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Algae’s key role in taking care of consumer expectations

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by Roger Gilbert, Milling and Grain Publisher

he inclusion of algae in food production took on a meaningful turn when Olmix presented its antibiotic-free broiler chicken to delegates attending its oneday conference ‘Building a Healthy Food Chain – Thanks to Algae,’ in Paris last month. The chicken, raised on algae-included feed rations and managed, processed and distributed by Olmix, was tasted by the 400-plus delegates attending the conference. While broiler and fish production differ widely, algae products are attempting to achieve similar levels of food safety in both livestock and aquaculture. Until now the benefits algae provides in terms of human nutrition and health have been largely associated with cultural and coastal communities and with those looking for dietary alternatives. In livestock and fish production algae has been considered a valuable ingredient in its own right for some time, but products have now been developed to help protect health, improve well-being and reduce the need for medicines and in particular antibiotics. Algae has not yet proven itself as a viable source of protein in meeting the growing demand from our food producing animals, particularly not in fish diets where the pressure is on to minimise the amount of fishmeal included in feeds. However, Paris may well prove a turning point in the way we consider algae inclusion in our food production system. “We are now ready to meet consumers’ expectations for a better life,” Olmix marketing director Daniéle Marzin told the delegates

48 | October 2015 - Milling and Grain

Oct 2015 - Milling and Grain magazine  
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