Page 1

Urban Planning Portfolio

Kyle Gibbs


Index

4

About Me

5

Resume

6 -7

Street Art District

ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher

8 -9

Food Deserts and Swamps

ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

10 -13

Redlining Factors

ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher

Sacrifice Zones

Eviction Project

Intimate Mapping

Over-the-Rhine Intervention

Design Manifest

14 -15

16 -19

ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher

20 -21

ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Office

22 -25

Hand-drawn | Illustrator

AutoCAD | ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator | SketchUp

26-37

AutoCAD | Adobe Draw | ESRI ArcMap | Hand-drawn | Illustrator | Photoshop | SketchUp | V-Ray

38 -39

Guatemala Project

41

Reflection


Graffiti Alley | Toronto


4

About Me

The first 20 years of my life were spent in a manufacturing town along the Ohio-Indiana border; it offered a homogenous lifestyle that my grandparents lived, as well as their grandparents before them. Heading for the nearest city, Dayton, Ohio, I became the first in my family to move out of our rural town. Quickly, my mind and heart filled with the diversity of the city: the architecture, the people, and the art. My first urban passions were street art and breweries; both represented community and creativity. While traveling, I set out to understand the uniqueness in every city, with street art and breweries filling my itineraries. After years of visiting different cities, I went back to school and graduated with an associate’s degree in Geography at Sinclair Community College. In the fall of 2018, I began the next step in my career: studying Urban Planning at the University of Cincinnati. The decision to pursue urban planning came from my experience with community development and researching human geography. Urban planning offers an interdisciplinary education, adding political science, economics, ecology, and land-use studies to my existing skills. It will provide a platform for me to work with communities and implement ideas.

Brim on Fifth | Day ton

“ Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.� - Dr. Martin Luther King


Res u me

Hello,

I’m Kyle Gibbs Planning Student United States

Education Expected Graduation: April 2023 Bachelor of Urban Planning University of Cincinnati GPA: 3.9

August 2016 - Graduation 2018 Associate of Arts, Geography Sinclair Community College, Dayton GPA: 3.9 Technical Certificate: Geographic Information Systems Study Abroad: Mexico (2017) and Guatemala (2018) Service Learning: International Buddy Program

Skills ESRI ArcMap Microso� Office Illustrator InDesign

Contact

4046 Cleveland Avenue Dayton, OH, 45410 937-336-4475 gibbsky@mail.uc.edu

Experience January 2018 - May 2018 Student Researcher Public Sociology Work Study, Dayton Research and provided GIS analysis on eviction and housing instability in Dayton. Worked on a team with legal aid firm, Advocates for Basic Legal Equality, and five other students.

September 2017 - May 2018 Student Assistant Sinclair College Center for Applied Social Issues, Dayton Peer review GIS projects, tutor students on ARCMap and GIS material, and assist students with research in Geography, GIS, Socology, and Social Work.

September 2017 - Present Volunteer West Dayton Strong, Dayton Work alongside students in an after-school program; providing cooking classes, music instructions, healthy meals, homework assistance, and physical activities.

March 2017 - Present GIS Freelancer Map Dayton Project, Dayton Create maps for community organizations, such as the Department of Planning and Community Development, United Way Greater Dayton, Greater Dayton Union Co-op Initiative, and Gem City Market.

2014 - Present Manager and Bartender Lock 27 Brewing, Dayton

AutoCAD SketchUp V-Ray

Certification: Cicerone and Servsafe

Photoshop Hand Drawing In progress***

Developed and implemented training program, handbook, promotions, menus, service operations, inventory management. While manager our weekly sales more than doubled ($15,185 to $33,347).

5


St r e e t A rt D i s t ri ct Location: Dayton, Ohio Project: Map Dayton, Sinclair Community College Goal: Locate art murals along the 3rd and 5th Street corridors, and identify the relation to vacant and commerical uses. Method: Put on comfortable shoes and walk the scope area, taking notes on the locations of murals, vacant buildings, and local restaurants and shops. Each art mural was mapped with ArcMap by creating a new point class. Both vacant and commercial businesses were mapped by selecting the structure from a building shapefile and saved as a new layer. A 500-foot buffer was geo-referenced and applied to each art mural. Results: The art murals do not impact vacancy and commercial activity, but art murals are encouraged in economically successful areas in Dayton.

STREET ART

DISTRICT

1 !

R SEA

Since 2013, organized street art has grown in Downtown. The modern-movement has given young talent the opportunity to create and beautify our city.

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TER PAT

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Dayton Inspires

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HAALO

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250 500

6 !

1,000 Feet

A mural arts program created through a partnership with the Montgomery County Juvenile Court Program. It encourages at-risk teens to participate in the creation of artwork and to have a sense of pride in the rejuvenation their artwork brings to the urban landscape around them.

