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DEVASAHAYAM O Tempora! O Mores! p32

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M Manimekalai, IFS,

Ambassador TO ROMANIA

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From the Editor

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vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012 Anil Tyagi | editor TR Ramachandran | executive editor Niranjan Desai | roving editor GS Sood | business editor Naresh Minocha | associate editor Bisheshwar Mishra | associate editor Neeraj Mahajan | associate editor B Harishchandra | associate editor (bengaluru) Venugopalan | bureau chief (bengaluru) Rakesh Bhardwaj | editorial consultant Col Sunil Narula | senior editor Kh Manglembi Devi | editorial coordinator Avantika Tyagi | reporter (trainee) Pawan Kumar | production coordinator Madan Bugalia | web master Sumer Singh | assistant manager, logistics Nipun Jain | finance Charanjit Kaur | hr Gautam Das | legal consultant Crossmedia Solutions | edit & design advertising & marketing 118, 2nd floor, dda site 1, new rajinder nagar, new delhi – 110 060 tel/fax: +91 11 2874 4789, +91 11 4508 2832, +91 99531 20281, +91 99111 10385, e-mail: adv@gfilesindia.com delhi: Ashna kalra— +91 9999413838 mumbai: Naresh Mordaani— +919920392797 Senior Vice-President, Sales & Marketing (All India) e-mail: naresh@gfilesindia.com 48/C-1, Areshwar, Mhada, S.V.P. Nagar, Andheri(W), Mumbai 400 053 bengaluru: 2210, 10b main road, 3 block, jayanagar, bengaluru 560 011 Venugopalan — +91 9845730298 Sanjay Jariwal— +91 9900239492

+All information in gfiles is obtained from sources that the management considers reliable, and is disseminated to readers without any responsibility on our part. Any opinions or views on any contemporary or past topics, issues or developments expressed by third parties, whether in abstract or in interviews, are not necessarily shared by us. Copyright exclusively with Sarvashrestha Media Pvt. Ltd. All rights reserved throughout the world. Reproduction of any material of this magazine in whole, or in part(s), in any manner, without prior permission, is totally prohibited. The publisher accepts no responsibility for any material lost or damaged in transit. The publisher reserves the right to refuse, withdraw or otherwise deal with any advertisement without explanation. All advertisements must

he Prime Ministers’ Excellence Awards 2012 on the 7th Civil Services Day saw two new faces on the dais with the Prime Minister — A K Seth, Cabinet Secretary, and Pulok Chatterjee, Principal Secretary to the Prime Minister. T K A Nair, Advisor to the Prime Minister and K M Chandrasekhar, former Cabinet Secretary, were sitting in the first row. Faces keep on changing in the government but the motto remains the same: performance with change. It is the system which delivers but officials remain the authoritative tools for good governance. ‘Perform or perish’ is the motto of any organisation that dreams to be big, but governments are not shaped in that mode. Security of job and career, spanning almost 38 years in an institution called government, gives one many options from the beginning itself: either make yourself so capable or result-oriented that one becomes indispensable to the system, or let the system force one to act, or one lets the situation take its own course the and organisation moves on in a default mode, irrespective of the results. Gfiles cover story on the ‘Civil Services Day Awards’ is an endeavour to appreciate the good work done by officials who have got the award and also those whose work has gone unnoticed by their big brothers sitting in South Block. Congratulations to Manmohan Singh who initiated the idea, but it will become redundant if the government doesn’t initiate action against non-performers. Inaction by the government will not only hamper the working environment but multiply its unsolved problems. Also in this issue, two experienced bureaucrats give a clarion call to those who are sleeping in the comfort of their job security. Former Cabinet Secretary Prabhat Kumar starts a dialogue with his fraternity with a word of caution: “Today, a civil servant is accused of not only being out of touch with the people but even being alien to them. He has ended up in a cul-de-sac of his own making.” The paradox of good governance can be understand from M G Devasahayam’s column where he says, “My objective is to run the organisation in an honest, efficient and vibrant manner. My Minister’s objective is to make money on purchases, transfers and protecting corrupt officials.” One feels proud of the vision of our founding fathers when the Standing Conference of Public Enterprises (SCOPE) awards are given to PSEs who excel not only in India but internationally. Gfiles covers the SCOPE awards in this issue to make the point that it is aware of all the good work and performance done in any sphere of the government. Undoubtedly, PSEs can perform much better if the chairmen, CEOs and controlling ministries stop using them as their personal fiefdoms. We should not let the government think that PSEs are just a bailout mechanism to mitigate the fiscal deficit. The expose by Naresh Minocha ‘Robbing the black gold’ is an eye opener and suggests that it may be the big daddy of all scams. Minocha writes, “Most of the coal block allottees (CBAs) have not mined even one gram of coal or invested anything. Even some public sector CBAs have not invested a single rupee and yet earned a fortune from the allocations. A majority of the CBAs have handed over the blocks to third parties called mined developer-cum-operator mine managers.” Do you think that a scam of such magnitude can happen without the tacit consent of those running the government? No way! It is a systematic failure, designed by politicians, greedy coal mafia and bureaucrats at the cost of robbing the nation of its natural resources.

comply with the Indian Advertisements Code. Published and printed by Anil Tyagi on behalf of Sarvashrestha Media Pvt. Ltd at Kala Jyothi Process Pvt Ltd. E-125, Site-B, Surajpur Ind. Area, Gautam Budh Nagar, Greater Noida-201306 U.P. (INDIA). All

Anil Tyagi editor@gfilesindia.com

disputes are subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of competent courts in New Delhi only

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CONTENTS 6 Bric-a-Brac

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LETTERS

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game players and game changers

cag overlooks details in coal scam

Traditionally equity has been used in Anglo Saxon jurisprudence through the Lord Chancellor to fill the gap. Both RTI and CPA should blaze the same trail and accommodate an equity approach. R Srinivasan on blog

22 Cover Story

Ruling over the army

STATESCAN MANMOHAN’S GAMEPLAN FOILED p23

10 Cover Story

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GOVERNANCE BABU RAJ OVER THE MILITARY? p26

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civil services day-celebrating excellence?

SPECIAL REPORT MINING IN MP: UNHOLY NEXUS p18

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16 Expose

pses with a vision

32 rooting out the corrupt

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EMPOWERING CONSUMERS

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36 ‘in-betweenity’ of civil servants

R.N.I. NO: DELENG/2007/19719

RAJIV AGARWAL, SECRETARY, CONSUMER AFFAIRS

38 Governance

are the elected truly representative?

42 Rapid Fire

dc north delhi opens up to gfiles

44 My Corner

redefining eligibility for key posts

46 First Stirrings

rm sethi’s maxims of life

48 Book Review bihar in the making

50 Silly Point

making the grade

51 Stock Doctor

look out for good deals

57 By the Way

making the most of a post

Cover Photograph: Fotos4india

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Consumer far from king ‘Consumer is king’- my foot! Right from the government, everybody is cheating and looting the consumers and the consumer courts are the worst culprits in cheating the consumers. The District Consumer Disputes Redressal Forum at Palakkad, Kerala holds sittings only for less than an hour everyday and disposes of only about one or two cases! More than 30 per cent of the cases are pending for more than three years! Taxpayers’ money is being totally wasted on these useless people. And even the odd case that is delivered in favour of the complainant can hardly be said to compensate for all the hardships caused by the forum itself! P M Ravindran on blog Laws like CPA can be best administered if they distinguish between two cases and bring an equity approach rather than mere law. There are cases where law can lead to reasonably just decisions, provided the loser is willing to accept the matter was fairly heard and abides by the verdict. Then there are cases where the law is seen by the loser to have failed -- an empty drumbeat -- due to the unjust formalism in law trumping over the unique circumstances of the case.

Devasahayam’s article titled ‘Are bureaucrats ‘controlling’ the military?’ is a timely and well articulated introspection. He has analysed the problems well. Solutions? How do you educate the political bosses and other national leaders about such “looming dooms”? All of us are aware of these impending perils! How do we leash these looters and sanitise the system? Any action plans or suggestions? R Sivasailam on blog The matter regarding the succession line being worked out, by manipulating the careers of some potential candidates by a Chief, seems very farfetched and a figment of one’s imagination. Should the writer be able to establish this by evidence and bring the name of the concerned Chief out in the open, the conjecture will be settled for once and all. The officer must then be publicly castigated and should go down in history as a sectarian and communal disgrace, who was a Chief. Brig S D Dangwal on blog

Breaking news Ref. your article ‘Well-oiled breaking news’ (gfiles March 2012), if you have the list, why not publish it in public interest? Why are you holding on to it? Sudipto Mondal on blog Disgusting, but not surprising. Those in journalism at least know the names of most of these racketeers here. But for that woman journalist. Wow! May your tribe grow. Savita on blog

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Bric-a-brac chairs & shares

Targeting big bucks ministers eye defence offsets

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oliticians seem to have a knack for smelling out the moolah! Seeing the big bucks in the defence offsets programme, several ministers have joined retired military and air force officers in strengthening the offset policy, so to speak. Gfiles has come to know that the scions of various interested defence officers flew to Russia,

France, Israel and the USA to discuss participation modalities with companies who have bagged orders or are likely to corner big deals. Under its defence procurement procedure, India imposes counter-trade obligations on original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) awarded defence contracts worth more than Rs  300 crore to transfer critical technologies and production of components to India. The revised (offsets) policy recognises transfer of technology (ToT) as eligible for discharge of offset obligations. The policy says, “The ToT should be provided without licence fee and there should be no restriction on domestic production, sale or export. The offset credit for ToT shall be of 10% of the value of buy-back by the OEM during the period of contract, to the extent of value addition in India.” So every arms supplier has to transfer technology and for that he needs local collaborators. Who better than politicians and retired army personnel! It also suits the supplier as he can make inroads into the Defence Ministry through retired officials and into the government through ministers. And, under the guise of the offset policy, it’s all legal – and big money.

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Business of laws

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he Law Ministry is in the limelight. Not surprising in an era of scams and scandals. After all, its job is to give legal opinion to all ministries on any and every issue. Naturally, even big business houses need to engage with the law ministry. Enjoying the limelight is Law Minister Salman Khurshid. But now Salman has invited trouble for himself. The President of the Legal Service Officers Association, Prabhakar Singh, who is a Joint Secretary in the ministry, is filing a petition in the CAT against the minister. The issue at hand is the manner in which a highly controversial officer NK Sharma was promoted to the rank of additional secretary by superseding six others. We all know the DOPT rules state that promotions can only be through two methods – either by seniority or going by the ACR. In this case, interviews were conducted by Salman Khurshid himself

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and Sharma was handpicked. It is learnt that Sharma is close to the younger brother of a prominent business house from Mumbai. It is no secret that the younger brother and Salman are good friends and the younger brother takes a great deal of interest in the postings of ministers and officials of the law ministry. There is also a buzz in the ministry that the senior brother also called on the minister recently as he wanted his candidate appointed as law secretary. Former Law Minister Veerapa Moily is going around telling the world that he was ousted from the Law Ministry under pressure from corporate lobbies. And ironically, Salman Khurshid was removed from the Corporate Affairs Ministry because he was seen as being too close to corporate lobbies by the Congress leadership.

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INSIDE EYE

illustrations: aruna

Lining up for Prez pranabda may opt out

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ndia will select the first citizen of the country in July. And, the heat and dust has begun. All the major political parties want a say in selecting the next resident of Rashtrapati Bhavan. If insiders are to be believed, the Congress has decided that there will be no elevation for the Vice-President and no repetition of past and present Presidents (read Kalam and Patil ). Mamata Banerjee too is reluctant to elevate Vice-President Hamid Ansari. This does clear the mists for the wannabees. Many new contenders have emerged in the last three months. Leading the race are NRI entrepreneur and Rahul Gandhi advisor Sam Pitroda, Mahatma Gandhi’s grandson and former West

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Bengal governor Gopal Gandhi, Infosys Chairman Emeritus NR Narayana Murthy, India’s self claimed reformer ex-President APJ Abdul Kalam, Congress stalwart Pranab Mukherjee, Lok Sabha Speaker Meira Kumar and former Madhya Pradesh chief minister Motilal Vora. There are one or two more names but they are not in the reckoning. Insiders inform that Pranabda will exit from the race by issuing a statement that he clearly cannot be spared from the Cabinet and the party needs him at this juncture. There’s also another aspect to the race for President. Some socalled political preachers are demanding that the President of India should be apolitical. The question we would like to ask them is: If the President, Vice-President and Prime Minister (at present all don’t face the electorate directly) are apolitical, then why should they build a political career at all? This does not sound politically correct!

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Party later, me first‌ gadkari ready to back modi

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osing weight has worked wonders for Nitin Gadkari. But the BJP President, albeit a little more active these days, is worried about gaining weight, political weight that is. Gadkari wants a second term as BJP President though he has not done anything great in the last two years. Given the large number of aspirants, he is wooing his party colleagues left, right and centre. But BJP insiders inform that Narendra Modi wants to position his trusted man as the next party chief. And he trusts very few in the party! Modi has targeted 2014 to emerge on the national scene but first he has to win the Gujarat assembly elections (to be held before January 17, 2013). Modi and his close advisors are of the view that the party president should be their man so that after the assembly elections, there can be a smooth transition to the national scene. Well aware of these plans, Nitin Gadkari is also playing his cards well and is believed to be even ready to declare Modi as the BJP candidate for Prime Ministership. He knows nobody can predict what will happen in 2014. It is not yet clear what the RSS headquarters at Nagpur is planning but they clearly don’t have much choice available to replace Modi or Gadkari.

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cover story civil services day

cover story civil services day

A govt that runs, but how? by Neeraj Mahajan

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s compared to a mini-skirt, which reveals more than it hides, Prime Minister Manmohan Singh’s speech on the 7th Civil Services Day was more like a sari – hiding more than it revealed. Besides Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, Former President APJ Abdul Kalam, leading civil servants such as cabinet secretary Ajit Seth and principal secretary to the Prime Minister, Pulok Chatterji, were present on the occasion at Vigyan Bhavan. Accepting the fact that there was a growing perception that the moral fibre of today’s public servants “who rank among the best in the world”, is not as strong as it used to be and that the present lot of civil servants are more likely to succumb to extraneous pressures, the Prime Minister said, “these perceptions might be exaggerated, but I do

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think that there is a grain of truth in them.” “Even as we celebrate our successes, we should also be honest in admitting our failures and our deficiencies. I would like to take today’s opportunity to flag some issues about the civil services which I believe agitate the public mind.” he said. “The decisions that civil servants take must be fair and objective in nature, based on sound evidence and deep analysis and designed to serve the best interests of our country. Their judgment and advice should not be affected by the nature and colour of the political leadership. If this does not happen, the impartiality and fairness of the decision-making processes in public administration would get compromised,” he added. According to the Prime Minister, “civil servants in our country should fight the tendency of not taking decisions

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Sometimes, how you run the government is more important than merely running it. This was the message that came out loud and clear during the 7th Civil Services Day. because of the fear that things might go wrong and they might be penalised for that... we should encourage boldness in decision making, provided that the decisions are well considered and as per the law of the land. A civil servant who does not take decisions might always be safe, but at the end of the day he or she would have contributed nothing to our society and to our country.” If the overall mood of the PM’s speech is any indication, the days of the cavalier “couldn’t care less” attitude are numbered. The true significance of the PM’s short and yet not-so-sweet speech lies in the fact that like a precisionguided missile, it drove home the point that civil servants and bureaucrats in India need to be more competent, more professional, and alive to the requirements of the 21st century to act as agents of social change and facilitate rapid socio-economic progress.

