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WINTER 2016 FEATURES 52

INDIGO BLUES Fold, tie, twist, and dip your way to gorgeous, natural-dye linens for art, upholstery, and home accessories.

60

HUNG WITH CARE Our modern, fresh, streamlined approach to holiday decor may be just what you’ve been wishing for.

68

78

FROM FLIP TO HIP This Charlotte couple fell for a 1960 trilevel that offered a blank canvas for their oh-wow decor. CONCRETE THINKING Artisanal concrete makes for lightweight projects with rock-solid design cred.

84

PLAYING THE ANGLES A color-block buffet fashioned from stock cabinets, veneer, and stain creates a sophisticated piece for holiday entertaining and beyond.

92

MATERIAL WORLD A crafts room makeover boosts its style quotient with material upgrades— including a deluxe vinyl plank floor.

100

SIMPLE NATURE GIFTS These pretty presents are easy and inexpensive to make, and fun to give.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 1


WINTER 2016 DEPARTMENTS TRY IT Explore household goods— think corn syrup, flour, tempera paint—for stunning resist techniques.

35

14

ORDER IN THE HOUSE Bring serenity to your bedside table and your sleeping space.

40

18

COOL TOOLS You’ll be the most popular gifter with this roundup of DIY must-haves.

SPECIAL SECTION: SEW AT HOME Grow your sewing skills with our comprehensive guide to the basics and four projects for beginners.

112

TREND SITING A curated collection of leather goods and crafts kits.

8

20

30

WHAT TO DO WITH  . .. Foam is a crafts store staple with a plethora of possibilities.

ALSO 4 7 108

ON OUR RADAR A seasonal mix of the coolest new crafts, kits, and products your friends (and you) desire.

IN THIS ISSUE BHG.COM/DIY EDITOR’S LETTER RESOURCES

HANDY GIRL From snow shovel smarts to interior trim tips, turn here for cleaning, fixing, and upgrading your home.

08 28

17

12 30

35

ON OUR COVER PROJECTS PAMELA S. PORTER PHOTOGRAPH ADAM ALBRIGHT

2 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

52

PROJECTS UNDER $20 Marbled coasters 7 Resist-printed pillow cover 9 Resist-printed napkins 10 Resist-printed photo art 11 Resist-printed vase 13 Milk crate nightstand 16 Basswood memo board 29 Gold place card holders 24 Crepe paper carnations 26 Framed garlands 29 Pincushion 43 Indigo-dye artwork 54 Indigo-dye chair seat cover 56 Indigo-dye pillow wrap 57 Grid panel Christmas tree 61 Layered-ribbon gift wrap 61 Resin wreaths 62 Tinsel tassel garland 64 Cotton cord tassels 64 Copper geometric ornaments 65 Amethyst agate hangers 77 Yarn wall hanging 85 Silver vase 86 Gold leaf planter 86 Tray liner 87 Copper-wrapped lampshade 88 Painted lamp base 88 Place mat pillow cover 90 Spice-shelf crafts storage 94 Self-stick window film 96 Rock magnets 101 Copper gift tags 102 Seed disks 103 Garden starter gift set 103 Concrete planters 105 Painted tote 106 Painted zipper pouch 106 Clay ornaments 107


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sparkle & shine ORNAMENTS CRAFTED FROM HUMBLE KRAFT PAPER GET A SPARKLING MAKEOVER THANKS TO GOLD LEAF. FIND THE INSTRUCTIONS FOR MAKING THE PAPER, THESE ORNAMENTS, AND MORE. BHG.COM/GOLDPAPER

BHG.COM

MAKE IT SHINE Challenge yourself to learn a new technique or two. Find project inspiration at BHG.com. GOLD LEAF

SHIBORI

DIY ORNAMENTS

HOLIDAY DECOR

Almost any surface, including paper and glass, can be embellished by gold leaf. Learn how. BHG.com/GoldLeaf

Give your tea towels, sheets, and more global style with this easy dyeing technique. BHG.com/Shibori

Christmas ornaments crafted by you make excellent gifts, tree decor, and present toppers. BHG.com/DIYOrnaments

A quick quiz will help you find Christmas decorating ideas customized for your style. BHG.com/ HolidayDecorFinder

4 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


Cozy Up ith oye EASY LOOM KNITTING

FIND MORE ESSENTIAL BOYE PRODUCTS AT YOUR LOCAL CRAFT STORES

@Boyeneedle @boyeyarncrafts Boye Yarn Crafts


Senior Editor BRIAN KRAMER Senior Associate Editor MARIA V. CHARBONNEAUX Contributing Editor LACEY HOWARD Assistant Art Director CHRISTY BROKENS Contributing Designer BRITTANY MUELLER Contributing Copy Editor NANCY DIETZ Contributing Proofreader JOLEEN FIRST Administrative Assistant RENAE MABIE TM

ADVERTISING

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS SPECIAL INTEREST PUBLICATIONS Editorial Director JENNIFER DARLING Senior Art Director STEPHANIE HUNTER

HOME Senior Vice President and Group Publisher STEPHEN BOHLINGER stephen.bohlinger@meredith.com Associate Publisher DEIRDRE FINNEGAN deirdre.finnegan@meredith.com

HOME Senior Editors BRIAN KRAMER, SAMANTHA S. THORPE Senior Associate Editor MARIA V. CHARBONNEAUX Assistant Art Director LORI STURDIVANT Administrative Assistant RENAE MABIE

FOOD Group Publisher CAREY WITMER carey.witmer@meredith.com Advertising Director MALLORY PARKS mallory.parks@meredith.com Account Manager CAITLIN CARROLL caitlin.carroll@meredith.com Advertising Sales Assistant SHARON TAPLIN sharon.taplin@meredith.com

FOOD Executive Editor JAN MILLER Senior Editor JESSICA SAARI CHRISTENSEN Associate Editor CARRIE BOYD Assistant Art Director RACHEL KENNEDY Administrative Assistant MARLENE TODD Test Kitchen Director LYNN BLANCHARD Culinary Specialists SARAH BREKKE, CARLA CHRISTIAN, JULI HALE, SAMMY MILA, COLLEEN WEEDEN

DO IT YOURSELF Vice President and Group Publisher SCOTT MORTIMER scott.mortimer@meredith.com Advertising Sales Director AMY GATES amy.gates@meredith.com Advertising Account Manager AMBER DARBY amber.darby@meredith.com Project Supervisor BETHANY PETERSON bethany.peterson@meredith.com Business Development Director CURT BLADES curt.blades@meredith.com National Account Executive DANIEL WELLS daniel.wells@meredith.com Sales Assistant ASHLEY JACOBS ashley.jacobs@meredith.com

EDITORIAL ADMINISTRATION Copy Chief MARIA DURYEE Copy Editor MARTHA COLOFF LONG Office Manager GINGER BASSETT Photography Coordinator HOLLY PRUETT Contracts and Database Manager MARYANN NORTON Director, Premedia Services AMY TINCHER-DURIK Quality Director JOSEPH KOHLER Director Of Photography REESE STRICKLAND Photo Studio Set Construction Manager DAVE DeCARLO Photo Studio Business Manager TERRI CHARTER Prepress Desktop Specialist RANDY J. MANNING Color Quality Analyst PAMELA POWERS

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023 Associate Production Director APRIL BRACELIN Production Manager DEBBIE REYNOLDS Consumer Marketing Director LIZ BREDESON Consumer Marketing Manager BLAINE ROURICK DIRECT MEDIA Fax: 212/499-6757 Advertising Director GRACE CHUNG-MUI grace.chung-mui@meredith.com 212/499-6719 Associate Business Development Manager SAMANTHA GIORDANO samantha.giordano@meredith.com 212/499-6723 NEWSSTAND Director JENNIFER HAMILTON

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS Editor In Chief STEPHEN ORR Creative Director JENNIFER D. MADARA Executive Editor OMA BLAISE FORD Managing Editor GREGORY H. KAYKO Editorial Director, Digital Content and Products JILL WAAGE

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION Associate Business Director JENNA BATES Business Manager TONY ROUSE Product Sales HEATHER PROCTOR

Meredith National Media Group President | Jon Werther

CONTRIBUTING FIELD EDITORS Atlanta Lisa Mowry Baltimore Eileen Deymier Birmingham, Alabama Cathy Still McGowin Charleston, South Carolina/Savannah Sandra L. Mohlmann Charlotte/San Diego Andrea Caughey Chicago Megan Chaffin, Chandra Hammond, Elaine Markoutsas Dallas/Fort Worth Donna Talley Denver Mindy Pantiel, Elaine St. Louis Detroit/Toronto Khristi S. Zimmeth Jaffrey Center, New Hampshire Stacy Kunstel Los Angeles Darra Baker, Laura Hull, Robin Tucker Minneapolis/St. Paul Bonnie Broten, Heidi Pearson, Alecia Stevens Nashville Anna Forkum New Orleans Kimberly Clarke, Margaret Zainey Roux Newport, Rhode Island Lynda Sutton New York City Jorge S. Arango New Paltz, New York Anna Molvik Portland, Maine Susan Salomon Portland, Oregon Shannon Quimby San Diego Karen Reinecke San Francisco Sarah Alba Seattle Linda Humphrey Washington, D.C. Jeanne Blackburn Chatham, Massachusetts Karin Lidbeck-Brent For editorial questions, e-mail doityourself@meredith.com or write us at Do It Yourself, Special Interest Publications, Meredith Corp., 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. To subscribe, go to BHG.com/MyAccount. For subscription help, e-mail diycustserv@cdsfulfillment.com or call 800/247-0078.

President and General Manager of Meredith Magazines DOUG OLSON President of Meredith Digital STAN PAVLOVSKY President of Consumer Products TOM WITSCHI Chief Brand Officer KIM MARTIN Chief Revenue Officer MICHAEL BROWNSTEIN EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENTS President, Parents Network CAREY WITMER Chief Marketing Officer NANCY WEBER SENIOR VICE PRESIDENTS Chief Digital Officer ANDY WILSON Digital Sales MARC ROTHSCHILD Research Solutions BRITTA CLEVELAND VICE PRESIDENTS Business Planning and Analysis ROB SILVERSTONE Content Licensing LARRY SOMMERS Corporate Sales BRIAN KIGHTLINGER Digital Sales MARLA NEWMAN Direct Media PATTI FOLLO Brand Licensing ELISE CONTARSY Communications PATRICK TAYLOR Human Resources DINA NATHANSON Strategic Sourcing, Newsstand, Production CHUCK HOWELL

SUBSCRIBER PLEASE NOTE: Our subscribers list is occasionally made available to carefully selected firms whose products may be of interest to you. If you prefer not to receive information from these companies by mail or by phone, please let us know. Send your request along with your mailing label to Magazine Customer Service, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. Chairman and Chief Executive Officer STEPHEN M. LACY President and Chief Operating Officer TOM HARTY President, Meredith Local Media Group PAUL KARPOWICZ Vice Chairman | MELL MEREDITH FRAZIER In Memoriam | E. T. MEREDITH III, 1933–2003

For reuse and reprint requests, contact CLpermissions@meredith.com. PRINTED IN THE USA


BYE-BYE, BASIC

Wood coasters become conversation starters when you tape off the rims and brush on acrylic paint. Remove tape, let dry, and glue a circle of laminated paper in the center of each coaster.

PHOTO JASON DONNELLY

FOR MORE GLAM-FESTIVE HOLIDAY PROJECTS, FLIP TO PAGE 84.

FROM THE EDITOR

This time of year, we’re reminded to stop and savor the moment. As the holidays near, each day seems to fly by faster, while your desire to enjoy the little things—the first snowfall, a favorite carol, a glass of wine with friends—grows stronger. We curated this issue of Do It Yourself ™ to help you make the most of this season’s whirlwind of get-togethers and to-dos. Whether you’re creating gifts (“Simple Nature Crafts,” page 100), whipping up decorations (“Hung with Care,” page 60), or welcoming guests (“Playing the Angles,” page 84), you’ll achieve the best results with our no-fail steps, product recommendations, and insider tips. You’ll even find sanity-saving gift ideas for all the tricky folks on your list, including tool-lovers (“Cool Tools,” page 18), neat freaks (“Order in the House,” page 14), and crafty types (“On Our Radar,” page 35). Cheers!

Brian Kramer Editor, Do It Yourself ™

Scan here to learn more.

Did you know that one pint of Old Masters Gel Stain can stain an entire fiberglass door, including side lights? Old Masters Gel Stain is your only choice for fiberglass doors.

USE LESS STAIN.

myoldmasters.com 800.747.3436


TRY IT

RESIST PRINTING Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find these easy paint projects that start with household staples simply irresistible. PROJECTS JODI MENSING HARRIS PHOTOGRAPHS STEVEN MCDONALD WORDS DEBRA STEILEN

8 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


FLOUR + WATER

WHAT IS RESIST PRINTING? IT'S AN EASY WAY TO CREATE PATTERN ON FABRIC, WOOD, OR GLASS BY PRETREATING SELECT AREAS OF A DESIGN SO THEY’LL RESIST DYE OR PAINT.

A

FLOUR POWER ABOVE AND RIGHT Give a plain pillow pizzazz by

designing with paste. Insert a piece of cardboard into a flat pillow cover, then pour the paste—which you make from equal parts of flour and water—over the front of the cover. Spread the mixture evenly with an old credit card (A). The paste will crack as it dries. Want more cracks? Crunch the fabric with your hands. Use a foam brush to cover the paste with black fabric paint—pushing it into cracks when necessary, opposite. Let dry. (We waited about 48 hours. If desired, use a small space heater to speed the process.) Run water over the pillow cover until you can peel away the paste. After all the paste is gone, heat-set the painted pattern according to the paint manufacturer’s directions. Wash the fabric by hand and let it dry before inserting a pillow form.


CORN SYRUP

mix & match WE PAIRED OUR NAPKINS RESIST-PRINTED IN MULTIPLE COLORS OF FABRIC PAINT WITH PURCHASED VARIEGATED BLUE PLACE MATS.


STICKY SITUATION OPPOSITE AND BELOW For a one-of-a-kind fabric pattern that looks good enough to eat, design with

corn syrup. Using a spoon, apply corn syrup in drips, smears, and swashes to a cloth napkin (A). Let dry at least 24 hours. (The thicker the shapes, the longer they’ll take to dry—possibly two or more days.) Thin fabric paint with water until it is the consistency of watercolor paint, then brush it over the napkin—covering all the corn syrup. Keep the fabric flat while the paint dries so the syrup-covered sections don’t stick together. Rinse the napkin under running water to dissolve all the corn syrup; let dry. Once the napkin is clean and dry, set the design by ironing the napkin following the fabric paint manufacturer’s directions.

A TEMPERA PAINT

A

PICTURE THIS LEFT Create an edgy portrait. Transform an image

to high-contrast black-and-white, then print. Rub a pencil or graphite stick across the back of the paper before taping it to a canvas (A). Trace around the white shapes, remove the paper, and fill in the transferred shapes with tempera paint. Let dry. Cover the canvas with brushed-on swashes of acrylic paint. Let dry. Rinse portrait under running water to remove the tempera paint. BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 11


ADHESIVE VINYL

A

shape & shine SIMPLIFY THIS PROJECT BY USING PRECUT VINYL WALL DECAL STICKERS. METALLIC GOLD SPRAY PAINT ADDS JUST THE RIGHT AMOUNT OF SHIMMER.

12 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

CORNER THE MARKET ABOVE LEFT AND TOP Upgrade a chair with painted designs.

Print desired shapes on adhesive vinyl sheets. Cut out the shapes and stick them to the chair where you want wood to show. Protect the rest of the chair from overspray with newspaper and painters tape. Spraypaint the design using light, even strokes. Let dry and remove the vinyl (A).


RUBBER CEMENT

STUCK LIKE GLUE BELOW AND RIGHT

Salvage a lackluster vase thanks to your grade-school friend: rubber cement. Using a small paintbrush dipped in the adhesive, dot on a pattern (A). Make sure dots are thick, so you can find them later under a layer of paint. Let dry. Using a round sponge applicator, pounce a thin layer of glass or ceramic paint over the vase exterior (B). Let dry. Rub off the rubber cement with your finger. Once the vessel is adhesive-free, bake it following the paint manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s directions. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

A

B


ORDER IN THE HOUSE

MAKING THE BED Search no further for a bedside buddy. Make, buy, or hack a stylish storage sidekick. PROJECTS CHRISTY BROKENS PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN WORDS SARAH WOLF

14 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


make it FLOATING NIGHTSTAND

This double shelf may look like it’s levitating, but trust us that it’s snugged securely to the wall, putting a clock, cup of water, and eyeglasses within groggy reach. Bonus: Its “floating” design frees floor space underneath! To make your own, cut a 12×24-inch piece of crafts plywood (we got ours at a home center) in half to make two 6×24-inch shelves. Cut a spot for a drinking glass in the end of one shelf with a 2½- or 3-inch hole saw, sanding the edges smooth. Attach the two shelves to the top and bottom of a prefinished white shelf (also from a home center—ours is 8×24 inches) with 1-inch screws every few inches for stability. Finally, attach the whole assembly to the wall. We secured ours with four 2½-inch drywall screws driven into the studs.

