An Educational Filter

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These pages are a dedication to readers for the future development of METADATA. The purpose is to leave a TAG or TRACING (name, date, drawing, etc) behind for other fellows. The proliferation of data is the reasoning for this thesis.

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Think about some of these words... Data Filter Virtual Physical Ubiquity Experiential Manipulated

<< Commence >>

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An Educational Filter The Manhattan 12 Strati Lacey Jane Hedegard San Diego, CA 2009- 2010

Art + Design

A thesis relegated to the Undergraduate Faculty of the NewSchool of Architecture & Design as per the Bachelor of Architecture Degree Requirements.

Copyright Š 2010 First Edition Lacey Jane Hedegard All rights reserved. Under no circumstance shall this material be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, electronic, mechanical, photocopied or otherwise without the permission of the author/ publisher. All work is of the author unless it is noted otherwise. Unsourced photographs are property of the author, Lacey Jane Hedegard. DESIGN PATENTED.

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Approved by: Mitra Kanaani, D Arch, AIA, Undergraduate Chair

________________________________ James A. Enos, M. Arch, MFA, AIA, Thesis Advisor

This book is dedicated to my mom.

stnetnoC Acknowledgement 6

Mom, you are my guiding light and steer an appropriate response for overcoming the forked divide. Thanks for always believing in me, and can not even begin to express how grateful I am for all your efforts associated with this thesis. It was a lot of work, but truly it was a definitive journey. I love you and continue to thank you everyday, from the bottom of my heart.

_______________________________

1 Introducing

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An Educational Filter...

2 Synthesis

17

Knowledge is Passion...

3 “Pre” Search

The Law is Reason... a Precedents b Program c Context

29 41 53

4 Design

Alan Rosenblum, M. Arch, 1st Year Graduate Coordinator

War and Peace... i Process ii Schematics

_______________________________ Photo Credit: Stan Hedegard, 1988

Lacey Jane Hedegard B. Arch

5 Remarks

67 83

121

Virtue Summed Up... .

Appendix

______________________________

129

“I got soul, and I’m super bad” - James Brown

______________________________

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This thesis offers an ideology directing a methodology resulting in an educative typologically significant piece of architecture. This project has fostered my determination and personal growth in architecture and it would not have been possible without the support of family and friends. I thank you all for the continuous questioning that drove my passion and tenacity in this project. To all I say reach for the stars! Believe in yourself and be spontaneous. All things result in growth and create dynamic and interesting results. Ride the wave- for the journey has just begun. Karen Kinney & Eric Robinson: Thank you for all the references and new book holdings. It has helped me tremendously in accomplishing this thesis. Alan Rosenblum: The creativity and passion you foster allows meaningful experimentation through interrelating the individual process, theory, phenomenology and architecture. Thank you for opening my eyes to a different way of digesting information. James Enos: Man, was this thesis intense. It was great! The intelligence I have learned will make me a better person, wherever I choose to go. I now understand the skepticism but the investigation of critical social theory has made me understand the importance of relational architecture. I also understand that if something new is to be created there needs to be a reinterpretation of that critical social theory in your own linguistics. Thank you for the inspiration and support when this project was submitted to Metropolis Magazine’s Next Generation competition. I hope it becomes my ticket to graduate school as we intended it for. Thanks again for the push to get this thesis where it needed to be. Mentee (aka Robert Hall): Articulate your architecture phenomenally for those structures become the definition for why architecture is a social, environmental, and experiential interface. When you find that uniquity showcase it as a social ambiance. Nathan Lee Colkitt: Thank you very much for the introduction to Deleuze & Guattari in fourth year. The experience took hold and propelled the foundation of my thesis and it has hit the ground running. I appreciate your insight and opportunity at NLCA, thus far. Perry Kulper: Thank you very much for your inspiration and cannot express how much your mentality and spirit became part of this project. Special Thanks: Allen Ghaida, Aston Lawrence, and Gavin Studer. You are my supporters for life and I look forward to the future collaborations (service, speech, questioning, and renders).

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stnemegdelwonkcA Praiseworthy Mentionables...

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Data. Information is abstract. The abstraction can be represented in physical form. This graphic illustrates that the same information can look different as it participates in a filtering process. The process of these drawings correlates with the process of this thesis. First, four cardstock pieces were layered together to represent a physical form. Second, key words describing information were translated into lines onto the layered card stock using pen and India Ink. The ink itself interacted physically in the process seeping through to the multiple layers of cardstock forming four drawings representing multiple representations of the same data information. The four layered cardstock pieces represent the site that disperses information in physical form. Revealing key words that describe information offers collaborative interaction. And, the ink represents information dispersed on to the site of card stock. The process occurring between the site, the collaboration and the information acts as a filter. The filter process breaks the information down into digital data pieces at different levels through the interaction between abstract information delivered collaboratively at a physical site. This thesis proposes an educational filter design to offer an educational site that is physical, digital and experientially symbolic. Ultimately, the data is taken in, like a breath, amongst each step and becomes apart of our entire being. 8

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1 gnicudortnI

An Educational Filter...

invisible... Until it fails...we become... conscious of the extraordinary force

“For most of us, design is

and power of design... ...the design of the world.” -Bruce Mau

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The author’s thesis proposes the design of prototypical learning spaces referred to as Public Information Service Parks strategically located in each of New York City’s 12 districts. This project offers a creative solution to two main problems. Firstly, the project addresses restrictive educational environments that decrease learning potential and secondly the project addresses the emerging problems related to the storage of digital information. The Public Information Service Parks serve the twofold purpose to house data on the 2 lower levels, and on the upper level, provide a collaborative learning space to mobilize experiential information and service acquisition. The Information Service Parks serve as an urban interface allowing users to access strategically unique information at each site. The Public Information Service Parks are designed to encourage urban action through interaction. The architecturally designed data center and information network in the Service Parks mobilize information acquisition as a service through an urban interface of ubiquitous information navigation within a ten block radius in New York City. The Public Information Service Parks encourage strategic exploration of each districts unique environmental, social, financial and political issues and facts. The site design is directed at demonstrating the connection of these 12 urban districts through an architectural plan that connects the structures with designated walking paths and virtual information paths. New York City offers 12 districts for prototypical learning space development with multiple University sites, dispersed all throughout the city, offering an architectural placement within a strong urban context. The 12 districts sites offer civic use through the distribution of education as a service at the Public Information Service Parks. Each district’s Park will house a unique category of information and service. For example, District 1, Tribeca, Civic Center, Battery Park and the Financial District relates to government and economics. District 1’s Public Information Service Park will store and offer a wide range of data on elected governmental officials, and the current issues affecting the public and the city. The Service Park can present information on available options for individuals to get involved in the solution process through the collaborative learning site activities. The educational filter concept links design ideas into a single purpose. The educational filter, an architectural solution, embraces the fact that data is proliferating, that learning spaces lack collaboration and that communities need interfaces that activate participation, connection and action. As a locative media project, the education filter design applied to Public Information Service Parks will ultimately facilitate social, cultural, and political interactions thus providing a solution that mobilizes the participation and dispersion of data as a public service directed at building communities.