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Over the last few years, the government has been experiencing a ‘decision-making paralysis’ with many otherwise bright and capable bureaucrats deciding to ‘take it easy’ instead of taking a decision and making a mistake in the process. Invariably this would lead them into a political minefield where the beleaguered bureaucrat might get a wrap on his knuckles, even if the mistake is made by the minister. A case in point is that of ex-telecom secretary Shyamal Ghosh, where the file was reopened after nine years of his retirement. Increasing frequency of incidents like this started the trend of institutionalised corruption and running the government without taking any decisions. Significantly, the country’s chief economic advisor, Kaushik Basu, kicked up a political storm recently when he claimed that economic reforms have slowed down in India

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cover story civil services day

PM gives away the awards

and would remain so till the next general elections in 2014. Speaking at function at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, an eminent Washington-based thinktank, Basu said that relatively less important bills might go through Parliament. “As the chief economic adviser, I have often expressed opinions which are not necessarily that of the Ministry of Finance or of the Government of India. This is one of the strengths of India that it allows us to generate and discuss new ideas without the government having to first endorse them,” Basu said in his clarification.

A background paper prepared by the Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions Ministry noted that graft is prevalent at all levels of officialdom and focused on the unholy nexus between politicians and the top echelons of the bureaucracy.

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background paper prepared by the Union Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions for the occasion of Civil Services Day noted that graft is prevalent at all levels of officialdom and focused on the unholy nexus between politicians and the top echelons of the bureaucracy. “At senior levels, it (corruption) is usually a result of strong nexus between politicians and civil servants and, at lower levels, it is a result of poor systems and ill-defined public service levels,” it said. Going a step further, the paper observed: “Programmes and schemes have been made in the past to provide social security to the marginalised. However, the benefits have hardly reached these people because of rampant corruption.” According to the paper, bribery has become a common phenomenon in government departments to expedite the

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processing of any application. “The challenge lies in changing the mindset of civil servants. Over time, they have been led to believe that corruption is a part and parcel of the public administration process,” the paper read. Making a scathing comment at many of the civil servants who seem to have lagged behind in the technological domain, the paper said, “Most senior officers see technology as a black box and have a tendency to go around it, rather than trying to explore and embrace it. They must use

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it as an enabler for achieving greater efficiency.” To make the most of the occasion, the organisers also initiated a debate on the possibility of allowing lateral entry in the civil services. “It’s noticed that some civil servants with a time-bound career progress get lazy and lethargic, which in turn, damages the overall efficiency of Indian bureaucracy,” a concept note released on this year’s Civil Services Day stated. The 56-page long background paper, which formed the basis of the panel discussion, gave the example of United Kingdom where more than 30 per cent of vacancies at the top three levels of the civil services were openly advertised during the recent years. “It would also give opportunities to people who might have either missed the bus initially or might think of entering the civil service after acquiring expertise in a particular area,” the paper said. Speaking on the occasion, former President APJ Abdul Kalam was all praise for two former Cabinet Secretaries he had interacted with – C R Krishnaswami and Prabhat Kumar. “Mr Prabhat Kumar would be remembered for his unique action by not only the millions of internet users, but also the 100-billion-dollar IT industry which is growing at around 12 per cent per annum,” Dr Kalam said. How come a man like Dr Kalam, who has served as a technocrat, could think of just two praiseworthy people? Significantly, it was Dr Kalam who had identified corruption as one of the biggest challenges for India a few days back when he said, “the country’s political-bureaucratic-

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cover story civil services day

The true significance of the PM’s short and yet not-so-sweet speech lies in the fact that like a precision-guided missile, it drove home the point that civil servants and bureaucrats in India need to be more competent, more professional, and alive to the requirements of the 21st century. judicial system requires an urgent ‘chemotherapy’ to deal with a ‘cancer-like situation’ engulfing the country.” Both Manmohan Singh and Dr Kalam need to be complimented for expressing their heartfelt concerns? But the issue is who would follow his master’s voice? Who will bell the cat? And how? Later, Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singh gave away the ’Prime Minister’s Awards for Excellence in Public Administration’. Four such awards for outstanding initiatives were given away under individual, group and organisational categories.

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he award in the individual category was given to M Manimekalai, IFS, a former Indian Ambassador, for rendering selfless service to evacuate Indian nationals amidst civil war in Libya. In the group category, the award was given to Tripura and Jammu & Kashmir. Ms Saumya Gupta, district magistrate and collector, North Tripura district, Dr SN Choudhuri, district family welfare and district surveillance officer, Mr Amalendu Bhowmik,

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Programme Officer (ICDS), Kumarghat, and Pinaki Acharya, technical director and DIO, Ministry of IT and Communication, NIC, North Tripura district centre, received the award for an initiative called Village Health and Nutrition Day in Complete Convergence Mode, Tripura. Likewise Jammu and Kashmir bagged the Prime Minister’s Award for Excellence in Public Administration in the group category for successfully conducting the Panchayat elections in the State. The award was received by Chief Secretary Madhav Lal, DGP Kuldeep Khoda and Chief Electoral Officer and Home Secretary B R Sharma. Similarly, in the Organisation category, the Scientific Watershed Management project in Gujarat was awarded and Ram Kumar, Chief Conservator of Forests, Gujarat, received the award. The award includes a medal, scroll and a cash amount of Rs 1 lakh. In case of a group, the total award money is Rs 5 lakh, subject to a maximum of Rs 1 lakh per person. For an organisation, the amount is limited to Rs 5 lakh. All officers of the central and state governments individually, or as group, or as an organisation, are eligible under this scheme of awards. However, if recognition of merit is the objective of such awards, we really need to sit back and think whether these awards are representative enough to celebrate the merit of 6.4 million civil servants in India, and motivate them. Can just four awards do the job? It’s fine for the handful that got the award, but what about the unsung hero(in)es who continue to serve with a smile without even a pat on their back? Do they not deserve an award? g

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EXPOSE coal scam

Robbing the Black Gold The CAG report on discretionary allotment of coal blocks only touches the tip of the scandal, and could well turn out to be the ‘mother of all scams’ by Naresh Minocha

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he Comptroller & Auditor General’s draft performance audit on discretionary allocation of coal blocks, identifying windfall benefits reaped by allottees, has evoked extreme reactions from its critics. A high-profile economist, for instance, dubbed the CAG findings as “outlandish” under a column headlined ‘Where donkeys fly’ published in The Indian Express. Similarly, Coal Minister Sriprakash Jaiswal rubbished CAG contentions, including its recommendations for auction of coal blocks as “baseless” and “illogical”. Both these eminent persons apparently did not do their home work before targeting the CAG. They should eat their words after reading this write-up. The fact is that the CAG has barely scratched the surface of the coal blocks’ allocation scam! Its 110-page draft report made public by The Times of India does not mention certain crucial elements of the scam. The CAG ought to delve deeper into the scam before finalising its report. And once it does so, it would end up concluding that captive coal mining (CCM) is a sham. It is a bogey that has caused huge loss to the state exchequer and has brought windfall benefits to the coal block allottees (CBAs) and their associates. It has legitimised crony capitalism and epitomised reforms paralysis. Most of the CBAs have not mined even one gram of coal. Many of them have invested peanuts in the allotted blocks. Some public sector CBAs have not even invested a single rupee and yet earned a fortune from the allocations. A majority of the CBAs have merely acted as landlords. They have handed over the blocks to third parties called mine developer-cum-operator (MDO)/mine managers.

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The prime contributors to the phased dilution of the 1993 CCM policy includes legal luminaries and now senior Cabinet Ministers like P Chidambaram and Kapil Sibal, whose legal opinion in 1994 was endorsed by the Attorney General in 1996, ultimately resulting in substantial relaxation of CCM guidelines (Box: Captive Coal Mining diluted to the core). By opting for MDOs and other investors, the CBAs harvested windfall benefits in the form of cashless /sweat equity not only through joint ventures (JVs) but also through downstream power JVs. A few CBAs articulated their rights over waste from coal washeries linked to their coal blocks. And they are now monetising these rights as facilitation fee per tonne of washery reject and/or as cashless equity in washery rejects-based power plants! Certain CBAs have also secured from MDOs or from JVs one-time upfront fees and facilitation fee per tonne of coal mined over the entire lifespan of the block. Other CBAs have either secured or asked for commitment from MDOs to supply coal at steep discounts (more than 42 per cent in one case) to the market price. Others have secured access to cheap or free power to be produced from such coal. The CBAs have indeed opened a cornucopia of assured benefits. They have also limited their investments or exposure to 26 per cent equity investment in mining JVs. The information about this sea of wealth is littered in tender documents, testimonials, brochures and press releases issued over several years. And, yet such benefits find no mention in the CAG report. The CAG should collate data on all such and similar benefits reaped and proposed to be reaped by CBAs. Their aggregation in a tabular form will give a broad pic-

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aruna

ture about the bonanza reaped by CBAs. This exercise will also give the public a rough idea of the presumptive revenue loss to the states.

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he CAG has relied on just one norm for calculating a windfall gain of Rs 6.31 lakh crore to allottees over the entire span of the mining period (which may vary from 10-30 years, depending on the size of the reserve and the yearly extraction). The CAG has reckoned

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the windfall in two steps. It first calculated the difference between the sale price of coal and cost of production in CBAs’ mines. It later multiplied the price difference with discounted coal reserves of CBAs. This windfall gain covers both captive CBAs and Central and state PSUs that were separately allotted coal blocks. The CAG excluded coal blocks allotted to developers of ultra mega power projects (UMPPs) from this calculation as they bagged UMPPs through electricity tariff-based

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EXPOSE coal scam

bidding. The assumption here is that the lowest tariff quoted by successful bidder factors in the advantage of captive mining. The Coal Ministry has so far allocated 216 coal blocks, with geological reserves of about 50 billion tonnes since June 1993. Out of these, 24 allocations have been cancelled. There have been several litigations over allocations as well as cancellations. A few critics and analysts have mistaken the CAG’s windfall calculation as revenue loss to the exchequer. The CAG has neither considered nor valued other benefits, such as cashless equity reaped by CBAs and profits to be earned by MDOs. The CAG has also not estimated the presumptive and actual revenue loss to the states. It is an extremely difficult task and yet worth trying. No two coal blocks are identical, unlike the radio-spectrum of the 2G scam fame. The value of a coal block depends on

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hus, the CAG should have relied on timelines specified in CBA guidelines to compute the loss of royalty or dead rent due to the inordinate delay in the development of blocks. The reasons for delays are many. These include availability of domestic coal at cheap prices even after decontrol of coal prices in January 2000. As domestic and global coal prices soared, and the demand for blocks turned into a scramble, it dawned on the CBAs that they were sitting on a jackpot. This was corroborated by subsequent MDO deals or tendering competitions arranged by CBAs for their respective blocks. Had the blocks been auctioned, the states and not the CBAs would have collected facilitation fee per tonne of coal, similar to the revenue-sharing arrangement in the telecom services sector, apart from existing royalty. They could have also asked for upfront, one-time licence fee from bidders. Such fee would certainly be realisable in the case of fully explored blocks having prime grades of coal. The CAG could have averaged different rates of facilitation fee per tonne of coal negotiated by the CBAs with the MDOs. It should have then multiplied the average fee with total reserves of allotted coal blocks to arrive at the gross revenue foregone by the states due to the Centre’s feet-dragging over auctions. Different percentages of cashless equity or sweat equity, ranging from 26 per cent to 51 per cent that CBAs have secured in mining JVs should be roughly valued to give

photo: himanshu joshi

Some have mistaken the CAG’s windfall calculation as revenue loss to the exchequer. The CAG has neither considered nor valued other benefits, such as cashless equity reaped by CBAs and profits to be earned by MDOs. The CAG has also not estimated the presumptive and actual revenue loss to the states.

factors such as geology, reserves, mining techniques, size of reserve, its location and the quality or grade of coal.

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Captive Coal Mining diluted to the core

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aptive coal mining (CCM) by power, steel and cement companies under guidelines announced in June 1993 is a misnomer. The dilution of the CCM concept virtually coincided with the start of coal block allocations. One of the coal block allottees (CBAs), Nippon Denro Isplat Ltd (NDIL) of the Ispat group sought relaxation of the guidelines as two foreign investors in its 1082 MW power project at Umred in Maharashtra were not interested in making investments in coal mining. The company had floated another company, Central India Power Company Ltd (CIPCO), to set up the power project. NDIL had then suggested that the group should be allowed to float a new company, Central India Coal Company Limited (CICCO), to develop its three allotted coal blocks. Official records show that NDIL forwarded to the Coal Ministry the legal opinion of senior Supreme Court advocates, Kapil Sibal, P Chidambaram, K K Venugopal, R F Nariman and G Ramaswamy, through a series of letter submitted during AugustSeptember 1994 in support of its request. An official note says: “all the legal experts were unanimous in their opinion that a suitable Gazette Notification issued by the Central Government under Section 3(3) (a) (iii) (4) of the Coal Mines Nationalisation Act

declaring that the supply of coal mined from the captive block by the coal company to the power company for the exclusive use of the latter will be the end-use for the purpose of this Act.” The Coal Ministry later referred this legal opinion to the then Attorney General who concurred with this opinion. Later, NDIL submitted a proposal to form a holding company for the power and coal mining companies, CIPCO and CICCO. It proposed that the holding company, Ispat Urja Ltd, would hold 26 per cent stake in each of these two companies. Foreseeing the possibility of receipt of similar applications, the Coal Ministry that took a first shot at the dilution of CPP guidelines by issuing a gazette notification on March 27, 1996. The CPP guidelines incorporated a special dispensation to provide for setting up of associated coal companies by coal block allottees. The guidelines say:

the public an idea of a second set of presumptive loss to the states. A similar exercise needs to be done for the sweat equity of 11-26 per cent that CBAs have sought in the washery rejects-based power JVs. The allocation of coal blocks to state-owned PSUs under the Government Dispensation Route (GDR) has turned out to be a backdoor for private energy companies in non-captive coal mining, a business that has remained a non-starter since 1997 for want of amendments to the Coal Mines (Nationalisation) Act, 1997! It is a backdoor entry because such PSUs are allowed to

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“a company engaged in any of the approved end-uses can mine coal from a captive block through an associated coal company formed with the sole objective of mining coal and supplying the coal on exclusive basis from the captive coal block to the end-user company, provided the end-user company has at least 26 per cent equity ownership in the associated coal company at all times.” The guidelines also provide for a holding company that can invest in the end-user company and in the associated coal mining company. The guidelines say: “There can be a holding company with two subsidiaries, i.e., a company engaged in any of the approved end-uses and an associated coal company formed with the sole objective of mining coal and supplying the coal on exclusive basis from the captive coal block to the end-user company, provided the holding company has at least 26 per cent equity ownership in both the end-user company and the associated coal company.” A few years later the guidelines were further diluted. The liberalised guidelines enable a CBA to mine coal through a mining company for getting exclusive coal supplies, provided the CBA or the end-user company has a firm tie up with the mining company for supply of coal, supported by a legally binding and enforceable contract /agreement.

sell fuel to any customer. And, PSUs have shared this business opportunity with private MDOs by forming JVs with them, giving them control of such blocks. And in most cases, the PSUs have not invested anything from their own pocket! In fact, some state PSUs had the audacity to invite expression of interest (EOIs) for joint venture participation and grant of sweat equity, etc., even before they applied for coal blocks. And such EOI invitations attracted a fairly good response. Ironically, competitive bidding-based selection of MDOs serves as a compelling rationale for auction of coal

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EXPOSE special

PIB

coal scam

Most of the coal block allottees have not mined even one gram of coal or invested anything. Even some public sector CBAs have not invested a single rupee and yet earned a fortune from the allocations. A majority of the CBAs have merely acted as landlords. They have handed over the blocks to third parties called mine developer-cum-operator (MDO)/mine managers. blocks. If bidding can open jackpots for CBAs, why should states not reap a windfall by forcing the Centre to resort to auctioning? All this analysis should convince CAG critics that the Centre has deprived the states of an opportunity to earn additional revenue since February 1997, when the Union Cabinet decided to auction coal blocks. Unfortunately, the CAG report has erred in listing this and other milestones in coal reforms. The report says: “Audit observed that in 2004, the concept of allotment through competitive bidding was first made public on June 28, 2004.” It appears the Coal Ministry has not given all the documents on this matter to the CAG. In any case, the CAG could have found facts on the proposed auction of coal blocks from the Lok Sabha and Rajya Sabha websites.