WITH A STUD FINDER, DRIVE TWO SCREWS THROUGH THE SHELF BACK AND INTO A STUD. SPACE A SECOND SET OF SCREWS 16 INCHES FROM THE FIRST—THAT WAY THEY SHOULD HIT A STUD, TOO.

GADGET HOLDER

buy it

Round up your flock of electronics—and charge them all at the end of the day—with this dark stained bamboo holder specially sized for a tablet, smartphone, and smart watch. $50; juxlihome.etsy.com

buy it THREE-SHELF CART So what if this

helpful piece was meant for a home oice or kitchen? This cart also can sidle up to the bed and serve three binlike layers of storage power. $130; worldmarket.com


hack it CRATE NIGHTSTAND

This is no teetering tower of milk crates like you had during your dorm days—it’s an upcycled upgrade tough enough for a kid’s room. Start with a pair of milk crates about the same width, stack them, and wrap parachute cord around the handles to keep the crates together. Cut an 8×24-inch prefinished white decorative shelf in half to make two 8×12-inch shelves (we got ours at a home center; buy one that fits into your crates when cut in half). Stretch strips of electrical tape over the shelves for extra flair. Cut four pieces of ¾-inch dowel to the width of the crates plus a few inches (ours are 15 inches long), and slide the dowels through the crates’ sides to serve as shelf supports.

double the storage capacity with a pair of $1 0 shelves!

16 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


STRIPE THE SHELVES PAINTBRUSH OR RULER

CONNECT THE TWO CRATES BY WRAPPING AND TYING NYLON PARACHUTE CORD AROUND THE HANDLES.

buy it A CUBE ON CASTERS

FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

Crafted from Baltic birch plywood, this minimalist and mobile nightstand can slide into almost any bedroom. Its short stature suits a platform bed or other lowstanding mattress. $202; bee9designshop .etsy.com.

buy it PHONE POCKET

For those whose only bedside essential is a smartphone—it does stand in as a lamp, reading material, an alarm clock, and the portal for Jimmy Fallon’s monologue— the Bunk Pocket may be all the nightstand you need. Slip it over a bedpost and instantly gain two pouches. $7; dormco.com


COOL TOOLS

GIFT & RECEIVE Wrap up your holiday wish list (or shopping list) with these must-have tools. WORDS BRITTANY BUNGERT PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN

4 UNDER $20

1

$20-$50

1 EK TOOLS 4 ADTECH PRO80

ENGRAVING TOOL

simplicity.com // $16

adhesivetech.com // $30

Create custom designs on materials, including glass, metal, ceramic, and leather, using this cordless engraving tool.

Interchangeable extension nozzles and a twin heater make this high-temp, highoutput glue gun the right choice for everything from detail work to large projects.

3

2 TADPOLE TAPE CUTTER

thegrommet.com // $6–$16

5 KREG RIP CUT

2

3 HYDE 14-IN-1 PRO

PROJECT MULTI-TOOL

hydetools.com // $12

18 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

kregtool.com // $35 Attach the Rip Cut to your circular saw to make straight and accurate cuts without measuring and marking. The guide will connect to most circular saws and adjust for right- or left-handed use.

Cleanly and easily tear tape every time with this gadget that transforms rolls of painters, electrical, duct, and masking tape into tape guns. Best part? You can say goodbye to the struggle of finding the end of the roll.

Versatility is the name of the game with this multitool that can be used 14 diferent ways. Scrape paint, set nails, open cans, spread putty, or use one of the four screwdriver bits stored in the handle.

5

TIP: FOR A CHEAP BUT HIGH-IMPACT GIFT, ADD A BUCKET TOOL ORGANIZER TO A 5-GALLON PAIL AND FILL IT WITH SMALL TOOLS AND SUPPLIES.

6 CRAFTSMAN EXTREME GRIP 10PIECE DIAMONDTIP SCREWDRIVER SET

craftsman.com // $40 A solid screwdriver set is an essential element of a toolbox. The set includes a mix of Phillips and slotted screwdrivers with stubby and long-reach handles.


$51-$100 7 HUSKY 3500 LUMENS

LED WORK LIGHT WITH TRIPOD

homedepot.com // $80 A cool-to-the-touch, longlasting LED bulb brightly illuminates your work area. Remove the sled base, pictured, from a telescoping tripod, also included, to put this light to work in nearly any space.

UPGRADE FROM A BASIC STUD FINDER TO A WALL SCANNER.

8 OLISO TG1050 SMART IRON

oliso.com // $100 Scorched fabric is a thing of the past thanks to Scorchguards that lift the iron of the fabric when you

10 WORX PEGASUS

FOLDING WORK TABLE & SAWHORSE

worx.com // $120 This versatile workbench doubles as a sawhorse and comes equipped with plenty of extras, including two bar clamps, four clamp dogs, and a storage shelf. It can support up to 1,000 pounds when used as a sawhorse. 11 SHOP-VAC 14 GALLON 6.5-PEAK-HP SHOP VACUUM

lowes.com // $199 Take advantage of the on-board storage, locking casters, and large rear wheels on this wet/dry vacuum that holds up to 14 gallons.

BHG.COM/DIY

9 BOSCH DIGITAL WALL SCANNER

boschtools.com // $79 Detect wood studs, magnetic and nonmagnetic metals, and live wiring using this wall scanner with an easy-to-read digital display. The automatic center finder takes the guesswork out of locating the middle of wood or metal objects.

12

8

$101-$250

remove your hand from the appliance. The iron also features digital temperature controls and continuous steam from a 12.7-ounce water tank.

12 BLACK+DECKER

20V MAX 4-TOOL COMBO KIT

blackanddecker.com //$179 Essential power tools packaged in the cordless set include a drill/driver, reciprocating saw, circular saw, and flashlight. Store the tools, plus a charger and two included batteries, in a softsided tool bag. Give the gift a boost with a 20V Smartech battery ($69), which connects via Bluetooth to the Black and Decker app that allows you to charge other devices via a USB port, enable or disable the battery, and view the battery’s remaining charge.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 19


WHAT TO DO WITH

Think beyond your fourth-grade solar system assignment, and dial up your decor with stylish foam projects. PROJECTS LESLIE POYZER PHOTOGRAPHS ADAM ALBRIGHT HOW-TO PHOTOGRAPHS JACOB FOX WORDS LAURA KRISTINE JOHNSON

20 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


ALL THAT GLITTERS

Toast the New Year with soiree-ready signage. Print cheers onto paper in your desired size and font, cut it out, and pin it to an 18×12×1-inch rigid foam sheet; trace with marker (A). Cut out the word using the FloraCraft StyroCutter Plus, which makes intricate cuts in foam. TIP: To make art larger than a single foam sheet, trace the word onto multiple sheets and join the sections using toothpicks and Floracraft Styroglue (see “Shop for Success,” page 26). Coat the sign with decoupage medium; sprinkle with confetti. Let dry. Repeat as needed. Insert wood dowels in the bottom of the sign, and mount the dowels in a piece of scrap foam placed in a shallow vessel and surrounded with decorative pebbles.

A


ROCK ON

Bring the geode trend home with a faux amethyst carved from a foam sheet. Colorful vasefiller gems and aquarium gravel, rings of paint, and dimensional glue achieve a convincing look. To display the faux stone, mount it inside a shadow box using a low-temperature glue gun. Tuck the box into a bookshelf, display on a bedside table, or hang on a gallery wall.

22 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

how to make a faux amethyst MATERIALS • 18×12×2-inch foam sheet • FloraCraft Foam Cutter • Spoon • FloraCraft Smooth Finish • Icing spatula • Fine-grit sanding sponge • Vase-filler gems in clear and pink • Magenta aquarium gravel • Mod Podge Dimensional Magic • Acrylic crafts paint in tan, brown, gray, fuchsia, magenta, white, gold • Artist paintbrushes Step 1 Cut an organic oval from the foam sheet, striving for uneven edges that look like natural stone. Use a spoon to scrape out the stone’s center, about ½ inch deep. Step 2 Coat the top and edges of the foam with Smooth Finish using an icing spatula (A). When dry, lightly sand. Remove dust with a damp paper towel. Step 3 Fill the concave center with layers of clear and pink gems and gravel (B). Coat with Mod Podge Dimensional Magic (C). Let dry. Step 4 Dab and blend tan, brown, and gray paint onto the foam edges (D). Outline the concave center with fuchsia, gray, and magenta rings (E). Dab gray, white, and magenta paint onto cardboard and drag it around the perimeter (F). Paint gray, gold, and fuchsia rings around the edge (G, H). Blend with cardboard (I). Let paint dry. Step 5 Spread Dimensional Magic across the foam surface for a shiny look; let dry.


CENTER OF ATTENTION

A 4×10-inch foam cake form serves as the base for a festive everlasting floral centerpiece. To cover the cake form, cut a strip of 180-gram ivory florist crepe paper two and half times longer than the circumference of the cake form. With your sewing machine set on the longest stitch possible and the upper thread tension increased, sew down the center of the strip to create gathers, backstitching to secure at the ends. (If the paper isn’t gathering, hold the top of the thread spool to create more tension.) Wrap the ruffle around the cake form, pinning the ends in place. Center a glass candleholder on the base and top with paper flower toppers. (See “How to Make a Crepe Paper Carnation,” page 26.)

SAVE A SPOT Direct dinner guests to their seats with these gilded balls. Use the StyroCutter

Plus to trim the bottoms of 2½-inch foam balls so they can rest on a flat surface. Cover the balls with gold-tone thumbtacks, working from bottom to top, overlapping slightly to cover foam. (Each ball uses about one package of 300 tacks.) Twist a 6-inch piece of gold-tone florists wire into two loops to hold a place card, sticking one end of the wire into the ball top.

24 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


HAVE A BALL Bring bling to your centerpiece with petite pops of gold. Cover 1-inch

and 1½-inch foam balls completely with golden thumbtacks. Cut an 8-inch piece of green 18-gauge wire for each ball. Place a dab of hot glue on the bottom of a ball, then poke the wire through the glue and into the ball. The glue holds the wire in place. Repeat for each ball. Insert the wire into the foam centerpiece to position the balls.

LEARN HOW TO MAKE CREPE PAPER FLOWERS. BHG.COM/PAPERFLOWERS


HOW TO MAKE A CREPE PAPER CARNATION

Cut three 2½×8-inch strips along the grain of 60-gram florists crepe paper. Trim one long edge of each strip with pinking shears, and then make ¾-inch snips every ½ inch to form the petals. Gather one of the strips along the straight edge to form the flower’s center; secure it to a 3-inch piece of 18-gauge florists wire with florists tape. Repeat with the remaining paper strips to add fullness. To make larger flowers, start with wider strips.

1

2

3

shop for success

5

1 FLORACRAFT STYROGLUE is nontoxic and dries clear. Use it for bonding foam to foam (insert a toothpick to strengthen the hold) and light embellishments. 6 7

4

8

2 FLORACRAFT SMOOTH FINISH hides the pitted texture of foam. 3 A LOW-TEMP GLUE GUN bonds foam without melting. Use it for securing heavy embellishments. 4 The FLORACRAFT

STYROCUTTER PLUS is a heated wand that can carve detailed designs.

5 The FLORACRAFT FOAM CUTTER has interchangeable serrated blades for clean straight cuts. 6 ACRYLIC CRAFTS PAINTS are best for brush painting. Thin with water first and apply in all directions. 7 DESIGN MASTER COLORTOOL SPRAY coats foam without distorting the surface. Spray 15 inches from the surface. 8 KRYLON CRAFT FOAM PRIMER provides a protective coat that prevents melting when spray paints aren’t foam-friendly.


north sea green 2053-30, BENJAMIN MOORE, BENJAMINMOORE.COM

how to make sunburst art MATERIALS • Six 9-inch foam cones • Six 12-inch foam cones • FloraCraft StyroCutter Plus • 8-inch foam hollow half ball • FloraCraft Smooth Finish • Icing spatula • Fine-grit sanding block • Design Master metallic spray paint, silver and gold • 16-inch cardboard cake round • Low-temperature glue gun (Note: A high-temp gun can melt foam.) Step 1 Cut foam cones in half lengthwise using the StyroCutter Plus. Coat the cones and the half ball with Smooth Finish using an icing spatula (A).

A

B

Step 2 Once dry, sand away rough spots. Remove dust with a damp paper towel. Spray-paint the small cones silver and the large cones and half ball gold. Let dry. Step 3 If no center ball is desired, cut a 7-inch-diameter circle from the cake round’s center. Step 4 Arrange the tips of the cones around the ring, alternating colors (B). Adhere the half ball to the sunburst’s center, covering the tips of the cones if desired.

WHAT A STUNNER Add sparkle during the holiday season—and beyond—with a

dimensional metallic starburst that’s sized right for the space above a fireplace mantel or a sofa. Put your own twist on this project by swapping out the half ball for a small round mirror or by switching up the paint colors. Bonus: No nails needed for this lightweight art. Hang on the wall using large adhesive picture-hanging strips.

WE USED FLORACRAFT MAKE IT FUN FOAM IN THE MOST COMMON SHAPES AVAILABLE AT CRAFTS STORES FOR THESE PROJECTS.

FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108. 28 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


SHAPE UP

A broken full-length mirror can lead to good fortune if you turn the frame into a display piece. Paint 2-inch and 2½-inch foam balls with acrylic paint and let dry (A). To make geometric shapes, shave the corners of 5-inch foam cubes at random angles. Spray them metallic gold. (Apply Krylon Craft Foam Primer first if your spray paint isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t foam-safe.) String the shapes onto twine using a long upholstery needle. Attach the garlands to the back of the frame using a staple gun.

A

sleepy1454, hollow BENJAMIN MOORE, BENJAMINMOORE.COM


DIY Q&A

HANDY GIRL A Handy Girl never puts her tools away. When cold weather hits, she simply switches gears. Here we tackle winter-perfect jobs. WORDS KELLY ROBERSON PHOTOGRAPHS MARY BALDWIN

DEAR HANDY GIRL,

Let’s talk trim. I’m a newbie at woodworking, in my first house, and I want to redo each room with simple but well-done woodwork. How do I figure out all those angles? Geometry class was a while ago... DEAR READER, I hear you: Everyone lied when they said we’d use algebra, amirite? So why is geometry all of a sudden so useful? And trim can feel intimidating. Saws! Coping! Angles! But don’t let that stop you. Here’s a quick intro to what you’ll need to know along with tips from the pros:

30 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

A MITER BOX AND HANDSAW are basic tools that work for quarter round or areas where what you see is less important than getting the job done. Mount the box on a bench to prevent your angles from getting wonky.

INSIDER SECRET Pros use a piece of scrap trim as a scribe. They’ll cut the angle for one end of a piece of trim and fit it against the wall. Then they use their scribe to measure and cut the second angle as practice, fitting it to see if the cut is right before working on the second end.

better & easier BUY OR RENT A PROFESSIONAL-GRADE MITER BOX SO YOU CAN TURN THE BLADE AT COMMONLY USED ANGLES.

3 TIPS FOR WOOD TRIM 1

Cut a little long; you can always file it down. Test the fit, then adjust as needed. 2

Have a funny angle to fit with trim? Use this trick: A. Measure the angle. B. Divide in half; that’s your angle to cut. C. Cut one piece of trim with the saw set to the left, the second one with the saw set to the right. 3

To figure out how much trim you’ll need, measure, then add 10 percent to account for angles and cuts.


MAKING THE CUT

cut + cut = joint

The two are related: Joints are how pieces of wood fit together. Cuts are how you trim wood so that joints fit without gaps. For professional-looking results, keep track of how you measure and cut the angles—from front to back or back to front, for example. COMPOUND MITER This generally requires a fancier compound miter saw as it’s both mitered and beveled. You’ll often use it on very tall crown moldings, and you can cut without reversing the board by using the saw.

COPED JOINT Coping allows you to cut contours into a complex piece of trim, which lets it nest against the face of the adjoining trim. It’s most often used in inside corners to prevent ugly gaps and because corners are very often not perfectly perpendicular.

SQUARE This is used to make a butt joint and for half of a coped joint—it’s just cutting a piece of wood at 90 degrees (square edge) versus at an angle.

COPE A piece of trim is cut at 45 degrees and then contoured to fit perfectly against its square-cut partner using a thinblade coping saw.

BEVEL

BUTT JOINT No middle school jokes here,

Basically any cut that’s at an angle that must fit relative to another piece of trim or a wall.

of the trim rests against (butts into) another piece.

SCARF JOINT Some stretches of wall are too long to be covered with a single piece of trim. In that case, you need to join pieces using a miter cut—one side cut from the left at 45 degrees, one side cut from the right at 45 degrees. This is called a scarf joint.

MITER When trim meets at an angle, it’s called a miter cut. Most of the time it’s a 45-degree angle that forms an inside or outside corner.


DEAR HANDY GIRL,

There’s so much about winter—cookies! presents! sledding!—that I love. But snow? A snowblower isn’t in the budget; there’s got to be a better way! DEAR READER, I feel your pain. Winter weather is not for the weary. But even if you had the monster of all snowblowers, you’d still need a shovel once in a while. As with most things DIY, the right tool really does make a diference. And it took me years to realize this, but one shovel really can’t do the whole shoveling job. Here are a few tips that can help you dig out.

a tool for every shoveling task THE PUSHER A long U-shape handle pushes a big blade with a gentle curve at the top that keeps the snow moving forward. Why you need it: Great for clearing big spaces or moving snow after a monster storm. Choose a big bucket to maneuver lots of snow short distances.

