, Surin, is said to have come from a comment made by a sceptical neighbour to one of the first winegrowers who planted it: “Elle sue rin ta vigne” ‘Your vines produce nothing’ in the regional dialect.) Guy Gaillard, a Châtillon-sur-Cher winegrower who is today retired, was the first to grow Sauvignon here in 1955.

BRUNO ALLION 41140 THÉSÉE TEL. +33 (0)2 54 75 21 63 This winemaker in his fifties was for many years a member of the Oisly wine cooperative. A long-standing convert to organic and biodynamic winemaking, today he sells the vast majority of his harvest to organic winemakers in the region and uses the rest to make his own wines. Bruno is hardline about additives you’ll find no sulfites in his wines. “Volatile acidity is natural to wine,” he declares with a mischievous smile. “Sulfur is not.”

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François Gilbert & Philippe Gaillard

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Cédric Allion runs this 26hectare vineyard near the village of Thésée. Since 2001 he has been equipped with modern winemaking facilities that allow him to take excellent advantage of his terroir, which is cultivated using sustainable agriculture. Alongside grapes from his own estate, he buys in grapes and sells the wines he produces under the trade name Guy Allion. DOMAINE JOËL DELAUNAY 48 LA TESNIÈRE 41110 POUILLÉ TEL. +33 (0)2 54 71 45 69 This 50% Sauvignon 23-hectare vineyard planted near the village of Pouillé is cultivated by Thierry Delaunay who took over from his father Joël. Today Thierry runs the estate with an eye to the future and is developing many new projects. He has been practicing sustainable agriculture for many years and recently acquired three hectares that are cultivated organically. He exports around 40% of his wine. DOMAINE DES ELÉPHANTS 19 ROUTE DES ÉLÉPHANTS 41400 MONTHOU-SUR-CHER TEL. +33 (0)2 54 71 32 08 Since 2006, the young winemaker Guillaume Boucher, now aged 22, has been in charge of this 30-odd-hectare vineyard, of which 24 hectares are planted with Sauvignon. Although the majority of the grapes are entrusted to the winemaking cooperative in nearby Oisly, Guillaume also makes his own wines from part of his harvest. Keep your eye on this estate … CLOS ROCHE BLANCHE 19 ROUTE DE MONTRICHARD 41110 MAREUIL-SUR-CHER TEL. +33 (0)2 54 75 17 03 This 18-hectare vineyard run by Catherine Roussel and Didier Barrouillet has been dedicated to organic cultivation for 15 years. Didier Barrouillet, who studied chemical engineering, knows what he is talking about. He is passionate about technology, winemaking and organic methods, which he employs to make his wines. The vinification takes place in a cave carved from tuffeau limestone, a cellar that is best suited for small equipment such as

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30-hectolitre stainless steel tanks and 13-hectolitre wooden vats. His motto: “If my wine resembles my neighbour’s, that means there is a problem. We haven’t succeeded in capturing the expression of our terroir.” This estate produces Sauvignons and also red wines. CLAUDE DUGUET LE CHAI DES VARENNES 5 IMPASSE DES VARENNES 41140 THÉSÉE TEL. +33 (0)2 54 71 48 43 Claude Duguet cultivates around 20 hectares near the village of Thésée. Aided by his son, who has decided to take over when the time comes, he produces several whites (an AOC Touraine Sauvignon and a Vin de Pays Chardonnay) but his speciality is reds: Gamay, Cabernet, Cot and Pinot Noir. The Pinot Noirs are particularly appealing. The estate also deserves a special mention for the very reasonable prices of its wines. DOMAINE MICHAUD 20 RUE LES MARTINIÈRES 41140 NOYERS-SUR-CHER TEL. +33 (0)2 54 32 47 23 Working his vineyard since 1985, Thierry Michaud now cultivates 25 hectares in Noyers-sur-Cher and Monthou-sur-Cher. Today he is one of the most respected winemakers in the region. Extremely knowledgeable about his terroir, which is cultivated using sustainable methods, he benefits from modern equipment that allows him to get the most out of his harvest. The price of his wine is also very attractive.

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DOMAINE DU HAUT PERRON 41140 THÉSÉE TEL. +33 (0)2 54 71 48 01

AND ALSO… Domaine Levin Bourré (41400) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 32 92 49 Domaine Desloges (Père et Fils and Cyril Desloges) Monthou-sur-Cher (41400) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 71 41 54 Château de La Presle (Jean-Marie Penet) Oisly (41700) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 79 52 65 Domaine Jean-Christophe Mandard Mareuil-sur-Cher (41110) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 75 19 73 Domaine Charbonnier Châteauvieux (41110) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 75 49 29 Château de Chenonceau Chenonceaux (37150) Tel. +33 (0)2 47 23 44 07 Alain Courtault - Thésée (41140) Tel. +33 (0)2 54 71 50 97

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I TA LY

Piedmont

Š FRANCO OBERTO - FOTOLIA.COM

A PREMIER LEAGUE VINEYARD

There is so much to say about Piedmont that it would fill an entire book. It is first and foremost one of the most prestigious wine-producing regions in Italy. With forty-three DOC wines and seven that have obtained the higher DOCG quality grading, it is above all renowned for its relentless pursuit of quality, and has the highest density of top-quality (primarily red) wines.

T

he aptly-named region of Piedmont shares its

Piedmont, which was also part of the French empire during the

mountainous borders with France, Switzerland and the

Napoleonic era. Shortly afterwards, popular rebellions and

Italian provinces of Valle d’Aosta and Liguria. Only its

uprisings led to the unification of Italy. Even though the capital

eastern border with Lombardy opens onto the gently sloping Po

was established in Florence in 1865, and then finally in Rome in

Valley. Historically, Piedmont played a key role in the creation of

1870, the first parliament of the united Italy sat in the

the new kingdom of Italy. It came under the aegis of Rome in the

Piedmontese town of Turin (Torino) in 1861. Since the western

early days of the empire, and was in turn occupied by the

part of Piedmont is too mountainous for the cultivation of vines,

Lombards, Francs and then the House of Savoy. In the 18th

the vineyards developed to the south-east of Turin. The hills,

century, the state of Savoy owned the whole of what is now

which occupy about one third of this rich region, are in fact well

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suited to vine growing. From the hills of Monferrato, on the right

18-20°C with braised beef in red wine, ground game (civet of

bank of the River Po, to the Langhe hills, crossed by its tributary

hare) and seasoned cheeses. The best producers include Angelo

the Tanaro, a judicious combination of natural elements produces

Gaja, Ceretto, Pio Cesare, Carlo Boffa, Prunotto and Ca’ Bianca.

such wines as Barolo, Barbaresco and Nebbiolo d’Alba.