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Answering a question in Rajya Sabha on March 10, 1997, the then Minister of State for Coal, Mrs. Kanti Singh, stated: “The Government have, subject to legislative changes, decided to offer new coal blocks to Indian companies, including public sector companies, on the basis of competitive bidding. The rules and regulations for such bidding are under consideration in consultation with the Ministries of Mines and Law.” The Government arrived at this decision on the basis of recommendations made by the Committee on Integrated Coal Policy (CICP) in May 1996. This recommendation was echoed by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Energy in its report on Coal Mines (Nationalisation) Amendment Bill 2000 submitted in August 2001. Taking note of the industry’s demand for transparency in coal blocks allocations, the House panel recommended that this job, including auctions of blocks, should be done under the supervision of an independent regulator. Subsequently, several entities either recommended auction or need for transparency and objectivity in allocations. Instances include reports of the Expenditure Commission and the consultants that prepared the roadmap for coal reforms under a World Bank project in 2000. These milestones do not find a place in the CAG report. Another crucial fact fotos4india absent in the CAG report is ‘The Coal and Lignite (Regulation & Development) Act’. The Government drafted this bill in the late nineties to constitute an independent coal regulator but it never introduced this bill in Parliament. Another fact overlooked by the CAG is that the Government has been playing around with different versions of the draft for the tendering competition over the last seven years! One draft tender document prepared in 2005 says: “The bidder(s) shall quote ‘production linked payment (PLP)’ as percentage of production year-wise and grade-wise to be shared with Government for the entire mine life.” Such payment is the same as the facilitation fee being mopped up by CBAs from MDOs. For the truth about why the Coal Ministry delayed the take-off of coal blocks auction and allowed discretionary allotment requires a high-level probe. g

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cover story public sector day

First among equals The SCOPE Awards given away by the President of India saw several Navratnas bag the spotlight as award-winning PSEs in different categories. by Ravindra Dubey

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he Department of Public Enterprises and Standing Conference of Public Enterprises (SCOPE) jointly organised the function on April 13. The President of India, Pratibha Devisingh Patil, presented the awards. Oil and Natural Gas Commission (ONGC) was presented the SCOPE meritorious award for Environmental Excellence and Sustainable Development for 2010-11. The SCOPE Gold trophy also went to this enterprise along with the Steel Authority of India Ltd for Corporate Governance. The National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) and Tehri Dam and Hydro Electric Project (THDC) won the award for Corporate Social Responsibility, Indian Oil and Bharat Electronics Ltd (BEL) for R&D,

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Technology Development, Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd (BHEL) for best practices in Human Resource Management, Power Finance Corporation (PFC) for best managed bank and financial institution and National Scheduled Castes Finance & Development Corporation (NSFDC) for best managed PSE set-up under Section 25. Commendation certificates were given to the Gas Authority of India Ltd (GAIL) for Corporate Governance, Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) for Corporate Social Responsibility and Responsiveness, Engineers India Ltd (EIL) for Human Resource Management and National Backward Classes Finance and Development Corporation (NBCFDC) for Best-Managed Bank, Financial Institution or Insurance Company under Section 25.

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SCOPE AWARD

Oil and Natural Gas Corporation

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sia’s leading financial publication, Finance Asia, lists the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) as top among Indian blue chip companies. In accordance with 100-year-old energy market information service, Platts of the US, it is the world’s third biggest oil and gas exploration and production company. Platts also placed it 123rd in the Platts top 250 Global Energy Company Rankings last year. ONGC stood at number 155 in Forbes magazine’s list of world’s largest companies last year. With a net worth of Rs 864 billion, it posted a profit of nearly Rs 168 billion last year. ONGC is the only fully-integrated petroleum company in India, operating along the entire hydrocarbon value chain. It holds the largest share of hydrocarbon acreage in India, producing near 80 per cent the country’s oil and gas. It owns and operates more than 22,000 km of pipelines in India and participates in 40 projects in 15 countries.

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Sudhir Vasudeva Chairman and Managing Director, ONGC Category: Environmental Excellence and Sustainable Development

Sudhir Vasudeva, the Chairman and Managing Director of Oil and Natural Gas Corp Ltd. serves as its Head of offshore oil and gas fields. He served as Director of Offshore since February 2009. Joining ONGC as an Executive Trainee in 1976, Vasudeva steadily worked his way up with majority of his assignments in offshore oil-fields. He has diverse and rich experience of more than three decades in various fields, majority being in offshore oil-fields. He was President of Mumbai arm of Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE). He also steered the Offshore Joint Venture segment of ONGC’s Operations and tried to improve recovery from ageing Mumbai High fields.

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Steel Authority of India Ltd. (SAIL)

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AIL, the country’s leading steel-making company, is a fully integrated iron and steel maker, producing basic and special steels for the domestic construction, engineering, power, railway, automotive and defence industries for sales abroad. SAIL is also among the four Maharatna Central PSEs. SAIL has achieved landmarks in corporate governance as it has the required number of independent directors on its board. Besides, inter alia, it constituted an Audit Committee of the Board, long before SEBI made it mandatory. It has also constituted a shareholders/investors grievance committee, prepared a code of conduct for board members and the senior management personnel, framed an Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) policy and the board meetings are held regularly.

SCOPE AWARD

Arup Roy Choudhury Chairman and Managing Director, NTPC

Category: Corporate Social Responsibility & Responsiveness

Arup Roy Choudhury is a civil engineer from BIT, Mesra, Ranchi, with a post-graduate degree in management from IIT. He was earlier head of the National Buildings Construction Corporation (NBCC). He was the youngest Chief Executive Officer of a Central PSU when he joined NBCC at the age of 44 in April 2001 as CMD. He has undertaken a number of initiatives to further strengthen NTPC. Under him, it has achieved its highest ever new capacity addition of 2490 MW in one year (2010-2011). He has been unanimously elected Chairman of Standing Conference of Public Enterprises (SCOPE) for a consecutive second term from April 1 last year.

SCOPE AWARD

Chandra Shekhar Verma Chairman and Managing Director, SAIL Category: Corporate Governance

Chandra Shekhar Verma took charge of SAIL in June 2010. Before this, he was Director (Finance) with BHEL. As he has stated himself, his first priority was to get SAIL to produce more value-added products so as to fulfil the power sector requirements. Currently, SAIL sells 7 per cent of its steel to BHEL and Verma is trying hard to get BHEL to increase its purchases from SAIL. Besides, he is also looking at acquisition opportunities abroad, especially for raw material assets.

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National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)

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et up in 1975, NTPC is India’s largest power generating company with an installed capacity of 34194 MW through 15 coal-based, seven gas-based and six joint venture power stations. It has been ranked as Asia’s no. 1 and the world’s no. 2 independent power producer in the Platts top 250 Global energy company ranking. Besides, it has undertaken many community development activities in the fields of education, health, capacity building, women empowerment, development of infrastructure, support for physically challenged persons and support during natural calamities.

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Tehri Hydro Development Corporation India Limited (THDCIL)

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HDCIL, a joint venture corporation between the Government of India and Government of Uttar Pradesh, was incorporated as limited company under the Companies Act 1956, in July 1988, to develop, operate and maintain the Tehri Hydro Power Complex and other hydro projects. The works were handed over to THDCIL in June 1989. Equity is being shared by Government of India and Government of Uttar Pradesh in the ratio of 75:25.The Corporation has an authorised share capital of Rs 4,000 crore. The business of THDCIL is in remote hilly areas where there is acute poverty. It is engaged in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) activities in education, environment management, healthcare, income generation, women empowerment, infrastructure development, welfare activities and water conservation.

SCOPE AWARD

R S T Sai Chairman and Managing Director, THDCIL

Category: Corporate Social Responsibility & Responsiveness R S T Sai took over as Chairman & Managing Director of Tehri Hydro Development Corporation Ltd (THDCIL) on March 8, 2007. Prior to this, he was Director (Finance) in the company since May 2005. An electrical engineer, Sai is a fellow of Institution of Engineers. He has done management diploma from IIM, Bangalore, and law from Delhi University. Sai has 33 years of experience in banking, finance, commercial, EPC contracting and contract management. He has developed transparent tender documentation for evaluation of suppliers’ credit and also introduced innovation of bonus for early project completion in Delhi Metro. Before THDCIL, Sai worked in SBI, NTPC, Powergrid and Delhi Metro.

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SCOPE AWARD

RS Butola Chairman and Managing Director, Indian Oil

Category: R & D, Technology Development and Innovation Before joining Indian Oil, RS Butola was MD of ONGC Videsh Ltd (OVL). Under him, OVL built a formidable E&P portfolio, comprising both discovered and producing assets in over 15 countries. Out of 30 years of professional life, he spent 20 in the hydrocarbon industry. He was also responsible for evaluating Mumbai High Redevelopment Scheme and implementation of ONGC’s first ERP. As the first Chief (Commercial) of ONGC, he negotiated and executed the first crude oil sales agreement with the refineries upon dismantling of the administered pricing regime. He holds an MBA from the Faculty of Management Studies, New Delhi, and is a certified Associate of Indian Institute of Bankers.

Indian Oil Corporation Ltd.

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ndane, the most popular product of Indian Oil, is today one of the largest packed LPG brands in the world. Having launched LPG marketing the mid-sixties, Indian Oil is credited with bringing about a ‘kitchen revolution’. It has led to substantial improvements in the health of women, especially in rural areas, by replacing the smoky chulha. Awarded in the category of Research and Development, the company today has India’s foremost centre of excellence in the areas of lubricant and refinery technologies, fuel additives, engine-testing, material and environmental sciences, pipeline transportation, biotechnology and alternative fuels.

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cover story public sector day

Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL)

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he Ministry of Defence established BEL in Bengaluru in 1954 to meet the specialised electronic needs of the Indian Defence Services. It developed into a multi-product, multi-technology, multi-unit company serving the needs of clients in India and abroad. A wide spectrum connects the services offered by BEL, be it radars, military communications, naval and electronic warfare systems, telecommunications, sound and vision broadcasting, opto-electronics, tank electronics, solar photovoltaic systems, embedded software and electronic components. BEL has diversified in civil areas, including electronic voting machines, solar power LED-based traffic signal lights, simputers and set-top boxes. However, defence remains its prime focus. It also offers contract-manufacturing services for both domestic and international customers.

SCOPE AWARD

B Prasada Rao Chairman and Managing Director, BHEL

Category: Best Practices in Human Resource Management B Prasada Rao took over at a crucial time when BHEL was building capability to help meet the country’s power forecast for the eleventh plan and beyond. A mechanical engineering graduate from Jawaharlal Nehru University, Kakinada, Andhra Pradesh, and a post-graduate in industrial engineering from NITIE, Mumbai, he has 30 plus years of diversified, versatile and varied experience of working in strategic and operational areas in all major segments of BHEL, ranging from concept to commissioning activities. As the head of industrial systems and products business, he enhanced the business growth in the industry sector to an unprecedented level and marked a number of first-ever achievements in all the eight business segments.

SCOPE AWARD

Anil Kumar Chairman and Managing Director, BEL

Category: R&D, Technology Development and Innovation Anil Kumar joined BEL at its Ghaziabad Unit in February 1975 after graduating in Mechanical Engineering from Punjab University in 1974. He completed M Tech from IIT Delhi in 1979 while in service. He has extensive experience in development & engineering, production, material management and installing and commissioning of radar and communication systems. He served as Chief Regional Manager at BEL’s New York Regional Office for two years. He has visited Russia, Poland, Belgium and France in connection with technology transfers and project work. Anil Kumar was earlier Director (Other Units) of BEL.

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Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited (BHEL)

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et up in November 1964, BHEL is the largest engineering and manufacturing enterprise in the energy and infrastructure related sectors. It has an excellent track record of performance, earning profit since 1971 and paying dividends since 1976. Commercialisation of products and systems developed by way of in-house research and development contributed around 18 per cent to the company’s turnover of Rs 4,34,510 million in 2010-11. With an R&D spend at over 2.3 per cent of its turnover, BHEL is the highest spender on R&D in India for its kind of industry.

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Power Finance Corporation Limited

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stablished in 1986, Power Finance Corporation (PFC) Limited is India’s leading financial institution that provides a comprehensive range of financial products such as long-term loans for power generation, transmission, distribution and R&M projects, short-term loans, buyer’s line of credit, debt refinancing schemes as well as non-fund based services like default payment guarantees and letters of comfort. It also produces various fee-based technical advisory and consultancy services in the power sector.

SCOPE AWARD

SCOPE AWARD

Satnam Singh Chairman and Managing Director, PFC

Category: Best Managed Bank, Financial Institution and Insurance Company A graduate in commerce and an MBA in finance, Satnam Singh held the position of Director (F&FO) of PFC. He also handled various responsibilities including business development, loan disbursement and financial and legal operations. He was also instrumental in successful completion of IPO in February 2007 with over-subscription of 76 times, an all-time high for a public sector company. He has over 28 years of experience in the power and financial sectors, including NTPC and SJVNL. He assumed board level position in PFC as Director (F&FO) at the age of 47 and led the company on a profitable growth track resulting in consistent dividend payment to its shareholders. His other assignments include representing PFC on the Board of PTC, Chairman of Coastal Andhra Power Limited (Krishnampattna UMPP) and Chairman of Jharkhand Integrated Power Limited (Tilaiya UMPP).

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Hardip Singh Kingra Chairman and Managing Director, NSFDC

Category: Best Managed PSE set up under Section 25 Hardip Singh Kingra, an IFS officer of 1980 batch of Himachal Pradesh cadre, took over as CMD, NSFDC, under the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment.

National Scheduled Castes Finance & Development Corporation

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et up in February 1989, National Scheduled Castes Finance & Development Corporation (NSFDC) was bifurcated in 2001 into two separate corporations -- one each for Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes. The objectives of NSFDC are to economically empower Scheduled Caste persons living below Double the Poverty Line (DPL) by providing concessional financial assistance for income generating activities, developing and upgrading their technical and entrepreneurial skills and assisting them in making avenues.

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Gas Authority of India Limited (GAIL)

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AIL is India’s flagship Public Sector Enterprise in the natural gas value chain. Started as a single project company 27 years back, GAIL has grown to a turnover of around Rs 32,500 crore. Corporate Governance, for which the company has been awarded the commendation certificate, has been strengthened by formulising and adopting the code of conduct for directors and senior management personnel, code of conduct for prevention of insider trading, policy on risk assessment and minimising procedures, etc.