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tcartsbA Summary...

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Where would you rather BE learning? This thesis addresses the current learning challenges resulting from non-collaborative and indoor educational environments. Traditional classroom settings restrict creativity, limit exploration and impact learning negatively (Moore, 2005). Outdoor learning environments that provide stimuli to entice student exploration enhances learning and memory (Rogan, et al., 2005; Wilson, 1994). Exterior (outdoor) environmental interactions aid student comprehension in regards to social, societal, political, and environmental issues (Gardner, 1983; DurĂĄn-Narucki, 2008). Therefore, the majority of real learning takes place externally, outside the housed ‘containers’ (Orr, 2002). Designing a learning environment that structurally enhances collaborative learning and provides an outdoor interactive setting with in a city can resuscitate stagnant educational environments. Another emerging problem addressed in this 12

project relates to the storage of digital information. Data storage facilities are needed to accommodate the rapid growth of digital information. Adam Wilson, general manager, Information Lifecycle Management stated that inadequately managed data growth is fast becoming a problem of epic proportions, with databases increasing in size by as much as 50 percent a year (Informatica, 2010). Fast Pace information growth is a part of this culture. The Oracle Applications Users Group research suggests techniques like database archiving and database sub-setting can counter the progressively negative impact data proliferation has on application performance (Trading Markets.com 2010). Designing strategically located data centers that accommodate information management and storage with greater energy efficiency while facilitating the dispersion of sub-set information can help to accommodate this growth. Contextually

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Critical noitisoP Acquired from Source: (Opposite) Demi Maniaki- http://www.avatarlondon.org/

placed datacenters facilitate disbursing information strategically to mobilize interactive learning within inner city streets, as well as, decreasing data pile up and trafficking that will ultimately slow bandwidth speed and create information access challenges. Additionally, this thesis explores the process of learning theoretically through a rhizomatic process applied to collaborative learning. A rhizome constantly changes, is flexible and spontaneous (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987). The destination of the path is the process of networking. The Rhizomatic Theory provides a model to develop a learning space that constructs a collaborative knowledge-based community (Cormier, 2008). Therefore the qualities of the Rhizomatic spaces become the root force supporting the collaborative prototypical learning spaces that offer direction towards creating a networked globalized student ecology. What architecture potentials emerge in relationship to an educational filter based on rhizomatical peda-

gogy? An architectural educational filter design based on the ideas of data, collaborative learning environments and the rhizomatic process offers an architectural forum to design and build interesting and aesthetic spaces that differ from current educative design potentials. The collaborative educational filter design encourages the students to develop their own linguistics through spatial communication with other environments. A rhizomatic education allows students to teach themselves. A rhizomatic learning space offers a type of engaged collaboration that metaphorically grows a connective tissue or network that has the ability to change spatially, depending on forced conditions. The networked adhesion develops a sense of place (Rogan, et al., 2005) where the undefined rhizome (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987) becomes the educative space that operates through the promotion of social exchanges. Thus a type of urban interface emerges. The applied phenom-

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enon produces connection and passion towards engaged learning. The rhizome process expands the student’s environmental interaction through collaborative experiences that defines new educative practices that can conform to data server/ storage contextual conditions. Defining data as pedagogy (Orr, 2002) directed the investigation of a new typology with data as a scape (Public Information Service Park). A student immersed in the physical structure is also part of a nodal communicative space for networking users. The information as a public service drives the learning space prototype. This design additionally acts as a filter by strategically dividing information available at each Information Service Park into district categories. Determining a site for the development of the prototypical learning space was directed at finding a space that offered the opportunity to showcase the educational filter design. New York City offered this space. New York City’s 12 districts are within a ten mile radius and are in close proximity to multiple learning institutions. This innate city structure offers a setting to develop walking and informational paths that network university campuses located in the core districts. The rhizomatic learning environment located in the existing urban fabric of New York ultimately networks universities, businesses and people. This thesis explores a futuristic locative media project offering a multiple phase architectural project culminating in the development of prototypical learning spaces called Public Information Service Parks. The Information Service Parks’ main objectives are to provide data storage, data dispersion and provide a unique learning space directed at providing urban interfaces throughout district communities in New York City. Socially, the Information Service Parks act as hubs for communication. 14

They manage information through collecting and dispersing data into the urban environment. The realization of the total concept is a long-term complex process. It takes steps to begin to mobilize and bridge the conceptual ideas. This thesis addresses that bridge. The project begins with the implementation of an efficient system of modular data centers to store date and manage information, initially for students then progress to include the local population to provide urban services and interaction. Ultimately the data centers will house and facilitate collaborative education sites with physical walking paths and virtual information paths between the Service Parks offering education and services for multiple urban sectors.

The following researched concepts and issues below help to define a language to fully explain and mobilize a rhizomatic education through an ‘Educational Filter’ design.

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Phase 1

Phase 2

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Architecturally, data is the beginning of a new paradigm.

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2

sisehtnyS Knowledge is Passion...

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INTRODUCTION Many philosophical and theoretical ideas impact cultural identity and can be applied in the areas of education and architecture. A thorough review of literature provided a researched body of knowledge that served as a tool to direct the development of the architectural design in this thesis. A review of multiple ideas and issues in phase one of the thesis development helped define the language to fully explain and mobilize a rhizomatic education through an ‘Educational Filter’ design. The ideas researched in phase one included: Collaborative Learning, education environment, Rhizomatic Theory, knowledge acquisition, phenomenology, the production of a place, disease macrophage immune process and data. In addition, a review of case studies revealed concepts relating to psychosis, urban interface, network, and digital storage. These ideas add depth and meaning to the practice of architecture and foster new ideas about learning spaces. COLLABORATIVE LEARNING The design of an architectural educational filter offers a learning space based upon the evidence based model of Collaborative Learning. The concept of collaborative learning has been widely researched and the professional literature advocates the principals. The term “collaborative learning” refers to an instruction method in which students at various performance levels work together toward a common goal. The students are responsible for one another’s learning as well as their own. Collaborative learning environments promote the active exchange of ideas that increases interest, promotes critical thinking, achieve at higher levels of thought and retain information longer (Johnson & Johnson, 1986).