THE SCOOPER Think old-school work shovel. Why you need it: To toss really big chunks of snow (and get a hard-core workout). The deep curves on the scoop can help you get rid of a lot of snow quickly.

THE ELECTRIC These machines generally clear a path about 12 inches wide and must be plugged in. Why you need it: It’s a good bridge between a snowblower and an old-fashioned shovel. Look for one with a telescoping handle to adjust to users of varying heights.

THE THROWER A traditional snow shovel lets you scoop and toss. Why you need it: A durable, versatile shovel ofers an efort-minimizing way to clean walks and drives. A narrower scoop—less than 24 inches—works best when

THE ROOF RAKE Not really a shovel but it’s useful to pull snow of of roofs; get one with a telescoping handle to allow greater reach. Why you need it: Great if you’ve got a section of roof that overhangs a sidewalk— you can remove the snow before it freezes, melts, and turns to ice.

THE SCRAPER This small blade on a long handle is made for chopping away at ice on sidewalks. Why you need it: Not really a shovel, but a great tool for eliminating icy patches. Look for the most durable blade (forged steel). FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

32 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


4 SHOVELING HACKS

SHOP SMART APPROACH SHOVEL SHOPPING AS YOU WOULD WITH ANY TOOL: KNOW YOUR STUFF.

1

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Bend your knees, scoop, and stand— that’s easiest. Also, grip closer to the shovel portion to help the snow feel lighter. 3

Packed is bad, new is good. Don’t wait: Two passes on the light stuff are way easier than one pass of tamped-down snow. 4

Deice. Make a homemade solution—2 parts rubbing alcohol with 1 part water—and spray it on sidewalks before a storm to reduce the risk of icing.

RIGIDITY

HANDLE

Look for it, especially on the blade edge. If it bends, that’s no good—but metal blades are heavier. One note of caution: Materials such as steel can scratch surfaces other than cement or asphalt.

It should be tough and comfortable. Wood is sturdy but heavy. Metal is strong but cold to the touch. Fiberglass offers a nice balance. Padding on the grip, as well as a second handle closer to the blade, helps make tossing snow more comfortable.

LENGTH

If the overall length is shorter, it’s easier to throw the snow. If it’s longer, the shovel is best used to push snow out of the way.

ERGONOMICS

Yes, bent handles are better on the back, but can make for more awkward shovel-andtoss strokes.

WEIGHT

Lighter weight is better, but balance that with durability.

ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN! October 1 - November 30, 2016 TO ENTER: Stop By Your Local Woodcraft Store, Or Visit Us Online At Woodcraft.com/CaliforniaDreaming For Complete Rules. GRAND PRIZE: ■

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50 Woodcraft Gift Card

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For A Free Catalog Or To Find Your Local Woodcraft Store, Visit woodcraft.com Or Call 800-225-1153. 16DY12H


DEAR HANDY GIRL,

I’m ready to impress my friends with MacGyver-like skills. What can I do with duct tape? DEAR READER, You mean besides make clothing and wallets? Well—plenty. Use duct tape to:

Remove lint. Just wrap some tape, sticky side out, around your palm, and roll it over your clothing. Hair, fuzz—gone!

Fix a vacuum cleaner hose. Got a hole? Don’t ditch the vacuum (or your cleaning duties). Wrap it neatly with a length of duct tape.

Clean up a broken window. Stray rock or ball shoot through a window? Cover the broken section with an X of duct tape; it will keep stray pieces from falling out.

Keep furniture from scraping the floor. Those felt pads are nice, but they don’t always stay in place. Instead, cut a small piece of duct tape to cover the bottom of the legs for the same floor-protection efect.

Prevent plywood splits. Cutting a thin piece of wood? Cover the to-cut line with duct tape, which helps minimize splinters and splits.

DEAR HANDY GIRL,

Give me a paintbrush or power tool, and I’m good. But a tax form? Ughhh. But I know my DIY efforts save me money. What should I be tracking? DEAR READER, I’m with you—tax time makes me want to do really unpleasant tasks, like clean the oven, instead. But you’re right: Your elbow grease can pay dividends. There are two main types. RESIDENTIAL TAX CREDITS: If you install residential energy-eicient upgrades (geothermal pumps, solar panels), make qualified energy-eiciency improvements (insulation, exterior doors, for example), or invest in energy property costs (electric heat pumps, central air-conditioning systems), you may be eligible

34 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

for a tax credit on your federal tax return. The percent you can claim varies, and there are generally maximum allowable amounts. As always, talk to your tax preparer for guidance.

UTILITY PAYBACKS: Most utilities ofer rebates for qualified purchase and installation of certain energy-saving systems, particularly Energy Star appliances. Every utility varies in what it covers and the total available credits. Visit energystar.gov/rebate-finder to find rebates in your location.

tax tip WANT TO TAKE TAX CREDITS OR REBATES FOR HOME IMPROVEMENT? KEEP YOUR RECEIPTS TO SHOW HOW MUCH YOU SPENT. ASK YOUR TAX ADVISOR FOR HELP.


sweet tape PAGE 38

STUFF WE LOVE

Mini PAGE 37

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Tis the season for crafting, wrapping, and creating. These products make it easy. PROJECTS AMBER WAGNER PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN & JASON DONNELLY WORDS CHELSEA EVERS

PAGE 38

Make wrapping gifts for friends and family simple yet special this year. Start with plain white or brown kraft paper, then dress up each gift with pom-poms, layered washi tape, and other handmade embellishments. Your personalized presents are sure to impress.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 35


1 Removable containers on this handy caddy make finding, rearranging, and switching out supplies a cinch. You can stack multiple handled units for easy storage. $30;

deflecto.com for retailers 1

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2 With six templates and a variety of colored string, this nail art starter pack is perfect for beginners. Simply paint as desired and use included nails to hammer away at your new wall art. $13;

hobbylobby.com 3 Learn how to embellish light fixtures, vases, and more with Amy Butlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comprehensive decoupage guide. Eighty pages of fabulously patterned paper are sure to inspire. $20;

chroniclebooks.com 4 Messy watercolors are a thing of the past thanks to Swatch Sticks. Run the included paintbrush over the pigmented sticks or use them directly on paper for easy, splatterfree art. $10 for six sticks; 4

5

cosmocricket.com 5 Bring old-school and modern digital photography together with this purse-friendly tool. Set your smartphone inside and scan 35mm film negatives or slides into instantly sharable formats. $49;

shop.lomography.com


6 Household repairs both inside and out are no match for Gorilla Clear Repair Tape. With just enough flex and stretch, the tape creates a weatherproof, airtight seal on tricky surfaces like rubber and vinyl. $7;

gorillatough.com 7 Turn out mini 3-D masterpieces with the Mod Melter deluxe kit. Use the included heating tool to fill molds with melts, then pop them out and embellish as desired. $35

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for kit; plaidonline.com

8 Ideal for young and experienced crafters alike, Miriam Seoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sew Spectacular collection of 12 pattern-printed animal cards includes a booklet of tips, embroidery floss, and a blunt needle. $19;

chroniclebooks.com 9 Those pesky mesh drywall patches are a thing of the past with this kit. Just drill, cap, and spackle over problem areas in minutes. $12 for 4-inch kit;

ryobitools.com 10 Flex some origami muscle with a paper taxidermy kit. Select from various animal species and paper colors, then cut, fold, and glue to create your own wall trophy. Starting at $48;

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sculpapershop .etsy.com

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 37


11 Intricately cut, Pavilio lace tapes are perfect for quick gift wrapping, card making, and home decorating. $5 per 12-meter roll; wanoiki.com

12 Fuze It polymer adhesive bonds wet and dry, porous and nonporous surfaces instantly. $7;

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liquidnails.com 13

13 Water-base Metallic Lustre wax is the easy way to rub shine and shimmer onto home accents. The pastelike formula goes on like polish and dries like paint. Available in 18 hues. $7 each; decoart.com

14 Smoothing intricate surfacesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;banisters, furniture legs, and moreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; just got easier. Simply aix hand-shape sheets of sandpaper to these reusable gloves and get to work. $20 for pair of gloves and papers in three grits;

peelandstick sandingglove.com

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15 Make your own pompoms, tassels, and mini tapestries with these petite bamboo tools. Kits include your choice of loom tool, a darning needle, ďŹ ve colors of yarn, and instructions. $25;

theloome.com


16 The pocket-size ZIP instant printer pairs with your smartphone via Bluetooth to instantly produce 2×3-inch masterpieces that combine your photos and Polaroid’s funky graphics. $130; polaroid.com

17 Create no-and lowsew pillows, blankets, and scarves using pretty printed fleece. Choose one of hundreds of designs or create your own on the site’s design center. $27 per yard;

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spoonflower.com 18 Deck the halls with worry-free cheer when you use any—or all—of these smart string-light solutions. $10 for Twist two-pack, $9 for Cord Protect, and $30 for Cord Dome;

twistandseal.com 19 Turn any surface into a chalkboard—without painting it black! This clear finish adds a writable, erasable top coat to drywall, wood, metal, concrete and other surfaces. $4 for spray, $10 for quart; rustoleum.com

20 Give dry, itchy skin a treat with this repairing lotion. The unscented, nongreasy formula keeps your skin hydrated for 48 hours. $13;

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okeeffescompany.com

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 39


SPECIAL SECTION

sew AT HOME

Instead of paying a hefty price for custom home decor, learn simple sewing skills so you can make it yourself. PRODUCTION MARIA V. CHARBONNEAUX WORDS ELIZABETH BEESE STYLING JESSICA MILLER PHOTOGRAPHS JACOB FOX


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INSTRUCTIONS TO MAKE THIS SUPER-EASY PINCUSHION: BHG.COM/DIYPINCUSHION

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MATERIALS 101

Like any DIY project, sewing is easier when you have the right tools. Collect these items in a basic sewing kit. 1

TA PE MEASURE Take measurements around dimensional objects, such as pillows, with this plastic or fabric tape.

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CUT TING MAT

FABRIC SHEARS

IRON, HAND-SEWING NEEDLES, NEEDLE THREADER

ROTARY CUT TER

SEWING GAUGE

Use this self-healing mat Reserve one pair of shears to protect your work for fabric only—no paper surface when using a allowed. RazorEdge rotary cutter. 18×24-inch Softgrip Fabric Shears; Cutting Mat; fiskars.com fiskars.com

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WATER-SOLUBLE MARKERS

SEAM RIPPER

EMBROIDERY SCISSORS

Marks made with these are removed with water (don’t iron over the marks—they may become permanent). BHG.COM/DIY

Rip out seams and pick out individual threads when the need arises.

Clip threads with these small, sharp scissors. Forged Embroidery Scissors; fiskars.com

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Use this metal ruler to double-check your seam This pizza cutter lookalike cuts several fabric allowances when sewing or hem measurements layers. Splash 45mm when pressing. Rotary Cutter; olfa.com

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GLASS-HEAD PINS SEAM SEAL ANT

ACRYLIC RULER

Unlike plastic-head pins, these won’t melt if touched by an iron. Extra-Fine Glasshead Pins from Dritz Quilting; joann.com

Roll a rotary cutter along a ruler to get straight edges and protect your fingers. 6×24-inch Folding Ruler; fiskars.com

Prevent raw edges or knots from fraying with this clear liquid. Fray Check; joann.com

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 41


NEEDLE GUIDE Sewing machine needles come in several different types; here are a few of the more popular. Use sharps for woven fabrics, ballpoints for stretch fabrics, or a universal needle, which is a compromise between the two. Pay attention to the numbers at the bottom of the needle packaging—the higher the number, the larger the needle. Use size 70/10 or smaller for lightweight fabrics, 80/12 for regular sewing, and 90/14 or larger for heavyweight fabrics. Be good to yourself—and your machine—by inserting a new needle with every project.

THREAD GUIDE With so many kinds to choose from, looking at the assortment of thread at the fabrics store can be dizzying. Luckily, some brands label their threads with clear-cut names, such as “outdoor,” “all-purpose,” or “heavy-duty.” For general-purpose sewing, look for 40-weight thread in cotton or polyester. One rule of thumb to remember: The lower the number, the thicker the thread.

PRESSER FEET

Most sewing machines come with a variety of presser feet to accomplish various stitches. Your manual is the ultimate resource for your machine, but here’s a basic guide to what you’ll find. 2

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BUT TONHOLE

QUILTING

ZIGZAG

OVERCASTING

A built-in button guide measures your button to set the perfect size buttonhole.

Use this attachment for free-motion quilting (moving multiple fabric layers freely in any direction).

A good all-around foot, the opening can accommodate straight and wide stitches.

Use this foot when overcasting—sewing over the edge of a fabric to prevent it from fraying.

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MONOGRAMMING

ZIPPER

BLIND STITCH

Use this foot when sewing decorative stitches that are more dense, such as a satin stitch or lettering.

This foot allows you to sew close to the left or right side of a raised area, such as on a zipper.

The guide on this foot will help you just barely catch the edge of the fold when doing blind-hem stitching.

BUT TON FIT TING

¼-INCH QUILTING

This foot holds a button while you stitch it in place.

Use the edges of this foot as a guide for perfect ¼-inch seam allowances.

STITCH GUIDE FOOT Line up the edge of the fabric with the chosen line to keep a consistent seam.

6

WALKING Used for straight lines of quilting, this attachment moves the top layer of a quilt evenly with the bottom layers.


MACHINE ANATOMY 8

Whether you’re buying your first sewing machine or upgrading to a better model, here are some areas to know and features to look for. Laura Ashley Limited Edition Sewing & Quilting Machine with Built-In Sewing Font (CX155LA); brother.com

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12 one provides a larger area of support for your project.

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PRESSER FOOT

FEED DOGS

BOBBIN COVER

THREAD GUIDE

This holds the fabric down while you’re sewing. Several may come with your machine.

These metal teeth grip the fabric and move it with each stitch.

The bobbin (a plastic or metal disk of thread) can either be a drop-in type or front-loading.

Follow the manual to be sure you’re threading correctly through all of the thread guides.

UPPER TENSION CONTROL

SEWING SPEED CONTROLLER

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SPOOL PIN BOBBIN WINDER NEEDLE POSITION The thread spool sits on Wind thread onto a bobbin BUT TON a horizontal or vertical Set the needle to automatically stop when the pin and feeds into the needle after a series needle is at its highest or of guides. lowest point. BHG.COM/DIY

to use for the lower thread in the machine.

Adjust the tension (tightness or looseness) of the upper thread.

Set the maximum speed your machine will go—good idea if you have a lead foot.

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HANDWHEEL

STITCHES

Use this wheel to manually raise or lower the needle.

Machines vary widely in the number of built-in stitches they have.

FOOT CONTROLLER Use this pedal to activate the machine while you guide the fabric with your hands.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 43


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FABRIC T YPES

Fabrics stores are filled with materials in all sorts of weights, prints, and textures. Here is a guide to some of the most commonly used for home dec projects. 1

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UPHOLSTERY WEIGHT

LINEN/LINENLIKE Linen blends ofer the look of linen without the high price or tendency to wrinkle.

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VELVET

COT TON

WOOL/WOVEN

KNIT

OUTDOOR

Natural or synthetic velvet ofers a luxe look and feel.

Medium-weight cotton solids and prints are another option for decor projects.

Weaves such as classic herringbone or nubby twills add texture.

For a change, try sewing accessories with comfy knits.

These fabrics have a finish that makes them water-resistant and/or less susceptible to sun damage.

Use this heavier home decor fabric for slipcovers and cushions.

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SHEER

FAUX SUEDE

For a little privacy without blocking sunlight, use sheer drapes.

This synthetic fabric is tough and a good choice for upholstery.

HOME DECOR WEIGHT Home decor fabrics can be used for drapes, pillows, and most anything. Available in a wide array of prints and weights.

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STITCH T YPES

Although a basic straight stitch is what you’ll find yourself using most, here are a few additional helpful stitches for home decor sewing.

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SATIN SCALLOP

BLIND-HEM

APPLIQUÉ

TRIPLE STRETCH

ZIGZAG

FAGOTING

Use decorative stitches like this on areas such as hems.

This stitch creates professional-looking hems in much less time than hand-sewing.

Secure the raw edges of a fabric shape onto a background with this stitch.

This straight stitch provides a secure seam with a little give for sewing on knits and reinforcing seams subject to strain.

Use this stitch for finishing raw edges, attaching elastic, or couching over yarn or other trim.

Some decorative stitches mimic the look of hand embroidery.

44 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

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Inspire Your Fashion Sense Want to create incredible, runway-ready fashions? Then look no further than the Simplicity® by Brother lineup. With a total of eight machines to choose from, including two award winners, there’s something for everyone. These eight versatile and affordable machines offer it all – from the easy-to-use sewing machine that helps launch your first projects, to the powerful sewing and embroidery combination machine for more advanced designers, or the embroidery-only model for adding elegant embellishments. Explore the Simplicity® by Brother lineup, and bring out the sewing star in you!

FEATURE-PACKED • HIGH-QUALITY • AFFORDABLE

SB170 Affordable Sewing MSRP $99*

SB8000 Combination Sewing & Embroidery MSRP $1,499*

SB7900E Professional Embroidery-Only MSRP $999*

To learn more or take a test drive, visit your local Authorized Brother Dealer.

brothersews.com • 1-800-4-A-BROTHER

/brothersews

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bin as we did, choose pots without drainage holes. (Place small rocks in the pot before adding potting soil to improve drainage.)