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Street Art District, ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher


St reet Art Dist rict

Vacant Buildings in the Street Art District, ESRI ArcMap The map shows vacant buildings within 500 feet of art murals. The vacancy rate in the vicinity was 7.1% , 83% less than the city’s average of 42.1% vacancy .

Local Businesses in the Street Art District, ESRI ArcMap The

map

shows local businesses within 500 feet of art murals. The average number of businesses in the vicinity of art murals was four.

commercial

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Foo d D esert s a nd S wa mps Location: Dayton, Ohio

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Project: F ! Map Dayton, United Way Greater Dayton, Gem City Market, and Greater Dayton F ! Union Co-op Intiative

F ! F Goal: ! K ! Locate West Dayton’s access to fresh proK ! F ! farmer’s markets) duce (e.g., grocery and and unhealthy sources (e.g., convenience F ! stores, carryouts, and fast food dining). G

K !

F ! FF ! !

Method: At community meetings residents were C routine food purchasing locasurveyed on ! tions. The study area was broken into secK ! tions, and groups observed available food options at each location. After the visits, residents classified each location as ! either F Grocery, Convenience, Carryout, or Fast Food. Then each field was located on ArcFF ! F Map using an address locator. Half mile buf-! fers were applied to Grocery sites and areas with more than eight unhealthy sources.

K !

! K ! K ! Results: G 68% of residential areas ! have no fresh produce

sold within a half mile and are considered a food K ! desert. Seven areas were determined as having an abundance of unhealthy foods K G as a within ! a half mile and were labeled ! food swamp. C ! K ! G ! G !

DESERTS & ! ! SWAMPS K

A FOOD DESERT IS (ONLY-RESIDENTIAL)

DAYTON, OHIO

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A FOOD SWAMP IS

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Creator: Kyle Gibbs Data Source: Map 2 - Store List.xlsx, Michael Mehaffey, Hall Hunger Initiative, United Way of the Greater Dayton Area Software: ESRI ArcMap 10.4

Food Deserts and Swamps, ESRI ArcMap K F K FF! ! !


Food Deserts a nd Swa mps

9

Gem City Market is a food co-op organized, developed, funded, and run by the community of Dayton. The citizens in West Dayton researched, studied, and communicated their concerns of not having access to fresh and healthy food options. In 2017, the organization began collecting shares of $100 from any citizen intereseted in becoming a member and collaborative owner of a new health-centric market. Local private corporations have also donated to the cause. The market is set to break ground in 2019 and open their doors in 2020.

Gem City M a r ke t

Hillcrest Philadelphia

Trad e A rea

t or N h a M

al S em

in

Cornell

Superior J am

es

Gem City Market Trade Area, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

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3rd

Edw i n

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The map shows the future location of the market, and is printed in the organzation’s informational brochure. The location was determined by the Deserts and Swamps project.

US - 35

s

es


Re d l in ing Fa ct ors Location: Dayton, Ohio Project: Map Dayton, Sinclair Community College Goal: Redigitize the residential security map for the city of Dayton and map the factors which determined the grades. The grades are important because they largely influenced decisions made in the underwritten manual. The manual determined the financial risk and desireability of investment for mortgages and housing loans from 1936-1968. The Zones graded D or lined with red were considered the highest risk and least desireable, and the residents received minimal investment from the banks. Method: Using ArcMap, the original residential security map was geo-referenced with the most recent Great Maimi River shapefile. A feature class for each graded zone was created and redrawn onto present-day Dayton. The 47 Home Owners Loan Corporation (HOLC) canvassing documents were downloaded and transferred into an Excel spreadsheet and joined with the correlating zone. Results: Many factors determined the grade of each zone, including: terrain, parks, institutions, odors, noise level, labor type, buildings, occupancy, and construction. A routine pattern did not appear, but the factors with the largest impacts were ethnicity, household income, and home values.

C14

D14

LEGEND ...A FIRST GRADE ...B SECOND GRADE ...C THIRD GRADE ...D FOURTH GRADE

DAYTO REDIGITIZED

RE

RESIDENTIAL SEC PREPARED BY HO Original Residential Security Map


Red l ining Factors

11

C14

B11

C14

B10 C9

A7 B8 B7 C12

B9

D10

D5

D7

C10

C11 D9 D10

D4

D8 D12 D13

D3

C3

C5

B6

C1 D2

B5

C4

C13

B5

C4

C6

D11

C1

B4

D2

A3 A4

A2

B3

C2

B2

OAK W O O D

ON, OHIO

ENDITION

D6

OF

C7

A5

THE

CURITY MAP OLC IN 1937

B3

A6

A1 C8

B1

D1 C15 D1 Redigitized Residential Security Map, ESRI ArcMap


12

Red l ining Factors

The map displays the most occupied minority ethnicity for each zone in 1937 (provided by the HOLC documents).