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‘Collaborative Knowledge Based’, CKB learning environments emphasize personal experience and offer environmental support for imagination and creativity (Cormier, 2008). The problem is that there is a poor integration of collaborative learning practices in college education (Moore, 2005). Collegiate buildings are structured for learning; however, the facilities are just ‘containers’ that house learning (Orr, 2002). The containment, out of convenience, defines a space where learning should occur, but learning is conditional (Orr, 2002). These facilities fail to provide what students actually need to stimulate the learning process. Creativity emerges as the environment stimulates the learner’s imagination and itself becomes a device that promotes learning (Sabbadini, 1989). When schools enact a CKB approach, it promotes learning by enabling teamwork (Cormier, 2008). With this teaching style, students can bounce ideas off one another developing synergy. The students become the teachers. Johnson and Johnson (1986), discuss the persuasive evidence that collaborative education increases higher levels of thought and retention of information. The shared learning experience offers an opportunity to fully engage, take responsibility and direct one’s learning, thus encouraging critical thinking (Totten, Sills, Digby, & Russ, 1991). The advances in technology increase the emphasis on teamwork within the workforce. “Workers need to be able to think creatively, solve problems, and make decisions as a team. Therefore, the development and enhancement of critical-thinking skills through collaborative learning is one of the primary goals of technological education” (Gokhale, 1995). The basis for developing this type of education is to devise connective tissues or networks that change spatially. The network adhesion will develop a sense of place (Rogan, et al., 2005) that becomes the space that actually educates. This space/place

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will create an attachment that combines the community’s ideologies to enhance a sense of belonging (Rogan, et al., 2005). From a phenomenological standpoint, a CKB community unifies the concepts of knowledge, identity, and place under magnification, which humanitarianly promotes the intelligence of space. Collaborative environmental spaces become a playground for the understanding of what is learned (Rogan, et al., 2005), thus increasing the perceptions of intelligence (Bloom, et al., 2003). EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT Wilson’s (1994) studies show that external outdoor learning environments stimulate learning more effectively than interior stylized environments. Teachers noticed that students are lethargic and less active, socially, in interior (indoor) environment (Gardner, 1983; Durán-Narucki, 2008). Additionally, the results noted that students retain more information in external environments (Rogan, et al., 2005). Exterior (outdoor) environmental interactions aid student comprehension of social, societal, political, and environmental issues (Gardner, 1983; Durán-Narucki, 2008) and establishes mystic qualities through direct correlation and somatic memories with the environment (Wilson, 1994). Therefore, the majority of real learning takes place externally, outside the housed ‘containers’ (Orr, 2002). Consequently, design should take into account external outdoor environments. This thesis design promotes this concept through the development of walking and virtual information paths between each Public Information Service Park. The technology promotes the outdoor navigation through the strategic and exciting delivery of information through a ubiquitous devise in a natural, yet energetic, environment.

RHIZOMATIC THEORY What is a Rhizome? The root of space is described in what is known as a rhizome. A rhizome is a part of a plant that conducts a biolgically natural process of sending roots in multiple, yet no ‘one’ direction. Theoretically, a rhizome is un-definable; it’s a point that cannot stand alone and all points are networked to other points, which essentially become lines (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987). A rhizome is constantly changing. It may change direction, striation, or tracing. It is a spontaneous map always fluctuating. Furthermore, a rhizome is a flexible adhesion of path networks and the actual process of networking is the destination of the rhizome (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987). The destination does not arrive. It is infinite. The Rhizomatic Theory provides a model to develop an intensified educational space offering a collaborative knowledge-based community (Cormier, 2008) that is contextually adept. Rhizomatic spaces possess experiential qualities that produce phenomenal structures. The rhizome defines environmental forces that impact the nature of all kinds of worldly perceptions (Massumi, 1992). Systematically, the brain’s neuronal activity resembles a rhizomatic process (the firing of receptors, transmitters and receivers; Bloom, Beal, & Kupfer, 2003). The Rhizomatic Theory influences the research and design of the proposed informational learning spaces through the support and mobilization of collaborative knowledge-based community. KNOWLEDGE AQUISITION What is knowledge? Knowledge is the actual location of identifiable components, within nature, or the physical environment (Rogan, et al., 2005). The goal of education is to intentionally incorporate and facilitate a process of obtaining and manipulating knowledge. The approaches directed at the acquisition of

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knowledge change with emerging theoretical ideas (Cormier, 2008). Knowledge acquisition includes the analysis of how one fits in the environment of the vastly growing world (Cormier, 2008). Knowledge acquired directly affects the understanding of self-identity (Cormier, 2008). Additionally, one’s identity directly affects the execution of environmental interactions. Knowledge produces scientific logistics that determine a perceptual bias including the emotional content of experience related to conscious subjectivities. Subjectivity awareness includes affect (feeling), orientation (spatial location), manipulation (objective movement), categorization (informational knowledge), and encoding’ (memory) (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). Therefore, place knowledge can determine the perceptual subjectivities of consciousness. Traditionally, knowledge was thought to be acquired in static locations from physical entities, such as localized books or computers. Internet and Telecommunication use has tripled over the course of the first decade within the 21st century (NTIA Report, 2010; AOL & UM, 2010). IPods, Smartphones, and now iPads allow locational information access quickly. These products promote mobile information access and provide for a network of global communication. Knowledge acquisition is now ubiquitous and exists throughout the environment, and most might consider it invisible. A large portion of the population will have access to this technology instantaneously. Hence, routers, antenna transmitters, and wireless local area networks (WLAN), most commonly referred to as Wi-Fi, transfer information through wireless infrastructure (Sun Microsystems, 2006) and integrate technology within the environment. Educational facilities often lack the understanding of this concept and therefore do not implement the full capacity of knowledge acquisition strategies (Gardner, 1983).

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PLACE What is a place? According to dictionary.com (2009), there are fifty different definitions of place. There is no one single way to define place. A ‘place’ (Auburn & Barnes, 2006; Rogan, O’Connor, Horwitz, 2005; Manzo, 2005) is a setting where the characteristics determine the environmental perceptions. An ‘experience-in-place’ (Manzo, 2005) occurs from the existence of a space. It is the actual experience of a place at that time and moment that creates the meaning through conscious and unconscious associations (Manzo, 2005). Places are settings for meanings to be made. Meaning-making (Auburn & Barnes, 2006) is the collective social event in which experiences are shared as a community. Gustafson (2001b) defines the feelings shared collaboratively amongst a community as a root. Meaning making is significant because it draws out the community to enhance collective or publicly used spaces (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). In the context of meanings being made, it is relevant to mention the collaborative knowledge based approach, because it associates the collective learning process with the environmental fabric. Places become meaningful if a person is involved and maintains relationships in the social, political and environmental realms. The Public Service Information Park is intended to not only provide services but also to serve as a social communicative hub. The social science field offers a description of three elements that mobilize the “social” experience of a place: locale, location, and sense of place (Agnew, 1987; Gustafson, 2001a). First of all, the locale is the setting where multiple social interactions occur and develop over time (Gustafson, 2001a). Secondly, the location is the geographic context; the specific location affects the social intermixing of diverse perspectives cultur-