46 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


HOW TO SEW A FABRIC BIN Inspired by berry baskets from the produce aisle, fabric bins make great little catchalls or decorative pieces.

DIAGRAM B

DIAGRAM A

DIAGRAM D 1⁄ 2"

DIAGRAM C

1"

DIAGRAM F

DIAGRAM G

MATERIALS • Two 18-inch squares of coordinating fabrics • Matching thread • ¼ yard of double-sided fusible heavyweight interfacing (such as 72F Peltex II) • Iron • 1 yard of ½-inch double-fold bias tape • Clothespins

Step 2 Unfold exterior and lining pieces (they will look like plus shapes). Place pieces right sides together. Using a ¼-inch seam allowance, sew pieces together at each corner as shown (A).

sew the bias tape on in Step 8 without sewing through the bulky interfacing. Press plus shape on both sides to fuse the interfacing pieces in place. Step 6 Topstitch around center and side interfacing pieces (D). Step 7 Place exterior side down. Open folds of double-fold bias tape. Fold one side of box up. Turn end of bias tape under ½ inch and place end of tape in center of a box side, aligning tape and box side edges; pin (E).

Step 9 Flip bias tape up and over the top of the basket to conceal the raw edges. Fold inside edge of bias tape under ½ inch and secure using clothespins. Working from outside of basket, topstitch the bound edge a scant 1 ⁄8 inch above bottom of bias tape, catching inside of tape in seam (G).

Step 3 From double-sided fusible heavyweight interfacing, cut one 4¾-inch square and four Step 8 Working around bin 3¼×4¾-inch rectangles. and leaving a ½-inch gap of unpinned bias tape at each Step 4 Center the interfacing corner, pin bias tape to all sides. square on the exterior piece of the plus shape; press with an iron Overlap ends of tape by at least to fuse in place (B). Clip into each 1 inch. Sew ½ inch below top corner, cutting just up to but not edge of each side panel and corner (F). through the stitching. Turn right side out. Step 5 Slip an interfacing rectangle into each opening of the plus shape (C). Adjust interfacing rectangles so there is about 1 ⁄8 inch of space around interfacing sides to allow for topstitching. There should also be about 5⁄8 inch of fabric without any interfacing at the top of each opening; this will allow you to

INTERFACING STIFF INTERFACING, SUCH AS PELTEX, PROVIDES THE BIN’S STABILITY. LOOK FOR THIS DOUBLE-SIDED, FUSIBLE, HEAVYWEIGHT INTERFACING AT YOUR FABRICS STORE.

Packaged bias tape comes in many colors at the fabrics store It’s used to finish the raw edges of fabrics, such as in this fabric bin.

fold line

Step 1 Enlarge pattern, below right; cut out. Fold each fabric square into quarters and cut the pattern from each (one piece for the bin’s exterior and one for the lining).

DOUBLE-FOLD BIAS TAPE

FABRIC BIN PATTERN Enlarge 200%.

fold line

DIAGRAM E


LIKE THE LOOK? GET THESE FABRICS OR COMPLETED PILLOWS AT MINTED.COM.


HOW TO SEW A PIECED PILLOW Fashion a large throw pillow by combining four fabrics for a dazzling diamond effect.

CLOSURE METHODS

4¾ x 181 ⁄8

DIAGRAM A

DIAGRAM B

PIPING DIAGRAM

DIAGRAM C

MATERIALS • ¾ yard of fabric 1 (pillow top, piping) • 1 ⁄ 3 yard of fabric 2 (pillow top) • 1 yard of fabric 3 (pillow top and back) • ¼ yard of fabric 4 (pillow top) • Rotary cutter and cutting mat • Acrylic rotary cutter ruler with 45-degree line • 3 yards of 3⁄8-inch cording • Polyester fiberfill Finished pillow: 24×24 inches Cutting: Fabric 1: cut two 67⁄8-inch squares; cut each in half diagonally for four triangles total. From remaining, cut enough 2½-inchwide bias strips (cut diagonally across the fabric) to total 106 inches. Fabric 2: Cut four 4¾×18 1 ⁄8-inch rectangles. Fabric 3: Cut four 4¾×18 1 ⁄8-inch rectangles and one 24½-inch square. Fabric 4: Cut two 6 7⁄8-inch squares; cut each in half diagonally for four triangles total.

corner. Cut end of cording so it will fit snugly into folded opening at beginning. The ends of the cording should abut inside covering. Refold bias strip so it covers cording, lapping folded end over raw end. Finish stitching piping to pillow top. Step 6 Using basting line as a guide for stitching, sew together pillow top and 24½-inch square from fabric 3, leaving an opening for turning. Step 7 Turn right side out, stuf with fiberfill, and hand-stitch closed.

Step 1 Align 45-degree line on acrylic ruler with a corner of a fabric 2 rectangle and trim (A). Repeat at opposite end to form a trapezoid. Repeat with remaining fabric 2 and fabric 3 rectangles. Step 2 Using ¼-inch seam allowance, sew together a fabric 1 triangle, fabric 2 trapezoid, fabric 3 trapezoid, and fabric 4 triangle (B). Press seams in one direction. Repeat to make four blocks. Step 3 Join blocks in pairs (C). Press seams in opposite directions. Join pairs to make pillow front. Press seams in one direction. To make it easier to turn corners with piping, round each corner slightly. Step 4 Sew together fabric 1 bias strips to make one long strip. Fold under an inch at one end of strip, then fold in half lengthwise with wrong side inside. Insert cording next to folded edge, placing cording end 1 inch beyond fabric folded end. Using zipper foot, sew through both fabric layers right next to cording to make piping (piping diagram). Trim seam allowance to ¼ inch. Step 5 Aligning raw edges, baste piping around edge of pillow top; begin stitching 1½ inch from piping’s folded end. At each corner, gently ease piping into place around BHG.COM/DIY

HAND-SEWN OPENING

Learn a new invisible stitch method at BHG.com/Stitch for a professional look.

ENVELOPE ST YLE

Piping is made by sewing a bias-cut fabric strip around a length of cording.

See this easy-sew option at BHG.com/Envelope, then add a fun button embellishment.

HIDDEN ZIPPER

Adding a zippered closure doesn’t have to be an intimidating prospect. Learn how at BHG.com/Zip.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 49


HOW TO SEW CURTAIN PANELS

GROMMETS OPTIONAL

Easy measuring and simple sewing give you a pair of grommeted panels to cover any window with style. 2–4"

MEASURING YOUR WINDOW For custom window covers, install the curtain rod before you take your first measurement. The rod should be at least 2–4 inches above the window frame and the brackets that same distance from the outside edges of the frame. Take measurements as directed, below, and fill in the blanks in the equations. If you have multiple windows in a room, be sure to measure each window, as they can vary even if they look identical. Decorator fabrics are usually 54 inches wide but also could be 45 inches. Either width can be used—just fill in the correct width, below.

A

CLIP-ON RINGS

The easiest method for making drapes is simply making two drapery panels, then attaching them to a decorative rod with clips. Be sure to include the height of the rings and clips in the overall finished length.

CALCULATING FABRIC YARDAGE 1

Measure from top edge of curtain rod to the desired finished length (line A, above right) A _____. (Suggested finished length for floor-length curtains is ½ inch above the floor.)

2

10½ inches + A _____ = B _____. (This is the cut-length measurement.)

3

Measure the distance between curtain rod brackets and multiply this number by 1½ or 2 (depending on how full you want curtains to be) C _____. (The panels shown, opposite, use 1.5 for the multiplier.)

4

The width of your fabric is D _____.

5

C _____ ÷ D _____ = E _____. Round up to the nearest whole number. (This is the number of fabric widths needed for a pair of curtains.)

6

The fabric pattern repeat distance (if applicable) is F _____ (see “Pattern Repeats,” below).

7

B _____ + F _____ = G _____. (This additional amount of fabric is needed to match the repeat design.)

8

G _____ × E _____ = H _____.

9

H_____ ÷ 36 inches = _____ total yards of decorator fabric you’ll need for a pair of curtain panels.

CALCULATING LINING YARDAGE 1

Measure from the top edge of the curtain rod to the desired finished length (line A, above) A _____.

2

7½ inches + A _____ = BB _____. (This is the cut-length measurement for the lining.)

3

BB _____ × E _____ (determined above) = CC _____.

4

CC _____ ÷ 36 inches = _____ total yards of lining fabric you’ll need for a pair of curtain panels.

50 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

PAT TERN REPEATS: THE DISTANCE FROM ONE COMPLETE MOTIF UNTIL YOU SEE THAT SAME ONE AGAIN.

LOOPS

For this method, use enough loops to adequately support the weight of the drapes and remember to allow for the height of the loops in the total length of the finished drapes. To make each loop, sew a fabric tube twice the loop length plus ½ inch. Turn tube right side out, center the seam and press flat. Fold in half to make a loop and baste the raw edges to the top of the drapery panel, between the fabric and drapery lining.

DRAPERY WEIGHTS Make your drapes hang nicely by sewing a drapery weight in each corner of the hem.


Oversize grommets, available at the fabrics store, slide along the rod, letting your drapes open and close with ease.

A blind-hem stitch is a machine stitch that mimics hand-sewing, creating barely noticeable stitches on the front of your drapes.


SEWING THE CURTAIN PANELS MATERIALS • Decorator fabric* • Lining fabric* • Curtain rod (no larger than 13⁄8-inch diameter), mounting brackets, and finials • 19⁄16-inch-diameter grommets (an even number for each panel, spaced 6–8 inches apart) • Water-soluble marking pen *Determine amount in “Calculating Fabric Yardage“ and “Calculating Lining Yardage,“ page 50.

Left Curtain Panel

Right Curtain Panel

4"

Half Width

Full Width

Full Width

Half Width

1" 3" 4"

DIAGRAM A

DIAGRAM B

DIAGRAM C

DIAGRAM D

2" 11⁄ 2" 21⁄ 2"

DIAGRAM E

Step 1 Straighten one edge of decorator fabric; cut of selvages. Cut one fabric width to length measurement B from “Calculating Fabric Yardage,” page 50. Using this piece as a guide, cut additional widths needed (E from “Calculating Fabric Yardage”), matching design repeats on subsequent panels. If E is an odd number, cut one width in half lengthwise to create two half widths. Step 2 Straighten one edge of lining fabric; cut of selvages. Cut number of widths needed (E from “Calculating Fabric Yardage”) to length measurement BB from “Calculating Lining Yardage,” page 50. If E is an odd number, cut one width in half lengthwise to create two half widths. Step 3 Using a ½-inch seam allowance, sew decorator fabric together to make each curtain panel, matching repeats if needed. If using half widths, sew to outermost edge of each curtain panel (Diagram A). Use pinking shears or finish raw edges of seams with a zigzag stitch. Press seams open. Step 4 Fold up bottom edge of each panel 4 inches with wrong side inside; press. Fold over another 4 inches; press (Diagram B). Step 5 Set up machine for blind-hem stitch; machine-stitch hems (Diagram C). Step 6 Join lining widths to make a panel. Use pinking shears or finish seam edges with a zigzag stitch. Press seams open. Trim lining to be 6 inches narrower than curtain panel. Repeat to make second lining panel. 52 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

DIAGRAM F

DIAGRAM G

Step 7 Fold up bottom edge of each lining panel 3 inches with wrong side inside; press. Fold over another 3 inches and press. Blind-hem stitch hems. Step 8 With right sides together, center a lining panel on each curtain panel, aligning top edges. (Curtain panel should extend 3 inches beyond each side edge of lining panel.) Join pieces along top edge with ½-inch seam allowance (Diagram D). Step 9 Bring lining over to wrong side of curtain panel. Press top edge flat, including remaining ½-inch seam allowance that extends beyond lining (Diagram E). Stitch close to top edge through all layers to prevent lining from showing on right side. Repeat with remaining curtain panel. Step 10 On side edges of each curtain panel, turn under 1½ inch twice, encasing lining raw edges; press. Using blind-hem stitch, sew sides in place to complete each panel (Diagram F). Step 11 With panel lining side up, use watersoluble marking pen to draw a line across panel width 2½ inches from top edge. Step 12 Plan placement of an even number of grommets along drawn line. Centers of first and last grommet should be at least 2 inches from each side edge and 2½ inches from top edge (Diagram G). Divide remaining distance across panel evenly for number of grommets being used, placing grommets 6–8 inches apart. Using your

DIAGRAM H

grommet, trace inner opening at each grommet location. Step 13 Pin around outside of one marked circle to prevent fabric from shifting when cut. Carefully cut on marked line through all layers to create grommet opening (Diagram H). (Circle should fit snugly against grommet. If opening needs to be made larger later, trim one thread at a time.) Step 14 Place grommet rim-side up on a hard surface. Gently place grommet opening, lining side up, over grommet. Without distorting fabric, trim opening if necessary to fit over grommet rim. Use your fingernail to push fabric as flat as possible around grommet. Place remaining grommet half on top. Using your palm, apply quick and direct pressure to snap grommet halves together. Step 15 Repeat to set all grommets. Weave rod through grommets in panels. Set rod into brackets and arrange panels to hang in even folds. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

SPECIAL THANKS TO CLOUD9 FABRICS, FISKARS, OLFA, JO-ANN FABRIC AND CRAFT STORES, MINTED.COM, PREMIER PRINTS, INC.


Fold, wrap, and dip fabrics to make stunning dyed accents for your home. PROJECTS CATHY KRAMER PHOTOGRAPHS JAY WILDE WORDS HEIDI PALKOVIC


before you begin Indigo dye uses oxidation to turn the fabric blue. With creative shibori-style folding and tying of fabric and inserting objects between layers, you can create striking resist patterns. For our projects, including the artwork, below, we used the Indigo Tie Dye Kit from Jacquard Products. To prepare the dye, wear rubber gloves and add hot water to a lidded container. Add indigo packet to the water; stir with a paint stick (A). Stir in soda ash and reducing agent (B); place lid on container. Let sit for 15â&#x20AC;&#x201C;60 minutes. Remove lid and gently remove the bloom from the mixture (C) before submerging fabric.

A

B

C

54 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H I

J

how to make the artwork MATERIALS • Basic dyeing supplies (see opposite) • Large square of natural-fiber fabric • Rubber bands • Artists canvas • Staple gun Step 1 Prepare indigo dye in plastic container. Let mixture set according to manufacturer’s instructions. Fold one-third of fabric. Fold one-third of adjacent side to create a square (A). Beginning at double folded corner, accordion-fold the fabric until you reach the center (B). Step 2 Bring opposite corner into center (C). Continue accordionfolding the strip across remaining fabric. Fold strip in half crosswise (D). Wrap strip in rubber bands (E). Step 3 Soak fabric in water; squeeze out excess. Dip long edges of fabric in dye mixture (F). Fabric will turn from green to blue as it oxidizes. Step 4 Rinse fabric in water; remove bands (G). Unfold fabric (H, I, J) and heat-set in dryer. Mount fabric on artists canvas using a staple gun.


ON THE GRID

Indigo tie-dyeing produces imperfect, yet striking, results. To get the grid resist pattern on the chair fabric, pieces of wood were placed on top of the accordionfolded fabric. The tote bag and petals on the flower embellishment are simply dipped in a container of dye.

56 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


A

how to make the chair seat

B

C

D

ideas to dye for

MATERIALS • Indigo Tie Dye Kit • Basic dyeing supplies (see page 53) • Natural-fiber fabric • Two 23⁄4×31⁄2-inch pieces of wood • Rubber bands • Chair with upholstered seat • Staple gun Step 1 Gather materials (A). Prepare dye and let mixture set according to manufacturer’s instructions. Lay fabric flat. Fold one fabric edge, using a piece of wood as a guide for width (B). Accordion-fold fabric.

SMALL PIECES OF WOOD PLACED ON THE FABRIC PREVENT THE DYE FROM PENETRATING THOSE AREAS. ITEMS SUCH AS COINS, FLAT ROCKS, AND WASHERS YIELD OTHER EFFECTS.

E

F

G H

I

Step 2 Accordion-fold fabric along length of strip (C). Place piece of wood on top and bottom of folds (D); secure with rubber bands (E). Step 3 Soak fabric in water; squeeze to remove excess. Submerge fabric in dye mixture (F); remove. Fabric will turn from green to blue as it oxidizes (G). Rinse fabric. Step 4 Remove bands and wood (H); unfold (I). Wash, dry, and press fabric. Wrap fabric around chair seat and staple edges to back.


FEELING BLUE

A dyed throw and pillow wrap make a personal statement. When working with large pieces of fabric, such as the throw, fold the fabric into a manageable size and use a clamp-style hanger to hold it while dipping the fabric into the dye. To make the pillow wrap, fray the edges of a fabric rectangle and accordion-fold the rectangle on a diagonal before putting it in the dye.

58 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


how to dip dye MATERIALS • Indigo Tie Dye Kit • Basic dyeing supplies (see page 53) • Natural-fiber pillowcase or throw • Clamp-style pants hanger • Plastic trash bag Step 1 Gather materials (A). Prepare indigo dye and let mixture set according to manufacturer’s instructions. Spread plastic trash bag on surface where the wet fabric will hang to drip.