PROPHETIC WORDS The words of Angelo Gaja - a producer as generous as he is intransigent - may help readers to better understand the philosophy that reflects a reality where tradition and the pursuit of quality are not incompatible: “The Barolo and Barbaresco regions lie on the gently sloping Langhe hills surrounding the town of Alba. The combination of the soil (calcium-rich clay) and climate (relatively cool continental, often wet and misty) favours the production of these exceptional wines. The name of the grape variety (Nebbiolo) used to produce both the Barolo and Barbaresco wines, is in fact derived from the word nebbia which means fog or mist in Italian. The region is also renowned for its

Barolo (DOCG): Barolo is a wine that invites connoisseurs to discover the Italian vineyard of which it is one of the finest vintages. You have to walk among the vines, above the village of Castiglione Falletto, to fully appreciate this truly exceptional vineyard whose well-exposed slopes and chalky clay soils suit the Nebbiolo grape down to the ground. It is easy to see why Barolo has always occupied an important place in Italy’s viticultural history. However, modern producers, while respecting this tradition, are adapting new techniques to a heritage that is respected throughout the world. Whether the grapes come from La Morra, Barolo, Serralunga d’Alba or Castiglione Falletto, winegrowers are turning these differences to good effect, in spite of the traditionalists who oppose any attempt to “lighten” and

white truffles, its hazel trees and its beef. Like the history of all the major wine-growing regions of Europe, the history of Langhe is marked by years of experimentation with a view to achieving the best combination of cultural practices and regional potential.” But we mustn’t forget all the other wines produced with the Barbera, Dolcetto, Freisa, Brachetto, Muscat, Grignolino and Cortese grapes. Whether they come from Monferrato, Langhe, the Asti region or much more northerly areas, the environment is often the same, with more or less well-exposed slopes. The climatic conditions are very similar, only the grapes are different. Evidently, their charm forms an integral part of a truly remarkable regional wine list.

PROFILE OF THE PRINCIPAL WINES OF PIEDMONT Barbaresco (DOCG): made from the Nebbiolo grape, this is undoubtedly one of the best and most elegant of all Italian wines. Its area of production lies to the east and on the slopes opposite the town of Alba, around the villages of Barbaresco, Treiso and © RIZIO - FOTOLIA.COM

Neive. The soil is predominately chalky clay and the best vines are found on the hillsides, at an altitude of between 250 and 400 metres. Barbaresco has certainly never been better than it is today, and its consistent quality cannot be stressed enough. It has a deep, intense colour and its fruity and flowery (violets) aromas develop to produce a complex bouquet of spices, woodsmoke, liquorice and occasionally chocolate. The wine is tannic, concentrated, well structured and has a good acid base. The quality and balance of a good Barbaresco can be recognised in its strength, depth and length on the palate, as well as its fineness and elegance. After being matured for 4 years, it can be classified as a Riserva. Serve at

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THE BARBERA GRAPE IS CULTIVATED ON THE WELL-EXPOSED HILLS AROUND ALBA AND THE NEIGHBOURING VILLAGES SEPTEMBER 2010


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Nebbiolo d’Alba (DOC): with Barolo and Barbaresco, this wine makes up the trinity associated with the famous Nebbiolo grape. It is produced in the area of Alba and the surrounding villages. Although less well-structured and simpler than its two illustrious colleagues, Nebbiolo d’Alba is more affordable and easier to serve as an accompaniment. It has a more or less intense ruby-red colour and fruity and flowery (violets) aromas. It is tannic and fairly full-bodied, with a lot of fruit on the palate and an acidity that creates an overall balance. Serve at 16-18°C with marinated beef (served with salad, mushrooms and white truffles), osso bucco, grilled, roasted and sautéed red meats, and spaghetti with a meat sauce. Barbera d’Alba (DOC): The occasionally underestimated Barbera grape is cultivated on the well-exposed hills around Alba and the neighbouring villages. However, when the yields are reasonable, Barbera d’Alba is particularly attractive - a meal in a local trattoria will prove the point! The wine is robust and tannic, with good acidity. It has a beautifully intense, rich red colour, with aromas of very ripe fruit (blackcurrants, blackberries). Serve at 18°C as an accompaniment for cannelloni, lasagne, grilled, roasted and sautéed red meats, and on winged and ground game. Two other Barbera DOC wines are also worth mentioning: Barbera d’Asti and Barbera del Monferrato. Gattinara (DOCG): in 1991, this wine from northern Piedmont wa s awa r d e d t h e u l t i m a t e q u a l i t y g r a d i n g : D O C G (Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita). Made mainly from the Nebbiolo (known locally as Spanna) and Bonarda grapes, in recent years it has benefited from certain improvements, both on the vine and in the winery. Several

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“modernise” the style of their wines. Barolo has something to suit every taste - the key is to leave it for a few years in order to fully appreciate, among other things, the rich aromatic palette of this magnificent wine. It has a beautiful, intense garnet-red colour with pale orange reflections, even when young. The flowery (violets, faded roses), fruity (ripe fruits, jam) and spicy (nutmeg) aromas are transformed as it matures into a rich and complex bouquet of tobacco, woodsmoke and leather. It is a wellconstituted wine with a good tannic structure, good acidity and a flavour of pepper, and sometimes liquorice, on the palate. It has an ageing potential of between 10 and 20 years. It make an ideal accompaniment for red meats garnished with a seasoned sauce (fillet of beef au poivre or served with white truffles), winged game (salmis of wild duck) and ground game (haunch of venison). Ceretto, Conterno, Vajra, Domenico Clerico, Pio Cesare, Voerzio, Borgogno, Fontanafredda and Poderi Colla are some of the best producers.