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ally and economically (Gustafson, 2001a). Lastly, a sense of place is the ‘structure of feeling’ (Gustafson, 2001a). An individual’s feelings influence the perception and personal meaning applied to a place (Manzo, 2005; Tuan, 1974). In selecting a place or site, there are three procedures that assist in the examination of existing conditions and the associated meaning that can help direct the choice of a place as an architectural site. The first includes a local analysis of a site location, in relationship to the user (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). This is a geographical concept. Secondly, postulation for what location would best fit the needs for a public space (Auburn & Barnes, 2006) and lastly, topic or activity analysis determines the best area to host the services offered at the site (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). These procedures examine the existing conditions and notate the conceptual placement of a designed space. Assessment of the New York proved notable for the current division of 12 districts within the city. The area with in the 12 districts serves students at multiple University and educative settings. In addition, the area serves business and residential populations in an urban setting. The location within the 12 district areas offers direct access to the intended user of the Public Service Information Park. The physicality of location is known as a ‘place identity’ (Rogan, et al., 2005). The direct environmental contact promotes identity growth. Place identity answers the ‘who we are’ in relationship to ‘where we are’ questions (Rogan, et al., 2005). Place identity evolves as an individuals’ perceptions relates with the environment (Rogan, et al., 2005). Experiences within the environment and nature showcase spiritual insight. A place identity unveils the ‘unconscious’ ideology of how one reflects, emotes, and acts in regards to the present environmental conditions (Manzo, 2005). The membership or user of the place includes stu-

dents in the first phase of the project expanding to the local population needs of urban services. The place activities include data management, service access and collaborative urban learning. A sense of place is the understanding of the people and environment (Rogan, et al., 2005). Auburn and Barnes (2006) identify a ‘common communicative environment’ as one that facilitates the interface between two or more people in a natural context. A person’s involvement within a community gives a place meaning while relaying a physical bond with the environment (Rogan, et al., 2005). The most prevalent bonds are portrayed through empowered individuals. Order is accomplished through interfacing people and it is unnaturally conscious until the users’ communicate (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). Some places may exhibit behavioral situations (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). These situations observe the environmental observations of how people interact. For example when resided in a church, there can be complete silence. For some, the silence becomes the ‘socialized’ (Auburn & Barnes, 2006) recognition of how to behave within this physicality. Service Park users gain access to services that promote activity and involvement throughout the community. The subjectivities (affect, orientation, manipulation, categorization, and encoding) describe the adaptations of a cognitive remembrance, in an environmental standpoint (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). The design of Public Information Service Parks will intend for those subjectivities to become the architectural trigger for social interaction. Architecture and Place become woven strands, rooted together to emphasize the experience of defining personal meaning (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). DATA CENTER A data center houses all electronic equipment that processes information through dedicated

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servers, storages, and networks of communication (EnergySTAR, 2007). A successful data center design requires thorough analysis of multiple areas including information technology, computer science, network infrastructures and information management because the data stored and serviced at the center is important to the systematic design of the entire process, especially regarding energy consumption. Research on service warehouse and data center designs showcased a specific product available currently. Sun Microsystems developed a portable shipping contained data center called “Blackbox”. The Sun Microsystem’s “Project Blackbox” (2006) analyzed the systematic efficiency and design of the small-scale modular data center. The employment of this efficient modular data center allows for future growth in the area of data center design. The data center is constructed out of 20 feet shipping containers and allows for ‘virtualized computing’ and data storage. This offers a portable option to localize the systematics of data warehouse storage. The “Blackbox” product demonstrates the potential benefits of designing data centers. Strategically located data centers’ storage of information systems can help to accommodate digital information growth. Implementation of urban data centers can reduce heating and cooling loads within existing building infrastructures because of their energy-efficiency. These data centers could harvest power by using off-grid technologies, such as solar and wind generation. Data centers produce excess heat gain and designing them efficiently would decrease CO2 emissions, and reduce electricity costs by approximately 4.5 billion dollars a year (EnergySTAR, 2007). A data safety issues emerging in relation to data storage centers is that the outsourcing of sensitive data away from the data source increases both enterprise data volumes and business risk (Informatica, 2010). Currently, the majority of New York’s 22

information is stored in large-scale, suburban, data warehouses in New Jersey, 25 miles outside the city. This proposal focuses on an innovative usage of data storage centers located within inner-city streets to facilitate distribution of information and decrease information access challenges by localizing and sub-setting unique information at each data center housed in the Public Information Service Park. In addition, creative management of the information at the data center can mobilize strategic services and interactive learning within inner city streets. 1:27:00 am on January 21, 2010: 277,788,775,000 Bytes of information have been created (Digital Footprint Application). 11:11:00 pm on June 11, 2010: 348,262,682,708 Bytes of information have been created (Digital Footprint Application).

DISEASE Macrophage immune process

The creation of a space that enhances the spreading and creative integration of knowledge is a major goal of this thesis project. Research in the area of the body’s response to the spread of viral disease, as a typological process assisted to metaphorically define the contributing role of collaborative education in the process of knowledge production. Viral diseases are transmitted to cells in the body through exposure to vectors or disease transmitting organisms carrying contagious viral information via blood or saliva (Roitt, 2003). The virus carries information to the body cell causing the body cell to change and replicate itself as the virus. The viral cells then spread the new viral information quickly in many directions though out the body and to others through human contact (Roitt, 2003).The body’s immune response releases the macrophage cell to follow the virus and engage in a process of incorporating the virus into itself (Roitt,2003). The macrophage “communicates with” other macrophage cells to assist in

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this process. With the digestion of the virus information, a change takes place within the macrophage as it learns the new information about the virus. The macrophage integrates this knowledge gained and spreads the new information into the body’s overall immune system enhancing the capacity for growth and survival. Metaphorically, the body cell is the thesis project site. The virus is the collaborative learning environment. The collaborative learning process (virus) located within the project site (body cell) spreads information quickly and in many directions though human contact. The project site and the integrated collaborative learning process facilitate the engaged interaction within the learning space and through human contact. The metaphoric macrophage or the student/user engages at the project site and digests the information when coming in contact with and interacting in he collaborative learning process. The student “digests� the new experiential information contributing to personal change through creative integration of the new information learned. The student spreads the new information by collaboratively communicating and participating with other students at the project site. The student/user becomes the macrophage that spreads information as an artful, academic disease/immune process.

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v

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Macrophage Social Network

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(Above) This graphic was developed with NodeXL and it is an algorithmic representation of all my Twitter contacts. It clustered and mapped my interests with those of my contacts. There is no scale, but my account is represented in the middle, as an orange square.