A

B

C

D

Step 2 Soak fabric in water, squeeze to remove excess, and fold fabric to fit in hanger (B). Dip a portion of the fabric into dye (C). Lift and lower the fabric in the dye until satisfied with dyed edge and intensity of color (D). If desired, use a paint stick to help the dye wick up the fabric, creating an uneven dye line. Step 3 Rinse fabric, unfold, and hang. Let dye drip of onto trash bag. Heat-set in a dryer.

FLOWER POWER Give your dyed bedroom scene the golden touch by adding a gilded stenciled flower to a dipped pillow sham. Simply Spray stencil paint is specially formulated for fabric and creates a silkscreen effect. The paint is permanent, fast-drying, and machine-washable.

FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.


HUNG

wCARE ith

Oh, what fun! Deck your halls and walls with these pretty projects that add geometric glam. PROJECTS AMBER WAGNER PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN WORDS EMILY ELVERU

60 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


budget Breakdown GRID LIGHT PANEL $13 WALL HOOK $2 TOTAL // $15

TREE-MENDOUS TRELLIS

If you’re tight on space or can’t get your hands on a real spruce, this geometric grid alternative is fit for you (and your living area). Mark your tree’s trunk at the middle of the short side of a grid light panel. Use the grid squares as a guide to indicate the branches and top of the tree. Once you are satisfied with your design, snip the edges of the grid along your guideline with wire cutters (A). When finished, hang the tree on a hook or lean against a wall. Decorate with lightweight ornaments.

A


budget Breakdown PLASTIC SERVING TRAY $1 CLEAR CAST EPOXY CASTING RESIN $16 METAL LEAFING FLAKES $10 TOTAL FOR FOUR 9-INCH WREATHS // $27

THE HARDENED WREATH FROM THE MOLD BY PLACING IT IN THE FREEZER FOR 5–10 MINUTES, THEN GENTLY PEEL BACK THE TRAY. SILVER AND GOLD Add glamour to your walls with these sparkly resin wreaths. To start, look for a disposable plastic tray that, when turned over, has a channel that can hold water. This will act as your resin mold. Place the inverted serving tray on a flat surface in a well-ventilated area. Mix clear casting resin according to the package directions. Stir in 1–2 teaspoons of silver and gold metal flakes until evenly distributed throughout the mixture. Pour the resin into the serving tray rim (A). You have about 20 minutes to make adjustments before the resin is no longer workable. Allow to cure for at least 24 hours. Once hardened, remove from the mold and hang from ribbon.

A


A KEEP HOLIDAY DECORATING EASY BY REPLACING A CURTAIN ROD WITH YOUR DOWEL—PLACED ON THE EXISTING BRACKETS. THE MIX OF METAL AND WOOD GIVES YOUR WINDOW A WARM, MODERN LOOK.

budget Breakdown 3 BIRCH WOOD STRIPS, 3×36-INCH $10 DOWEL $1 YARN OR CORD $5 METAL LEAF MIX $10 DECOUPAGE MEDIUM $3 CRAFTS PAINT $2 TOTAL // $31

B

NATURAL CHARMER

This airy valance warms the wintry scene outside your window. To make, soak three birch strips (found at crafts stores) for about five minutes to soften the wood and prevent it from splitting or breaking. Cut circles from the strips using a hole punch (A). We cut fifty-two 2∏-inch circles for our 36×36-inch valance. In some of the circles, cut a triangle shape using a crafts knife if desired. Brush decoupage medium over the remaining circles and press on metal leafing (B). Let dry. Tape off sections of a dowel starting about 4 inches from each end and working toward the center to create a desired pattern. Apply crafts paint to the exposed areas and let dry. Measure and cut yarn or cord in varying lengths and tie each length to the dowel. Hot-glue the circles to the yarn. Once dry, place the dowel in the curtain rod holder.

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 63


A ROPED IN These cotton tassels are so pretty you may want to keep them up all year. Begin by cutting 4–5 feet of clothesline cord and tying a double knot at each end. To make the tassels, wrap cotton cable string about 40 times around a 20-inch piece of cardboard or wood. Tuck one of the knotted ends of the clothesline cord into the center of the wrapped string. Slide the bundle off the cardboard and tie a string around the middle of it to secure. Fold the bundle in half, and cut the loops at the bottom. Arrange the clothesline cord so the knot is covered by strings and the other end is at the middle of the tassel top. Cut a 24-inch length of string, and starting about 1 inch from the top of the tassel, form a 3-inch loop with the string, then wrap the rest around the tassel. Stick the string’s end through the loop you created and pull tight; trim tails. Add pops of color to the long clothesline cord by wrapping embroidery floss tightly around the cord in about 2–4-inch lengths (A). Repeat along the cord as often as desired.

B

64 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

TINSEL TOWN Who said tinsel could only go on trees? Tie a knot at each end of a length of clothesline cord. Separate a small amount of tinsel from the rest of the box. To tie the tinsel to the cord, lay it over the cord to create an A shape (B). Thread the two sections of tinsel up and under the cord, then through the loop; pull. Secure with a small rubber band to prevent the tassel from unraveling. Repeat at regular intervals along the cord. Trim the uneven ends of the tinsel with scissors.


budget Breakdown A COPPER COLLECTION

Geometric ornaments give your tree an elegant upgrade. Use a marker to trace triangle or square shapes onto a sheet of plexiglass. Lay a metal ruler next to the tracings as a guide when you cut out the shapes with a crafts knife. Remove the protective plastic film from the plexiglass, and create the prisms by attaching the edges of the shapes with cyanoacrylate glue. Once dry, fold copper foil tape over the edges to hide gaps. To create a hanging loop, cut a small strip of foil tape, thread it through the hole of a jump ring, and secure it to a prism end with a drop of glue. Hang the prisms with velvet ribbon.

THREE 1-MM, 8Ã&#x2014;10INCH PLEXIGLASS SHEETS $2 EACH CYANOACRYLATE GLUE $1 COPPER FOIL TAPE $7 COPPER JUMP RINGS $3 VELVET RIBBON $3 TOTAL // $20


MAKE THESE MOBILES LOOK LIKE THEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE FLOATING BY DANGLING THEM FROM NYLON HANGING WIRE. THE CLEAR, FLEXIBLE

A

B MERRY MOBILES Hang these

mod movers as seasonal art. To make the larger mobile, trim two square wood dowels to 16 and 18 inches long, and cut a 12-inch embroidery hoop in half. Paint the dowels and hoop; let dry. Set a 12-inch metal macramĂŠ ring inside a 14-inch ring, and place the semicircle embroidery hoop toward the bottom. Glue pieces in place using metal epoxy. Once cured, make a tassel to hang from the metal rings. Wrap embroidery floss about 50 times around a 12-inch piece of cardboard (A). Slide the floss off the cardboard, and fold it in half over the bottom of the rings (B). Tightly wrap a length of floss around the bunch under the metal rings to secure. Cut the bottom loop to create the tassel. Adhere the two dowels parallel to each other on the metal rings using cyanoacrylate glue. Adhere three bells evenly across the underside of the longer dowel; let dry. To create the smaller mobile, paint the inner circle of a 4-inch embroidery hoop; let dry. Place the embroidery hoop and 6- and 8-inch metal hoops together, touching at the bottom center; adhere together using metal epoxy. Make a small tassel by wrapping floss 30 times around a 5-inch piece of cardboard. Loop and tie the floss around all three rings at the bottom. Glue a bell to the top underside of the embroidery hoop. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.


5 DIY IDEAS TO STEAL These products will help you deck the halls with projects, color, style, and plenty of DIY holiday cheer. WORDS EMILY ELVERU

1. DAMAGE-FREE DECORATING Create your own gallery wall—minus the nail holes—with the Command Picture Hanging Kit, which allows you to hang up to 15 pictures. The strips hold strongly and come off cleanly. Visit Command’s website for step-by-step instructions on completing this Gilded Modern look. $20; command.com for retailers.

2. TOTAL FANDOM Treat your guests to an eye-popping display by simply unfolding and hanging these multicolor holiday party fans. Each pack comes with eight fans in varying sizes with gold foil and glitter accents to add some temporary flair to your space. $25; mymindseyepapergoods.com

BHG.COM/DIY

3. LIGHT THE WAY Building your own marquee light couldn’t be easier with the Heidi Swapp Marquee Love Christmas Paper Shape. Each kit comes complete with your choice of a paper star, snowflake, or evergreen tree shape, one tracing template, an LED light strand, and bulb caps. Just add batteries to your assembled piece. $15; heidiswappstore.com

4. LET IT GLOW Clip your holiday cards on these charming Firefly Clips String Lights made with bendable copper wire and bright LED bulbs. The plastic clothespins are removable so you can create your own customizable look. $20; urbanoutfitters.com

5. MAKE IT STICK This versatile bonding agent helped us complete every project that required glue. Gorilla Epoxy adheres to steel, wood, glass, plastic, and many more materials. Plus, its separate barrels of epoxy resin and hardener keep the glue from drying in the bottle, so you know it will be ready for your next project. $6; gorillatough .com for retailers.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 67


from

to

An understated backdrop was the perfect springboard for a homeowner’s passions: clean lines, vibrant color, and bold pattern. WORDS JAN SOULTS WALKER PHOTOGRAPHS BRIE WILLIAMS FIELD EDITING ANDREA CAUGHEY

When Ashley Walker Delapp and husband Mark Lassiter first toured this house, it had languished on the market for a year as a flip that seemed to have flopped. “Potential buyers likely saw only an underwhelming sea of ‘greige,’” says Ashley, referring to the gray-beige hue swathing the walls of the Charlotte 1960 trilevel. But the couple instead envisioned a great home base for their combined family that includes seven children, ages 7 to 23. “Plus, it just had great bones,” Ashley says, including refinished original hardwood floors and a vaulted ceiling in the living room.

68 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

For Ashley, an interior designer, the neutral palette was simply a blank canvas ready to receive her mix of confident color and hey-check-me-out geometric patterns—all achieved with strategically located wallcoverings, painted finishes, thoughtfully selected fabrics, and abstract artwork. Plus, the home’s Rat Pack-era styling serves as an appropriate setting for her love of cool midcentury modern-inspired furnishings and accents.


1 Ashley Walker Delapp was over the moon when ofered her husband’s grandmother’s suite of 1958 Lane furniture. She re-covered the sofa in tone-on-tone fabric and the slipper chairs in a bold black-and-white pattern. A vintage Italian marble table completes the living room’s retro vibe. 2 Red lacquer updates this living room desk—originally a vanity that Ashley found at an antiques shop. 3 Geometric exterior architecture and a vibrant vermillion three-light door foreshadow the home’s interiors.

before!

1

meet ashley 3

2

ASHLEY WALKER DELAPP AND TESSA THE FRENCH BULLDOG STAND IN THE ENTRYWAY WHERE NEW GRASS CLOTH LAYERS THE EXPANSIVE STAIRCASE WALL WITH TEXTURE.


WALLPAPER IS A GREAT WAY TO DEFINE “ SPACES, ESPECIALLY IN AN OPEN-PLAN HOME.” ASHLEY WALKER DELAPP, HOMEOWNER/INTERIOR DESIGNER

4

5

4 “It’s all a play on geometry,” Ashley says of her design choices, such as the new dodecahedron wood pendant in the dining room paired with an accent wall covered in gray metallic wallpaper. 5 Two chartreuse fabrics—faux bois on the outside and velvet for the front and seat—add interest to the barrel chair Ashley found on Craigslist.


6 Beaded-board panels on existing IKEA kitchen cabinets didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suit the desired midcentury aesthetic, so homeowner Mark Lassiter reversed the door and drawer fronts to expose the smooth side. 7 Ashley boosted the kitchenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s subtle glamour with brass-tone pulls and knobs she found on Etsy. 8 Mark removed a cabinet near the range and installed open shelves. Matte penny tile introduces texture on the backsplash.

6

before!

8

7

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 71


I LOVE TO MIX OLD AND NEW. A COAT OF “ PAINT AND NEW HARDWARE CAN MAKE VINTAGE FINDS LOOK LIKE A MILLION BUCKS.” ASHLEY WALKER DELAPP

9

10

11

72 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

9 Dusty lavender curtains serve as a floor-to-ceiling headboard in Ashley and Mark’s bedroom. 10 This petite chair was a serendipitous find on the floor of a designer’s showroom. To set it of, Ashley chose wallpaper that appears abstract but, on closer inspection, reveals a pattern of people. 11 Ashley simplified these mapleand-cherry bedside tables by applying black lacquer to the tops and leaving the base stained. New agate-slice knobs make a big statement.


Inkwell SW6992, SHERWIN-WILLIAMS; SHERWIN-WILLIAMS.COM

13

before!

12

15 14

12 Ashley divided one long room beside the small master bedroom into two spaces, creating a lounge and a luxurious dressing room/closet. 13 Navy lacquer walls in the master lounge define a groovy spot for Mark and Ashley to enjoy a cocktail, conversation, or movie. 14 Graphic wallpaper camouflages the low ceiling. 15 To make the dressing room an always-sunny space, Ashley chose grass cloth in unexpected chartreuse.


16 Painting son Suttonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bedroom white keeps the attention on the accent wall of hexagon-pattern paper in dramatic black and white. White epoxy paint refreshes the vintage headboard. A yellow pendant replaces an existing ceiling fixture. 17 One corner of Suttonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room becomes an inviting spot for reading with the addition of a desk and IKEA picture ledges for organizing books.

16

Hit Hexagono 1961-2, TRES TINTAS; TRESTINTAS.COM

before!

74 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


17


18 In the guest room, Ashley created a modern panel efect by trimming pieces of Rothko-esque wallcovering with classic-profile molding. She updated the bedroom furniture with lacquer: black for the vintage headboards and citron for the nightstand. 19 In the guest bathroom, a bamboo dresser becomes an elegant vanity when dressed in black lacquer and topped with a vessel sink and sleek faucet. As a finishing touch, overhead lighting was removed and new electrical boxes added for angular sconces. 20 For the tub surround, single rows of cream subway tiles alternate with three rows of white for subtle contrast.

18

20

19

LACQUER LOVE Revitalize thrifted furnishings with a gloss finish. “A lacquered finish elevates an ordinary find into something really special and resists chips,” Ashley Walker Delapp says. She sends large furnishings to a pro, such as a cabinetmaker or auto body repair shop, and saves small pieces for DIY spray-on lacquer. “Sand between coats for a super smooth finish,” she says. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.


6 DIY IDEAS TO STEAL These DIY-friendly products will help you cultivate your own modern chic makeovers.

1. LAMP-TASTIC Ashley Walker Delapp loves this line of handmade table lamps inspired by midcentury designs. Mix and match shapes, shades, hardwood accents, and 12 glaze colors to create your custom light. Prices start at $185; Alberta, above, in turquoise and cherrywood is $500. caravan-pacific.com

4. PENNY THOUGHTS Bring understated graphic texture to a backsplash with Bliss Penny Round mosaic tiles in matte white. For easy DIY installation, the tiles come mounted on 12×12-inch mesh sheets ($9). homedepot.com

BHG.COM/DIY

2. BRASSY SUGGESTION Swapping hardware remains one of the fastest updates for cabinets and furniture. Ashley fell in love with midcentury modern pulls in brushed satin brass finish (see page 71). Up-andcomer Forged Hardware Studio offers a bevy of glamorous designs that combine shapely metal and crisp Lucite. Prices for pulls shown, above, start at $4 each. forgehardwarestudio.etsy.com

5. GET WIRED New light fixtures adorn nearly every room in Ashley’s home. An essential tool for the task is a combination wire cutter/stripper so you can cut, strip, and loop most sizes of wire. The arced handle on the Kurve helps you reach into tight spots. $22; acehardware.com

3. SHINE ON Give furniture and accessories a glossy lacquered finish with a dynamic paint trio from designer Amy Howard. First apply Furniture Lacquer Primer ($14.50) to seal and level wood grain, and then choose from 13 colors of High Performance Furniture Lacquer, above, ($21–$25). Finish with a protective top coat of clear Bright Idea Lacquer ($16). amyhowardhome.com

6. GET HOOKED Re-create the pretty and handy hooks in Ashley’s dressing room. The Agate Hooks kit includes glue, screws, spacers, and three colorful, medium-size agate slices. $18; darbysmart.com

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 77


CONCRETE THINKING Cast your own artisan-concrete projects. Plenty of edgy textureâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;no hard hat required. PROJECTS AMBER WAGNER PHOTOGRAPHS JACOB FOX WORDS LAURA KRISTINE JOHNSON

78 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


ROUGHING IT Add chic substance to your office space by crafting raw, textured furniture and accessories out of concrete from Buddy Rhodes. Artisan concrete mixes lend an ease-ofuse factor—as well as a range of pigments and finishes—for first-time concrete crafters and aficionados alike. Although concrete needs water to activate, adding too much can cause it to slump. In the case of too much, wait for the mixture to stiffen and then remix, or add more concrete to the batch. Grab the construction details on the following pages.

go mobile CRAFT THIS SCULPTURAL PEDESTAL (ON WHEELS!) WITH THE STEP-BY-STEP INSTRUCTIONS ON PAGE 80. CUSTOMIZE THE SEAT HEIGHT BY PACKING CONCRETE UP THE MOLD’S SIDES AS HIGH AS YOU DESIRE.

tip : Temps matter

When concrete mix comes in contact with water, a chemical reaction occurs and the mixture starts to harden, which allows projects to eventually retain their shape. But you want to slow that chemical reaction to allow time to complete your project. Warm conditions (at least 70 degrees Fahrenheit) accelerate the hardening; cool water slows it. The desired water temperature depends on the length of time you’ll be working and the ambient temp: Outside in the summer sun? Add ice! Inside the garage during winter? Cold tap water is probably OK. The manufacturer says aim for 60 degree water.


how to make a concrete stool concrete until evenly distributed. If mixture stifens, add water reducer sparingly until concrete is workable, then add a second layer of concrete to the mold using the same method as before (D) for a 2-inch thickness (E). Let dry for 72 hours. Remove stool from mold by unscrewing the boards and gently tapping them with a hammer.