C12

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LEGEND

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.....A FIRST GRADE .....B SECOND GRADE .....C THIRD GRADE .....D FOURTH GRADE

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The documents reported the “detrimental influence” in the grading of zone C12 was “the need to travel through a colored section to get to it”. The adjacent vicinity of Black Americans was viewed as a detriment for a White American zone with high income and average housing values.

NEGRO

Every zone with majority

JEWISH & RUSSIAN POLISH-HUNGARIAN ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

occupany of Black Americans was redlined, compared to 56% foreign-born and 11% White American zones.

GREEKS & ITALIAN-HUNGARIAN & GERMAN

***Identifying terms match original documents

1937 MINORITY PROVIDED

BY

ETHNICITIES

HOLC

DOCUMENTS

1937 Minority Ethnicities in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap

Housing values by zone in 1937 and the flood damage of 1913 (geo-referenced from the flood and conservency map).

D12

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$6000 - 40000 $4000 - 6000 $2000 - 4000 $800 - 1800 AREA EXPERIENCED DAMAGING WATERS IN THE FLOOD OF 1913

1937 Housing Values and the Flood of 1913 Damage Zone in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap

Only zones graded A or B included average home values above $4,000 (ranging up to $40,000). Every zone with average values below $1,800 (including all Black American zones) were redlined. Values were appraised by condition and the owner’s ethnicity. The largest natural disaster in Ohio history was Dayton’s Flood of 1913 . All zones (except D12) damaged by the flood were valued below $4,000 for existing and/or potential damage.


Red l ining Factors

GRADES A & B ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !

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1937 Annual Family Income in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap

Redlining Factors, Microsoft Publisher Poster presented at the AAG East Lakes regional conference at Eastern Michigan University. Placed second in undergraduate poster presentations.

$4000 - 10000 $2000 - 4000 $1000 - 2000 $700 - 1000

Every zone with an average annual family income above $2,000 (ranging up to $10,000) were graded A or B; only one zone (B7) was of a minority ethnicity. Three of the four redlined White American zones (D1-D3) had an annual family income below $1,000, documented as “a lower class of white�.

C

D3 D2

D1 GRADE

D

13


2

!

2

Sac r if i c i a l Zones

!2

Location: Dayton, Ohio

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2 Results: 2 2 2 2 2 were Four census tracts 2222 22identified as poten2 tially having the2metrics 2 22to be classified as

! ! data on metro parks, EPA super! !! Collect ! fund sites, ! ! EPA toxic release inventory sites, ! movement of poverty, and median family ! !income,and map ! the data by census tracts

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a sacrifice zone. Each of these tracts had an increase of poverty moving in, county low ! 2 sites, and income, numerous contamination 22 2 lack of quality green space.

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Presentations: REACH Conference Keynote session, EPA LISTED TOXIC RELEASE INVENTORY PARKS Dayton,METRO Ohio SUPERFUND SITES LISTED POLLUTION SITES

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Goal: Locate areas in Montgomery County which best resemble the indications of the Sacrifice Zone theory.

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using2ESRI ArcMap. The critria for selec!2 tion were areas which had three of the possible situations: more than 12% of its ! ! population moved into! the census tract since 2015 and ! are at least 100% below the ! poverty level, bottom 10% in median family income, at least 10 EPA sites, and no metro parks.

Data Source: Environmental Protection Agency and AmerBOTTOM 10% MOVEMENT OF POVERTY ican Community Survey 2015- estimates. MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE BELOW 100% POVERTY

! !

0 - 1.4%

($ 11,170 - $ 22,340)**

MORE THAN 12% OF THE CENSUS TRACT POPULATION MOVED IN 2015 AND ARE AT LEAST 100% BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL ($16,958)

BOTTOM 10% IN COUNTIES MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

4.5 - 6.7%

6.8 - 12%

12.1 - 33.5%

THAT MOVED INTO THE CENSUS TRACT IN 2015

ENVIRONMENTAL

STUDIES CRITERIA IN DETERMINING SACRIFICE ZONES (AT LEAST 3 SATISFIED):

1.5 - 4.4%

ECONOMIC

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POPULATION

2015 MOVEMENT OF PEOPLE BELOW 100% POVERTY INTO THE CENSUS TRACT

4,100

2,356

5,846

2,035

888 888

8888

88888

888

597 (14.6%)

340 (14.4%)

496 (8.5%)

284 (14%)

(%) OF POPULATION

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME

$ 21,959

$ 21,960

$ 24,788

$ 40,321

SUPERFUND SITES

AT LEAST 10 EPA SITES POLLUTION SITES

NO ACCESS TO METRO PARKS

PARKS

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Sacrifice Zones in Montgomery County ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher

CREATED BY: KYLE GIBBS | PROGRAM: ESRI ARCMAP 10.4 | SUPERFUND SITES: https://www.homefacts.com/environmentalhazards/superfunds/Ohio/Montgomery-County/Dayton.html | POLLUTION SITES: https://www.homefa /environmentalhazards/polluters/Ohio/Montgomery-County/Dayton.html INCOME: ACS_15_5YR_S2503_with_ann | MOVEMENT OF POVERTY: ACS_15_5YR_B07012 | METROPARKS: https://www.metroparks.org/