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Viral TransMitted

all my no scale,

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Acquired by Source: http://www.google.com/firefox?client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official

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3 hcraeS”erP“ The Law is Reason...

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a

stnedecerP

Case Research...

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Collaboration EDUCATION

Pedagogical Styles Adapted by Source: Michael Wilhart: http://www.avatarlondon.org/

Montessori Reggio Pestalozzi

INFLUENCES

Steiner Bauhaus

SOCIAL NETWORKS

PAOLO SOLERI

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT

Taliesin

Facebook Myspace Flickr Google

Environment

Knowledge Point Cloud Diagram: The significance of the educative styles to how the projects’ issue.

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Live traced image of Manhattan, New York placed inside silhouette of a person’s head to symbolize the amount of knowledge we learn.

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MONTESSOURI:

Italian

The primary focus of this scientific pedagogy examines the “LIBERTY OF THE PUPIL... such liberty permits development of the individual...”. This is the observation of the child in their own natural environment and mentaility. This method involves using anthropometrics, psychology, environment, observation of environmental behaviors”(Schoken, 1964).

REGGIO:

Italian

Aims to “spread a strong idea of childhood, promote study, research, and experimentation...Schools are places for enhancing educational rights and promote a youthful, society of children”(Reggio Children, 2008).

STEINER

- Waldorf:

Austrian

“Fosters an integrated multisensorial approach to learning and expression, and emphasize ‘oral listening and memory’(Edwards, 1998).

PESTALOZZI:

Swiss

Learn by thinking and making. This is an individual process that focuses on addressing your own answers to the questions (Smith, 2007).

EDUCATIONAL PEDAGOGIES

BAUHAUS:

German

The School was founded in 1919, in Weimar, Germany by Walter Gropius. He wanted an educational model that “combined architecture, sculpture, and painting into a single form” (W.G.; The Bauhaus Manifesto). The pedagogy focused on ‘educating with the senses’ by promoting ‘industry, craft and commerce’.

PAOLO SOLERI ARCHITECTURE AS HUMAN ECOLOGY. The aim is to be “a working model geared to transforming today’s environmental, social, and cultural circumstances, while offering growth opportunities and learning” (Soleri by Lima, 2003). Principles: 1. architecture as an urban route, 2. Nature = inexhaustible spring for knowledge, 3. Bridges are audacious landscapes for connecting cities

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT “Educate, preserve, create”. Manipulates space and light Adapted from Source: Google

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Proto - Formal

“...Quests for productive knowledge intermingle with imagination and illusory projection, loosening the authoritative grip of quantitative information and analytical domination.�

Adapted from Source: http://dprbcn.wordpress. com/2009/10/15/perrykulper-revisited/

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Perry Kulper This thesis (can take out) methodology helped determined how the site analysis should be conducted to derive this project’s design of Public Information Services Parks (PISP). These PISP’s are located in each of the 12 different districts in New York City is similar to Perry Kulper’s framework for the conceptual projects that were produced for the Motel for 24 paranoias study. Kulper maps global zones through the analysis of sensory interpretation of the information. He appropriated 24 conceptual ideas based on phenomena. In a personal email (11.18.09), Perry describes the project: “it is an architectural proposal that enabled psychological and embodied participation that came about by thinking about the global context of psychological metamorphosis (surrealist enterprise) that resulted in the appropriation of the 24 time zones that articulate time differentials in the world - this was the framework/ground that the ‘paranoiac’ spaces occupied. The spaces were appropriated images and I think were modified according to the particular paranoia they were about... - See attached plan.” Through a similar process, this thesis will conduct site analysis in NYC and determine 12 zones for further prototypical analysis (the factor of 12 is the enumeration of Manhattan districts, encountered within the five boroughs) of designated walking and virtual information paths.

Source: Perry Kulper

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34

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Lebbeus Woods High House: Published on LW Blog February 23, 2010 Lebbeus Woods’ city reconstruction proposal offers similarities with how this thesis will address the site context of New York City. Woods’ project partially proposes a ‘reconstruction for the city of Sarajevo after a siege’ in the early 1990’s. The specific site analyzes an industrialized tobacco factory in the centralized district of the city. Woods’ concept reveals ‘houses rise up high into the airspace once occupied by falling mortar and artillery shells fired by the city’s besiegers...’ the space above ground - air is the symbolic reclamation of space for the city. The balanced structure utilizes ‘scavenged steel beams, welded end-to-end... Stabilized by steel cables anchored to the site, the houses, poised like catapults, fulfill the paradoxical desire to fly and at the same time be rooted in their place of origin. ’The spaces are meaningful as they produce conflicts, physically and mentally by broadcasting the ‘city’s past and present, aiming at a future uniquely for Sarajevan.”

Adapted from Source: http://lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com/2010/02/23/high-houses/

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Naja & de Ostos Project: The Hanging Cemetery of Baghdad Typology: Funerary Architecture Naja de Ostos concept questions what to do with bodies after war. This proposes “a gigantic presence of a hanging funeral structure” to hover above the war torn streets of Baghdad, floating unceasingly and lush with growth from an endless supply of dead Iraqis. The presented project explores a memory that cannot be buried. As a place of remembrance the Hanging Cemetery is an ambiguous space. It does not offer comfort, but rather encourages actions. The main driving force was to consistently explore, through an inventive design proposal, the ambiguities that surround our current lives, not only as social producers of space but also as global spectators. Living in a world of images and quick memories fed the concept of an ever changing and up-to-date architectural model. The Hanging Cemetery apparatus in Baghdad situates us in the acute absurdity of an ongoing innocent human loss. As an embodiment of flesh and remembrance, the project puts into motion the imperative task of recalling and acting.” Metaphorically, the Hanging Cemetery of Baghdad helps define the possible evolution of the educative networks as layers of “dead” information currently located above typical occupied streets. Activating the information networks through prototypical spaces integrates learning about the city’s environmental, social, financial and political issues through learning/teaching practices, will promote new educative networking and strategic information processing techniques directed, ultimately at mobilizing urban action, in a global context. Information networks architecturally designs prototypical learning sites, located strategically to create virtual ribbons of physical, social, sensory, information, activation, action and metaphoric paths. As the networked ribbons integrate, the prototypical learning space houses urban intellect.. This case study offers actual and metaphoric connection with how the conveyance of an information service based park. Similar to Naja de Ostos’ project intention, this thesis will encourage exploration and will reveal unique facts and ambiguities associated with each district of New York City.