MATERIALS • Two ¾×11¾×36-inch melamine shelving boards • Saw • 1½-inch screws • Drill • Heavy plastic sheeting • 75 pounds of Buddy Rhodes Craftsman Mix concrete • Plastic bucket • Buddy Rhodes Water Reducer 420 • Disposable gloves • 2 cups Buddy Rhodes Alkali Resistant Glass Fiber (for strength) • Hammer • 6-foot 1×6 oak board • 12½×12½-inch piece of ¾-inch plywood sheathing • Wood stain (We used Rust-Oleum Ultimate Wood Stain in Kona.) • Casters

A

Step 4 Cut oak board into four 14inch pieces, and make nonparallel 45-degree miter cuts to the ends of each piece, so that short ends are 12½ inches long. Screwing at the centerline of each oak board, attach the plywood square (F), ensuring the oak’s mitered edges form 90-degree angles in each corner. Stain box and let dry for one hour. Once stain is dry, screw casters onto the underside corners of the plywood, 1 inch from the edges (G). Invert concrete stool and place it into the box base.

Step 1 Gather supplies (A). Cut each shelving board in half to create four 11¾×18-inch boards. Stand two boards upright, forming a right angle, and screw edges together (B). Add remaining boards to form a square mold, and place mold on the plastic sheeting.

B

Step 2 Pour concrete into the plastic bucket and, while stirring, add chilled water sparingly until concrete develops the consistency of clay. If needed, stir in a small amount of Buddy Rhodes Water Reducer 420 to improve workability. While wearing disposable gloves, pack concrete into mold, covering the base and working up along the sides to the desired height (C). Step 3 Stir 2 cups of Alkali Resistant Glass Fiber into remaining

D

C E

F

G


Custom colors TO THE LETTER

A concrete letter bookend adds a monogrammed touch to your shelf. Cut out the back of a hollow cardboard crafts letter with a crafts knife. Mix 1 cup of Buddy Rhodes Artisan Concrete Mix with 1 teaspoon of Buddy Rhodes Ultrafine Pigment for each of the two mixtures (we used the colors Straw and Smoke). Stir chilled water into each mixture until concrete develops the consistency of pudding. Combine both mixtures and lightly swirl together. Pour mixture into the letter form and gently tap the mold on a flat surface to remove air bubbles. Let dry for 24 hours, then peel off the cardboard.

MATCH YOUR PROJECT TO YOUR DECOR WITH A CUSTOM CONCRETE PIGMENT. BUDDY RHODES’ COLOR LAB CAN MATCH ANY BENJAMIN MOORE PAINT CHIP.

SET IN STONE Anchor a thrifted desk lamp with

a one-of-a-kind base. Remove original lamp base. Spray nonstick cooking spray on the inside of a plastic stepping-stone mold. Mix 1¼ cup of Buddy Rhodes Artisan Concrete Mix with 1 teaspoon of Buddy Rhodes Ultrafine Pigment for each of the two mixtures (we used the colors Straw and Smoke). Stir chilled water into each mixture until concrete develops the consistency of pudding. Combine both mixtures and lightly swirl together. Pour mixture into the mold, gently tapping it on a flat surface to remove air bubbles. Wrap one end of a copper coupling with a small circle of plastic sheeting before inserting it into the mold. Let dry for 24 hours, then remove concrete from mold. Insert desk lamp into base, securing with strong glue.

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 81


how to make concrete picture frames MATERIALS • 10-pound tub of Buddy Rhodes Artisan Concrete Mix • Buddy Rhodes Ultrafine Pigment (We used Straw.) • Plaster frame molds in desired sizes • Nonstick cooking spray • Picture hanger hook • Plain-edge picture frame (make sure it fits inside desired mold) • Cork tiles • Sandpaper • Crafts glue Step 1 Gather materials (A). Mix 2 cups of Buddy Rhodes Artisan Concrete Mix with 2 teaspoons of Buddy Rhodes Ultrafine Pigment for a large frame mold; 1 cup of concrete and 1 teaspoon of pigment for a small frame mold. Stir chilled water sparingly into each mixture until concrete develops the consistency of pudding. Step 2 Spray nonstick cooking spray inside frame molds (B), then pour in concrete mix. Gently tap molds on a flat surface to remove air bubbles. For a built-in hanger, insert the flat edge of a picture hanger hook into the concrete, making sure the hook’s loop sticks out. For a dryerase board, remove the glass and backing from a picture frame and press the front of the frame ¼ inch into the wet concrete. Let concrete dry for 24 hours. Gently turn over the molds to remove concrete, then let the concrete cure for another 12 hours. Step 3 To create a corkboard, cut a cork tile to fit behind the frame opening, then adhere it with crafts glue (C). To make a dry-erase board, reinsert the picture frame’s glass along with a piece of white paper before attaching the frame’s original backing (D).

82 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

A

B

C

D


soft touch GLUE FELT TO THE RESTING EDGE AND UNDERSIDE OF THE TABLET STAND TO PROTECT ELECTRONICS AND FURNITURE SURFACES FROM SCRATCHES.

STAND BY ME Read from your tablet with ease using a handcrafted concrete stand. Measure the size of your tablet, then use a utility blade to cut two pieces of insulation sheathing to match. Glue the pieces together with silicone caulk. Let dry, then cut one of the insulation’s sides at an angle so the insulation lays flat against the bottom and one side of a 12-inch plastic mud pan. Center the insulation against one side of the pan and adhere with caulk, then caulk around the edges of the insulation to fill any gaps. Let dry. Sparingly add chilled water to 6 cups of Buddy Rhodes Craftsman Mix concrete while stirring until concrete develops the consistency of clay. Stir 1 tablespoon of Buddy Rhodes Water Reducer 420 into mixture for improved workability. Spray the tray and insulation with nonstick cooking spray, then put on disposable gloves and pack concrete into mold. Let dry for 24 hours. Gently turn mold over and tap to remove concrete. Allow concrete to cure for 12 more hours.

PENCIL IT IN A stylish, industrial pencil holder

all shapes & sizes CORRAL THICKER PENS AND MARKERS BY INSERTING LARGER COUPLINGS INTO THE WET CONCRETE.

makes for a clutter-free desk. Set three large copper pipe couplings upright on plastic sheeting. Mix 2 cups of Buddy Rhodes Artisan Concrete Mix with 2 teaspoons of Buddy Rhodes Ultrafine Pigment in Straw, then mix 1 cup of concrete with 1 teaspoon of the pigment in Smoke. Stir chilled water sparingly into each mixture until concrete develops the consistency of pudding. Combine both mixtures and lightly swirl together. Pour concrete into each of the large couplings. Cut out small circles from plastic sheeting and wrap one end of three small copper couplings so they don’t fill with concrete as you insert them into the wet concrete. Let dry for 24 hours before use. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.


on

of

i LY ct e ll s! NNEL co r O a hee O N D S ith e. C T; JA w n le shi R I G H b ta nd A L B i sp r a A D A M o e e h m APHS r o m R m shi OTO G en at P H v h R e e ts t O R T E om jec L A P h r pro A M E u o g DS P y e tin O R ak ra + W M eco C T S d OJE PR

84 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


THE PERFECT COVER-UP A color-block buffet

forms the basis for a winning hand in all your holiday entertaining. If your cabinet doors aren’t stainable, cover them with birch veneer. Cut veneer to size plus ½ inch on all sides. Mix contact cement according to manufacturer’s instructions and apply to the back of the veneer and to the front of the door; let set. Carefully align before adhering pieces. Using a veneer roller, roll the veneer smooth, starting at the center and working outward. Repeat with a smoothing blade. Flip door over and use a utility blade to remove excess veneer. Let dry and cure. See staining instructions on page 89.

BEFORE

FOR OUR BUFFET, WE USED TWO IKEA SEKTION WALL CABINETS, 24×15×30 INCHES, IN HAGGEBY WHITE. $65 EACH; IKEA.COM


silver lining SPRAY EXTERIOR OF A GLASS VASE WITH SILVER METALLIC PAINT AND A CLEAR COAT FOR PROTECTION.


OR AT YOUR LOCAL HARDWARE STORE.

see through TURN A CLEAR GLASS LAMP BASE ANY COLOR YOU CHOOSE BY SPRAY-PAINTING THE INSIDE.

STYLE MAKERS OPPOSITE Glam up a basic bowl using copper leaf. Follow

manufacturer’s instructions to apply the leaf—be careful, it’s super delicate. For first-timers, choose an easy design like our oops-proof ragged edge. Finish with a clear spray sealer to resist fingerprints. ABOVE LEFT Cut marbled paper to fit, then laminate at a copy shop before slipping it into the tray. ABOVE RIGHT Copper foil tape trims a lampshade in less than a minute. RIGHT This totally touchable wall hanging takes minutes to fabricate. Loop chunky yarns around a piece of driftwood. Cut ends at an angle to form a center point, and add beads, tassels, or knots.

WE LOVE SPEEDBALL COPPER LEAF SHEETS, ADHESIVE, AND SEALER. WEAR GLOVES AND APPLY WITH NATURALBRISTLE BRUSHES AND COTTON GAUZE. BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 87


MARBLE MARMI GREY CONTACT PAPER IS EASY TO REPOSITION. $60 FOR AN 18-INCH BY 491⁄2-FOOT ROLL; DESIGNYOUR WALL.COM

A ON THE SURFACE ABOVE RIGHT

Get high-end countertop style without the high price. Peel-and-stick contact paper in a marble look is easy to apply and looks surprisingly like the real deal. Cut paper large enough to wrap your countertop (including sides) plus ½ inch or more to wrap underneath on all sides. Follow manufacturer’s instructions to apply paper to the top of countertop. Cut excess paper from the corners so it’s flush to the countertop on one side and leave an -inch tab on the other (A). Beginning with tabbed ends, wrap paper to the back and burnish to secure. Wrap tabs around sides and burnish. Repeat with non-tab ends. RIGHT We added flair to our retrofitted furniture legs by installing metal tips, but you could get a similar look with metallic paint.

88 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


how to apply color-block stain

A

B

MATERIALS • Stains (We used Cabot Natural, Honeysuckle, Rhubarb, Seastone.) • Birch veneer cabinet doors • 220-grit sandpaper and tack cloth • Satin water-base sealer • Small foam brush • Wood conditioner • Pencil and straightedge • Frog Tape • Crafts knife • Lint-free rag Step 1 Test a variety of stains on a veneer scrap (A) and select three (B) in addition to Natural for the base. Step 2 Gather materials. Remove doors from cabinet, sand, then wipe with a tack cloth. Using a small foam brush, apply sealer to door edges only. Let dry.

C

D

E

F

Step 3 Apply wood conditioner (C) to door fronts according to manufacturer’s instructions. Apply Natural stain (D) over all door fronts. Let dry overnight. Step 4 Position doors tightly together on a work surface. Using photo, page 85, as a guide, lightly mark the corners of a triangular design with pencil (E). Connect the marks using a straightedge. Step 5 Place Frog Tape along outer edge of line for first section to be stained. Place straightedge along inner edge of tape and use a crafts knife to cut into the veneer (F). Burnish the tape and follow manufacturer’s instructions to activate and seal the tape using a wet cloth (G). Wipe dry.

G

H

Step 6 Using first color of stain and a lint-free rag, stain taped-of section, following the direction of the wood grain. Avoid wiping stain into the tape line. When desired color is achieved, remove tape and let dry overnight. Step 7 Repeat taping, scoring, and staining with other triangular sections. Let dry overnight, then seal with two coats water-base satin sealer (H), allowing sealer to fully dry between coats. Reassemble cabinet.


FESTIVE ACCESSORIES

THIS PHOTO Make a living wreath by coating a wire form with metallic spray paint and attaching fresh eucalyptus and air plants with florists wire. To tuft a plain pillow, start with a shank button kit such as this button frame by Dritz. Mark the center of the pillow in front and back. Double thread a long needle and stitch through front mark to back mark. Pull one end of the thread through and leave other end at front of pillow. Insert back thread through a utility button, then through to the front of the pillow. Pull both ends of thread through button shank in opposite directions, pull tight to tuft, then double knot under button. Clip excess thread.

90 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

EASY DO CUT OPENING IN THE BACK OF A TWO-LAYER PLACE MAT, INSERT A PILLOW, THEN HAND-STITCH CLOSED.


IN GOOD SPIRITS RIGHT Use

metallic porcelain paint (A) to add festive confetti dots to a glass carafe. Dip a paint dauber into the paint, blot on a paper towel, then press it to the glass. Continue, applying dots densely at the bottom of the vessel and more spaced out as you move up. Use a cotton swab to fill in dots if needed. Follow paint manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s instructions to heat-set the paint. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

A

LEARN HOW TO SEW A PERFECT BOX CUSHION: BHG.COM/BENCHCUSHION

THESE SUPPLIES MAKE TUFTING A PILLOW EASIER: COVERED-BUTTON KIT, ERASABLE FABRIC MARKER, HEAVY-DUTY THREAD, UTILITY BUTTON, SEWING NEEDLE, AND UPHOLSTERY OR DOLL NEEDLE.


Fabric, decals, and flooring: DIY basics take a superstar turn in these stylish yet simple surface upgrades. PROJECTS LESLIE POYZER PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN WORDS KELLY ROBERSON


1

2

1 Take a good look at that stunning wall: Is it fussy-to-apply wallpaper? A time-stealing stencil? Nope: It's just ordinary fabric, measured and tacked to the wall. Start at a top corner of the room and work down and across, smoothing the fabric and adding tacks or staples as you go. Use the entire span of the fabric bolt when possible; in this room, two full-width panels ďŹ&#x201A;ank a trimmed-down middle section for a balanced visual feel. Attach trim strips to create a frame and hide seams. 2 Of-the-shelf baskets and boxes stash a variety of project-speciďŹ c supplies in this DIY storage piece, created from two bookshelf units and one center element with drawers and doors.

BHG.COM/DIY

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 93


3

4

94 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


3 Narrow spice shelves and a screwdriver make quick work of ever-so-essential storage needs. Pieces like this are great for keeping items within easy reach without crowding your work space. 4 The easiest add-on to a room? One you don’t have to do anything to. That’s where furniture pieces like this multipurpose table—originally intended as a kitchen island, repurposed here as a standing-height workstation—can become first-rate, hardworking components in a range of spaces. A few simple DIY personalizations meet your needs and increase its usability: Consider wheels to make the table mobile, or an additional low shelf to double the storage square footage. 5 Anchoring a room in style is quick and easy with snap-together, vinyl-plank flooring. Choose your wood species and finish, then turn to page 97 for our step-by-step installation guide.

5


6

7

8

6 No sewing skills? This simple Roman shade is made just for you. Measure the window to decide the shadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s length and width. Place an inexpensive set of blinds on a ďŹ&#x201A;at surface and remove all strings except the two thick verticals that connect the slats and raise and lower the blind. Decide on the number of evenly spaced shade pleats. (A 60-inchlong shade with six pleats would have 10-inch pleats.) Clip of blind slats, leaving one slat to make every pleat. Retie the strings at the bottom so the length matches the desired shade length. Apply fabric glue to the remaining slats and the header; attach fabric, let dry, and hang the shade. 7 See-through spaces snatch privacy with a simplest-ever project: a self-stick window ďŹ lm or decal in head-turning patterns and colors. 8 Take a turn through the kitchen aisle of your home center store for a storage-smart helper: a wall-mount utensil rod. The easy install, adaptable function, and available accessories make it attractive for holding ribbon, jars, or tools.

96 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016


how to install a vinyl-plank floor MATERIALS • Broom or vacuum • Level • Leveling compound • Vinyl planks • Transition strips, if necessary • Safety glasses • Drill • Measuring tape

• Oscillating saw • Jigsaw • Shear cutter, table saw, or chop saw • ¼-inch spacers • Square • Utility knife • Rubber mallet • Pull bar • Tapping block

A

mix it up PULL PLANKS FROM VARIOUS CARTONS TO ENSURE A MIX OF PATTERNS AND COLORS.

B D

C

E

hold helper WOOD TOOTHPICKS HOLD ANCHORS IN CONCRETE.


F

Step 1 Gather materials (A). Prep the floor by thoroughly sweeping or vacuuming up all dust and particles. Step 2 Using a level, determine if the floor is mostly even. If not, apply leveling compound to uneven spots, following the manufacturer’s directions. Step 3 Determine the layout of the flooring and pick the start point, which should be along the longest exterior wall. As you work, pull vinyl planks from diferent cartons—one plank from one, the next from another—to ensure a mix of plank patterns and colors. Step 4 If the longest wall includes a doorway, install the metal part of a doorway transition strip. (If not, delay this step until needed). Use a pencil to mark the location of the screws.