THE FAMOUS NEBBIOLO GRAPE WHICH IS USED TO MAKE THE EXCELLENT WINES OF BAROLO AND BARBARESCO producers are still doing their utmost to invest it with the qualities worthy of its status and origins. The wine has an intense garnetred colour and flowery aromas. It is tannic, fleshy and lively, with an aftertaste of spices and a slight bitterness to finish. Gavi or Cortese di Gavi (DOCG): the chalky and chalky-clay soils of this part of Upper Monferrato seem ideally suited to the cultivation of the Cortese grape since it forms the basis of several wines, the best known of which is undoubtedly Gavi. It should be recognised that, in a region devoted to the production of primarily red wines, this white wine stands up well and deserves its place at table, especially when it is developed in a slightly more modern way by conscientious producers. Always white, it is attractively tinged with straw-yellow reflections and has a slightly vegetal nose with a touch of citrus fruit (a hint of lemon). It is dry and not particularly acid. Serve at 8-10°C with seafood, grilled fish and fish à la meunière (trout with herbs), egg noodles with butter, parmesan and white truffles, and dry goat cheese.

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A C A P T I VAT I N G R E G I O N

Š PAUL MERRETT - FOTOLIA.COM

I TA LY

Tuscany

This beautiful region tells the history of Italy, the history of wine growing - or quite simply history - on a bend in the road or in the heart of a village. If you look at Tuscany on a map, the natural barriers of the Apennines and the Tyrrhenian Sea, which washes its western shores, appear to protect the magnificent hills that form the principal part of the region and constitute its pride and joy.

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estling between Liguria, Emilia-Romagna, Marche, Umbria and Latium, Tuscany is a seaboard province that occupies a privileged position in north-western Italy. Thanks to its geographical location, the region enjoys natural conditions that are ideally suited to the agriculture that covers half its territory. Everywhere on the hillsides, vines and olive trees combine to create the beauty and harmony of the Tuscan landscape. Cypress trees border the little roads leading to a fattoria

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(farm or vineyard); vines and olive trees often grow on the same plot, offering passers-by a foretaste of the flavours that grace the region’s tables.

A REGION RICH IN HISTORY Tuscany derived its name from the Etruscans, a people who lived in the region in the 6th century BC. The Romans referred to the inhabitants of what was then Etruria as Tusci and their country as

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Tuscia. Although the vine was an integral part of their civilisation, the Romans developed and extended its cultivation. There are many accounts describing a flourishing wine trade in the region during the 13th and 14th centuries, when Florence and Siena appear to have been very busy towns. The tavernas no doubt contributed to this commercial prosperity... In 1430, Tuscany was united under the Medicis, who not only made it the centre of the Renaissance movement but also played a key role on the political, European and world stages until the end of the 15th century. It was during this period that the vineyards of Tuscany began to be divided into more specific areas - Chianti, for example.

The cultivation of the vine developed in central Tuscany, especially in the Chianti Classico area between Siena and Florence. The surrounding “satellite” towns of San Gimignano, Montalcino, Montepulciano, Carmignano, Rufina and Pomino also gave their letters of nobility to wines that became increasingly highly prized. Chianti - which was, and still is, the region’s best known and most widely produced wine - has certainly established a worldwide reputation with its famous straw-covered wine flask which, over the years, has become the symbol of Italian wines. Unfortunately, its quality did not always live up to its reputation and producers had to think again. This led to the regulations being revised as a result of vigorous lobbying on the part of producers determined to make only the very best wines. Some fought long and hard to achieve the results with which we are now familiar, particularly with regard to the proportion of white grapes used in the production of red wines, high-density planting (which could be further increased), the yields per hectare and the quality of the casks used.

© ARDISC - FOTOLIA.COM

AN INDISPUTABLE WINEPRODUCING TRADITION

THE BRUNELLO GRAPE IS A CLONE OF THE SANGIOVESE VARIETY SELECTED BY FERRUCIO BIONDI-SANTI IN THE 1870S

Meanwhile, and in spite of everything, it was decided to plant new grape varieties. Cabernet, Merlot, Chardonnay and Sauvignon were added to the traditional list of Sangiovese, Canaiolo, Malvasia, Vernaccia and Trebbiano. The cultivation of these new varieties became sufficiently widespread for them to be used in the production of DOC wines. They have also become the mainstay of the famous Vini da Tavola, which are now mostly IGT (Indicazione Geografica Tipica) wines. Affectionately nicknamed “Supertuscan”, they include Sassicaia, Vigorello, Ornellaia, Cepparello, Solaia, Sassoalloro, Coltassala, Tignanello, Balsastrada and Fontalloro, to name but a few. Their introduction

© ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

AN ATTRACTIVE RANGE OF GRAPE VARIETIES - AND SOME SURPRISING TABLE WINES

SANGIOVESE GRAPES, USED TO MAKE TUSCANY'S CLASSIC CHIANTI WINES

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has certainly changed the viticultural landscape of Italy. Paradoxically, however, the merits of the principle grape variety Sangiovese - have never been so highly acclaimed (and rightly so), with the other varieties, in this instance, acting as a foil.

PROFILE OF THE PRINCIPAL WINES OF TUSCANY Brunello di Montalcino (DOCG): possibly the finest Tuscan wine. The picturesque town of Montalcino, south of Siena, is situated in a hilly region famous for its Brunello grape, a clone of the Sangiovese variety selected by Ferrucio Biondi-Santi in the 1870s. Some one thousand hectares of chalky-clay soils are devoted to this noble grape variety. The wine has a deep, rich colour and distinctive aromas of red fruits and pepper which, as it matures, are transformed into a bouquet of undergrowth, spices, leather and sometimes liquorice. Tannic, fleshy and long on the palate, it is ideal with a portion of venison au poivre and seasoned cheeses. Serve at 18°C. Best producers: Bondi-Santi, Caparzo, Banfi, Barbi, San Felice and Frescobaldi. In the same wineproducing area, Rosso di Montalcino is an unpretentious wine rich in flavour, soft in the mouth and very fruity. Serve at 16°C, with osso bucco or paupiettes of veal.