36

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Adapted from Source: Naja & de Ostos, 2007

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Project Blackbox

Sun Microsystems “Project Blackbox� designed a mobile, energy efficient data center utilizing a portable shipping container that houses a data center. The Blackbox is designed to provide emergency back up data storage of important information such as health records and is to be located in dense or arid environments. This prototype design uses a 20-foot wide by 40-foot long shipping container to house the data storage systems. The Blackbox offers a mobile data warehouse concept that is energy efficient. The mobile data center concept offers a portable option to localize the systematics of data warehouse storage. The design and employment of this efficient modular data center demonstrates the architectural potentials available and promotes future growth in the area of data center design. The Blackbox prototype mobilized this author’s investigation of implementing smaller scaled data centers within urban districts to help accommodate the significant challenges associated with digital information growth.

Adapted from Source: http://photos.sun.com/page/1183 38

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Data Warehouse

Currently, the majority of New York’s data is stored in large-scale, suburban, data warehouse infrastructures located in New Jersey, 25 miles outside the city. In addition, local corporations including NYIIX (New York International Internet exchange) have begun to store data locally in New York City. The NYIIX TeleHouse America operates three vertical data centers in NY at 25 Broadway, 60 Hudson and 111 8th Avenue.

Adapted from Source: http://www.grassvalley.com/assets/ media/2450/20071207_K2_Aurora_ Rack_Right_Angle_Rendering.LowRes. RGB.jpg

Source A

Source B

Source C

Extract, Load, Transform

Data Warehouse

Report

Analyze

Typical Information Computing Process: Redrawn- Adapted from Source: http://www.longwoods.com/articles/images/CS_EH_ Dec07_SandersF1.jpg

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A rhizomatic learning environment springs from existing urban fabrics and networks university campuses, located in core districts, to construct a prototypical interdisciplinary nodal unit, where social exchanges produce a knowledge transmission. 40

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b

*margorP

Project Guidelines...

*Note: subject to change depending on context and prototypical conditions.

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Learning The NewSchool of Architecture and Design Mission Statement: “To develop technically competent, aesthetically sensitive, socially responsible professionals prepared for a changing, global society.� Three concepts held within the mission statement include technical competence, aesthetically sensitive and social responsibility. Interestingly, these concepts can be applied directly to the Public Information Service Park’s intrinsic qualities of space and design. 1

3

2

This project design is intended to offer: 1: Technic = Spatial conditions that competently promote urban service and learning acquisition while efficiently providing the storage and strategic management of data. 2: Aesthetic = Perceptual conditions that promote meaning in the space. 3: Social = Environmental conditions that mobilize collaborative interaction and responsible urban awareness and action. The overlap of these intrinsic qualities of the space and design promotes an architectural solution directed at offering meaningful spaces that provide education and service in an urban context through a collaborative rhizomatic process . The collaborative Space is open in the Public Information Service Park. The exterior between the Service Parks provide additional collaborative space. The collaborative spaces present spatial and experiential design strategies that promote social interaction, learning and service.

Requirements categorized by:

Spatial

Environment

Educational Satellites

+ Perceptual/ Experiential ________________________________________________ Augmented (increasing knowledge in multiple = Qualities of Space locations = dispersal of intellect throughout cities)

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Adjacencies A: Collaborative Space: Is open and exterior (most likely an interstitial/ in between another environment) because these spaces obtain spatial and experiential criteria to promote social interaction. B: Structured Space: Is closed and interior to house or ‘contain’ learning within a defined area/ room.

Cafe

B

Knowledge Center

Collaborative Learning

INTERIOR ENVIRONS Structured M Learning W Technology Inter-faces

A

EXTERIOR ENVIRONS Digital Storage

Design Objectives: 1. Develop nodal zones that increase student awareness of knowledge/ education. 2. Connect existing urban universities through development of a rhizomatic process. 3. Create communal spaces to connect students with the urban environment. 4. Network systems for a more efficient environment. 5. Design for a humanistic ecology. 6. Incorporate technology within the design of the structure and environment.

ple t

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Programmatic

44

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Telescopic Information:

Model

The concept of Telescopic Information serves as an assessment model to understand if the potential subjects participating in the Public Information Service Parks interact with each other thus transferring knowledge. This is an interactive program model to help determine the networked activities needed in the learning spaces. The Telescopic Information assessment model serves as an employed research methodology. Successful collaborative transmission of information will be measured through the assessment of the occurrence of a person discussing the information that was recently experienced with another person. The collaborative learning process ultimately produces an experiential knowledge building experience.

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Perceptual Perception uses the sensorial systems of touch, taste, smell, sound and sight to interpret information. Experiential aesthetic qualities are perceived through the senses. Human beings perceive experience and understand spaces through the sensorial systems.

Bone

PROGR

See

B

PER

Hear

SEN

enviro

PUBLIC

Smell

PRIVATE

ENVIRONMENTAL

Skin

A

Taste

PERCEPTU

ENVIRONM

Touch

46

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Sensorium Architecture conveys emotional attachments and through cognitive processes users will be able to subconsciously map the environment. The seven senses allow architecture to become existential through communicating the perceptual, environmental, and spatial qualities of space that define “phenomenal structure” (Rosenblum). PROGRAM TRAJECTORIES

C

EXPERIENTIAL

VISUAL: SIGHT

HEAR: INFORMATION ear / auditory sensation

OLFACTORY: SMELL nose sensation

TOUCH: FEEL skin sensation

GUSTATION: TASTE tongue sensation

1 cognitive risk:

emotions associated with complex confrontational experiences

2 orientation frame:

physical surroundings provide cues about how or where people use spaces.

SKELETON: BONE rigid/ structured sensation

3 order:

the environment is structured according to existing infrastructures, organizational principles, and site forces.

B

4 possession:

spaces provide motivation by integrating innovation, creativity, technology, and collaboration.

PERCEPTUAL

SENSORIUM:

5 stimulate & change:

adaption to the environment by implementing adjustments.

+

“perceptions...articulate thoughts”

environmental contextual perceptions based on the 5-7 senses.

MUSCLE: TISSUE connects sensation

plays with the minds’ psychology (+ and - aspects considered)

7 contact/ affiliation:

PRIVATE

implantation of rhizomatic structure within two to three localized cities: Paris, New York, Prototypically fits anywhere.

MATERIALS/ CONSTRUCTION:

8 retreat/ solitude:

This regionally would enable students to communicate with other economies or networks producing global knowledge. The brain is constantly perceiving new information and therefore this type of interstitial environment depicts a cognitive awareness of what issues, activities, etc are going on throughout the city. This becomes a social network broadcast of student relations.

