Page 9

house and I wasn’t crazy about the kids using knives to cut up nuts, especially after their epic battle over clay pots. So, what we did was we pulled up a recipe off the Internet for seed bombs.This utilized ingredients I had lying around the house. Neither child liked the consistency of the dirt, but I found it remarkably soothing to play with. Adult playdough one could say. So I wound up rolling a lot of balls and listening to jokes about poop. Because, yes, it looked a little like poop.They both were actually quite insistent that I had mistakenly made the recipe with used/dirty cat litter instead of fresh/unused cat litter. So if you like poop jokes, this is perfect for you, but do skip this activity if your child has sensory issues. I put these bombs in Easter eggs at Easter egg hunts and when the kids found the eggs, they could plant the balls by lobbing them somewhere or save them until they got home. Isaac, 6

Seed Bombs Ingredients: Cheap, unscented clay kitty litter; Potting soil; Flower seeds;Water; Nontoxic paint (optional) Method: 1. In a large bowl, combine roughly 5 parts clean, dry, granulated kitty litter and 1 part soil. 2. Stir, adding water a little at a time, until the clay granules soften and blend with the soil to make a uniform dough with a mud patty consistency. You want it just moist enough that when you squeeze a handful firmly, it stays together and doesn’t fall apart when you poke it with your finger. 3. Form your dough into rough balls, about the size of a golf ball, poking a finger or a stick into the middle of each to make a little “well.” Set the balls on a cookie sheet or a cardboard tray lined with newspaper, well side up. 4.Wash and dry your hands and drop just 2 or 3 of the seeds of your choice (all the same or a variety) into each of the “wells.” Once all have seeds in them, pick up each ball and gently squeeze it to seal the seeds into the center of a solid ball of dough and put it back on the tray. Let the balls dry and harden in a sunny spot. 5. Once the balls are hard and dry, store them in paper bags until you are ready to throw them out onto your ground. 6. If you want to “plant” them right away, you can set them down gently rather than lobbing them long distances. - Thanks to www.rodalesorganiclife.com for this fun idea! The opportunity to explore our environment is all around us. I am not a huge fan of the outdoors but was able to find activities that worked for both active children and myself. All these activities and more can be found in books at your library and local stores. ■ Kimberly Wise is the mother of 2 boys who adores shade and sunscreen and is learning to enjoy the little things. www.athensparent.com

9

Athens oconee parent mj17  
Athens oconee parent mj17