SCOPE AWARD

S Roy Choudhury Chairman and Managing Director, HPCL

Category: Corporate Social Responsibility and Responsiveness

SCOPE AWARD

B C Tripathi Chairman and Managing Director, GAIL Category: Corporate Governance

A mechanical engineering graduate from NIT Allahabad, B C Tripathi started his career in Oil and Natural Gas Corporation and subsequently joined Gas Authority of India Limited (now GAIL India Limited) in 1984 when the gas industry in India was at its infancy. He is one of the founder employees of GAIL and has worked under different capacities in different departments. He successfully executed several prestigious projects of GAIL, from the HVJ to the recently concluded Dahej-Dabhol Pipeline. He was the project manager for GAIL’s prestigious Dahej-Vijaipur Pipeline project, which received Silver Medal for Excellence in project Management in the Mega Project Category from International Project Management Association, Germany.

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S Roy Choudhary took charge on August 2010. Prior to this, he was Director Marketing from May 2004 to July 2010. He is a mechanical engineer from the University of Assam and started his career with Assam Oil company, Digboi. He joined HPCL in June 1982 as a construction engineer. In these 29 years, he has worked in the refinery, marketing (operations) and projects and sales divisions as General Manager (Supply, Operations and Distribution), General Manager (Pipelines), General Manager (Sales), West Zone, and Executive Director (Direct Sales).

Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL)

A

Fortune 500 company, Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Limited (HPCL) is a company with 20 per cent market share and a strong network. It owns and operates the largest lube refinery accounting for over 40 per cent of India’s total Lube base oil production, in addition to fuels refinery at Mumbai and Vishakhapatnam. The corporation’s turnover increased by 22 per cent to Rs 1,32,670 crore in 2010-11.

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Engineers India Limited

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IL is a total solutions consultancy company and EPC contractor in the fields of petroleum refining, petrochemicals, pipelines, oil & gas terminal and storages, mining and metallurgy, and infrastructure projects. The company has diversified into newer areas such as nuclear, solar and thermal power, water and solid waste management, city gas distribution and fertilisers. Engineers India Limited (EIL) was set up in 1965 to provide engineering and related technical services for petroleum refineries and other industrial projects. EIL is working under the administrative control of Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MoP&NG), Government of India. In addition to petroleum refineries, with which EIL started initially, over the years it has diversified into and excelled in various other fields

Ratan Tata conferred Japanese Award

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n April 29, 2012, His Majesty The Emperor of Japan honoured Ratan N Tata, Chairman of theTata Group, with The Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun, in recognition of his outstanding contribution to strengthening and developing the economic relations between Japan and India. The ceremony for conferment will be held in Tokyo on May 8, 2012 at the Imperial Palace, when Ratan Tata will be conferred the decoration and will be given an audience with His Majesty The Emperor of Japan.

uni

SCOPE AWARD

A K Purwaha Chairman and Managing Director, EIL

Category: Best Practices in Human Resource Management.

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uni

An electrical engineer from Delhi University, A K Purwaha has more than 35 years of extensive experience in oil and gas sector. He started his career with ONGC in 1977, almost at the inception of Bombay High in drilling business group. In 1985, he joined GAIL (India) Limited and served the company in various disciplines like cross-country pipelines for gas distribution, operation and maintenance of gas pipeline systems and project management for gasbased LPG recovery plants. He also functioned as Managing Director of Mahanagar Gas Limited from 2001 to 2006. In 2006, he became Director (Business Development), GAIL (India) Ltd., and in October 2009, he took over as Chairman & Managing Director, Engineers India Limited (EIL).

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We light up more than cities

Enlightenment through education. That’s our mission in all communities we belong in. In the communities around our 29 power stations, NTPC puts a lot of funding and energy into education. We adopt schools. Promote rural sports and cultural activities. Run Adult Education Centres. Focus intensely on educating girls. Provide education aids and equipment and sponsorship and more…to bring light into the darkness of underprivileged minds. After all, there’s more to NTPC power than street lights and industry and transportation and mechanization. 48000 students educated every year in the schools run and promoted by NTPC. There’s the quality of living…and learning. 37014 MW I 29 power stations I Ranked 341st in Forbes Global 500 I Over 25000 employees NTPC Limited, NTPC Bhawan, SCOPE Complex, 7 Institutional Area, Lodhi Road, New Delhi-110003. www.ntpc.co.in

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cover story

corruption m g devasahayam

Civil Services: O Tempora! O Mores! Today, the objectives of civil servants and their political masters have seamlessly coalesced, with the former awaiting ‘orders from above’ on almost everything

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N the mid-fifties, Management Guru Peter Drucker advocated ‘Management by Objectives (MoB)’, a system that seeks to align employees’ goals with the goals of the organisation. This ensures that everyone is clear about what they should be doing and how that is beneficial to the whole organisation. Nowadays, any American idea is instantly gulped up. But this concept took time and became a rage only in the early eighties. As the then chief of Haryana’s State Transport Undertaking, I attended a World Bank training course at the Administrative Staff College of India (ASCI) for senior Government and PSU officials. A professor from one of the Ivy League universities in the US gave a two-hour lecture on MoB. Balwant Reddy, ASCI’s officiating Director, was present. During question-time, I remained silent, but Balwant goaded me. So I queried: “Government is a combination of employees (civil servants) and non-employees (Ministers). On whose objectives should an organisation be managed?” The Professor was baffled and could not understand the question. So I elaborated: “I am the Chief

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Executive of Haryana Roadways and my objective is to run the organisation in an honest, efficient and viable manner. My Minister’s objective is to make money on purchases, transfers and protecting corrupt elements. The Chief Minister wants big deals. Now, by whose objective should Haryana Roadways be managed?” The Professor acknowledged the mismatch of objectives, but did not give an answer. Things have changed and it looks as if objectives of civil servants and their political masters have seamlessly coalesced. The 2G Spectrum scandal commenced when a senior civil servant solicited the job of Telecommunication Secretary promising complete compliance. Senior civil servants in the Commonwealth Games Secretariat and the Prime Minister’s Office not only allowed rogue politicians to run amuck, but also took part in the loot. The Adarsh Housing scam highlights the unholy nexus between the political class and the bureaucracy in Maharashtra. The fodder scam in Bihar, National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) fraud in Uttar Pradesh, mining scams in Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh, and the forestry scam in Haryana all point

In 2011 alone, the government gave its nod to chargesheet IAS officers in 15 corruption cases. In the Adarsh building scam, the CBI arrested senior IAS officers, some of whom were beneficiaries. There are many more examples! www.gfilesindia.com


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reuters

years

Are bureaucrats becoming too political?

to strong politician-civil servant nexus. In Tamil Nadu, some hardcore bureaucrats coach and guide newlyappointed Ministers on ways to loot the exchequer! Let us come to specifics. In 2011 alone, the government gave its nod to chargesheet IAS officers in 15 corruption cases. In the Adarsh scam, the CBI arrested senior IAS officers, some of whom were beneficiaries, for their complicity and conspiracy. Senior IAS Officers in Uttar Pradesh have been arrested and chargesheeted for alleged irregularities in utilisation of NRHM funds. Haryana’s multi-crore forestry scam is likely to hit the headlines soon and several IAS officers are involved in it

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along with ministers and MLAs. In Andhra Pradesh, two senior IAS officers were arrested in the case related to illegal iron ore mining as well as the APIIC-EMAAR real estate fraud.

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he Enforcement Directorate has attached property worth Rs 350 crore belonging to suspended Madhya Pradesh IAS officers Arvind and Tinu Joshi. Officers of Uttar Pradesh, Jharkand and Orissa cadres have been chargesheeted and arrested by the CBI for allegedly possessing disproportionate assets worth several crore. The 1971-batch Neera Yadav is the first Chief Secretary of Uttar Pradesh to be jailed for corruption. Prasar

Bharati CEO BS Lalli and DirectorGeneral Aruna Sharma were sacked, and the CBI registered cases against them for colluding with the UK-based broadcast firm SIS LIVE that resulted in a loss of Rs.135 crore. Ravi Inder Singh, an IAS officer in the Home Ministry, was arrested and jailed for passing on sensitive information to business houses in exchange for cash and sexual favours. Such a long ‘rogue gallery’, however, did not impress a retired IAS officer, who had served as the vigilance and anti-corruption watchdog: “Most of these are small fries. The big fish and crocodiles continue to swim and swallow with abandon. Nobody touches them because they are in

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corruption m g devasahayam innovative joint ventures with politico-business looters.” Yet, most starry eyed teenagers topping in secondary school examinations dream of entering the IAS and ‘transform the country’, and successful youngsters joining the service eagerly look forward to ‘serving the people’. Happily, hope is still alive! Way back in 1984, eminent jurist Nani Palkhiwala wrote these words: ‘The picture that emerges is that of a great country in a state of moral decay. The immediate future seems to belong to the doomsayers rather than to cheer-mongers. We suffer from a fatty degeneration of conscience, and the malady seems to be not only persistent but prone to aggravation. The lifestyle of too many politicians and businessmen bears eloquent testimony to the dictum that the single minded pursuit of money impoverishes the mind, shrivels the imagination and desiccates the heart.’

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his lifestyle now includes several civil servants. Singleminded pursuit of mammon has desiccated their heart to such an extent that they are actively assisting politicians and businessmen to plunder our land, forests, minerals, waters, oceans and skies thereby ravaging our economy and environment. These corrupt elements persecute those resisting them using the harshest anti-democratic instruments of a police state. Shameful examples are far too many. Repression and suppression through draconian sedition laws of farmer-fisherfolk peacefully protesting against the Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project; tribals protecting their forests from mining mafia and villagers trying to save

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An overarching objective of civil services is to “give an independent, honest and just democratic administration to the people”. But over time, civil servants appear to have lost their moorings. their land from MNCs are just a few. Fortuitously, there are still many honest and conscious Civil Servants who pine for democratic governance and do not indulge in such horror? But, there are also equal numbers who either become zombies, content with crumbs and sinecures, or just fade away, unable to stand up to the venal and the corrupt. In the event, it is not the ‘brutality of the bad, but the silence of the good’ which is the misfortune of civil services. An overarching objective of Civil Services is to “give an independent, honest and just democratic administration to the people”. But over a period of time, civil servants have lost their moorings, abandoned their objective and become part of the

‘political convulsions of compromise and corruption’ instead of standing by their objectives. Even the background paper prepared by the Union Department of Personnel on the occasion of Civil Services Day admits this and contends that corruption in civil services is institutionalised! In several states, senior Civil Servants have virtually abdicated their role and await ‘orders from above’ on almost everything. In Tamil Nadu, they do not open their mouth and interact with media or civil society in any matter. The Law of ‘Omerta’ is strictly enforced! Members of IAS, who enjoy constitutional protection to perform their functions without fear or favour, genuflecting like this is nothing but betrayal of the people they are mandated to serve! Contemplating on the state of Civil Services today one is reminded of Rome of 63 BC. Cicero, a consul and lawyer, was charged with the responsibility of prosecuting the infamous Sergius Catilina, known for his extravagance and evil ways of plundering the treasury. This conspiracy was timely discovered by Cicero and as he tuned himself up to prosecute Catilina, he famously lamented: ‘O Tempora! O Mores!!’ meaning ‘Oh! the times! Oh the morals!!’ This is not the time to lament like Cicero, but to fight for some morals and values. The good among the Civil Servants should assert and stand by the constitutional scheme of things. They should hear and heed the sane advice of philosopher-statesman Edmund Burke: “When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.” Sooner the better, before irreparable damage is done! g

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psychology prabhat kumar

Heroes or villains? The civil servant is afraid of annoying his political masters; afraid to do something that does not have a precedence and is always fearful of being victimised.

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he civil service in India has lost much of its credibility because of its own undoing. Despite possessing unmatched intellectual calibre, its members have relegated themselves to playing the role of passive advisors and order takers. They have not assumed the ownership of policies aimed at improving the welfare of the people. Instead of talking about innovative strategies for poverty alleviation and social justice, they have ceded the initiative of voicing the aspirations of the masses to other actors. In fact, politicians, civil society and the media have rendered the civil service into being a caricature of stupidity. Now its incompatibility with governance is a syndrome that is being passed down from senior members to new entrants. It is said that every dog has his day; except the Indian civil servant. For the last 60 years after Sardar Patel, rarely has a civil servant been credited with anything. While he is regarded as a character in the drama of governance, one is not too sure about the role he plays. Is it that of a villain or of a comedian? Or is he merely a sidekick of the villain? In the beginning, the civil servant had a distinct advantage of close contacts with the public. He worked with grassroots leaders, knew the condi-

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tion of the poor and had the flexibility of reacting to local problems. As district officer, he could provide justice to the weak and the helpless. And, scores of IAS officers excelled in becoming friends of the people. Somewhere along the way, however, the will to govern for the welfare of the common man disappeared, both among political leaders and bureaucrats. One feels nostalgic about the era when leaders used to ascertain the wishes of the people in order to win their support. It is nobody’s fault; it is just how the modern capitalist democracy has developed. Today, a civil servant is accused of not only being out of touch with people but even alien to them. He has ended up in a cul-de-sac of his own making. He has become a victim of the illusion that he is invisible. The ‘in-betweenity’ of most IAS officers is truly amazing. They want to do the right thing, but the relative security of employment guaranteed by the Constitution prevents them from getting into open hostility with their political masters. They are constantly seeking to balance between integrity and avoidance of open conflict with the politicians. They conspicuously avoid performing their public duties for fear of being victimised. Benjamin Franklin said ‘he that

is secure is not safe’, and it applies beautifully to the Indian bureaucrat. For the odd IAS officer who wants to speak out, the microphone is missing. Even I am not fully satisfied with what I did at various stages of service. Now I feel that I should have done much more than what I did. I can cite several cases where I did not bend to unscrupulous political pressure, but I did not go to the extent of sticking my neck out or becoming a hero by airing my views against my political masters in the public or the media. For instance, I was in charge of a progressive district for about three years. I always thought I had done a lot for improving irrigation. I got a large number of tubewells bored and energised. I encouraged the construction of a number of cold storages for the potato crop, which earlier used to be either sold at throwaway prices or used in the fields as manure. I started an annual development exposition to

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aruna

highlight the composite GangaJamuni culture. But when I visited the district years later, I was shocked by what more I could have done. I can seek excuse in my pre-occupation with law and order or in the day-today exigencies of a district officer. During the Ayodhya days, I should have gone to the Cabinet Secretary and requested him for the Central Government taking possession of the land appurtenant to the templemosque or for issuing directions to the state government under Article 355. Though I did submit to the Chief Minister the complexity of the prevailing situation, I did not have the courage of approaching the Cabinet Secretary. During the hijacking of Air India flight 814 in December 1999, I should have taken steps to order an inquiry into the facts and circumstances in which the aircraft was allowed to leave Amritsar airport. There were

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The ‘in-betweenity’ of most IAS officers is truly amazing. They want to do the right thing, but the security of employment guaranteed by the Constitution prevents them from getting into open hostility with their political masters. many questions left unanswered by the political leadership, like why the National Security Guards (NSG) failed to get airborne on time and why did the police in Amritsar not obstruct the passage of the aircraft. As Cabinet Secretary, I fell short of providing effective leadership to all civil services. Not that I did not try. Though I did a little like giving opportunity to officers of non-IAS services to hold posts of secretaries to the Government of India, it was not

enough. I conducted cadre review exercises for some non-IAS services and created higher level posts for them. But I was more preoccupied with the day-to-day requirements of a Cabinet Secretary’s work – Cabinet meetings, GOM meetings, COS meetings, CCS meetings, advising the Prime Minister, ACC work, policy formulation, etc. At the policy-making level, a civil servant is charged with more than merely tendering judicious advice to the political bosses. He has to take the lead in creatively thinking of measures that elude the politicians. It is my hypothesis that if retired bureaucrats analyse the situation faced by them and study the alternatives in retrospect, it will help the present administrators in doing their job well. The fact is that we do not consider possible alternatives before taking a certain step. We are all prisoners of our delusions. We live in them and exult in them. In my view, it is now the turn of the civil servant to not knock before entering the arena of public discourse. And, this puts enormous responsibilities on him. He can no longer hide behind the cloak of anonymity. Till now, his voice has remained in the confines of confidentiality. The Right to Information Act opens his conduct and actions to any citizen. At the same time, the RTI makes it possible for him to go to the people through the media. He has to ensure that because of his timid conduct, the door may not be shut tightly again. Lest I may be accused of painting the civil service by a broad brush, I wish to clarify that I am trying to start a conversation, not to have the last word. g (The writer was the Cabinet Secretary and the First Governor of Jharkhand. He can be reached at pkumar1511@hotmail.com)

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Governance democracy a k verma

Think About a Second Republic?