URBAN (CITY FABRIC)

PERCEPTUAL

D

LAND USE/ SITE ECOLOGY:

INSTITUTIONAL (COLLEGIATE FABRIC)

A

ENVIRONMENTAL

PUBLIC

REGIONAL DESIGN

+

6 heightened awareness / poetic impact:

SPATIAL

contextual correlation with existing infrastructure and community design ECOLOGICAL DESIGN: “a form of design that minimizes environmentally destructive impacts by integrating living processes...it is the meshing of human purposes with larger patterns and flows of the natural world and the study of those patterns and flows that inform human actions (Orr, 2002).”

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN:

PROGRAM

LOGIC

BIOCLIMATIC DESIGN:

ENVIRONMENTAL

TELESCOPE OF INFORMATION

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Technology

S

Displays

Knowledge Production

Collaborative Learning

48

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FINAL BOOK 2.indd 49

do multiple experiences affect the interaction?

how do you interact with space?

An open or closed space?

How is the environment shaped/ formed?

what emotion does the space evoke?

Experientials

Structured Learning

Educational Zones

Social Learning= SPATIAL ACTIVITY!

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TRAJECTORIES

TECHNOLOGY VISUAL: SIGHT

HEAR: INFORMATION ear / auditory sensation

OLFACTORY: SMELL nose sensation

TOUCH: FEEL skin sensation

GUSTATION tongue sens

SKE rigid/ struc

B

PERCEPTUAL

SENSORIUM:

+

“perceptions...articulate thoughts”

environmental contextual perceptions based on the 5-7 senses.

PUBLIC

KNOWLEDGE PRODUCTION

PRIVATE

REGIONAL DESIGN

implantation of rhizomatic structure within two to three localized cities: Paris, New York, Prototypically fits anywhere.

+

ENVIRONMENTAL

MUS conn

This regionally would enable students to communicate with other economies or networks producing global knowledge. The brain is constantly perceiving new information and therefore this type of interstitial environment depicts a cognitive awareness of what issues, activities, etc are going on throughout the city. This becomes a social network broadcast of student relations.

URBAN (CITY FABRIC)

LAND USE/ SITE E

INSTITUTIONAL (COLLEGIATE FABRIC)

contextual correlation with e community design ECOLOGICAL DESIGN:

A

“a form of design that minimizes environmentally destructive impacts by integrating living processes...it is the meshing of human purposes with larger patterns and flows of the natural world and the study of those patterns and flows that inform human actions (Orr, 2002).”

PERCEPTUAL ENVIRONMENTAL

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN:

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

Experiential + Perceptual = Spatial 50

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C

EXPERIENTIAL

GUSTATION: TASTE tongue sensation

1 cognitive risk:

emotions associated with complex confrontational experiences

2 SKELETON: BONE rigid/ structured sensation

orientation frame:

physical surroundings provide cues about how or where people use spaces.

3 order:

the environment is structured according to existing infrastructures, organizational principles, and site forces.

4 possession:

spaces provide motivation by integrating innovation, creativity, technology, and collaboration.

MUSCLE: TISSUE connects sensation

DISPLAYS MATERIALS/ CONSTRUCTION:

5

stimulate & change:

6

heightened awareness / poetic impact:

7

contact/ affiliation:

adaption to the environment by implementing adjustments.

plays with the minds’ psychology (+ and - aspects considered)

STRUCTURED LEARNING

8 retreat/ solitude:

D

LAND USE/ SITE ECOLOGY:

SPATIAL

contextual correlation with existing infrastructure and community design

-

PROGRAM

LOGIC

BIOCLIMATIC DESIGN:

ESIGN:

TELESCOPE OF INFORMATION

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- www.KKMusicStore.com - 60% Off plus $100 Coupon Avalible Ships Free, Free Tuner, Free Lesson

52

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c

txetnoC A New York Site Analysis...

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New York City offers 12 districts for prototypical learning space development. New York City was chosen as the site of this project to take advantage of the multiple University sites dispersed throughout the city. In addition, local data storage and management issues challenge inner cities due to the real estate supply vs demand that increase cost of physical space. The site allows the architectural placement of the Public Information Service Parks within a strong urban context. The Public Information Service Park sites must foster the Park’s two-fold purpose to provide data storage and offer a unique learning and service space. In addition, the multi- phase site design plan is directed ultimately at illuminating the connection between the 12 districts sites through an architectural site plan that connects the multiple sites with unique and strategic walking and virtual information paths. 54

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Queen Br


Queensborough Bridge

Manhattan Bridge

Site Location: City Hall Park

Proposed 9/11 WTC Memorial

World Financial Center

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Site Requirements: The site objectives include a location in close proximity to learning institutions in a large city to mobilize service access and interaction in an urban context. The Public Service Information Parks will use the existing façade structures of other buildings; the communication wiring and antenna systems will “spider” out to the neighboring structure’s façade. The existing neighboring build’s façade is enhance by the aesthetics of the “spidering” communication structures. The infrastructure is based on promoting service access and collaborative learning through a rhizomatic process. The environment must promote interaction among students through the development of social networks. Three physical test sites are defined. The unique educative discipline assigned to each site denotes the ‘sphere of knowledge’ that the specific Public Service Information Park specializes in. The three sites include the civic governmental/ financial district, the art district and an academic district. Test site locations will determine the context, similarities and/ or dissimilarities of the site, annotating what and how the rhizomatic service and learning acquisition is working. After completing the contextual/ site analysis there will be a re-programming phase. This is necessary to determine the second phase architectural needs as the Public Service Information Park expands to the public and includes the addition of walking and further development of the virtual pathways. Size/ Area: 10-15 block radius in New York City. Project Size: > 10,000 S.F. Spatial Relationships: Private:

Public:

-rest rooms (M/W) -mechanical rooms -study rooms -digi cubes (10’ x 10’ room rentals) -storage

-informational displays -courtyard/ outdoor areas -communal/ gathering spaces -nodes -data/meta space (portal cafe, ATM-like services) -storage

IInterior/ Exterior Relationships: Typical: inside/ out

Fire Safety/ Accessibility: according to ADA guidelines

56

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ve

ati

cre ry

ina

g ma

i

co

s

ce

du

n co

ge

ed

wl

o kn

al

ion

it nd

ied

od

b em

dis

y

tas

fan

ll

cia

so

s

ork

tw

e yn

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la

This diagram had two purposes in relationship to the site context. The project progressed from an intended imaginary site that becomes extinct at the borders to a project with a relative location within a ten block radius amongst three collegiate institutions including St. John’s University, Borough of Manhattan Community College, and Pace University.


NYC HISTORY: Knowledge quickly spreads throughout cities. New York City holds strong experiential and perceptual qualities from dramatic historic events. This design benefits from this quality because it creates conditions that produce phenomenal effects contributing to communicating networks that are dispersed throughout the skyscraped landscape of the city. 58

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Freedom

1/06/10

9/11/01

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Networks

New York City offers many networked systems to traverse the landscape: Taxicab, Automobile, Airplane, Bike, Pedestrian Walkway, Subway, Bus, or Ferry. Creating local virtual networks for strategic urban services and education acquisition adds another dimension to the transportive landscape of New York.