Chianti (DOCG): today some 24,000 hectares are devoted to the production of Chianti, which represents the most extensive winegrowing area in Italy. However, the original - and undoubtedly the best - area of production, known as Chianti Classico, is situated in the hills between Siena and Florence. Its soils are extremely varied and its climate erratic. Even so, recent years have seen the production of the finest wines ever. A five year-old Classico Riserva has an intense colour, with hints of leather and undergrowth. The tannins are softened and it makes an ideal accompaniment for braised beef in red wine or winged game. Serve at 18°C. Best producers: Antinori, Isole e Olena, Barone Ricasoli, Villa Cafaggio, Monte Vertine, Castello di Volpaia, Castello di Fonterutoli. Vino Nobile di Montepulciano (DOCG): one of the best topquality red wines from Tuscany. Possibly a little harsher than Brunello, the tannins of the Prugnolo Gentile grape (a clone of Sangiovese) are occasionally austere, with hints of spices, tobacco, leather and woodsmoke when the wine is a few years old. Excellent with a civet of rabbit with juniper. Serve at 18°C. Avignonesi and Boscarelli are two very good producers. Vernaccia di San Gimignano (DOCG): its pale golden colour, flowery aromas and freshness make this dry white wine a pleasant accompaniment for fish à la meunière. Ideally, try and taste it on its home ground since San Gimignano is one of the most beautiful little fortified towns in Italy, justifiably proud of its myriad of majestic towers silhouetted against the sky.

© WJAREK - FOTOLIA.COM

Carmignano Riserva (DOCG): Carmignano, to the west of Florence, was popular with the Medicis who chose it as their favourite hunting ground. Well-exposed hills on stony ground, combined with marls and schists, enable the Sangiovese and Cabernet grapes to ripen in the very best conditions. Riserva is full-bodied, rich and elegant, with slightly toasted notes on the palate. It makes an ideal accompaniment for fillet of beef with

Madeira or mature Tuscan pecorino (sheep’s milk cheese). Serve at 18°C. Tenuta di Capezzana is the cream of the crop.

A PANORAMIC VIEW OF MONTEPULCIANO, A PICTURESQUE TUSCAN VILLAGE 100

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The Veneto wine route

© DREAMING ANDY - FOTOLIA.COM

FROM VALPOLICELLA TO LA SERENISSIMA

Our wine route begins on the shores of Lake Garda with Bardolino, one of the best-known Italian red wines. The wine-growing area, which lies on the hills around Bardolino and Peschiera, occupies a large part of the eastern shore of this impressive lake. The pale red wine is very light, fruity and soft in the mouth, with an aroma of ripe cherries. It makes a good accompaniment for cold meats, sautéed white meats, grilled poultry and spaghetti alla carbonara.

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alpolicella - one of the region’s most popular wines - is produced in a nearby valley, to the east of the lake and north of Verona. Increasing demand has led to some over-production, but fortunately a few producers in the real Classico area, at the western end of the valley, stand apart from the rest. These houses - Allegrini, Masi, Tedeschi, Serego Alighieri,

Bolla, Quintarelli, Boscaini, Tommasi, Pasqua - produce some really beautiful wines that deserve to be drunk with due care and attention. As well as the usual Valpolicella, these wine-growers also successfully produce the delightful Recioto, Amarone and Ripasso. Valpolicella has a moderately intense, ruby-red colour, with aromas of well-ripened red fruits. It is usually fruity, more or

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EAST OF VERONA, ON THE MOTORWAY TO VENICE, THE SMALL TOWN OF SOAVE less full-bodied, soft and fresh in the mouth, with a bite of bitter almonds to finish. The delicious Recioto della Valpolicella has a rather intense, beautiful garnet-red colour, with rich, concentrated aromas of ripe fruit and spices. Heady, smooth and long on the palate, it becomes Amarone della Valpolicella when it is made from semi-dried grapes. Its name is a reference to the slightly bitter (amaro) taste characteristic of this particular type of wine, which is highly prized for its rich, complex and spicy bouquet. The rich and wonderfully concentrated Ripasso, which came onto the market a few years ago, is a very original wine, developed to suit modern tastes by the excellent house of Masi, although it is sometimes poorly imitated by other producers. Valpolicella makes an ideal accompaniment for cold meats, cannelloni, grilled red meats, roast poultry and polenta with meat brochettes. Amarone is better served with sautéed red meats and pot-au-feu, mutton stew and ground game (civet of hare). Recioto is surprisingly good with calf’s caul au poivre or a spiced cake.

THE SWEET WINES OF SOAVE East of Verona, on the motorway to Venice, the small town of Soave and its wines exert an irresistible fascination for the many tourists who visit the Veneto. Although many of these wines are rather light and fairly ordinary, there are fortunately some fine exceptions. These delicious Soaves are developed by competent

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and committed producers who grow mainly Garganega vines in the Classico area. The extremely well-exposed slopes of this delightful wine-producing area produce juice of very high quality enabling the production of excellent wine. Well-adapted management of the vines (gradual elimination of the pergola and high-density planting), more modest yields and a faultless wine-making process are today producing some very good results. A good Soave has a more or less intense straw-yellow colour and clean, fresh aromas of flowers, plants and sometimes dried fruit. It is both dry and soft in the mouth, with good acidity, and makes an ideal accompaniment for shellfish and other crustaceans, grilled fish and fish à la meunière, and sautéed poultry in a sauce. Recioto di Soave is obtained by raisining grapes from the upper part of the bunches - known locally as recie (ears) - and fermenting them after over-maturation. It has a beautiful golden-yellow, sometimes amber-yellow colour and very rich aromas of honey and dried and candied fruits. It is smooth and full-bodied, and strikes a good balance between mellowness and acidity. The best houses, whose production of this wine is classified, often produce bottles that are destined to become classics. Anselmi, Pieropan, Tedeschi, Tommasi, Zonin, Masi, Boscaini and Pra are the names to look out for.