Sacrif ica l Zones

OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY

SACRIFICE ZONES 2

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METRO PARKS

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EPA LISTED SUPERFUND SITES

TOXIC RELEASE INVENTORY LISTED POLLUTION SITES

0 - 1.4%

BOTTOM 10% MEDIAN FAMILY INCOME ($ 11,170 - $ 22,340)**

ENVIRONMENTAL

1.5 - 4.4%

4.5 - 6.7%

6.8 - 12%

12.1 - 33.5%

MOVEMENT OF POVERTY PERCENTAGE OF PEOPLE BELOW 100% POVERTY THAT MOVED INTO THE CENSUS TRACT IN 2015

ECONOMIC

Sacrifice Zones in Montgomery County ESRI ArcMap | Microsoft Publisher !!

STUDIES CRITERIA

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Ev i c t ion Pro ject Project: Map Dayton, Advocates for Basic Legal Equality

Location: Dayton, Ohio Goal: Reseach and analyze Montgomery County eviction data (2012-2017) and create an index predicting which census tracts would have the most eviction filings in 2018.

Method: Obtain eviction data from county public records. Organize and prepare data for ESRI ArcMap. Create Montgomery County address locator and connect with dataset to generate a Point shapefile for each eviction. Download Census and American Community Survey data; organize and prepare. Create maps using ESRI ArcMap. Calculate the rent burden percentage of each census tract: multipling the median monthly rent by 12 months, then dividing by the annual family income. To form the eviction predictor indicator, each metric normalized or inverse-normalized and weighted to 25% and given an accumulative score.

Results: High Eviction Filing (HEF; more than 400 eviction filings from 2012-2017) census tracts tend to have lower value properties, disproportionate monthly rents, and lower incomes. Data Source: Montgomery County eviction data (20122017) and American Community Survey 2015- estimates.

Rent Burden Percentage by Census Tract in Dayton, Ohio

Rent Burden in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap The Census tracts in orange and red indicate that the average monthly rent is disproportionally high compared to the average income.

Rent Burden Percentage

7% 2.

0% .1

%

-5

-4 40

30

.1

%

-3 % .1 20

10

.4

%

-2

0%

Methods: multiple Monthly Median Gross Rent by 12 months and divide by Annual Median Household Income, for each Census Tract

0%

** Families who pay more than 30 percent of their income for housing are considered cost burdened - U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development


Evict ion Project

Median Household Income, Eviction Filings, & Monthly Rent by Census Tract in Dayton, Ohio

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Median Monthly Rent, HEF, and Median Household Income in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap

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The map shows darker Census tracts having the lower household income, while the larger dots represent higher monthly rent. HEF tracts are outlined in yellow.

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Median Monthly Rent

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§ ¦ ¨ 75

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$601 - 800

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,7

Census Tracts with More than 400 Eviction Filings from 2012 - 2017

$241 - 600 00 0

Monthly Rent !

$2 4

Based on these maps, the law firm questioned why low-income residents were paying higher rents for low-valued properties.

00

47

!

!

!

Every HEF tract averaged below a $80,000 property value; the two tracts averaging under the income poverty level (from the previous map) were below $50,000.

0, $4

Monthly Rent, Median Home Value, & Eviction Filings by Census Tract in Dayton, Ohio

!

The map displays the median rental property value for census tracts; the lighter green indicates lower average value.

0,

2,

-4

-2

7

5

47

82

$2

$1

3,

25 $8

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24

31

Census Tracts with More than 400 Eviction Filings from 2012-2017

-1

-8

12 -6

13

41

$6

!

!

!

$2

Median Monthly Rent, HEF, and Median Rental Property Value in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap

! !

! !

!

Nine of thirteen HEF tracts had an average monthly rent range of $613-$824; two tracts average below the income poverty level for Dayton ($22,476).

!

!

17


18

Evict ion Project

Eviction Predictor Index in Dayton, Ohio

Eviction Predictor Index in Dayton, Ohio, ESRI ArcMap The map displays a darker blue for Census tracts with the highest chance for the most eviction filing in 2018. EP Index:

40 1

-0

.8

00 70 0.

60

1

-0

.7

00 0.

0.

50

1

-0

.6

00 .5 -0 1 42

0.

0.

25

0

-0

.4

20

! !

! !

Annual Household Income Median Home Value Monthly Median Rent

The Eviction Predictor Index assisted the law firm in targeting communties to offer free representation in court, with the goal of eviction prevention.

Eviction Filings from 2012 - 2017

Eviction Predictor Index Table, Microsoft Office The metrics used in the index include annual household income, median monthly rent, median rental property value, and total eviction filings from 2012-2017.