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uestions are being raised about the validity of democracy in the Indian Republic. There is a widespread view that democracy in India is no longer by the people, of the people, for the people. The leaders who brought democracy to India in 1947 were giants in conviction, commitment, ethics and morality. There were many of them. Their tribe lingered for many years after Independence but their numbers kept on diminishing. Today, that tribe has vanished completely. Search as one might, not a single individual can be found qualifying for the citizen’s unquestioning acceptance as the leader of the nation. Responsible for this sad state is the continuous growth of unscrupulous politics, degeneration of instruments of democracy and emergence of a new elite, reliant on the power of money, muscle and mafia, to monopolise the rewards of democracy. Today, no sense of shame is felt in claiming that compulsions of coalition politics require principles of probity to be jettisoned. Practice of democracy fundamentally requires that democratic norms will be upheld and observed in all interactions at the citizen’s level. But it is ironic that while the Constitution has been amended to introduce democracy at the Panchayat level, with multilateral political support, real inner party democracy eludes many political entities and very little support has emerged to secure this end. The result is that politics in the country is becoming more and more dynastic. In the present Lok Sabha, all the elected members in the age bracket 25 to 30 years are closely related to serving politicians. Again, 50 per cent of those in the age bracket

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Electoral reforms are not seeing the light of day, because no one can be expected to approve legislation which will disqualify him or her from getting elected of 31 to 50 years are similarly blessed. The fear is that if the trend continues, the Lok Sabha will become the monopoly of a few families in the years ahead. This will be a reversal of history of India getting rid of its zamindars, taluqdars, rajas and maharajas. How representative are our parliamentarians of the citizens in whose name they enter the Lok Sabha and participate in the governing process? Most get elected if they can secure 20-30 per cent votes. Some manage to get into Lok Sabha with 10 per cent or lesser votes in their favour. Electoral indifference has in the past been responsible for this phenomenon. The Election Commission has been doing an admirable job in educating citizens why they must exercise their right to vote. But such education cannot disband the vote banks, which flourish on caste and other extraneous considerations, and which remain prize catches at election times. All this has had a baneful effect on the quality of people who manage to enter the Lok Sabha. It has not been possible to prevent entry of a large number of persons facing criminal charges. Electoral reforms which would remedy the situation are not seeing the light of the day, because no one can be expected to approve legislation which will disqualify him or

her from getting elected. The fundamental function of the legislature is to legislate, debate foreign and domestic policies, and ensure transparent governance for the benefit of the citizen. Unfortunately, the jury is out whether such functions are indeed being performed. One sees a paralysis in action in the legislatures on key issues and a slide towards a greater collapse. The TV is conveying to one and all the images of daily disorder in the august chambers. The citizen is left to wonder whether this is the way to promote his interests and safeguard his security. He fears that the country is being pushed towards a grim future. As far as the citizen is concerned, he is seeing a can of worms opening almost everyday. His long term welfare is entwined with issues of education, growth of infrastructure, research and development, and a proper evolution of regulatory systems. In each one of these fields, the failure has been monumental. Poverty levels have not abated. Inflation is out of check. Right to education remains a promise unfulfilled. Inequalities are soaring. Corruption has moved on from the tactical level to strategic heights. According to information floating on the internet, there is almost no one at the ethereal heights untouched by the tar of corruption. Cynicism has grown to such extent that few seriously believe that there is a genuine will to fight the demon of corruption. At the same time, one notes a popular desire to punish corruption. According to some psephologists, the change in the fortunes of some leading lights in recent State Assembly elections was brought about by the changing perceptions of the electorate on the issue of corruption. Appropriate laws and mechanisms

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are the crying need of the hour for controlling corruption. The mobilisation under Anna Hazare last year was a measure of the popular disenchantment. It will be a mistake to think that that this mobilisation has petered out. Anger in the people’s awareness on this issue is like a volcano, which can erupt perhaps sooner than later. Public esteem for those presiding over the destiny of the nation has touched an all-time low.

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he thinking classes in the country are cognizant of these trends and in their thinktanks, seminars and intellectual discussions have been shouting for reforms. There have been a plethora of events on administrative, electoral, judicial, intelligence and police reforms but no meaningful action has been consummated in any of these sectors. The case of police reforms is reflective of the mindset of the governing classes, who are refusing to allow the mechanisms of police to be established on the principles of autonomy despite mandatory orders of the Supreme Court. In plain words, this is an illustration of how the political executive is ready to flout the dictum of the highest judiciary in order to protect its own interests. Concomitant with this reality is the question: is the Supreme Court so helpless that it cannot ensure its deadlines? The Supreme Court may be keen to avoid a direct confrontation with the executive, and perhaps for good reasons. Right in our neighbourhood, a drama is being enacted where a Prime Minister is publicly refusing to carry out the injunctions of his Supreme Court and announcing his readiness to face contempt proceedings. The issues highlighted above have very wide amplitude. It will be no exaggeration to state that the prob-

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lems of poor governance and corruption are part of a common mosaic which includes black money, stagnant or declining economy, and the nation’s security. Such an amalgam constitutes a threat not only to the individual citizen but also to the integrity, cohesiveness and unity of the entire nation. Under these circumstances, the sovereignty of the citizen from whom is derived all the powers of the Constitution just becomes a concept on paper. Now, according to some, the consequent denial of freedom of thought, expression and action to citizens, guaranteed under the Constitution, on account of the degeneration of the legislative, executive and judicial systems, has been of an order that no cure can be expected from them. When the whole body has been affected by cancer, an attempt at remedying it part by part will bring no solution.

The mobilisation under Anna Hazare last year was a measure of the popular disenchantment. It will be a mistake to think that that this mobilisation has petered out. One has again to go back to 1947 to understand that the seeds for such a harvest were planted then, though the intentions were honourable. The systems that were inherited from the British Raj in 1947 continue substantially in the same format and form. Those systems belonged to a different age and era, when the sovereign resided in Britain and the subject people in India. A new era dawned in 1947 when sovereignty was transferred to the subject people. The quality of governance was expected to change dramatically but this did not happen as the governing machinery

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remained colonial in temper and practice, and the new governing classes allowed their idealism to be subverted by pursuit of power for self enrichment. The consequential effects were soon seen in all the three organs of governance, legislature, judiciary and executive. The legislatures have also become the playground for the rich as the wealth returns of candidates seeking elections to the legislatures in the recent past indicate. Thus, it is not surprising that the quest for economic justice remains a distant dream and the rich become richer but the poor poorer.

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oday’s India requires not just structural reforms but also a vision. Vested and greedy elements have to be eliminated. The whole society needs to be transformed, not just a small nucleus of people. Any roadmap, drawn to reach an envisaged destination, will remain unattainable, unless new paradigmatic norms are brought in existence. A vision of India involves the setting of a goal, what India should be at the end of a specified period, say 20 years, and crafting a roadway for it. The starting point for developing a

vision would be our present potential; not in an abstract sense, but how far we are actually matching it. Our vision can be built up only on the basis of the development of the marginalised sections of our people. At the heart of such development, will be elements such as law and order, corruption free administration, social and economic justice, fair treatment of weaker classes and so on. Such a vision requires expansion of fundamental rights of the citizen. He should have the right to recall his elected representatives and to demand referendum at the national, state, district and village levels. This is a vision of direct democracy. Such ideas should be an indivisible part of our democracy. Unfortunately, the present state of national politics, divisive, fractured and mutually distrustful, absolutely rules out acceptance of a comprehensive programme of reforms National parties do not seek same answers. So, what is the way to challenge these multiple problems of failure and to create a new vision? Perhaps, the time has come for India to think of a Second Republic. A holistic exercise seems called for because piecemeal remedies have not been found to be effective. The example of France may be kept in mind where Charles DeGaulle led France into the Fifth Republic to tackle problems which were defying solutions. Methodology will have to be thought out also since altering the basic structures of the Constitution is presently forbidden. But the country appears to be in a mood for changes. Those who fall within the spectrum of demographic dividend, i.e., the young, are the most favourably inclined, as without substantives reforms their future can remain stuck in the dark doldrums of uncertainty and despair. g

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zu siddique dc, north delhi

‘My dream holiday is to go to Switzerland’ The 1985 batch IAS officer of AGMUT Cadre, Z U Siddique is a focused, hard working officer who joined as DC North Delhi in 2009 What kind of music do you prefer to listen to? Z U Siddique: Indian music, light classical music and of course, ghazals.

Which character did you like the most in that movie and why? Siddique: The character of Aamir Khan fascinated me. He has a simple funda: ‘Run after excellence, success will follow you’. Parents should not impose their wish or unfulfilled desire on their children; their role should be that of a facilitator. Delhi is a major cuisine hub. What kind of food tempts you the most? Siddique: See, I am a very simple, desi man, and so I prefer arhar ki daal, chapattis with mango chutney. Which luxury brand do you prefer? Siddique: Anything that suits me and is comfortable. It should fit me and make me look like a gentleman. Besides governance, what interests you? Siddique: Whatever time I get, I spend it on physical fitness and badminton. I have a badminton court in my house. I play with my wife, children and colleagues.

fotos4india

Which is the latest movie you have seen? Siddique: Well, I haven’t seen any movie for the last 7-8 months. 3 Idiots was the last movie I saw.

supplies, and labour departments. But I feel that I couldn’t do much as people’s expectations were too much. In my personal life, I am a contented man with my wife and two children. These are the highest points of my life. But yes, when my kids don’t study, I do feel low. Are you tech-savvy? Siddique: Yes, I can use a computer well. Who has inspired you the most in your life? Siddique: My maternal uncle and his name is A A Siddiqui. He is an IPS, Punjab Cadre, and retired as DGP, Punjab. One dream that you’d like to realize… Siddique: My dream is that all bureaucrats should respond to the people’s needs and their problems whenever they are approached for this.

Your most absurd fear... Siddique: Being looked upon as a corrupt and arrogant officer. I dread if someone says such things about me.

What is your dream holiday destination? Siddique: Switzerland, because I am told it’s like our Kashmir. I have not been there and so I want to explore that beautiful place. I would also love to go to Europe.

The lowest and highest points in your life... Siddique: As a bureaucrat, I have done a lot of improvements wherever I was posted like in revenue, food and

What other profession would you have chosen? Siddique: Law, as I have done LLM from Allahabad University, or most likely, teaching law in a varsity. g

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MY CORNER

appointments amitabh thakur

Appointed to disappoint O

aruna

There are thousands of senior posts in various bodies, commissions and institutions belonging to the Government where no definite method of appointment exists

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UR country has a very large number of bureaucratic posts, which have been framed in a manner that only career bureaucrats (or government servants) can be appointed. Thus, we know that a peon in a State Secretariat or a Secretary belongs to some distinct services. So is the case with a major chunk of the governance machinery. These people join a particular class of service and

remain part of it, moving from one rank to another and getting appointed to various posts available to that particular service. In all such cases, the concerned person becomes a part of such service through a selection process. Posts are advertised and applicants get selected and become part of the service, if they fulfil the requirements. There is another class of people associated with governance who are not career bureaucrats or permanent government servants. They get appointed on some kind of contractual basis. The posts of ViceChancellors of Universities and various technical or expert advisors in different organisations can be cited as examples. Here again, most of the time there is some definite process of appointment. Advertisements are issued, the intention to fill in the required vacancies is made public through some definite process and then through some kind of selection process, a few persons are found more suitable than others to be appointed to the post. In each of the above two cases, there is some kind of selection through some process. Thus, it can be said that there is transparency in the way decisions are being made. Again, every person is being given equal opportunity to get appointed, in case he fulfils other requirements and eligibility criteria. The same holds true for MLAs and MPs, who constitute the other pillar

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of democracy. They are not selected by someone but they have to get elected by the people. Thus, they pass through the rigour of being chosen by the masses. This needs acceptability of the people and is again a well-defined process. The Ministers as the heads of various ministries and departments, who are often members of various legislative bodies, need to enjoy the confidence of the Lower House at the Centre or the States. Hence, whether it is career bureaucrats or contractual appointees or elected legislators or ministers, each of them are chosen through a process that is well-defined and well structured. Sadly, unlike them, there are thousands of posts in our country, both with the Central Government and the State Governments, where no definite method of appointment exists. There is no transparency in the way people are chosen or selected for such posts. What is pertinent to note is that most of these posts are extremely important. They include chairmen, vice chairmen and members of various commissions, committees, institutions and companies belonging to the Government. Thus, ironically, we do not know why someone is appointed to the post of chairman or member of the Central Information Commission or the State Information Commission. Similarly, we do not know why a particular person is appointed as the chairman of the Human Rights Commission or Child Welfare Commission or Women Commission or Minorities Commission and so on. I agree that in most of these cases, a few basic criteria and/or eligibility norms have been fixed. But still the issue remains that setting such criteria (often quite generalised, vaguely stated and open-ended) does not itself make the appointment process

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transparent. Often, words like expert in the field, having sufficient knowledge and/or experience, being a renowned personality, etc., are used. But we all know that such open-ended words have the capacity to encompass almost every person in the country. There is no legal and technical definition of being an expert, having sufficient knowledge or experience and of being a renowned personality. Whoever is appointed to the post can later be pointed out as being an expert or being renowned. This is exactly what is happening all over the country. People, who are completely unknown to the masses,

There is no legal and technical definition of being an expert, having sufficient knowledge or experience and of being a renowned personality. Whoever is appointed to a post can later be pointed out as being an expert or being renowned. get suddenly appointed as chairmen and members of important commissions, committees and institutions solely on the basis of their political importance. Some of them are the brothers, sisters, sons, daughters and even concubines of powerful political entities. Others are political workers. Thus, despite having no knowledge or experience or proficiency for the post to which they are being appointed, such people get appointed because of political necessities. This is nothing but political dole-giving. This is a kind of political patronage, where certain persons are being obliged at the cost of the masses. It is quite

obvious that if a person has no expertise or knowledge or experience or sincerity for the post to which he/she has been appointed the public will get little benefit. The real sufferer in such cases is the general public while the incumbent enjoys various privileges and perks, and feels politically and socially important. This arrangement is against the basic tenets of democracy and is also clearly against transparent governance. One possible way to minimise this problem can be to make the entire process as transparent as possible. We heard of Anna Hazare’s suggestion about the appointment of the Lokpal. In my opinion, similar procedures can be adopted for all such posts, which presently are being filled through political patronage. The first step is to make the appointment process to all these posts open. Let there be open advertisements about all such vacancies. Let there be some definite eligibility criteria and let everyone be permitted to apply. If the same procedure can be adopted to appoint vice-chancellors of universities, I am sure that this can be extended to all other Government posts as well. Once the appointment process becomes public and transparent, the Government will certainly become answerable for whatever action it takes. This will be scrutinised not only by the people but will also be liable to judicial review. I do not say that such a process will completely wipe out all kinds of incorrect political benefactions, but it will certainly make a very clear dent. I am also sure that adopting such procedures will make such commissions and organisations more relevant than what they are presently proving to be. g (Amitabh Thakur is an IPS officer associated with the National RTI Forum)

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FIRST STIRRINGS rm sethi

Living life C king size

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RM Sethi has worn many different of hats while leading a life completely on his own terms. And, he has succeeded in almost everything he did.