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Although many other wines are produced in the Veneto around a few quality zones such as Gambellara (good Zonin wines), Bianco di Custoza, Vini del Piave and Lison-Pramaggiore, there is one that stands a little apart from the others, less well known and yet extremely attractive in terms of its quality. In fact, the vineyards of Breganze, north of Vicenza, have undeniable potential, under the direction of one producer in particular. With his know-how and an uncompromising attitude to quality, Fausto Maculan has set an example for the last fifteen years. By investing, limiting his yields and planting some exceptional grape varieties Merlot, Cabernet and Pinot Noir for the reds, Pinot Bianco,

Pinot Grigio and Vespaiola for the whites - he has been able to achieve a high level of quality. Lovers of effervescent wines can enjoy such sparkling white wines as the famous Prosecco (named after the grape variety) from the villages of Conegliano and Valdobbiadene. It is produced using the Charmat method, in a closed vat, or more traditionally, by adding liqueur de tirage (yeast and sugar) to the bottled wine. Prosecco is very good when it is dry, made by one of the major producers (Nino Franco, for example) and enjoyed in good company on a café terrace in Venice, on the Grand Canal or, better still, in the early evening on one of the little bridges in the Santa Croce district. The route ends with a visit to the peaceful town of Bassano del Grappa, renowned for its earthenware, but more especially for its grappa, a crystal-clear marc brandy distilled from grape pomace. The bottles - which look rather like alluring bottles of perfume invite connoisseurs to bring this feast of irresistible distillates to a fitting close.

© NATALIA BRATSLAVSKY - FOTOLIA.COM

GRAPE VARIETIES OF THE VENETO- AND ELSEWHERE

A GOOD SOAVE MAKES AN IDEAL ACCOMPANIMENT FOR SHELLFISH AND OTHER CRUSTACEANS, GRILLED FISH AND FISH À LA MEUNIÈRE, AND SAUTÉED POULTRY IN A SAUCE

A great many red and white grape varieties are grown in the Veneto. Corvina, Molinara, Rondinella, Negrara, Refosco, as well as Merlot, Cabernet and Pinot Noir, combine to produce red wines ranging from the most simple to the most complex. Garganega, Tocai Friulano, Trebbiano, Prosecco, Verduzzo, Durello, Vespaiolo, Moscato, as well as Pinot Blanc and Gris and a touch of Sauvignon and Chardonnay, form the basis of different types of white wines, from the driest to the unctuous Recioto di Soave, via a complete range of sparkling wines, from the coarsest to the most refined. Let’s take a closer look at three of these wines. Garganega: the leading grape variety in the production of Soave wines. It is a vigorous variety, with a consistently abundant yield, which produces pleasant, fruity and lively wines that are also soft in the mouth, especially when it is grown on well-exposed slopes. Trebbiano: a variety found throughout Italy and worldwide. Known as Ugni Blanc in France (especially in the Cognac region), it is becoming increasingly resistant to disease, is well adapted to all soil types, and produces dry, light wines that are usually rather too neutral. Corvina: this red grape variety, which may have originated in the Veneto, is used in Valpolicella and Bardolino wines. It does well on rather chalky and relatively infertile soils, has an average resistance to disease, and produces fruity wines with a slightly dominant taste of bitter almonds. Ideal for raisining (see Recioto).

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Malt whiskies and the Scottish art of living

© GLENFIDDICH

The production of Scotch whisky is based on ancestral traditions and long-established expertise. It is a rich and historic world that is fascinating to discover. Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International invites you to join us on a trip to the hills and dells of Scotland, with its fragrance of peat and heather and the music of rushing, crystal-clear streams.

© ABERLOUR

THE LARGEST WHISKY-PRODUCING REGION IS THE HIGHLANDS, WHICH COVERS THE ENTIRE NORTHERN PART OF SCOTLAND

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THE PRODUCTION OF WHISKY IS AN ANCESTRAL TRADITION THAT HAS CHANGED LITTLE OVER THE CENTURIES. BARLEY, WATER AND PEAT ARE THE THREE PRINCIPAL ELEMENTS

B

efore we set off, a brief reminder that whiskies are divided into two families: blends and single malts. The former are made from a mix of malted barley and other grains (for example, wheat or corn). These tend to be less expensive whiskies (in France they are commonly drunk as an apéritif), although some that have been matured for long periods can attain a remarkable quality.

(which gives a smoky, earthy taste), the spring water (which must be absolutely pure), the blending, the type of vats used … this complex science is one in which Scottish master distillers excel.

SOME GEOGRAPHY Scottish

distilleries

are

distributed

over

four

regions.

Campbeltown, a peninsula located on the west coast, is the

Single malt whiskies, on the other hand, are the aristocracy of

smallest. It produces rare whiskies with a complex character and

whiskies. There are countless different styles arising from a

smoky and salty hints that reveal its proximity to the sea.

multitude of details, each of which has crucial importance: the

Springbank and Glen Scotia are the only local distilleries. The

quality of the barley (the only grain allowed in single malt

second region lies several miles off the Scottish coast, to the

whiskies), the malting (the germination of the seed), the peat

northwest of Campbeltown. The Isle of Islay produces distinctive

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malt whiskies with a powerful peaty character. Its most famous

The fourth and largest whisky-producing region is the Highlands,

brands are Lagavulin and Laphroaig, dear to whisky lovers who

which covers the entire northern part of Scotland. This region

enjoy strong flavours. Malt whiskies from Islay go well with food;

alone is home to over 80% of Scotland’s distilleries, including

they are remarkably good with oysters and smoked salmon.