RiNo | Denver


I n t i ma te Mappi ng Location: University of Cincinnati (UC), Ohio

Project: Studio Project, University of Cincinnati

Method: Create map of campus with ESRI ArcMap and walk campus. Twelve open spaces were choosen, and measurements and notes collected. Three spaces were hand-drawn in perspective view; every space hand-drawn in plan view. On ArcMap, the tree canopy shapefile was selected and calculated in square footage. Using an architecture scale, each pathway and edge distance were measured. The three metrics were normalized and weighted for each space to form the intimacy indicator.

Synopsis: Explores public spaces on University of Cincinnati campus, measuring the comfort, privacy, and aesthetics. The sense of intimacy students feel towards campus spaces influence their use and experience.

Measurements: Comfort: edge density, Privacy: amount of pathways, aesthetics: tree canopy coverage.

Goal: To create an indicator for intimacy of open spaces on UC campus by quantifying qualitative metrics.

Results: The most intimate spaces on campus had a balance of good tree canopy coverage, low pathway access, and dense building edges. The best way to increase intimacy of spaces were to increase the coverage of tree canopy.

b

c

a

McMicken Commons Vignette, Hand-drawn

Schneider Quad Vignette, Hand-drawn

Main Street Vignette, Hand-drawn

The nodal intersection on campus is a vast opening, offering many pathway options and evenly distributed tree canopy. The edges are defined by buildings, wide pathways, and trees.

The minor quadrant has building edges and few pathways. The narrow opening includes low tree density; however, it is evenly distributed.

The central link on campus offers one primary path defined by its topopgraphy and the edges of buildings. Tree canopy is minimal and poorly distributed in the slim opening.


Int imate Mapping

b c

a

1239 ft.

755 ft.

360 ft.

372 ft.

434 ft.

593 ft.

432 ft.

645 ft.

999 ft.

306 ft.

355 ft.

Index measurement: each category normalized divided by the average. Weights: Pathways (40%), Tree Canopy (30%), Edge Distance (30%)

intimacy index

364 ft.

edge distance:

1.20

1.10

1.00

.900

View index data set

.800

.700 To increase the index score to .826, 147ft² in Tree Canopy needs to be added. These additions would move the space up three positions and no longer in the bottom three.

An additional 136ft² in Tree Canopy increases the intimacy of the space, moving the index score to 8.40, ahead of two other spaces and out of the bottom three.

Adding 150ft² strategically along the pathways increases the Tree Canopy and decreases the Edge Distance. These actions move the space out of the bottom three and up three spots in the index with a score of .814.

Intimate Mapping, Hand-drawn | Illustrator

21


Over - t he - R h i ne In t er vent i on Location: Over-the-Rhine (OTR), Cincinnati, OH Project: Studio Project, University of Cincinnati Method: Research and collect data on OTR. Create overview of analysis that details and supports the opportunties and issues our group researched. Run a SWOT analysis to futher study the strengths, weaknesses, opportunites, and threats. Create an overview of recommendations to assist in improving and activating the opportunities and issues. Create a project which benefits OTR and begins to solve a specfic opportunity or issue. Run a schematic process on project and develop the implementation. Goal: Activate vacant spaces in OTR, and provide a public laundry facility with services. Issue: OTR residents have no access to public laundry facilites or services. New and redeveloped units come equipped with washer and dryer connections; however, the majority remain outdated with no connections. The nearest laundry facility is 2.3 miles away: a 10 minute drive (for residents with access to a vehicle), a 28 minute bus ride, or a 41 minute walk. Results: A plan that activates seven vacant locations in OTR and gives equal access to a laundry facility with services for residents.


Over-t he-Rhine Inter vent ion

Overview of analysis The objective is to present the five most signficant issues or opportunites found in OTR research. The conclusion for each field is briefly described, and complimented with supported figures.

23

1.

2.

An abundance of empty space decreases vibrancy, surrounding uses, and safety, while providing available space for community growth.

Clustered pockets of development produces a vacuum of tourism, and raises the cost of living for areas outside of new investment.

Vacancy

212

Condemned Vacant Properties

Development

131

historic properties redeveloped

48

8

new construction buildings

Available Average rent in Cincinnati

$

974 1613

$ is the average rent in Over-the-Rhine

?

? ? ? ? ?? ??

3.

4.

5.

Liberty Street is a physical barrier; limiting fluidity and perception through the neighborhood.

Limited distribution of ordinary services and facilities, low-income amenities, and inclusive employment.

Create a strong inclusive indentity; driven by the diversity of history, architecture, art, and the people.

Walkability

Liberty St. is

7 lanes

Accessibility

0

Laundry

wide

facilities

1 2

north

of Liberty

12 37

fresh produce markets are leaving

is

$

$

to the

54

art murals

Largest collection

of

The median income

Identity

of

Italianate

architecture in the U.S.