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oming from a refugee family that set up a small shoe shop in Allahabad to make a modest living after migrating from Pakistan, Ravi Mohan Sethi has never been afraid to lose. And as far as he remembers, he has always lived life on his own terms and this has paid off... “I believe in taking quick decisions… what is the worst that can happen… badshah se rank aur rank se badshah banne main samay nahin lagta…” he says. A one-time academic-turned-bureaucrat-turned-entrepreneur, RM Sethi has worn so many different kinds of hats that many others don’t even get to see in a lifetime. As an IAS officer, he has been former MD of the Uttar Pradesh Financial Corporation (UPFC), MD, Pradeshiya Industrial and Investment Corporation UP (PICUP), and Secretary Agriculture, Government of UP. He is today Chairman of Steller Group, having interests in real estate, cooperative banking, IT parks, Hospitality and Recreation (which he himself started) besides being the independent director of Rs 250-billion public sector natural gas transmission company, GAIL India Ltd. Apart from this, as an IAS he had been an instructor at the Lal Bahadur Shastri Academy of Administration, Mussoorie; he studied management and economics at the Boston University, USA; he was among the first Hubert Humphrey Fellows from India in 1979-80; and, he had managed to save some money from his salary as a consultant on the UN Watershed project. He has been able to all this because he never hesitated in taking a decision—and lived life king size… Yet many things occurred in his life as if by accident. After his Bachelor of Arts in Economics, Political Science

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and English Literature, and Masters in Political Science, he was quite happy teaching at the Allahabad University when he was selected to join the 1970 batch of the prestigious Indian Administrative Service in the UP cadre. Obviously, Sethi was happy to be the first and only IAS officer in the family. The IAS in those days was considered to be a profession where you walked with the kings. Sethi too had his share of glory. KM Chandra Sekhar, the former Cabinet Secretary, was one of his batchmates. Big-time industrialists like Dhirubhai Ambani and Singhania were on first-name basis. As a collector in Bahraich, he created history by opening the first mosque after Independence. As the MD of UPFC, he transformed a sick and dead unit into a profit-making organisation. Apart from this, his stints as ND Tiwari’s special assistant and Director, Information and Chief Censor earned him lot of clout and high-level contacts. In short, everything was going smooth for him and he had a promising career ahead of him in the IAS.

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hat is when he decided to give it up – just like that; without any apparent reason or provocation. The timing of his decision was, however, important: the wedding of one of his 24-year-old twin daughters was less than a month away and his son was studying in class 11th in Modern School. “It was Guru Nanak’s birthday, a holiday when I saw eagles soar in the sky… Suddenly my decision was made. I did not consult any astrologer,” he says. He was that time in Kanpur while his wife and children were in Delhi. So on November 7, 1995, he called up his wife Anita Sethi and dropped the

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“ Badshah se rank aur

rank se badshah banne main samay nahin lagta, Sethi explains the basic thought behind his capability of taking quick decisions

bombshell. “Are you sure?” she asked “Yes,” he said. “Are you happy?” “Yes,” he said. “I believe in you and I am with you,” she said. And with these three short sentences, the entire decision was made. The next day, Sethi formally put in his papers for voluntary retirement after 25 years of service in IAS. This came as a surprise to many people, including Motilal Vora, who was the Governor of Uttar Pradesh. He tried to dissuade Sethi. Even the then Cabinet Secretary Surendra Singh – who was from the UP Cadre -- and his wife Hemlata tried to convince Sethi not to commit “suicide”.

“You have a good reputation and track-record; you may retire as Cabinet Secretary if everything goes on the way it is going,” he was told. “I know my answer did not make much sense to many people then and now, but there are situations in life when you wish to challenge yourself. I wanted to be sure that I could survive the cocoon of the IAS. The tag of IAS symbolises power and everything merges into it, I just wanted to explore if I was something more than IAS or a factor of IAS alone,” he says. This was when something he had learnt from Laxman and Rajaram – two cobblers in his father’s shoe-shop – came in handy. Laxman and Rajaram were extremely proud of the fact that no competitor craftsman could sew the shoe sole like them… This important lesson became Ravi Mohan Sethi’s mission statement: “Create as if you are creating for eternity… but do so at a speed as if you are going to die tomorrow”. Interestingly, even at this time Sethi had no idea as to what he was going to do ahead in life. There were, of course, a few people who had offered him jobs in the corporate sector while he was in service; many of them did not bother to call up when he was out of the job. There were a few others who offered money to start a business venture on absurd terms. So, after voluntary retirement from the IAS in February 1996, Sethi set up the Stellar Group of Companies, investing his savings and income as a consultant bringing large and medium scale private companies back to health. The rest is history. Thanks to his unique blend of administrative experience and never say die attitude – he is a living success story. g (As told to Neeraj Mahajan)

gfiles inside the government vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

47


5

BOOK REVIEW

years

development

by D i p t e n d r a

Raychaudhuri

So remarkable a journey Bihar through the eyes of a seasoned IAS officer Title: Making Sense of Bihar: An Autobiography of a Civil Servant in Bihar Author: Shree Shankar Sharan Publisher: Abhinav Publications Price: Rs 500

A

book like this, almost each page of which is filled with interesting anecdotes, that too by someone who has remarkable insight, is a reader’s joy, particularly for those who want to have a better understanding of the functioning of the system. Some of the observations by the author, like the one on the Finance Ministry that ‘has become a choking point in speedy disposal of matters’ are not unknown. But the author has not stopped there. He has recommended a way out, one that could have sounded utopian even a year ago. But no longer. Take for example: ‘There should be a penalty for deliberate delays recoverable from the person responsible. The outer limit for taking a decision should be three months’. If only the government of the land was a little sensitive to what its own employees felt, it could have brought into effect changes that would have saved it from Team Anna’s wrath. Even now, the agitators on the streets have not raised their voice against the slow functioning of the government due to its own internal ‘choking point’ that Sharan is

48

gfiles inside the government

vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

talking about (p. 263). But will anyone listen to him? There are many such suggestions that come from the experience of a seasoned IAS officer. The author joined the IAS in 1955 and quit it in 1989 to promote his own agenda of social service. He was born in a family that had many luminaries. Lal Bahadur Shastri was his maternal uncle. Jaya Prakash Narayan was his father’s uncle. He was close to Anugrah Narain Singh, a stalwart in Bihar politics. He has revealed all these details in the penultimate chapter (My Family Life) of his book. He himself was a keen observer of things. He has described how in the Senate Hall in Patna, students manhandled Nehru during the turbulent days of communal frenzy, but listened to Jaya Prakash Narayan (p.59). It is only expected that such a man will throw new light on different aspects of administration and political life. He has done that with proper analytical prowess. Though in the eyes of the common man, a District Magistrate or Collector is a man of immense power, in reality, they face hundreds of obstacles. The book gives several such examples. At times, the officer may have to risk his own life to ensure fair administration. Read this: ‘I found the SP comfortably ensconced at Jamalpur PS. While I upbraided him for inadequate patrolling, news came of an imminent breach of peace elsewhere...… The SP came with two truckloads of armed force and teargas after the crisis is over.’ (p. 164-5) He refers to

another case where the SDO revolted against him and stuck to orders he gave out defying the order of the Collector! (p. 167-8) Sharan left IAS to serve the society in his own way. He tried his hand on various vexed problems the country faces, from Kashmir to Babri Masjid to the Maoists. But, his love and concern for Bihar has remained the anchoring point of his life and this gets wonderfully expressed all through the book. The Bihar he saw as a student, the Bihar he served as an IAS, and the Bihar he sees now are not the same. He has seen the decline of the great state and is concerned. At the end of the book, he discusses present-day Bihar and the developments, particularly in agriculture, that are taking place in that state. Sharan concludes the book with three sentences with which everyone concerned about Bihar will happily agree: ‘Bihar has also looked down on personal ambition and has cultivated humility, perhaps a relic of its Buddhist influence. Happily, humility and high ability combine very well as in numerous Bihar leaders of national fame. May that be Bihar’s contribution to their and India’s future.’ g

Next Month An outsider everywhere Revelations by an Insider

www.gfilesindia.com


May ‘12


SILLY POINT humour mk kaw

Patternless postings

I

am reminded of my years in the Department of Defence Production in the early 1990s. There were four Joint Secretaries and two Additional Financial Advisers, reporting to N Raghunathan, a 1959 veteran of the Maharashtra cadre. Raghu was a topper of his batch and a gentleman to a fault. He let us do what we wanted, helping us out only when we were about to get into trouble. After we had spoken on a file, there was an unofficial zero hour, when we could discuss anything and everything. Most of us were into it and enjoyed ourselves a lot. There was just one exception, the Joint Secretary in-charge of Ordnance Factories. Sometimes, one of us would raise a point about him during zero hour. Raghunathan would smile and change the subject. Sometimes, if one of us persisted, he would wink and say, “Oh you need not worry about him. He will be all right.” It was a few years later. Orders were issued posting this gentleman as the Defence Secretary. Some of us shook our heads in disbelief. The one person we did not think would make it even to the Additional Secretaries’ panel was now holding the all-important seat. In fullness of time, we all retired. This gentleman now found a berth as Governor of an important State, a post he still holds. Many of us again shook our heads in disbelief and mumbled about the inscrutable workings of fate and how postings did not follow a pattern. It was at a party that the mystery was unravelled. We discovered to our astonishment that our friend was no less than the brother-inlaw of an up and coming member of the Service. This gentleman had been the aruna Deputy Com-missioner

50

gfiles inside the government

vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

of Rai Bareli and ever since was tied strongly with hoops of steel to the Dynasty. He was a close confidant of Rajiv, an icon of the Rajiv Gandhi Foundation, a high official with the World Bank and had finally landed up as the Principal Secretary to the Prime Minister, with a projected career graph of Cabinet Secretary, India’s Ambassador to the United States of America… going into the stratosphere. In other words, no less a person than the redoubtable Pulok Chatterjee. In case a parallel example is sought, the case of Wajahat Habeebullah comes to mind. Any time any sensitive posting falls vacant, Wajahat is the logical choice. That reminds me of another Muslim officer, under whom I had the privilege of serving. These days we talk with a sense of consternation about the manner in which Thomas was appointed as the Chief Vigilance Commissioner. But human memory is very, very short. Let us recapitulate the circumstances. P V Narasimha Rao is the Prime Minister of India. It is an unstable perch, as, by the laws of primogeniture, Rajiv should have been in that chair. Rao is preparing his speech for Independence Day. Can he do something dramatic, to show the Muslims of India that his heart is in the right place? His advisers scout around. Someone comes up with the explosive idea that a Muslim officer can be appointed as the Cabinet Secretary of India. There is just a tiny snag. Zafar Saifulah, who can be considered for the job has eight CBI cases registered against him. Eight CBI cases! Even the shadow of a single CBI case would cook his goose under normal circumstances. What does one do to eight cases? Simple. Withdraw and file all the cases. Appoint Saifullah as the new Cabinet Secretary. And, announce it from the ramparts of the Red Fort. This is done. An officer, who was perched on the shelf as Chairman, Bombay Port Trust, with eight CBI cases against him, now occupies the senior-most post in the civil service. And not even a dog whimpers. Given the precedent of Zafar Saifullah, the decision in the case of Thomas no longer falls in the category of patternless postings! So what are we whimpering about?!g (MK Kaw is former secretary, Government of India )

www.gfilesindia.com


5

STOCK DOCTOR

years

dr gs sood

Caught in uncertainties

T

he 50 basis point cut in the cash reserve ratio (CRR) by the Reserve Bank of India on April 17 came as surprise and brought widespread cheer to the markets. However, the bullish mood was short-lived and the markets corrected sharply thereafter, pointing to the concerns that remain alive. The latest addition in the long list of such concerns is the confusion with regard to the General Anti Avoidance Rules (GAAR). GAAR has, in fact, dampened the mood of foreign institutional investors (FIIs), especially hedge funds and has led to a significant slowdown of inflows since Budget Day. There is no denying the fact that the rise in the markets witnessed during the first

The prevailing high current account and fiscal deficit, which coupled with the declining capital inflows and tight domestic liquidity may put significant pressure on the rupee that is already at its three-month low

three months of this calendar year was mainly driven by the liquidity supplied in part by the European Central banks’ longterm refinancing operations. However, it is equally true that the Indian markets have shown great resilience by not correcting sharply to any contagion from Europe or other parts of the world. Some economists feel that RBI has played with fire by slashing the repo rate by 50 basis points and it may prove counterproductive in the longer term. This, they say, is in view of the prevailing high current account and fiscal deficit, which coupled with the declining capital inflows and tight domestic liquidity may put significant pressure on the rupee that is already at its three-month low. Inflation may have moderated but the upside risk remains alive, especially due to the suppression of administered prices of fuels, fertilisers, etc. The global outlook remained gloomy, with increased worries about Europe’s financial health, an unexpected rise in jobless claims in the US and disappointing home sales and factory activity data. China also witnessed its weakest GDP growth in the last three years. All this may result in softening of commodity prices, especially oil, and that may bode well for economies like India. The growth in earnings of corporate India are likely to remain subdued on a year-on-year basis though net earnings for the March quarter may not entirely be disappointing due to reduced foreign exchange losses since the rupee did not witness sharp depreciation till March end. The market is likely to remain range bound in the short-run with a negative bias. Such a scenario can be used by investors to steadily accumulate good stocks on every correction and build a sound portfolio.

g

Stock Shop by

Rakesh Bhardwaj

Jayshree Tea & Industries (CMP Rs97)

T

his B K Birla Group company is engaged in the manufacture of tea, sugar, chemicals and fertilisers. It derives about 75 per cent of its revenues from tea and the balance from sugar, fertilisers, etc. The consolidated margins of the company are likely to improve substantially because of an expected improvement in margins from tea plantation coupled with reduction in losses from the sugar business. Analysts expect tea prices to tread higher on a sustainable basis in the long run due to production falling short of rising demand led by continuing global shortages, lower inventory in India, lack of recovery in the Kenyan crop and rising consumption. The stock has corrected substantially from its 52-week high of Rs 181 and is currently available near its 52-week low, with a price to book value of 0.79. The current market price discounts the TTM EPS of Rs 9 by 10.8 only as against the industry average of 16.78. The company has had an uninterrupted record of paying dividend with current dividend yield of more than 3 per cent. In the uncertain global environment, the stock is a safe pick with the scope for a decent appreciation.