G H

I

J

K

Step 5 Drill the holes for the transition strip (B).Tip for concrete subfloor: To better hold your screws, insert wood toothpicks in the drill holes as you insert the screw and anchor into the concrete. Then install the transition strip (C). Step 6 When the wall includes a doorjamb, prep this area. Mark the door trim with the height of a plank and cut out the notch with an oscillating saw (D). Slide the plank under the doorjamb (E).


Cut to fit USE A JIGSAW TO CUT PLANKS TO FIT THE SPACE.

L M

Step 7 On the first row of planks, remove the tongue from the planks using a table saw. This enables the first row of planks to butt up against the wall. Arrange planks so no one plank is shorter than 6 inches. Place Âź-inch spacers against the wall (F) to provide the floor floating space to expand and contract. To shorten planks, use a square and circular saw (G). Note: Cutting the planks will dull saw blades quickly. Have extra blades on hand. Step 8 As you install the first row of planks, click the locking mechanism together. Apply light pressure to join two planks, using a rubber mallet to fully lock the planks if necessary. Step 9 Start the second row: Cut the plank to the desired length (H). Insert the long side of the tongue into the groove of the plank in the first row (I). Use the rubber mallet to tap down on the seam (J) to click it into place with each end of the plank. Use the pull bar and tapping block (K) to make sure the rows fully lock into each other to create straight rows. Place planks so that end-of-plank seams do not align. Step 10 Continue laying planks.

N

O

Step 11 As needed, use a jigsaw to cut planks (L) to fit around elements in the room (M). Step 12 When finished laying planks, install trim around the perimeter of the room against the baseboard (N), and add final plank transition strips at any doorways (O). FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

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SIMPLE N AT U R E CRAFTS Family and friends will naturally love handcrafted gifts inspired by the great outdoors. PROJECTS DANA BORREMANS PHOTOGRAPHS JACOB FOX WORDS DEBRA STEILEN

the flatter the stone, the better the image will transfer.


budget Breakdown

You can make tons of magnets with one jar of transfer medium.

STONES FOUND! OR $17 FOR 30 LBS TRANSFER MEDIUM $11 MAGNETS $13 FOR 14 MATTE MEDIUM $15 TOTAL // $56 OR LESS

DOWNLOAD THE IMAGES FOR THIS PROJECT AT BHG.COM/DIYNATURE

BHG.COM/DIY

ROCK SOLID MAGNET Give your pal’s fridge a beautiful gift.

Print our downloadable images on a laser (not ink-jet) printer. For each magnet: Daub a stone’s flattest side with transfer medium, then place an image facedown on it. Starting at the image’s center, smooth out any creases and air bubbles with your finger. Remove excess medium with a damp cloth. Let dry at least eight hours. Moisten the paper and let it sit for several minutes; then use a damp towel to rub away the paper and reveal the image. Seal with clear matte medium; let dry. Hot-glue a rare-earth magnet to the back.

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 101


GIFTABLE GIFT TAGS Upgrade any gift with an embossed metal tag. Print our downloadable feather pattern at the desired size, then trim and tape it to a sheet of 40-gauge copper placed on a spongy surface. Using a medium-tip embossing tool, lightly trace the pattern onto the copper. Remove the pattern, then deepen the lines by retracing them with more pressure. Flip the copper over. Run your tool alongside both sides of each line to deepen and define it. Flip the copper over again. Emboss diagonal lines from the shaft to the featherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edge (A). Cut out the feather, use an embroidery needle to punch a hole, and thread a ribbon through to create a hanger.

A

DOWNLOAD THE PATTERN FOR THIS PROJECT AT BHG.COM/DIYNATURE


A

B

CRAFTY GARDEN STARTERS Give your

friends gardens-atthe-ready with paper seed disks. Here’s how: Put 4 cups of shredded newspaper in a blender. Cover with water, then blend on high until the shreds become gray pulp. Strain out some water (A), then transfer pulp to a bowl. Mix in food coloring, if desired. Divide colored pulp into five portions. Add about 100 herb or flower seeds per portion, mixing thoroughly. Divide each portion into four parts. Form each part into a disk, gently squeezing out water as you work. Rotate the disk; squeeze out more water. Repeat until disk is nearly dry. Place the finished disks (about the size of sandwich cookies) on paper towels and let dry completely (B). Write the seed variety on the back of each disk. Present several disks in a small flowerpot; include a tag that reads: “Place each disk in a pot with moisture-rich soil. Keep seeds moist and warm until they germinate.”

BHG.COM/DIY

budget Breakdown NEWSPAPER FOUND SEEDS $4 PER PACK OF 200+ FLOWERPOT FOUND! OR $1 EACH TOTAL // $5 OR LESS

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 103


a 2-cup container with a 6-cup container for this mold.

A B QUICK CONCRETE PLANTERS Showcase giftable botanicals in

contemporary planters cast from vinyl concrete patcher. Select two plastic containers: one large, one small. Punch or drill a ¼-inch hole through the bottom of the small container. Attach a dowel to the large container’s interior with double-stick foam tape (A). Smooth oil-base modeling clay where the dowel meets the large mold to create a watertight seal. Liberally coat the dowel, the interior of the large container, and the exterior of the small with petroleum jelly. Feed the small container onto the dowel. Slowly add 4 parts dry vinyl concrete patcher to 1 part water—stirring until it resembles thick brownie batter. Fill the large container partway by scooping in the mixture, then tapping the bowl on the table to remove air bubbles. Continue filling until mixture almost reaches the small container’s rim. Tap again. Smooth the surface with a gloved finger (B). Weight down the small container with pebbles; let dry 24 hours. Release the cast from the molds and remove the dowel, tape, and clay. Gently smooth the planter’s rim with 200-grit sandpaper. Finish the rim with gold leaf if desired.

BHG.COM/DIY

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DOWNLOAD THE IMAGES FOR THESE PROJECTS AT BHG.COM/DIYNATURE

PRETTY, PAINTED, AND PERSONALIZED

Surprise a friend with an arty, painted tote. Start by printing our downloadable tropical leaf image at a size that fits the tote. Trace the leaf onto the back of a stencil-making sheet (A). Cut out the reusable stencil; save the leaf shape and inner pieces (holes in the leaf ).

A

B

Cut a plastic foam board to fit inside the tote, spray the board with repositionable adhesive, and place in tote. Pull fabric tight and tape into place. Spray the back of the stencil and inner pieces with repositionable adhesive. Using our photo for guidance, position them on top of the bag. Place the tote inside a large plastic bag. Using 2-inch-wide painters tape, seal the bagâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s edges around the stencil to deflect overspray (B). Spray-paint the stencil using light, even strokes. Repeat as needed, letting paint dry between coats. Let dry before removing tape, bag, and stencil. Leave foam board in place. Place the stencil and inner pieces slightly askew on the painted leaf. Trace the shapes with a paint marker to create decorative ofset lines.


A

B MAKE AN IMPRESSION

Savor favorite herbs forever by turning them into polymer clay ornaments. It’s as easy as making sugar cookies—promise! Working atop parchment paper, roll out polymer clay until it’s about inch thick. Position herb sprigs on top of the slab, filling the space without too much overlapping (A). Gently roll over the herbs with a rolling pin, then peel greenery out of the clay. Cut out ornaments and carefully place them on a cookie sheet. Use a drinking straw to cut holes for ribbon hangers. Bake following manufacturer’s directions; let cool completely. Squeeze a thin line of paint onto a waxed paper plate. Roll each ornament through the paint until the edge is covered (B). Let dry. Tie a ribbon through the hole. to create a hanger. FOR RESOURCES SEE PAGE 108.

budget Breakdown CLAY $3 FOR 2 OZS HERBS $5 PAINT $1 TOTAL // $9

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 107


FIND CLICKABLE LINKS TO ALL THESE SOURCES IN THE DIGITAL EDITION OF THIS ISSUE. BHGSPECIALS.ZINIO.COM

RESOURCES

SHOPPING GUIDE Here’s where to find building materials, furnishings, and accessories shown in Do It Yourself™ magazine. We cannot guarantee the availability of items or services.

[P] Paint Color Because of the magazine printing process, paint colors depicted on our pages might vary slightly from manufacturers’ colors. Use paint color names or numbers, when provided, as a starting point. To get a color as it appears in the magazine, take the page to a paint retailer for matching.

[T] To the Trade Contact a design professional to find more information about this product or service.

TRY IT: RESIST PRINTING PAGES 8–13 Pages 8–9 White pillow for project, artwork on wall, teal pillow—HomeGoods; 800/888-0776; homegoods.com (product line varies). Black fabric paint—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Textured pillow—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies). Page 10–11 (top) White napkin set, place mats— HomeGoods; 800/888-0776; homegoods.com (product line varies). Fabric paints—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Wood tea-light holders, silver napkin rings—World Market; 877/967-5362; worldmarket.com. White vase—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies). Page 11 (botom) Wall paint Galapagos T16-04(D), charcoal paint Cracked Pepper PPU18-01(D)—Behr Process Corp.; 800/854-0133; behr.com [P]. Canvas for artwork 8×8-inch canvas, washable tempera poster paint, acrylic paint for canvas art—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Page 12 Chair—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies).

108 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

Metallic gold spray paint—Krylon Products Group; 800/457-9566; krylon.com [P]. Gold curtain, pendant light painted ater purchase—World Market; 877/967-5362; worldmarket .com. Gold wall burst, yellow magazine file, rug—HomeGoods; 800/888-0776; homegoods.com (product line varies). Page 13 White vase for project—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies). Rubber cement, pouncer, metallic ceramic paint—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Light gray curtain—World Market; 877/9675362; worldmarket.com.

HANDY GIRL PAGES 30–33 Pages 32–33 The Scraper Ace 7-inch sidewalk ice scraper—Ace Hardware; acehardware .com. The Electric Power shovel—Toro; toro.com. The Thrower 18-inch aluminum snow shovel with D-grip on ergonomic handle—True Temper; true-temper.com. The Pusher Perfect Shovel—Nordic Plow; nordicplow.com. The RoofrakeTrue Temper 17-t Aluminum Extendable Roof Rake— Lowes; lowes.com. The Scooper #10 aluminum scoop w/ D-handle—Ames; ames.com.

ORDER IN THE HOUSE: MAKING THE BED PAGES 14–17 Pages 14–15 3-inch hole saw, 12mm by 12×24-inch Crat Plywood, 5/8×7¾×24-inch shelf in white, 1-inch screws—Menards; for locations throughout the Midwest, visit menards.com. Pages 16–17 Dairy crates—The Container Store; 800/786-7315; containerstore.com. Cord ataching crates Polyester Rope Cord, 5/8×7¾×24-inch white shelf, ¾-inch poplar dowel—Menards; for locations throughout the Midwest, visit menards.com.

SPECIAL SECTION: SEW AT HOME PAGES 40–51 Pages 40–41 Glass-head pins 4792339, tape measure 8120586, sewing gauge 1052844, water-soluble pens 9449307, seam sealant 8638496, hand needle 13059472—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/7394120; joann.com. Rotary cuter 1120311, rotary blades sold as set of two, 1079062—Olfa; olfa.com. Cuting mat, folding ruler, embroidery scissors, fabric shears—Fiskars Brands, Inc.; 866/348-5661; fiskars.com. Pages 42–43 Sewing machine Laura Ashley Limited Edition Sewing & Quilting Machine with Built-In Sewing Font CX155LA— Brother; brother-usa.com. Pages 44-45 Fabric from the Garden Secrets collection—Cloud 9 Fabrics; cloud9fabrics.com. Interfacing 72F Peltex II Ultra Firm 2-Sided Fusible Interfacing 7844186, bias tape Wright’s Double Fold Bias Tape in Navy Blue 1051663, Leaf 1623750, and Plum 2681054—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Pages 48–49 Fabrics for pillow projects Uneasy Stripes in white, Graphic Florals in pink and purple, Watercolor Dots in purple, Indigo Stripe in black, Sot Rocks in purple, Pop Patern in light

WHAT TO DO WITH: FOAM PAGES 20–29 Console with drinks, desk shelves with amethyst project—All Modern; 800/615-9703; allmodern.com. Palm plant—Walmart; walmart.com. Pink mirror sand—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/7394120; joann.com. Crushed mirror glass, paint, glue, thread, foam ball, dimensional glue—Michaels Stores, Inc.; michaels.com. Crepe paper for flowers—Crepe Paper Store; crepepaperstore.com. Thumb tacks, foam balls, florists tape—Dollar Tree; dollartree.com. Aquarium rock—Petco; petco.com.


pink, and Petaled Echo in pink— Minted, LLC; minted.com. Pillow forms 18×18-inch two-pack 12747523, 24×24-inch 4661765, 14×14-inch 1776772, 16-inch zipper in white 1033356, 3/8-inch-wide cording 11600954—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Pages 50–52 Curtain panel fabric Phase Twill in Gunmetal PHASEGM—Premier Prints; premierprints.com. Grommets Dritz Home 1.56-inch Curtain Grommets in Pewter 8629206, fabric lining Roc-Lon Home Décor Fabric Lining in white 7962467, drapery weights Fabric Covered Drapery Lead Weights—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. INDIGO BLUES PAGES 53–59 Throughout Indigo dye kit JIDK—Dharma Trading Co.; 800/542-5227; dharmatrading.com. Page 58 Duvet White Fiesta Solid Percale duvet cover 8579 in queen, pillow sham White Fiesta Solid Percale sham 8580—Garnet Hill; 800/622-6216; garnethill.com (product line varies). Hanging pendant light—World Market; 877/967-5362; worldmarket.com. HUNG WITH CARE PAGES 60–67 Pages 61–62 Rug Prairie sheepskin/wool white shag Rug 2×3-foot by Safavieh—through Overstock.com; 800/843-2446; overstock.com. Page 62 Velvet ribbon—Mood Fabrics; 855/630-6663; moodfabrics.com. Page 64 Tinsel for tassel garland in gold and silver—Hobby Lobby; 800/323-9204; hobbylobby.com. Cable-twisted coton string—Bonjour Handmade; bonjourhandmadediy.etsy.com. Braided coton clothesline rope—Perfect Package; perfectpackage.etsy.com. Colored embroidery floss on rope garland—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/7394120; joann.com. Shelving Sawyer Mocha Leaning Bookcase—Crate and Barrel; 800/967-6696; crateandbarrel.com. Page 65 Acrylic sheets for ornaments, copper foiling tape—Hobby Lobby; 800/323-9204; hobbylobby.com. Tree Small Ivory Goose Feather Tree 17 inches—Efeeks; efeeks.etsy.com. Velvet

BHG.COM/DIY

ribbon on prisms—Mood Fabrics; 855/630-6663; moodfabrics.com. Page 66 Red-framed chair in corner Amish wood armchair in red by Modway Furniture—through Jet; jet.com. Side table Hex in white marble and raw steel—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies). Green pillow Round Pintuck in green, tan pillow Venice Net tassel bolster— Urban Outfiters; 800/282-2200; urbanoutfitters.com. HIP TO FLIP PAGES 68–77 Interior design: Ashley Walker DeLapp, Evaru Design, Charlote; 704/307-4949; evarudesign.com. Carpentry: Craig Waltonowski, Chislin’ Wood Creative Carpentry, Monroe, North Carolina; 704/451-8470. Throughout Moldings—Craig Waltonowski, Chislin’ Wood Creative Carpentry, Monroe, North Carolina; 704/451-8470. Wallpaper installation—Ashley Mullis, Mullis Brothers Wallcovering, Huntersville, North Carolina; 704/896-9399. Page 69 (top, botom left) Wall paint Cumulus Cloud—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore .com [P]. Rug similar items available— Safavieh; safavieh.com. Coffee table vintage Italian marble—through Sleepy Poet Antique Mall, Charlote; 704/529-6369; sleepypoetstuff.com. Red lamps—Caravan Pacific; caravan-pacific.com. Mirrors flanking sofa table—Stuff: Vintage, Greensboro, North Carolina; 336/558-7242; Facebook: Stuff: Vintage. Vanity used for desk—The Red Collection; theredcollectiononline.com. Paint for vanity Vermillion—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore.com [P]. Artwork at desk—Michelle Armas; michellearmas.com. Gold honeycomb stool and striped vase, both from the Threshold collection, faceted blackand-gold lamp Nate Berkus—Target Stores; 800/800-8800; target.com (product line varies). Yellow glass knot artwork—West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm.com (product line varies). Fabric for Chippendale chairs Chiang Mai Dragon in Alabaster—F. Schumacher & Co; 800/523-1200; fschumacher.com [T]. Sofa, black chairs vintage Chippendale— homeowners’ collection. Page 70 Wall paint Classic Gray—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore

.com [P]. Console—through Sleepy Poet Antique Mall, Charlote; 704/5296369; sleepypoetstuff.com. Lamps— Target Stores; 800/800-8800; target .com (product line varies). Purple glass vase—HomeGoods; 800/614-4663; homegoods.com (product line varies). Fabric for dining chairs Cat’s Cradle in Sunshine—Robert Allen; 800/333-3777; robertallendesign.com [T]. Table reproduction Planter table—Regency Shop; 866/776-2680; regencyshop.com. Fabric for barrel chairs Lawrence in Citron by Thom Filicia—Kravet; 800/645-9068; kravet.com. Ceiling light fixture similar items available— Visual Comfort & Co.; 866/344-3875; visualcomfortlightinglights.com. Fabric for drapery panels Cable in Mustard and Oter—Harlequin; harlequin.uk .com. Wallpaper Modern Trellis in Charcoal—F. Schumacher & Co; 800/523-1200; fschumacher.com [T]. Dining chairs vintage, barrel chairs— homeowners’ collection. Page 71 Pendant at sink—Regina Andrew, High Point, North Carolina; 734/250-8042; reginaandrew.com. Cabinetry at island, floating shelves—Craig Waltonowski, Chislin’ Wood Creative Carpentry, Monroe, North Carolina; 704/4518470. Backsplash tile Penny Round in mate white—The Builder Depot; thebuilderdepot.com. Granite for island countertop Cold Spring, faucet Moen, range, refrigerator, and microwave with range hood Frigidaire, dishwasher GE—The Home Depot; homedepot.com (product line varies). Stainless-steel toaster Black & Decker, tea towels, stand mixer KitchenAid—Target Stores; 800/800-8800; target.com (product line varies). Covered pan on range—Cuisinart; 800/726-0190; cuisinart.com. White coffee cups with black design—Kate Spade; 800/519-3778; katespade.com. Page 72 Wall paint Greyhound—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore .com [P]. Bed Baxton by Studio Russo in beige, rug Safavieh—Overstock .com; 800/843-2446; overstock.com. Bedside tables similar items available—The Utermost Co.; 800/678-5486; uttermost.com. Lamps—Robert Abbey, Inc., Hickory, North Carolina; 828/322-3480; robertabbey.com. Overhead lighting— West Elm; 866/428-6468; westelm .com (product line varies). Wallpaper People in Onyx and Chalk—Harlequin; harlequin.uk.com. Lavender chair Simon—Younger Furniture; youngerfurniture.com for a location near

DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016 109


3526 you. Stripe pillow fabric Eos Stripe in Chalkboard—Robert Allen; 800/3333777; robertallendesign.com [T]. Faux-fur throw on chair—Pier 1 Imports; 800/245-4595; pier1.com. Ombré throw on bed, white shag pillow on bed—HomeGoods; 800/614-4663; homegoods.com (product line varies). Artwork at chair—Kalalou; 800/249-4229 shop.kalalou.com [T]. Page 73 Wall color Inkwell—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore.com [P]. Wallpaper on ceiling Sumi in Linen and Indigo—Harlequin; harlequin.uk.com. Overhead light fixture—Park Studio LA; parkstudiola .etsy.com. Velvet fabric for chairs Bella Velvet in Pewter— OnlineFabricStore.com; onlinefabricstore.com. Bar cart vintage—Piccolo Antique Mall, Belmont, North Carolina; 704/825-5656; piccoloantiquemall. com. Rug, pillows—Global Views, Inc.; 888/956-0030; globalviews.com. Grass-cloth wallcovering in closet area Manila Hemp in Quince—Phillip Jeffries, Ltd.; 800/576-5455; phillipjeffries.com. Closet system— EasyClosets.com; easyclosets.com. Elephant-head cabinet knobs— Hobby Lobby; 800/323-9204; hobbylobby.com. Fret pulls—LbFeel; lbfeel.etsy.com. Carpeting Antelope in gray—Stark Carpet Corp.; 800/7529000; starkcarpet.com. Stools— Dimond Home; 888/578-7288; lazysusanusa.com. Chairs— homeowners’ collection. Pages 74 –75 Wall paint Field Stone—Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore .com [P]. Wallpaper Hexagono in black—Tres Tintas; trestintas.com [T]. Headboard vintage, lacquered white—through Sleepy Poet Antique Mall, Charlote; 704/529-6369; sleepypoetstuff.com. Desk—Target Stores; 800/800-8800; target.com (product line varies). Lamp— Jonathan Adler; 800/963-0891; jonathanadler.com. Rocking chair Eames style—Lexmod; lexmod.com. Dog pillow fabric Greyhounds—F. Schumacher & Co; 800/523-1200; fschumacher.com [T]. Page 76 (top) Twin headboards vintage, lacquered black—Stuff: Vintage, Greensboro, North Carolina; 336/558-7242; Facebook: Stuff: Vintage. Paint for custom bedside table Citron— Benjamin Moore; 855/724-6802; benjaminmoore.com [P]. Wallpaper

110 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

Demeter Stripe in Quince, Teal and Pebble—Harlequin; harlequin.uk.com. Sconces similar items available— Robert Abbey, Inc.; 828/322-3480; robertabbey.com. Pillow fabric Romo Black Patola in French Blue— Blackedition; blackedition.com [T]. Wood antelope heads—HomeGoods; 800/614-4663; homegoods.com (product line varies). Page 76 (botom) Wallpaper Candice Olson Onyx— York Wallcoverings; 800/375-9675; yorkwall.com. Vanity vintage dresser lacquered black—Reinvented Charlote, Charlote; 704/340-7023. Vessel sink, faucet—through The LA Shop; thelashop.com. Mirror— Wisteria; 800/320-9757; wisteria .com. Sconces similar items available—Robert Abbey, Inc.; 828/322-3480; robertabbey.com. Fabric for shower curtain Neo Toile in coral—Robert Allen; 800/333-3777; robertallendesign.com [T]. Towel bar—CB2; 800/606-6252; cb2.com. Paint for small table Leafy Rise in satin—Lowe’s; lowes.com. Small table, towels—HomeGoods; 800/614-4663; homegoods.com (product line varies). Floor tile Exedra Calacata honed porcelain tile—In Style, Charlote; 704/333-5110; instylecharlotte.com. Wall tile subway tile in White and Biscuit—Daltile; 800/933-8453; daltile.com. CONCRETE THINKING PAGES 78–83 Vintage orange clamp-on desk lamp—Etsy; etsy.com, search: vintage desk lamp. Frame molds 6¼×7 inches, 12¾×15¾ inches—Artcove.com; artcove.com. ¼-inch copper couplings for pencil holders, stain for wood base of stool Rust-Oleum Ultimate in Kona—Lowe’s; lowes.com. Mud pan, rigid insulation, and silicone caulk for iPad stand, ½-inch copper coupling for lamp stand—The Home Depot; homedepot.com (product line varies). Desk Nelson Swag-Leg Desk by Herman Miller—Pigot, Des Moines; 515/279-8879; pigott.com. Water reducer for stool and iPad projects Water Reducer 420, alkali-resistant glass fiber for stool, artisan concrete for most projects, coloring for frames, leters, and pencil holder Ultrafine Pigment in Straw, coloring for leters Ultrafine Pigment in Smoke, concrete for stool Cratsman Mix 50-pound bag, mold releasing medium for most projects— Buddy Rhodes; 877/706-5303; buddyrhodes.com.

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation (All Periodicals Publications Except Requester Publications) 1. Publication Title: Do It Yourself. 2. Publication Number: 011-792. 3. Filing Date: 10/01/2016. 4. Issue Frequency: Quarterly. 5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 4. 6. Annual Subscription Price: $19.97. 7. Complete Mailing Address of Known Office of Publication: 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Polk County, Iowa 50309-3023. 8. Complete Mailing Address of Headquarters or General Business Office of Publisher: 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa 503093023. 9. Full Names and Complete Mailing Addresses of Publisher, Editor, and Managing Editor: Publisher: Scott Mortimer, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-3023; Editor: Brian Kramer, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-3023; Managing Editor: Brian Kramer, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-3023. 10. Owner: Meredith Corporation, 1716 Locust Street, Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. The names and addresses of all stockholders owning or holding 1 percent or more of the total amount of stock: Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. (0010), Attn: Jerry Travers, 525 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (0015), Attn: John Barry, 1300 Thames St, 6th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21231; Vanguard (0062), Attn: Ben Beguin, 14321 N. Northsight Blvd., Scottsdale, AZ 85260; Brown Brothers Harriman & Co./Etf (0109), Attn: Jerry Travers, 525 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. (0164), Attn: Christina Young, 2423 E. Lincoln Drive, Phoenix, AZ 85016-1215; National Financial Services LLC (0226), Attn: Peter Closs, 499 Washington Blvd., Jersey City, NJ 07310; The Bank Of New York Mellon (0901), Attn: Jennifer May, 525 William Penn Place, Suite 153-0400, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; JPMorgan Chase Bank, NA (0902), Attn: Marcin Bieganski, Associate, 14201 Dallas Pkwy, 12th Fl., Corp Actions Dept, Dallas, TX 75254; Citibank (0908), Attn: Paul Watters, 3801 Citibank Center, B/3rd Floor/Zone 12, Tampa, FL 33610; The Bank Of New York Mellon/Mellon Trust (0954), Attn: Jennifer May, 525 William Penn Place,Suite 153-0400, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; State Street Bank And Trust Company (0997), Attn: Christine Sullivan, 1776 Heritage Dr., North Quincy, MA 02171; The Bank Of New York/Spdr (2209), Attn: Jennifer May, Vice President, 525 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15259; JPMorgan Chase Bank/IA (2357), Attn: Marcin Bieganski, Associate, 14201 Dallas Pkwy, 12th Fl., Corp Actions Dept, Dallas, TX 75254; The Northern Trust Company (2669), Attn: Andrew Lussen, Team Leader, 801 S Canal Street, Attn: Capital Structures-C1n, Chicago, IL 60607; Ssb – Blackrock Institutional Trust (2767), Attn: Trina Estremera, 1776 Heritage Drive, North Quincy, MA 02171. Through some of the nominees listed above, the E. T. Meredith and Bohen families and family foundations own, directly or beneficially, approximately 16% of the issued and outstanding stock of the corporation. Each nominee listed above holds stock for one or more stockholders. 11. Known Bondholders, Mortgagees, and Other Security Holders Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages, or Other Securities: None. 12. Tax Status (For completion by nonprofit organizations authorized to mail at nonprofit rates) (Check one): The purpose, function, and nonprofit status of this organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes: __ Has Not Changed During Preceding 12 Months __ Has Changed During Preceding 12 Months (Publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement) Not applicable. 13. Publication Title: Do It Yourself 14. Issue Date for Circulation Data Below: Fall 2016 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months: a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run): 497,993 b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies): 193,186 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies): 0 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®: 79,750 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®): 0 c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)): 272,936 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541: 6,809 (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail): 0 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means): 954 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): 7,763 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e): 280,699 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3)): 217,295 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g): 497,994 i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100): 97.23% No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date: a. Total Number of Copies (Net press run): 509,739 b. Paid Circulation (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Mailed Outside-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies): 189,663 (2) Mailed In-County Paid Subscriptions Stated on PS Form 3541 (Include paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies): 0 (3) Paid Distribution Outside the Mails Including Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors, Counter Sales, and Other Paid Distribution Outside USPS®: 86,000 (4) Paid Distribution by Other Classes of Mail Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail®): 0 c. Total Paid Distribution (Sum of 15b (1), (2), (3), and (4)): 275,663 d. Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (By Mail and Outside the Mail): (1) Free or Nominal Rate Outside-County Copies included on PS Form 3541: 6,272 (2) Free or Nominal Rate In-County Copies Included on PS Form 3541: 0 (3) Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes Through the USPS (e.g., First-Class Mail): 0 (4) Free or Nominal Rate Distribution Outside the Mail (Carriers or other means): 965 e. Total Free or Nominal Rate Distribution (Sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): 7,237 f. Total Distribution (Sum of 15c and 15e): 282,900 g. Copies not Distributed (See Instructions to Publishers #4 (page #3)): 226,839 h. Total (Sum of 15f and g): 509,739 i. Percent Paid (15c divided by 15f times 100): 97.44% 16. Electronic Copy Circulation Average No. Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months a. Paid Electronic Copies: 41,369 b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 314,305 c. Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 322,068 d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c × 100): 97.59% I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. No. Copies of Single Issue Published Nearest to Filing Date a. Paid Electronic Copies: 39,226 b. Total Paid Print Copies (Line 15c) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 314,889 c. Total Print Distribution (Line 15f) + Paid Electronic Copies (Line 16a): 322,126 d. Percent Paid (Both Print & Electronic Copies) (16b divided by 16c × 100): 97.75% I certify that 50% of all my distributed copies (electronic and print) are paid above a nominal price. 17. Publication of Statement of Ownership: If the publication is a general publication, publication of this statement is required. Will be printed in the Winter 2016 issue of this publication. 18. Signature and Title of Editor, Publisher, Business Manager, or Owner: Tony Rouse, Business Manager. Date: 08/09/2016. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including civil penalties).


PLAYING THE ANGLES PAGES 84–91 Wall paint Eider White SW7014— The Sherwin-Williams Co.; 800/474-3794; sherwin-williams .com [P]. Flooring COREtec 7-inch Wide Plank in Ivory Coast White 50LVP705—Usfloors; 800/404-2675; usfloorsllc.com. Cabinets for dresser two Sektion cabinets—IKEA; ikea-usa.com. Cabinet legs—TableLegs.com; tablelegs.com. Stains for dresser— Cabot Wood Care Products; 800/877-8246; cabotstain .com [P]. Faux-marble contact paper—Design Your Wall; designyourwall.com. Rug—NuLoom, New York City; 646/964-5518; nuloom.com. Yarn for wall hanging— Lion Brand Yarn Co.; 800/661-7551; lionbrand.com. Copper tape for lampshade—TapeCase; 877/9598003; tapecase.com. Copper leaf for planter—Amazon; amazon .com, search: Speedball Copper Leaf. Fabric for seat cushion—Jo-Ann Stores; 888/739-4120; joann.com. Wreath form, candlesticks, metallic

spray paint Krylon—Michaels Stores, Inc.; michaels.com. Blue velvet pillow—World Market; 877/967-5362; worldmarket.com. Tan-and-gold graphic pillow, place mat for pillow project, lamp painted ater purchase, acrylic tray, white bowl, ice bucket, coasters—Target Stores; 800/800-8800; target.com (product line varies). Other barware, carafe—Overstock.com; 800/843-2446; overstock.com. MATERIAL WORLD PAGES 92–99 Flooring Resilient Classico Plank in Rosso—Shaw Industries; 800/4417429; shawfloors.com. Fabric for wall and Roman shade—IKEA; ikea-usa .com. Window film Pearl in white by Emma Jeffs—StickPretty; 888/6676961; stickpretty.com. Drawer pulls on island—MyKnobs.com; myknobs .com. Rug at black cabinet Grid Ivory Wool tuted rug—Dash & Albert; 800/658-5035; dashandalbert.com.

DIY HOME GALLERY

SIMPLE NATURE CRAFTS 100–107 Pages 100–101 Stones—Margo Garden Products; margogardenproducts.com. Transfer medium Americana Decor Image Transfer Medium by DecoArt— Amazon; amazon.com, search: DecoArt transfer medium. Page 102 40-gauge copper sheet, embossing tools—Hobby Lobby; 800/323-9204; hobbylobby.com. Page 103 Seeds for seed disk project—W. Atlee Burpee & Co.; 800/888-1447; burpee.com. Pages 104–105 Vinyl concrete patcher Quikrete—The Home Depot; homedepot.com (product line varies). Page 106 Bag for finished project Large bag— Baggu; baggu.com. Small bag in stencil process—TM1985; tm1985.com. Page 107 Polymer clay Sculpey, clay rolling pin—Hobby Lobby; 800/323-9204; hobbylobby.com.

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3

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LEATHER

Whether stitched, fringed, or made just for Fido, leather has a grip on our fashion sense.

WORDS CHELSEA EVERS PHOTOGRAPHS MARTY BALDWIN

1 Available in five sizes, this handstained leather collar can be personalized with your pup’s name in a variety of fonts. $20;

copperleafleather .etsy.com

2 Handmade from upcycled leather, this asymmetrical tassel key chain is available in 20 colors and ships in recycled paper. $22;

3 Made from leather sourced and tanned in the U.S., these airplant holders feature flexible legs for a customizable shape.

4 Give a soft touch to cabinets and drawers with these leather pulls, available in a variety of tans and colors. $13;

5 Stitch up your own leather bracelet. This kit comes with everything you need to create a colorful custom pattern. $32;

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$35; jayteske.com

thirteeneleven olive.etsy.com

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112 DO IT YOURSELF Winter 2016

Do It Yourself™ (ISSN 1075-1033), November (Winter) 2016, Volume 23, No. 4. Do It Yourself is published quarterly in January, April, July, and November by Meredith Corp., 1716 Locust St., Des Moines, IA 50309-3023. Periodicals postage paid at Des Moines, IA, and at additional mailing oices. SUBSCRIPTION PRICES: $19.97 per year in the U.S.; $23.97 (U.S. dollars) per year in Canada and overseas. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2). NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to Do It Yourself, P.O. Box 37508, Boone, IA 50037-0508. In Canada: Mailed under Publications Mail Sales Product Agreement No. 40069223. Canadian BN 12348 2887 RT. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: Do It Yourself, 2835 Kew Dr., Windsor, ON N8T 3B7. Better Homes and Gardens is a registered trademark in the United States, Canada, and Australia. Better Homes and Gardens marca registrada en México. © Meredith Corp. 2016. All rights reserved. Printed in the U.S.A.

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winter 2016