,000

,000

south

Travel time to work takes

20

longer

than

minutes for

40

%

of the residents

Population of

6697


24

Over-t he-Rhine Inter vent ion

Overview of Recommendations The objective is to present five recommendations developed to improve the issues and opportunties researched in OTR. A brief detail of the recommendation is included, as well as which issues or opportunites it addresses.

3.

Activate Vacant Spaces

1.

Community Engagement

Establishing greater emphasis for inclusive activities and meetings. Directed towards building relationships amoung all status of residents, and the developers.

2.

Add Low Income Amentites

Establish a co-op, and begin funding projects to meet low-income residents wants and needs. Establish an iniative to help support inherent businesses in the neighborhood.

Identity

Accessibility

Development

Development

4.

Soften Liberty Street

5.

Improve Streetscape

Find permanent or temporary uses to fill available vacant properties. Developtemporary uses to display potential of areas with a high concentration of condemned buildings.

Redesign the 7 vehicle traffic lanes into more pedestrian focus; lessoning the barrier and adding fluidity to the north and south.

Adding native and sustainable green space, fresh paint on vacant buildings, and community clean-up events to beautify and promote social synergy.

Accessibility

Accessibility

Walkability

Development

Walkability

Identity

Vacancy

Identity


Over-t he-Rhine Inter vent ion

The proposal begins improving identity, accessibility, development, and vacancy, addressing the lack of access to a public laundry facility for residents in outdated units. The proposed plan forms a community-owned cooperative (co-op) in OTR for the funding. All residents have the opportunity to become members and buy into the co-op at the same cost, giving equal ownership to residents of the community.

25

Mobile Laundromat Elevation, AutoCAD | Illustrator

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

W/D

Steps: 1. Engage with community 2. Assign community leadership 3. Launch a capital and membership campaign 4. Design proposal 5. Membership vote 6. Redesign proposal 7. Finalize proposal 8. Develop

Mobile Laundromat Plan View, AutoCAD | Illustrator | SketchUp

Simulation of the co-op was performed through engagement with colleagues and professors in the course. My final proposal was a Mobile Laundromat.

Mobile Laundromat Model, SketchUp

A retired city bus provides the space for machines and seating, as well as the ability to access different locations around OTR. Along both sides of the bus, six washer and dryer stacks fit. Four table-and- chair sets provide a comfortable atmosphere and space for residents to relax. The fare machine at the front accepts payment when residents enter. A shelving unit behind the driver seat has detergent, dryersheets, and brewed coffee. Bus will connect to fire hydrants for water source, drain into sewage, and use solar panels to provide electricty.

service performed by staff. Criteria for locations include: even distribution throughout OTR, available fire hydrant and sewer drain, and on vacant property.

Each day of the week will have a routine location, open 8am to 8pm, and operated by two employees spliting the day. Residents will have the option to drop-off laundry for

The long-term goal is to open a set laundry facility that operates alongside the mobile facility, funded through co-op memberships and revenue from Mobile Laundromat.

Operations: non-members wash and dry at cost, members receive one free weekly load, free services available to homeless, all loads include products, and additional services scheduled when available: tutoring, basic healthcare, pet care, food pantry, community meetings, live music, art shows, book clubs, and open mic nights. Mobile Laundromat Daily Locations ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator


Des i gn Ma n i f es t T hi s se c ti o n di spl ays my wor k i n using design soft ware ( e . g . A do b e Cre ati ve C l oud, AutoCad, S ketchup, V-Ray ), col o r t he o r y, a nd C a rtogra phy. T he examples compliment t he d e si g n s presente d i n the proj e ct sect ion, and furt her de m o nstrate my de si gn a bi l i ty.

Figure Ground of UC Campus, Hand-drawn Built structures are in black and the ground in white. The focus is on the comparsion of building density and open spaces.

Linkages of Hand-drawn

UC

Campus,

The map shows the movements of pedestrians and vehicles. Vehicle pathways are hallow and allows for the solid pedestrian pathways to draw attention; representing the campus’s pedestrian emphasize. Towards the center of the map are filled in areas, these spaces are open intersections with no definitive route.

Imageability of UC Campus, Hand-drawn

edges

: Buildings : Parks : Commercial : Sidewalk

Pathways

: Major : Minor

Districts

: Athletics : Arts

Landmarks

Nodes

The map highlights spatial features that display a strong sense of character on campus. For instance, Crosley Tower is a landmark because of its visibility anywhere on campus and it directs me to the DAAP building.


Design Ma nifest

27

Open Spaces on

Exploring University of Cincinnati Campus

0

N

Exploring Open Spaces on UC Campus, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

Major Quadrant

Minor Quadrant Primary Path

100

300

Courtyard

500 Feet

Plaza

Secondary Path

Kyle Gibbs | Plan 1055 | Assignment 3 | 10032018


28

Desgin Ma nifest

Figure Ground

Linkages

Cincinnati Neighborhood: Over-the-Rhine

Cincinnati Neighborhood: Over-the-Rhine

Major Intersection: Arterial Roads

Pathways and Open Spaces

Connector Roads

Intermediate Intersection: Arterial or Connector Road and Local Road

Building Footprints

Minor Intersection: Local Roads

.25 Mile Buffer

0

500

0

1,000 ft.