The author has no exposure in the stock recommended in this column. gfiles does not accept responsibility for investment decisions by readers of this column. Investment-related queries may be sent to editor@gfilesindia.com with Bhardwaj’s name in the subject line.

www.indianbuzz.com

gfiles inside the government vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

51


birthdays IAS officers’ birthdays  May 16, 2012 — Jun 15, 2012

IAS officers’ birthdays  May 16, 2012 — Jun 15, 2012

Narendra Kumar Sinha

Manjit Singh

N Gulzar

29-05-1974

06-06-1967

CADRE : BIHAR

CADRE : PUNJAB

CADRE : ANDHRA PRADESH

CADRE : RAJASTHAN

sinhank2@ias.nic.in

manjitsingh.ias@ias.nic.in

gulzarn@ias.nic.in

bhalevs@ias.nic.in

Anwar Ehsan Ahmad

S K Sandhu

Sreya Guha

Depinder Singh Dhesi

CADRE : MANIPUR-TRIPURA

CADRE : PUNJAB

CADRE : RAJASTHAN

CADRE : HARYANA

aeahmad@ias.nic.in

sandhusk@ias.nic.in

guhas@ias.nic.in

dhesids@ias.nic.in

S Chandramohan

T R Srinivasan

A Subbiah 30-05-1963

Chanchal Mal Bachhawat

CADRE : TAMIL NADU

23-05-1948 CADRE : TAMIL NADU

CADRE : WEST BENGAL

CADRE : WEST BENGAL

cmohans@ias.nic.in

snivas12@ias.nic.in

subbiaha@ias.nic.in

chanchal@ias.nic.in

V Umesh

M Subrahmanyan

Ravindra Kumar Srivastava

Rajesh Gupta

CADRE : KARNATAKA

CADRE : ANDHRA PRADESH

CADRE : JHARKHAND

CADRE : BIHAR

umeshv@ias.nic.in

subrahm@ias.nic.in

srkumar@ias.nic.in

guptar3@ias.nic.in

Anil Kumar

V Shashank Shekhar

Lian Kunga

Ajatshatru Srivastava

CADRE : NAGALAND

CADRE : NAGALAND

CADRE : BIHAR

CADRE : MADHYA PRADESH

kmranil1@ias.nic.in

shekharv@ias.nic.in

kungal@ias.nic.in

ajatshatru@ias.nic.in

Hemanta Narzary

Lalrinliana Fanai

Jagatsingh L Vasava

Ajeet Kumar Sahu

CADRE : ASSAM-MEGHALAYA

CADRE : UTTARAKHAND

CADRE : ASSAM-MEGHALAYA

CADRE : JAMMU & KASHMIR

narzaryh@ias.nic.in

fanail@ias.nic.in

vasavajl@ias.nic.in

aksahu03@ias.nic.in

Harshdeep Shriram Kamble

K Kailashnathan

Om Prakash Choudhary

Saroj Kumar Dash

CADRE : MAHARASHTRA

CADRE : GUJARAT

CADRE : CHHATTISGARH

CADRE : HIMACHAL PRADESH

kamblehs@ias.nic.in

kailashn@ias.nic.in

o.p.choudhary@ias.nic.in

dashsk@ias.nic.in

Kishor Uttamrao Gajbhiye

Deepak Singhal

Bhagwan Shankar

Rajendra Kumar Sharma

CADRE : MAHARASHTRA

CADRE : UTTAR PRADESH

CADRE : SIKKIM

CADRE : MADHYA PRADESH

gkishor@ias.nic.in

singhald@ias.nic.in

shankarb88@ias.nic.in

rksharma.ias@ias.nic.in

Anil Kumar-II

Sumana N Menon

M G Kiran

Rajesh Kumar Singh

CADRE : UTTAR PRADESH

CADRE : KERALA

CADRE : SIKKIM

CADRE : MANIPUR-TRIPURA

kumanil2@ias.nic.in

01KL021114@ias.nic.in

mgkiran@ias.nic.in

srkumar2@ias.nic.in

Shivaputara M Jaamdar

Injeti Srinivas

C R Prasanna

Alaknanda Dayal

CADRE : KARNATAKA

CADRE : ORISSA

CADRE : CHHATTISGARH

CADRE : PUNJAB

jaamdars@ias.nic.in

snivas8@ias.nic.in

crprasanna.ias@ias.nic.in

dayala@ias.nic.in

S F Khongwir

Sanjiv Kumar

Solanki Pravinbhai Khodabhai

Ankur Garg

CADRE : ASSAM-MEGHALAYA

CADRE : HARYANA

CADRE : GUJARAT

CADRE : UNION TERRITORY

khongwir@ias.nic.in

kumars23@ias.nic.in

spkhodabhai@ias.nic.in

ankurgarg.ias@ias.nic.in

Tahang Taggu

V Somasundaran

Balbir Tegta

Patil Dhyaneshwar Bhalchandra

CADRE : UNION TERRITORY

CADRE : KERALA

CADRE : HIMACHAL PRADESH

CADRE : MADHYA PRADESH

tahang.ias@ias.nic.in

somasund@ias.nic.in

balbirtegta@ias.nic.in

pdbalchandra@ias.nic.in

Jamjam Syamala Rao

Ajai Singh Nabiyal

Rabi Narayan Bohidar

Kanwal Singh Mehra

CADRE : ASSAM-MEGHALAYA

CADRE : UTTARAKHAND

CADRE : ORISSA

CADRE : UNION TERRITORY

raojs@ias.nic.in

01UL063317@ias.nic.in

bohidarr@ias.nic.in

mehraks@ias.nic.in

16-05-1958

16-05-1952

16-05-1956

17-05-1956

17-05-1953

18-05-1959

18-05-1970

19-05-1957

19-05-1966

20-05-1952

21-05-1949

21-05-1958

22-05-1967

22-05-1950

23-05-1959

24-05-1952

24-05-1973

24-05-1970

25-05-1953

25-05-1959

26-05-1959

26-05-1960

27-05-1960

27-05-1956

28-05-1952

29-05-1968

31-05-1957

01-06-1957

01-06-1952

02-06-1981

02-06-1962

03-06-1954

04-06-1976

04-06-1978

05-06-1953

05-06-1949

Vikas Sitaramji Bhale

07-06-1959

07-06-1958

08-06-1955

09-06-1958

10-06-1974

11-06-1952

12-06-1954

12-06-1963

13-06-1975

14-06-1980

15-06-1976

15-06-1952

For the complete list, see www.gfilesindia.com

52

gfiles inside the government

vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

www.gfilesindia.com


5

years

IPS officers’ birthdays  May 16, 2012 — Jun 15, 2012 Nanda Kumar Biswas 16-05-1949

K. Radha Krishnan Nair 23-05-1942

CADRE: WEST BENGAL

CADRE: KERALA

nandakb@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

krknair@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

T. Krishna Raju

M.C.Narayana Gowda

16-05-1956

23-05-1952

CADRE: ANDHRA PRADESH

CADRE: KARNATAKA

tkraju@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

mcngowda@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

A.K. Pateriya

Harish Chandra

17-05-1960

24-05-1955

CADRE: MADHYA PRADESH

CADRE: UTTAR PRADESH

pateriya@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

hchandra@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Raghavendra Suhasaa H.G.

S. Anantha Krishnan

17-05-1972

24-05-1963

CADRE: RAJASTHAN

CADRE: KERALA

suhasaa@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

aananthakrishnan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Ashish Batra

A.B.Venkateswara Rao

18-05-1972

25-05-1964

CADRE: JHARKHAND

CADRE: ANDHRA PRADESH

ashishb@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

venkateshwara@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

T.T.Tamang

Arvinder Singh

18-05-1955

25-05-1973

CADRE: SIKKIM

CADRE: MANIPUR-TRIPURA

tamang@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

arvindersingh@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

N.Tamil Selvan

B.P. Mohapatra

19-05-1961

26-05-949

CADRE: TAMIL NADU

CADRE: ORISSA

tamilselvan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

bpmohapatra@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

P. Vijayanand

Tashi Dawa

19-05-1955

26-05-1943

CADRE: KERALA

CADRE: HIMACHAL PRADESH

vijayanand@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

tashi@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Y. Puran Kumar

D.R.Doley

19-05-1973

27-05-1959

CADRE: HARYANA

CADRE: JAMMU & KASHMIR

purankr@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

doley@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

V.Kamaraja

Pranabindu Acharya

20-05-1955

27-05-1964

CADRE: HARYANA

CADRE: ORISSA

kamarajav@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

pranabindu@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

N.R.K. Reddy

S.M. Shaikh

21-05-1960

28-05-1952

CADRE: RAJASTHAN

CADRE: GUJARAT

nrkreddy@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

smshaikh@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

G.Umaganapathy Sastry

Jyoti Narain

22-05-1959

29-05-1969

CADRE: TAMIL NADU

CADRE: UTTAR PRADESH

gugsastry@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

jyotinarain@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

H.C.Kishore Chandra

P.V. Krishna Prasad

22-05-1959

29-05-1967

CADRE: KARNATAKA

CADRE: UTTARAKHAND

hckchandra@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

pvkprasad@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

IPS officers’ birthdays  May 16, 2012 — Jun 15, 2012 A.Natrajan

G Dorairaj

CADRE: JHARKHAND

CADRE: TAMIL NADU

anatrajan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

dorairaj@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

M.D.Antani

Sangey Dorjee

CADRE: GUJARAT

CADRE: SIKKIM

antani@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

sangey@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Natarajan Ramesh Babu

Tehal Singh Dhaliwal

CADRE: WEST BENGAL

CADRE: PUNJAB

nrbabu@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

tsdhaliwal@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Sita Ram Mardi

B K Shrivastva

CADRE: HIMACHAL PRADESH

CADRE: MADHYA PRADESH

sitaram@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

bkshrivastva@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

T A Chavan

P V Sunil Kumar

CADRE: MAHARASHTRA

CADRE: ANDHRA PRADESH

tachavan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

pvsunilkumar@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Lakhan Lal Ahirwar

Kiran Bedi

CADRE: MADHYA PRADESH

CADRE: AGMUT

ahirwar@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

kiranbedi@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Rajendra Namdeo Dhoke

Birendra Prasad Rao

CADRE: PUNJAB

CADRE: ASSAM-MEGHALAYA

rajendranamdeo@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

birendraprasad@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Muneer Ahmad Khan

Girdhari Naik

CADRE: J&K

CADRE: CHATTISGARH

ahmadkhan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

giridhari@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Durga Pada Tarenia

P Doungel

CADRE: WEST BENGAL

CADRE: MANIPUR-TRIPURA

dpadat@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

doungel@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Jyoti S Belur

Jasbir Singh

CADRE: UTTARAKHAND

CADRE: NAGALAND

joytisbelur@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

jasbir@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Manoj Nath

Ashok Juneja

CADRE: BIHAR

CADRE: CHATTISGARH

manojnath@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

ashokjuneja@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Sanjay Sinha

M G Saanap

CADRE: MANIPUR-TRIPURA

CADRE: MAHARASHTRA

sanjoysinha@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

mgsanap@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

Shalin

Arvind Pandey Pradhan

CADRE: BIHAR

15-06-1963 CADRE: BIHAR

shalin@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

appradhan@mail.svpnpa.gov.in

30-05-1962

30-05-1954

31-05-1967

31-05-1960

01-06-1954

01-06-1954

02-06-1965

02-06-1959

03-06-1959

03-06-1968

04-06-1952

05-06-1953

05-06-1974

06-06-1951

07-06-1956

07-06-1953

07-06-1950

08-06-1966

09-06-1949

10-06-1949

11-06-1959

11-06-1963

12-06-1972

13-06-1963

14-06-1952

For the complete list, see www.gfilesindia.com

www.indianbuzz.com

gfiles inside the government vol. 6, issue 2 | May 2012

53


Tracking SUDRIPTO ROY The 1978 batch IAS officer of Himachal Pradesh cadre has been appointed as Chief Secretary of Himachal Pradesh.

For a complete list of appointments & retirements, see www.gfilesindia.com

of Health & Family Welfare, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

R BHATTACHARYA

The 1978 batch IAS officer of Madhya Pradesh cadre has been appointed as Chief Secretary of Madhya Pradesh.

The 1978 batch IAS officer of Andhra Pradesh cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

OP RAWAT

DESH DEEPAK VERMA

R PARASURAM

The 1977 batch IAS officer of Madhya Pradesh cadre has joined as Secretary, Public Enterprises in Government of India.

PRADEEP KUMAR DEB The 1977 batch IAS officer of Rajasthan cadre has been appointed Secretary, Sports in Government of India.

RAM SEWAK SHARMA The 1978 batch IAS officer of Jharkhand cadre, Director General and Mission Director, Unique Identification Authority of India, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

SUDHIR MITTAL The 1978 batch IAS officer of Punjab cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Corporate Affairs, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

BIPIN BIHARI SRIVASTAVA The 1978 batch IAS officer of Bihar cadre, Additional Secretary, Central Information Commission, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre, Director General, Sports Authority of India, Department of Sports, Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

A K MANGOTRA The 1978 batch IAS officer of ManipurTripura cadre, Director General, DGS&D, Department of Commerce, Ministry of Commerce and Industry has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

V CHHIBER The 1978 batch IAS officer of ManipurTripura cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Road Transport and Highways has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

PANKAJ JAIN The 1978 batch IAS officer of Jammu & Kashmir cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Consumer Affairs, Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

VIVEK RAE

K N DESIRAJU The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttarakhand cadre, Additional Secretary, Department

The 1978 batch IAS officer of AGMU cadre, DG (Acquisition), Ministry of Defence, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

SANJAY KOTHARI The 1978 batch IAS officer of Haryana cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Tourism, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

RAJIV MEHRISHI The 1978 batch IAS officer of Rajasthan cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Agricultural Research and Education, Ministry of Agriculture has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

S R RAO The 1978 batch IAS officer of Gujarat cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Telecommunications, Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

SUDHIR KUMAR The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Women and Child Development, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

ANIL GOSWAMI The 1978 batch IAS officer of Jammu & Kashmir cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Home Affairs, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary Government of India.

PANKAJ AGARWAL The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Consumer Affairs, Ministry of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

UTTAM KUMAR SANGMA The 1978 batch IAS officer of Jharkhand

Moving On: IAS officers retiring in May 2012 ASSAM-MEGHALAYA Alok Perti (1977) Jagatsingh L Vasava (1982) ANDHRA PRADESH T Sanyasappa Rao (1980) S Balasubramanyam (1992) M Subrahmanyan (1993) BIHAR Prabeer Kumar Basu (1976) CHHATTISGARH S. R. V. Prabhat (1979) GUJARAT

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Chhotilal Meena (1984) P. N. Patel (1994) HARYANA Narinder Kumar Jain (1978) JAMMU & KASHMIR Bua Ditta (1995) KARNATAKA K Jairaj (1976) V Madhu (1978) K Jothiramalingam (1978) Shivaputara M Jaamdar (1980) Babu Rao Mudbi (1990)

MAHARASHTRA R. Y. Gaikwad (1975) S D Thakre (1993) B D Sanap (1998) MANIPUR-TRIPURA Anwar Ehsan Ahmad (1976) PUNJAB Bhushan Chander Gupta (1975) Darbara Singh Guru (1980) Ashok Kumar Singla (1997) RAJASTHAN Lalit Prakash Kothari (1977)

TAMIL NADU D Uthirakkumaran (1998) UTTARAKHAND Ajai Singh Nabiyal (1994) UTTAR PRADESH Kanhaiya Lal Meena (1983) UNION TERRITORY D C Sahoo (1996) WEST BENGAL Sridhar Kumar Ghosh (1995)

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5

years

cadre, Additional Secretary, North Eastern Council, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary Government of India.

Secretary, Ministry of Power in Government of India.

Commissioner, Municipal Corporation, Delhi.

R C MISHRA

S NARSING RAO

RAJINDER BHAGAT

The 1986 batch IAS officer of Andhra Pradesh cadre has assumed charge as Chairman-cum-Managing-Director of Coal India Limited (CIL).

The High Commissioner of India to Ghana has been concurrently accredited as the Ambassador of India to Burkina Faso, with residence in Accra.

T Y DAS

ANIL TRIGUNAYAT

The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre, Adviser, Planning Commission, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

The 1982 batch IAS officer of AssamMeghalaya cadre has joined as Joint Secretary (North East Region), Ministry of Development of North Eastern Region (DoNER).