Glenmorangie, Oban and Dalwhinnie. Almost half are found in

Farther north, we find the Isle of Jura, which produces Jura single

Speyside, the valley formed by the River Spey, which is fed by

malt whisky. The third region is the Lowlands (basically the area

many streams that also provide the water for the local whiskies.

south of Glasgow and Edinburgh). Here, around a dozen

The single malt whiskies made in this region (such as Aberlour,

distilleries produce smooth, light whiskies with floral aromas (for

Glenfiddich, Glenfarclas and The Balvenie) are diverse. They

example, Glenkinchie and Auchentoshan).

display a variety of characteristics, such as the aroma of heather and hints of peat (if peat was used in its production, which is not a requirement), which can be more or less pronounced.

WATER, FIRE AND TIME After the barley is harvested and sifted, it is left to soak for two days in large tanks of water. Then it is spread out on the malting floor to germinate. Around 12 days later, the barley secretes diastase, an enzyme that enables the conversion of starch to sugar. Next, the barley receives its distinctive aroma as it is dried over a peat fire (peat is partially decomposed vegetable matter – it produces an earthy-smelling smoke when burned). The next step is known as mashing: the dried malt is ground and mixed with hot water in large vessels called tuns. This converts the soluble starch into a sugary liquid known as wort. After cooling, natural yeast is added to ferment the mixture by converting the sugar to alcohol. This process takes about two days, producing a liquid known as wash. The wash is then distilled twice in traditional pot stills. The first distillation results in what is known as low wine, which is then redistilled. Only the resulting spirit that is of an acceptable standard is collected for whisky: the rest is not used.

THE FINAL PHASE After this rigorous selection process, the distillate must undergo a final phase (by far the longest) before it becomes single malt whisky: aging. When collected from the pot still, the spirit is close to 70% alcohol. It must now be refined and enriched aromatically by maturing it for long periods in casks of oak or barrels that have previously aged other types of alcohol. The casks most frequently used are those that have aged sherry, port or bourbon, which has an impact on the flavour of the whisky. Single malts that have each matured in different types of casks can also be ‘married’ or ‘vatted’ with other single malts. At the end of aging, the degree of © ABERLOUR

alcohol is reduced (40% is the minimum) by adding water before

THE SPRING WATER MUST BE ABSOLUTELY PURE 106

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bottling. Some distilleries release undiluted whiskies with up to 60% alcohol, which have a range of complex and subtle aromas. When drinking these, it is imperative to add mineral water, both to soften their effects and to allow their full potential to develop. Some Scottish distilleries also produce single malt whiskies that are the product of a single cask - they have not been ‘married’ with SEPTEMBER 2010


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EXPORT MARKETS FOR SCOTCH WHISKY 1 France 178.9 * 2 USA 120.1 3 Spain 87.4 4 Singapore 51.9 5 South Africa 50 6 Venezuela 42.4 7 Brazil 41.4 8 South Korea 35.9 9 Germany 35 10 Australia 32.9 * millions of 70cl bottles in 2009

© GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SCOTCH WHISKY IN FIGURES Scotch whisky is Scotland’s biggest export, ahead of petrol and natural gas. The global export value (3.8 b i l l i o n e u r o s i n 20 09 ) comes way ahead of business services (0.7 billion euros) and financial services (0.6 billion euros), two key sectors of the Scottish economy. In 2009, 34 bottles of Scotch whisky representing 116 euros of revenue were exported each second. Scotch whisky represents a quarter of British food and drink exports and is sold in 200 markets around the world.

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other single malts before bottling. These allow us to discover whiskies of the same age and provenance that have totally different aromas.

THE NEW SCOTCH WHISKY REGULATIONS New regulations came into force on 23 November 2009 covering all aspects of Scotch whisky production:

AGING IS EVERYTHING

For a whisky to be labelled " Scotch whisky ", the entire aging process must take place in Scotland.

The age of a whisky refers to the time it has spent in the cask. Like all spirits, once bottled, whisky no longer matures. Some labels include not only the age (eg. 10, 12, or 15 years), but also the year the whisky was distilled and bottled. This gives the true age of the whisky contained in the bottle. The aging process for single malt whisky varies. One method is double-matured whisky, in which

The traditional names of the production regions (Highland, Lowland, Speyside, Islay and Campbeltown) are protected; these names can only appear on whiskies wholly distilled in these regions. Five categories of whisky are clearly defined: Single Malt Scotch Whisky, Single Grain Scotch Whisky, Blended Scotch Whisky, Blended Malt Scotch Whisky and Blended Grain Scotch Whisky. Single Malt Scotch Whisky must be wholly produced in Scotland from distillation to bottling, including maturation. The use of the term " pure malt " is banned. The name of a distillery can only be used on the label if the whisky was wholly distilled there. The indication of the age of the whisky is clearly regulated. The statement " 12 years of age " indicates that the whisky was aged for 12 years.

the spirit is taken from its original cask and placed for the final two or three years of its maturation in a different type of cask. This is called a ‘finished’ whisky. For example, a 15-year old whisky may have spent 12 years in a cask that previously held bourbon and was then ‘finished’ by transferring it for three years to a cask that previously aged sherry or port. Another aging method is the solera process. This Spanish method developed for maturing sherry uses a set of casks arranged over several layers, with the bottom casks containing the oldest spirit. A portion of the content in the oldest casks is drawn off for bottling, and then the casks are topped up with spirits from the © ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

next layer of casks above, containing slightly younger spirits, which are topped up with the spirits from the casks above them, and so on up to the top level. This technique can impart ‘freshness’ to older spirits. The world of single malt whiskies is in perpetual transformation:

THE QUALITY OF THE BARLEY (THE ONLY GRAIN ALLOWED IN SINGLE MALT WHISKIES), IS QUITE IMPORTANT TO MAKE A GOOD SINGLE MALT 108

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a quest for quality, finesse and innovation is an obsession for Scottish distillers. They are constantly evolving, eager to meet the expectations of the millions of demanding whisky lovers around the world who long ago understood the attraction of one of the foremost spirits on the planet. Join their growing numbers! Sylvain Patard SEPTEMBER 2010


GOLD CLUB FOCUS ON 2009 BORDEAUX

Compare our tasting notes for a selection of wines from Bordeaux vintage 2009 with those of our well-known American competitors.* www.gilbetrgaillard.com, *www.erobertparker.com and *www.winespectator.com

SUBLIME BORDEAUX 2009 Bordeaux’s 2009 wines are exceptional. This is due to the ideal weather in the region that year, which saw a succession of optimal conditions throughout the growing cycle: uniform and incident-free flowering, early ripening, perfectly matured grapes thanks to a hot August, followed by excellent harvest weather.