500

1,000 ft.

5 Minute Walkshed

.25 Mile

.25 Mile

Figure Ground of OTR, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

Linkages of OTR, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

Land Use

Cincinnati Neighborhood: Over-the-Rhine The map is a broaden perspective on land use classifcation. For each major block (defined by connector and local roads) the dominate use represents the entire space, with the expection of mixed use.

Imagining the rhine

Residential

Shopping and Office Space

Pathways Industrial

Major Minor

Institutional and Entertainment

edges Transportation

Major Minor

Park and Recreation

nodes Major

Mixed Use

Minor

landmarks Major Minor

districts 0

500

1,000 ft.

Developed .25 Mile

Land Use of OTR, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

I nher ent

Imagea bility mapping highlights spatial features that display a strong

character

of

Imagining the Rhine, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

the

area.


29

Design Ma nifest

B u rger s

B ur g e r s , Alcohol,

8

,0

0

1

to

in

12

,0

0

otr

0

12

,0

0

1

and

to

16

,0

0

0

Produce in

ot r

Population of less than 8,000 per square mile

at io n Pop ul th an or e r of m 0 1 pe 16 ,0 ile re m sq ua

34 48 27

Each dot represents a single location where prepared food is served.

Alcohol

8

,0

0

1

to

in

12

,0

0

otr

0

12

,0

0

1

to

16

,0

0

0

Population of less than 8,000 per square mile

at io n Pop ul th an or e r of m 0 1 pe 16 ,0 ile re m ua sq

Each dot represents a single location where alcohol is served.

Produce

8

,0

0

1

to

in

12

,0

0

otr

0

12

Burgers, Alcohol, and Produce in OTR, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator The objective of this map series was to convey a sense of nourishment in OTR. The metrics are restaurants serving burgers, bars serving alcohol, and locations offering fresh produce. The overall comparison shows a priority to unhealthy consumption (burgers and alcohol) within the neighborhood. Furthermore, healthy options (fresh produce) are least available in the areas of high occupied density.

,0

0

1

to

16

,0

0

0

Population of less than 8,000 per square mile

at io n Pop ul th an or e r of m 0 1 pe 16 ,0 m ile re sq ua

Each dot represents a single location where food produce is sold.


30

Desgin Ma nifest

Typology Study Area Cincinnati Neighborhood: Over-the-Rhine

. ft

.

5

.

8

ft

ft 5

ft

Pleasant

.

ty

10

Elm

Li ber

Pleasant Street Cross-section, AutoCAD | Illustrator

Race

15th

Vine 14th

Typology Study Area, ESRI ArcMap | Illustrator

. ft

10

. ft 8

. 9

ft

. ft

200ft.

8

100

10

0

ft

.

Cross-Sections

15th Street Cross-section, AutoCAD | Illustrator


Design Ma nifest

Pleasant and 15th Street Proximity, SketchUp

Pleasant Street Elevation

Pleasant Street Elevation, AutoCAD | Illustrator

31


Desgin Ma nifest

OTR appealed to me because it felt alive. I’ll always be happy with growing up in northern Kentucky but OTR offers something like that from a movie. The buildings

history , the pace of people, and the buzz the main strips have on busy nights is thrilling . and their

Crime and danger do happen, but if you’re aware and smart about situations then you’re fine. My family for the longest time refused to visit me, until I gave them the same treatment, and now they

won’t stop

coming up here. Just surround yourself with people and don’t make yourself available to danger. Groceries suck here, like Findlay Market is more

novelty than viable . My diet is sh***y and I eat out a lot, unless I want to hail a bus up to Kroger by campus and lug my bags around. Findlay Market does have vegetables and fruit, it’s probably more that I’m lazy and would rather grab tacos or a burger. Something exciting is that my dad and I just opened our own brewery in Northside. Spaces in OTR are so

expensive and really small , so Northside made sense, and it’s a super chill area; people are starting to call it “Under-the-Rhine”. It’s like the underground spot that

Soul of OTR, Photoshop | Illustrator

strangers and out-of-towners

32

miss, so the reputation is that this is where real

‘natians go.

The poster tells the story of Paul, a resident in OTR, and his experience living in the neighborhood.

Greetings from

The Dynamic Postcard of OTR, Adobe Draw | Illustrator A individual walks through the neighborhood. Passing by buildings: dilapidated, newly constructed, and inherent. The postcard depicts the dynamic quality of OTR, and the changes the neighborhood is experiencing; with the hope of provoking thought into the social benefits and issues to these changes.