DEBRAJ PRADHAN

V RAJAGOPALAN

SANJAY KUMAR RAKESH

The 1978 batch IAS officer of ManipurTripura cadre, Central Provident Fund Commissioner, Ministry of Labour and Employment, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary Government of India.

PREM NARAIN

1978 batch IAS officer 1978 UP), Additional Secretary, Department of Chemicals and Petrochemicals, Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

S K SRIVASTAVA The 1978 batch IAS officer of AssamMeghalaya cadre, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Mines, has been promoted insitu as Special Secretary.

ARVIND MAYARAM The 1978 batch IAS officer of Rajasthan cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Rural Development, Ministry of Rural Development, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary, Government of India.

GOKUL CHANDRA PATI The 1978 batch IAS officer of Orissa cadre, Additional Secretary in the Department of Agriculture and Cooperation, Ministry of Agriculture, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary.

A P JOSHI The 1978 batch IAS officer of Karnataka cadre, Additional Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, has been promoted in-situ as Special Secretary, Government of India.

SHASHI SHEKHAR The 1981 batch IAS officer of Tamil Nadu cadre has been appointed as Additional Secretary, Department of Administrative Reforms and Public Grievances, Ministry of Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions in Government of India.

DEVENDRA CHAUDHARY The 1981 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre has been appointed as Additional

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The 1990 batch IAS officer of ManipurTripura cadre has been appointed as Chief Vigilance Officer (CVO) in the Central Warehousing Corporation (CWC), New Delhi.

RAJAT BHARGAVA The 1990 batch IAS officer of Andhra Pradesh cadre has joined as Joint Secretary in the Department of Economic Affairs.

SUBHASH CHANDRA SHARMA The 1996 batch IAS officer has been appointed as Secretary in the Home in Uttar Pradesh.

The Deputy Chief of Mission in Moscow has been appointed as the next Ambassador of India to Libya.

The Ambassador of India to Angola has been concurrently accredited as the Ambassador of India to the Republic of Equatorial Guinea, with residence in Luanda.

SANJEEV KUMAR The 1993 batch IRS C&CE officer has joined as private secretary (PS) to Indian Corporate Affairs Minister, M Veerappa Moily.

MD PALIATH The 1978 batch IAS officer has been appointed new Additional Controller General of Defence Accounts.

RATNAKAR BARAL

The 1988 batch IA&AS Officer has been appointed Joint Secretary, Defence.

The 1982 batch IPS officer of ManipurTripura, Addl. DGP - Manipur, has been promoted to DGP scale in the cadre.

SANJOG KAPOOR

K SREENIVASULU

DEEPAK ANURAG

The 1999 batch IRS-IT officer has been posted as First Secretary, Income Tax Overseas Unit (ITOU), Embassy of India, and Tokyo, Japan.

R SUDALAIKANNAN The 2001 batch IAS officer of Tamil Nadu cadre has been appointed as Managing Director of Tamil Nadu Road Development Company Limited (TNRDC) in Tamil Nadu.

A K JAIN The Resident Commissioner, Madhya Pradesh Bhawan, New Delhi, has been appointed as Advisor, Planning Commission under the Government of India.

PAWAN KUMAR SHARMA The 1999 batch IAS officer of Madhya Pradesh cadre has been shifted on intercadre deputation from Madhya Pradesh to AGMU cadre and appointed as Deputy

The 1994 batch IAS officer has been posted as Managing Director, Govt. Fruit Preservation Factory, Singtam, Sikkim.

MANU SHRIVASTAVA The 1991 batch IAS officer of Madhya Pradesh cadre has been appointed as Managing Director of Madhya Pradesh Power Management Company Limited.

SAURABH CHANDRA The 1978 batch IAS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre has taken over as new Secretary Industrial Policy and Promotion in the Government of India.

VIMLENDRA SHARAN The 1992 batch IAS officer of Maharashtra cadre, Private Secretary to Agricultural Union Minister has been appointed as Joint Secretary Agriculture Ministry, Government of India.

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Tracking G K PILLAI The Former Union Home Secretary has been appointed part-time non-official Director in the HPCL.

SIBICHEN K MATHEW The IRS officer has been deputed as Advisor in Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) at the regional office of Bangalore.

G P KUNDARGI The Director (P&P), MOIL, has been selected for the post of Chairman and Managing Director, MOIL Limited at a Public Enterprises Selection Board.

SHRAVAN KUMAR GOTRU The Director (A & PAC), Central Board of Direct Taxes (CBDT) has been nominated as Liaison Officer for the Board.

KUMAR PAL GAUTAM The 2009 batch IAS officer has been posted as Sub-Divisional Officer (OSD), Ramgarh (Alwar) in Rajasthan.

P ANURADHA BALRAM The 1986 batch IES, Director, Adviser, Food Processing Industries, has been promoted to Senior Administrative Grade (SAG) and posted as Economic Adviser, Food Processing Industries.

NEERA RAWAT The 1992 batch IPS officer of Uttar Pradesh cadre has joined as GM, Security Airport Authority of India in Ministry of Civil Aviation.

AKSHAYA KUMAR MISHRA The 1987 batch IPS officer of Rajasthan cadre has promoted as Additional Director General of Police, Rajasthan Government.

VIJAY RAGHAV PANT The 1978 batch IPS officer has taken over as new Director General of Police Uttarakhand.

CHITTARANJAN DASH The 1999 batch IRS IT officer has been appointed as First Secretary, Income Tax Overseas Unit, Embassy of India, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

MUNISH KUMAR The 1986 batch IES officer, Director, Planning Commission, has been promoted to SAG and posted as Economic Adviser, Labour.

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For a complete list of appointments & retirements, see www.gfilesindia.com

Uttar Pradesh reshuffles IAS officers: MADHUKAR DWIVEDI has been moved as Secretary (Home). PRAGYAN RAM MISHRA has been made Divisional Commissioner of Mirzapur. SAROJ KUMAR TIWARI has been appointed Secretary (Planning). SUBHASH CHANDRA SHARMA, DM, Bareilly will now be Secretary Labour. RANVEER PRASAD will be Additional Commissioner of Rural Development and Census. AJAY AGARWAL has been promoted and posted as Secretary (Finance). MUKESH MESHRAM has been appointed Mission Director, National Rural Health Mission and Executive Director of SIFPSA. DEEPAK SINGHAL has been given additional charge of Principal Secretary, Irrigation. ALOK KUMAR (II) has been given additional charge of secretary protocol. SANJAY AGARWAL, Principal Secretary,

Health and Family Welfare, has been given additional charge of Principal Secretary, Food and Drug Control Department as well. Y K GOYAL Etah DM has been transferred. L.VENKATESHWAR LOO, has been appointed commissioner, land consolidation department. MANOJ SINGH has been posted as commissioner and secretary board of revenue, Lucknow. MOHD MUSTAFA has been relieved from the additional charge of commissioner land consolidation. SUSHIL KUMAR has been appointed Director Social Welfare. RANVIR PRASAD has been moved to the GAD. SANTOSH YADAV (1995 IAS UP) Divisional Commissioner Meerut, transferred as Vice Chairman (VC) of the Ghaziabad Development Authority (GDA). R N SINGH has been moved from Azamgarh to Pratapgarh as DM.

The following IAS officers, district magistrates and five divisional commissioners have been reshuffled in Uttar Pradesh: MUKUL SINGHAL Divisional Commissioner Kanpur, K R RAO Secretary Information Commission, RAVINDRA NAIK Divisional Commissioner Bareilly, RANJAN SHUKLA Secretary Stamp Registration, Dr HARIOM DM Moradabad, S SAMMADAR Special Secretary Health, P R MISHRA Member Board of Revenue, ANIL KUMAR Divisional Commissioner Gorakhpur, SURESH CHANDRA Director Training and Employment, CHANCHAL TIWARI Divisional Commissioner Varanasi, RAJESH K SINGH additional charge Forests, SANJAY PRASAD Divisional commissioner Saharanpur, AMRIT ABHIJAT Secretary Technical education, R RAMESH KUMAR Secretary Languages, K S ATORIYA Divisional Commissioner Devipaten, HARI RAJ KISHORE PS Small Scale Industries, Dr HARSHARAN DAS Labour Commissioner Kanpur, SUBHRA SAXENA CDO Meerut, ADITI SINGH CDO Lucknow, VIJAY KARAN ANAND CDO Barabanki, BHANU GOSWAMI CDO Varanasi, ANUJ KUMAR JHA CDO Jhansi, MALA SRIVASTAVA Joint Development Commissioner Allahabad, NITIN BANSAL CDO Allahabad, RUPESH KUMAR CDO Agra, M ALI SARWAR CDO Moradabad, VIVEK CDO Mathura, BHUPENDRA CHAUDHARY CDO Jaunpur, D P DUBEY Special Secretary APC, PRAKASH BINDU CDO Gautam Buddha Nagar, C RAJA LINGAM CDO Moradabad, GOVIND RAJU DM Mirzapur,RAKESH DM Sultanpur, K VIJAY PANDIYAN DM, VIKRAM SINGH DM Mau, Ambedkar Nagar, RAJESH KUMAR DM Sant Kabir Nagar, S DUBEY Special Secretary GAD, MUTHU SWAMY V DM Farrukkhabad, KANCHAN VERMA DM Fatehpur,Y BHASKAR DM Shravasti, KUMAR R SINGH DM Deoria,RAVINDRA Special Secretary Commercial Taxes, SAMIR VERMA DM Varanasi, SUBHASH SHARMA Spl Secretary Labour, MANISH CHAUHAN DM Bareilly, ANIL GARG DM Aligarh, GAURAV DAYAL DM Jhansi, SURENDRA SINGH DM Muzaffarnager, S V S RANGRAO DM Firozabad, AMRIT TRIPATHI DM Sant Ravi Das Nagar, RAVI KUMAR DM Gorakhpur, SANJAY KUMAR DM Mathura, R JACOB DM Rai Bareilly, ABHAY DM Gonda, RITU MAHESHWARI DM Bhim Nagar, RAJ SHEKHAR DM Pilibhit, MANISH TIGHOTIA DM, Jalaun, PAWAN KUMAR DM Chandauli, LOKESH M DM Etah,P N SINGH DM Gazipur, G SRINIVASLU Spl Secretary Housing, MADHUKAR DWIVEDI Special Sec Higher Education, Pinki Joval DM Ballia,K Singh DM Bahraich, VIDYA BHUSHAN DM CSM Nagar, SAROJ KUMAR DM Kaushambi,S MUTHU SHALINI DM Basti,Dr KAJAL DM Mahoba and B CHANDRAKALA DM Hamirpur.

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...by the way

5

years

Winners all?

W

Search for Chief Secy

O

rders appointing P K Chaudhary as the new Commerce Secretary were on their way to Udyog Bhavan. The Prime Minister had approved his name. Suddenly, the next thing we came to know was that he was the new Chief Secretary of Haryana. What happened? Let us tell you. Apparently, Haryana Chief Minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda was in a fix. His Chief Secretary Urvashi Gulati was retiring at the end of March. He first approached Finance Secretary R S Gujral but the latter told Hooda, “I will do more for the state as Finance Secretary than to be the Chief Secretary”. Insiders, however, say Gujral cannot forget “one old indecent incident” so he politely refused. So Hooda landed in the office of Commerce Minister Anand Sharma and P K Chaudhary got a call from the Minister’s office. Anand Sharma informed Chaudhary that Hooda wanted him to be the Chief Secretary of Haryana. Chaudhary said, “When Chief Minister Hooda has come all the way to ask for me to be Chief Secretary, I am honoured and accept.” Chaudhary is also believed to have asked Hooda, “Why do you want me to be in Haryana, when there are so many honest and efficient officers available”. Hooda replied to Chaudhary, “no doubt there are many but I want honesty should be seen.” Chaudhary is said to be committed to restoring the prestige of the office of Chief Secretary and has already started implementing the Result Frame Document with all the ministries. g

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hen a war is won, if all the awards were to go to the General what would we think about him? A similar situation prevailed at the PM’s Award for Excellence in Public Administration, held in Vigyan Bhawan at Delhi recently. When the awards for successful holding of panchayat elections in J&K were announced, nobody was surprised. But when the awards went to the Chief Secretary, Director General of Police, Chief Electoral Officer, Special Secretary to Chief Secretary, and Principal Secretary (Planning and Development), everybody was left a bit nonplussed. In principal, all these officials are duty bound to hold the elections. It was nothing great. It would have been in the fitness of things if the work of collectors and SPs who did all the field work was recognised instead! How the awardees are selected is a great mystery however. The Department of Administrative Reforms and Public Grievances, which is the apex body for organising this award, never briefs how many citations it had received. Who are the officials in the selection committee? How do they decide which 10 out of thousands will be awarded? The entire process needs some introspection. It is learnt that Cabinet Secretary A K Seth personally called the Secretaries and Chief Secretaries to be present so the only solace which they can get is that the function was well attended. g

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5

...by the way

years

Ministry of Singhs

T

T

he Planning Commission’s main task is to decide where government money has to be spent wisely. This job is being done admirably by Montek Singh Ahluwalia, the Deputy Chairperson. It would not be wrong to say that Ahluwalia virtually controls the finances of the Government of India. His wife, also an economist, Isher Judge Ahluwalia has produced a book titled ‘India’s Economic Reforms and Development: Essays for Manmohan Singh’. Clearly, the husband-wife team is completely dedicated and loyal to the Prime Minister. But preaching to Ministries and States to control wasteful expenditure is easier said than done. And what about if Yojana Bhawan,the building which houses the Planning Commission, doesn’t care for Ahluwalia’s dictums. Insiders inform that two ‘smart toilets’ have been constructed for elite members of the Planning Commission. One can only have the access to these ‘smart toilets’ through smart cards. Naturally, this is causing much heartburn. These ‘unproductive assets’ have cost huge money. Now Aswani Kumar has to take a call to go to the bottom of the issue and see from where this plan of constructing costly toilets has originated. g

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illustration: aruna

Unproductive assets!

he Steel Ministry has many Singhs right now since Dilip Raj Singh Chaudhary has joined as the Secretary, Steel. Three other Joint Secretaries who are already working in the ministry are Upendra Prasad Singh, Uday Pratap Singh and Dalip Singh. So, the buzz is that the Steel Ministry belongs to the Singhs. The Prime Minister’s Office was undecided who they wanted as steel secretary for the last couple of months as the stakes in the ministry are very high. DoPT secretary PK Misra was handling the ministry on an ad hoc basis. He toured different countries in March to complete the unfinished agenda but there are many issues which have to be settled on a priority basis and the Minister Beni Prasad Verma can’t wait. So, the PMO appointed DRS Chaudhary, a 1977 batch MP cadre IAS with a successful three years stint in the Ministry of Home Affairs. Chaudhary, an MA in political science, was Deputy Secretary in the Ministry of Steel between 1986 and 1990. The advantage with Chaudhary is that he understands naxal issues and threats very well as he has handled Naxal Management in the Home Ministry. This experience will prove useful as most of the steel mines are in Naxal infested areas. Chaudhary is believed to have already started work at a fast pace. If insiders are to be believed, he is determined to clear all obstacles regarding the Posco project. Let us wait and watch how the Beni-DRS team enthuse the Steel Ministry and bring back it to the speed which PMO is looking for. g

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Regn.No.DL(C)-14/1161/2010-12 Licence No. U(C)-3/2012, Licence to post without prepayment Posted on 7th & 8th of every month at SPM SRT Nagar, Post Office, New Delhi 110055 R.N.I. No: DELENG/2007/19719. Rs.100, vol. 6, issue 1 | April 2012

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