WINE SCORES 95-100/100

an outstanding wine, when a great terroir meets exceptional winemaking expertise

90-94/100

a superlative wine combining finesse, complexity and remarkable winemaking

85-89/100

a wine of extremely high standard, which we enjoyed for its typicity and character

The resulting wines live up to feverish expectations with

80-84/100

structure and neatness for

their exceptional power and polyphenol concentration. Tasted en primeur, the wines are sometimes still austere, but should have remarkable potential. At their most successful - which is the case for many of them - they are full-bodied and well-balanced. There is little reason to doubt that we are dealing with first-class wines with excellent aging potential that will carry on delighting drinkers in the decades to come. However, watch out for

a quality wine combining balance,

a pleasurable wine drinking experience

75-79/100 70-74/100 65-69/100 50-64/100

a wine deemed acceptable a wine with defects, unacceptable a wine with major defects, inadmissible unacceptable wine, not worthy for sale

Note: wines scoring less than 75/100 are not included in our publications.

certain wines with excess tannins or alcohol, or worse, low acidity, which could lead to future unpleasant surprises. Below are the wines we are most enthusiastic about.

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(R) = RED WINE / (W) = WHITE WINE / n/a = not available

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GOLD CLUB FOCUS ON 2009 BORDEAUX

98 /100

SAINT-ÉMILION GRAND CRU A.C. Château La Gaffelière 2009

95 /100

1er Grand Cru Classé B

Intense purple-blue. Fresh, extrovert nose of ripe cherry flesh. Ad m i r a b l e h a r m o ny o n t h e palate, crunchy, silky, full mouthfeel, substantial fruity length. Very charming with total restraint.

95 /100

90

MARGAUX A.C. Château Lascombes 2009

/100

Intense colour, dark purple accents. Harmonious nose marrying ripe red and black fruit and elegant oak. Fullness and power are the key themes on the palate with refined, closelyintegrated tannins. Fruit expression across the palate. A successful effort.

SAINT-JULIEN A.C. Château Léoville-Barton 2009 Intense hue. Concentrated nose dominated by black berry fruits, liquorice. Powerful, very concentrated palate, still a little backward. A 2009 with faultless extraction. Huge potential.

SAINT-JULIEN A.C. Château Langoa-Barton 2009 Intense colour, crimson highlights. Huge extraction on the palate with very firm tannins still. An austere wine that can only be marked on its potential.

FULL CONTACT DETAILS FOR THESE ESTATES CAN BE FOUND ON PAGE 114

SAUTERNES - BARSAC PRICE €

PRICE €

VAT INCL.

VAT INCL.

18.94

92-93

90-93

90-92

Château La Tour Blanche

50.83

93-95

91-94

94-96

Château Lamothe

unknown

90-91

88-91

90-92

Château Coutet

63.63

94-96

95-98

n/a

Château Romer du Hayot

unknown

90-91

88-91

n/a

Château Rieussec

71.16

94-96

92-95

95-97

Château de Malle

unknown

93-95

89-92

88-90

Château Suduiraut

71.16

95-97

94-97

97-99

Château Filhot

20.09

91-92

89-92

n/a

Château d'Yquem

765.44

96-98

97-100

96-98

Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey

39.47

94-96

90-93

92-94

Château d'Arche

24.22

93-95

91-94

n/a Clos Haut Peyraguey

40.78

92-94

93-96

91-93

Château Doisy Daëne

39.47

90-91

90-93

n/a

Château Guiraud

42.46

94-95

95-98

94-96

Château Doisy Védrines

27.51

92-94

92-95

n/a

Château La Tour Blanche

50.83

93-95

91-94

94-96

Château Rayne Vigneau

38.75

94-96

92-95

94-96

Château Coutet

63.63

94-96

95-98

n/a

Château Lafaurie-Peyraguey

39.47

94-96

90-93

92-94

Château Rieussec

71.16

94-96

92-95

95-97

Clos Haut Peyraguey

40.78

92-94

93-96

91-93

Château Suduiraut

71.16

95-97

94-97

97-99

Château Guiraud

42.46

94-95

95-98

94-96

Château d'Yquem

765.44

96-98

97-100

96-98

Château Lamothe Guignard

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

SEPTEMBER 2010

113


COMING UP SOON...

In our next issue

7, parc des Fontenelles - 78870 Bailly - France Tel.: (+33)1 30 80 08 08 - Fax: (+33)1 30 80 08 88 EDITORIAL DIRECTORS: François Gilbert and Philippe Gaillard EDITOR IN CHIEF: Sylvain Patard

REGION THE EXCEPTIONAL TERROIRS OF MEDOC: Wedged between the forest of the Landes and the mouth of the Gironde estuary, the flat peninsula of the Médoc doesn't look like much, yet it produces around ten wines that rate among the best in the world. Explanation!

CHAMPAGNE: This internationally known wine-producing region produces exceptional wines from terroirs with distinctive characteristics. Our exhaustive study invites you to discover Champagne's vineyards, its winemakers, its names, and naturally, its wines.

© GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

© JOHN HODDER - CIVC

COVER STORY

Château La Tour de Mons +33(0)5 57 88 33 03 chateau-latourdemons@wanadoo.fr Recommended Wines Page 23 Château Tronquoy-Lalande Domaine de Daurion +33(0)5 56 59 30 12 +33(0)4 67 98 47 36 chateau@tronquoy-lalande.com E-mail: domainedaurion@wanadoo.fr Michel Gonet et Fils Château Bélingard +33(0)5 57 24 51 23 +33(0)5 53 58 28 03 info@gonet.fr E-mail: laurent.debosredon@wanadoo.fr Bernard Magrez Grands Vignobles Champagne Guy Tixier Propriétaire +33(0)3 26 03 42 51 E-mail: champguytixier@wanadoo.fr +33(0)5 57 26 38 38 chateau@latour-carnet.com Champagne Simon-Selosse +33(0)3 26 57 52 40 Domaine Henri Rebourseau E-mail: champ.simon-selosse@wanadoo.fr +33(0)3 80 51 88 94 domaine@rebourseau.com Domaine de l’Olivette +33(0)4 94 98 58 85 Domaine Philippe Leclerc E-mail: contact@domaine-olivette.com +33(0)3 80 34 30 72 Domaine Saint-André de Figuière philippe.leclerc60@wanadoo.fr +33(0)4 94 00 44 70 Domaine Guy Robin & fils E-mail: figuiere@figuiere-provence.com +33(0)3 86 42 12 63 Domaine Saint-Jean de Villecroze contact@domaineguyrobin.com +33(0)4 94 70 63 07 Domaine Fougeray de Beauclair E-mail: contact@domaine-saint-jean.com +33(0)3 80 52 21 12 Domaine de la Rouillère fougeraydebeauclair@wanadoo.fr +33(0)4 94 55 72 60 Domaine Guy Bocard contact@domainedelarouillere.com +33(0)3 80 21 26 06 nadinebocard@wanadoo.fr Gold Club Pages 25-39 Château Léoville Barton Domaine/Maison Jessiaume +33(0)5 56 59 06 05 +33(0)3 80 20 60 03 chateau@leoville-barton.com contact@domaine-jessiaume.com Château Mazeyres Domaine Auvigue +33(0)5 57 51 00 48 +33(0)3 85 34 17 36 mazeyres@wanadoo.fr vins.auvigue@wanadoo.fr Château Le Sartre Château de Flaugergues +33(0)5 56 64 08 78 +33(0)4 99 52 66 37 chateaulesartre@wanadoo.fr colbert@flaugergues.com CONTACT DETAILS OF ESTATES FEATURED IN THIS ISSUE:

114

GILBERT & GAILLARD WINE INTERNATIONAL

TASTING COMMITTEE: François Gilbert, Philippe Gaillard, Sylvain Patard, Olivier Delorme and James Turnbull REDACTION: Michèle Huyard CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE: Mark Andrew, Jim Budd, Christophe Chapillon, Pierre Courdurié, Richard Craig, Christine Fabre, Stuart George, Pascal Giberné, Walid Haddad, Louise Hurren, Thomas Magnani, Jean Natoli, Franck Rousseau, Philippe Roux TRANSLATION: Elise Bradbury, Sharon Nagel CORRECTION: Louise Hurren ADVERTISING: Annick Delauneux - Tel.: (+33)3 26 55 28 92 Alix Noblet - Tel.: (+33)1 30 80 81 69 PRESS RELEASE: Grégoire Meridjen - Fisheye - (+33)6 22 94 53 10

Domaine La Suffrène +33(0)4 94 90 09 23 suffrene@wanadoo.fr Domaine Dalmeran +33(0)4 90 49 04 04 chateau.dalmeran@wanadoo.fr Famille Quiot +33(0)4 90 83 73 55 vignobles@jeromequiot.com Domaine Gilles Barge +33(0)4 74 56 13 90 barge.gilles@wanadoo.fr Domaine Drouet & fils +33(0)5 45 83 63 13 contact@cognac-drouet.fr Château de Beaulon +33(0)5 46 49 96 13 c.thomas@chateau-de-beaulon.com Famille Gaillard +33(0)2 54 71 45 69 contact@joeldelaunay.com Wine and Food Page 81

La Cadiérenne +33(0)4 94 90 11 06 cadierenne@wanadoo.fr Gold Club Bordeaux 2009 Page 113

Château Lascombes +33(0)5 57 88 70 66 visite.lascombes@chateau-lascombes.fr Maison Malet Roquefort +33(0)5 57 56 40 80 contact@maletroquefort.com Château Léoville Barton +33(0)5 56 59 06 05 chateau@leoville-barton.com

SEPTEMBER 2010

LAY-OUT: Renata Lahalle PRINTING: MAURY - FRANCE DISTRIBUTOR IN FRANCE: MLP DISTRIBUTION SUPERVISED BY EXPORT PRESS: DISTRIBUTORS IN EUROPE: UK: Native Publisher services ltd, LS28 7LG Pudsey Belgium: Imapress, 2300 Turnhout Holland: Betapress, 5126PT GILZE Germany: WE Saarbach gmbh, 50332 Hurth Denmark: Interpress, 2605 Broendby Sweden: Svenska ab, 120 22 Stockholm DISTRIBUTORS IN NORTH AMERICA: USA: Speedimpex, 11 101 New York Medis Marketing Direct, New York Source Interlink, FL 34134 Bonita Springs Canada: LMPI, H1J 2L5 Anjou DISTRIBUTORS IN ASIA: China and Hong Kong: FPPS, Hong Kong Japan: DIP, 107 0051 TOKYO Taiwan: MULTI-ARTS, 10455 Taipei Korea : UPA, 110-850 Séoul DISTRIBUTORS IN AUSTRALIA AND NEW-ZEALAND: Gordon and Gotch Australia, Sydney Gordon and Gotch Australia, Auckland Gilbert & Gaillard Wine International is published by Vinipresse, SARL with a capital of 35,500 euros • Head office: 7 Parc des Fontenelles, 78870 Bailly, France • Legal representative and Editorial director: Sylvain Patard • Legal deposit: third quarter 2010 • Joint consultative committee: 0612 K 90504 Reproduction of part or all of the contents of this magazine in any form is expressly prohibited. Any company names that appear in the articles are given for information only and have no publicity purpose.


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