Design Ma nifest

33

Find l a y Ma rke t

In Awning, Illustrator The minimal map characterizes OTR by featuring Findlay Market. The market is a vital attraction for the city and embodies the identity of the neighborhood. The bright patterns of the storefront awnings add a signficant element to the aesthetics of the market. The map displays only one aspect: the awnings, but the density, vibrancy, and flow of the market is achieved.

Ove r- th e - Rhine Cinc innat i


34

Desgin Ma nifest

Model of UC Campus Entrance and McMicken Commons, SketchUp

Model of McMicken Commons, SketchUp

Model of McMicken Commons and Schneider Quad, SketchUp


Design Ma nifest

Illuminating McMicken Commons, Sketchup | V-Ray The objective of the render was to better understand the relationship of building density, tree canopy, and pathways in McMicken Commons. By lighting the pathways the building edges and flow of the space are visible. The trees are highlighted to emphasize the amount of green space.

Illuminating Schneider Quad, Sketchup | V-Ray

35


36

Desgin Ma nifest

Dayton Flag Project Submission, Adobe Illustrator | InDesign Dayton City Commission has released a new project: Dayton Flag Project. The project has gathered views and values that residents would like to display on the city flag. The last flag was introduced in 1958 and has quickly become outdated. Any resident can submit a prospal for the opportunity to design the next flag for the city.

The gem in the center of the flag represents our nickname: Gem City. The six facets on top represent the six most influential events in our history:

The four facets on the bottom are left open for future events. A symbol of celebrating the present and embracing the future.

Founding in 1796 Innovation Aviation Flood of 1913 Epicenter of Funk Peace Accord

Events can change based on public view.

Each facet of the gem stand for points in our city’s history and future.


Design Ma nifest

Each white line represents one of the five rivers flowing into Dayton. Positioned by their geography. Stillwater Mad River

Wolf Creek Twin Creek

In the center is the Great Miami River, the main stream to the four tributary streams.

The blue represents peace and harmony. One color signifies unity in our city.

The orange represents energy and enthusiasm.

37


Gu a tema l a Pro ject Location: San Lucas Toliman, Guatemala Project: High-Efficiency Wood Burning Stoves, Transformational Journeys Goal: Work with a Mayan community in rural Guatemala to develop new wood burning stoves to prevent health issues. Method: Arrive and settle in village. Walk the area and meet residents. Held community meetings to hear the stories of residents stuggles with health issues. Prior to our arrival, the organization stuied the issue of lung cancer by request of the village. The dwelling units were single room structures with one to two windows max. Each unit had a wood burning stove with no ventilation. The source of lung cancer was the infrastructure. Plans were developed during community meetings for: new sustainable and efficient stove, source of local materials, hiring of local masons, and distribution of sites. Results: In three weeks we designed, sourced materials locally, hired eight Mayan masons, and built high-efficient wood burning stoves in 21 units. After two-years, the project is still building stoves in San Lucas Toliman and surrounding villages. The project is now a non-profit and has employed over 30 Mayan masons. Due to inadequate sources of medical records quanitative data on lung cancer deaths is difficult to determine. The residents continue to demand the production of the stoves and notice health benefits related.


Guatema la Project

San Lucas Toliman, left.

Scope area. Location of the first constructed stoves.

Existing Stove, right.

An example of the prior cooking spaces inside the homes.

Construction plan, left.

A Guatemalan resident and hired mason demonstrates the construction of stoves.

Machete, right.

The most important tool was the machete. Used to cut cinder blocks into desired shapes.

Construction process.

Each stove was constructed by three team members. Requiring two workdays to complete.

Completed Stoves.

The most critical elements are: a sturdy base, heat conservation, and ventilation of smoke.

39


Front Street Galler y | Day ton


Ref lect ion

Over the last three years, I have worked alongside incredible people within the city of Dayton and internationally. My first community involvement was with West Dayton Strong and United Way: Hall Hunger Initiative; researching food access within the neighborhoods of West Dayton, the work helped in determining the location for the four million dollar food co-op opening in 2020. Next, I began volunteering with the DeSoto Bass community in Dayton, implementing an after-school program to provide educational and productive activities for children. Then, last March, I studied abroad with an organization called Transformational Journeys. We worked with a Mayan community in Guatemala to implement fuel-effiencient stoves, sourcing all materials and labor from within the community. My passion for art and community is driven by urban environments and grows with my education in urban planning. Working with marginalized populations to plan sustainable development is my interest; to me, that means increasing access to resources derived from their needs. Studying Geography and GIS has added the tools for researching spatial areas, and sets me apart from other urban planners. My research to this point focuses on structural discrimination, e.g.,redlining, eviction predictor index, sacrificial zones, and food deserts. Urban planning provides the platform to work with communities and implement their ideas.

41


Profile for Kyle Gibbs

Planning Portfolio - UC DAAP  

Planning Portfolio - UC DAAP  

Profile for gibbsky
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