Adapted from Source: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/ trans_maps/mnboro.shtml

60

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This model, nicknamed “The Fade” visually demonstrates the virtual information data distribution in New York City. The laser cutting processed the information sporadically. The laser was intentionally stopped early to represent the visual pixelized data of layer 3 fading into the data’s virtual and ubiquitous state. Layer 1: Transportation Stratus- Connective Tissues Layer 2: Ramification of the Built Environment Layer 3: Surrounded in Data

62

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MetaDiagram Situated in Manhattan, New York City

The purpose of a ‘Meta-Diagram (MD)’ (Rosenblum) is to show complex relationships, three dimensionally. A ‘Meta-Diagram’ communicates the relationships between materiality, emotion and phenomena (the feelings related to sensation, memory and desire that arise in a location). This MD constructs the circumstances I experienced while conducting this project’s site analysis in New York City. The process of a MD itself requires keen observation and ‘intense questioning’ (Rosenblum) to understand the overlaying of global connections in space. For this particular construct, I observed, processed, notated and digested the experience of the transportation networks of the city’s layered history. The deep present moment awareness mobilized through the Meta-Diagram process facilitated my strong experience of the city’s layered informational rhythms. Much of the information and data offered within the transportation networks is physical and observable. However, I also experienced the strong non-observable data information rhythms with in the city. This experience was intriguing and meaningful. This MetaDiagram offers a visual model of the rhythmic spaces in NYC that stimulated my personal fascination with information and ephemeral meanings.

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64

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4 ngiseD

War and Peace...

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66

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i

ssecorP

Hypothetical Development...

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Feb. 25- 28 2010- Digital/ Physical Modeling

Feb. 10- 22. 2010- Schematic Design Package Feb.. 8-9, 2010- Environmental Systems Feb. 5- 7. 2010- Defined and diagramed 12 Educative Disciplines Feb. 2.2010- Site Analysis Revisit: 12 districts of NY

Jan. 27-31.2010- Submitted Thesis to Next Generation Competition@ Metropolis Magazine

Jan. 20-27.2010- Data Management, Technology Facts, User/ Conceptual Scenarios

Jan. 19.2010- Data Warehouse/ Storage Systems (DATAPODS)

Jan. 16, 2010- Private, Public, Physical / Digital Uses Jan. 14-16.2010- Data Research

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Jan. 13-14.2010- Public Storage of Data, Locative Media Project

Jan. 11.2010- Smartpen Jan. 5-8.2010- New York Trip

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Portal Login


May 12- 23, 2010- Final Sectional Model

Apr. 20- May 20, 2010- Production: Book Ch’s 2/ 3, Finalizing Site Model Apr. 5-14, 2010- Ch. 1 Book, Digital Modeling, Preliminary Filnal Board Layout Apr. 4-10, 2010- Production: Book Ch. 1-3, Final Site Model

Mar. 19- Apr. 5, 2010- Spring Break: Digital Modeling Mar. 18. 2010- Winter Quarter Presentation

Mar. 12. 2010- Schematic Design Package for Book Due

Mar.1-11.2010- Schematic Design, Digital Model, Presentation, Book Feb. 25- 28 2010- Digital/ Physical Modeling

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Process Mapping

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Adapted from Source: http://extinctearth.org/inform/images/Landfill_compactor.jpg

70

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Think about this for a few minutes: What will happen in fifty plus years when information exceeds human beings? This questioning correlates to that conception of a landfill. What will happen when all landfills are full? Exactly...Now think about that except in relation to information. Where will information or bits of data terminate when all server databases have maxed out their capacity? What or where can additional capacities be allocated to increase digital storage? Informational Storages, why do we need this and for what purpose? Digital information grows at a “rate 8 times the amount of all data housed in US libraries”. (Infomatica) Information is a fast-paced society that human beings will not be able to keep up with. In order to acclimate with information and technology. Systems need to be designed with the ideology of “taking information in at real time, corollate it, then analyze it, and organize it by taking action at more than 60,000 times a second. That process is 300 times faster than a hummingbird can flap its wings (Informatica).”

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This is an exploration of a futuristic locative media project directed at developing prototypical learning spaces (titled Public Information Service Parks, PISP) filtered down to the first architectural phase of designing a structure that holds a twofold purpose including the housing of data and development of a prototypical learning space. The thesis development process that culminated in the design of the first architectural phase was extremely complex. Initially, the process was highly theoretical directed at translating a theory derived from a biological entity into an architectural application for learning spaces. Theoretically the rhizome offered a model describing connections; the author applied the model to information acquisition and learning. The author‘s desire to architecturally translate this theory drove the complex process. Firstly, assessment of the possible application of the rhizome theory to existing learning models revealed that collaborative learning models could be supported by the rhizome theory. Secondly, the author researched the conditions of spaces that promote collaborative learning and applied spatial adjacencies to arrive at an educative urban public display. The site in New York City satisfied the requirements for collaborative learning experimentation supporting ideas such as educational thermometers, pedagogies and satellites. From the experimental research, the author defined the following terminologies, telescopic information and perceptual and experiential sensorium, to assist with the classification of the qualities needed in a learning environment to foster the collaborative exchange of information. A trip to New York City revealed the 12 Districts that could support the ultimate futuristic locative media project directed at developing prototypical learning spaces titled Public Information Service Parks that serve to enhance learning by using technology to mobilize a user’s actual physical participation of navigating through the urban context and physically arriving at the different Public Information Service Parks in the 12 districts. The original site intention was directed at mobilizing two physical locations to determine the context, similarities and/ or dissimilarities of the site. For the third site location, I would explore the paper architecture side of myself to define the perception of a rhizomatic learning space. This perception would help dichotomize the spatial, perceptual, experiential, and environmental qualities of space. Also, imagination allows for an abstract exploration of space and would display the emerging interstitial complexities that construct a rhizom72

E =

Economi c

A= C = Civic

H=

Health

Overlap between all Discipline s Ac =

AR = Ar t

Academi c

Line of the Discipline: [A] = [ AC +AR + C + E + H]

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atic architecture. However, I determined the complexity of an internal site would decrease the ability to physically articulate the project’s concept to an audience. Three physical locations in New York City were defined. After the actual site visit in New York City, each of the 12 site’s context were reestablished based on the classifications that distributed unique educative disciplines to each districts based on their placement in the city’s urban context. To establish significance and relevance, the author conducted research on the contextually applied material used to arrive at sustenance data to reveal the specifics about the significance of the project. The complexity to architecturally articulate a vision related to the connection to a biologically driven theory mandated that a new typology be created to manifest in physical form architecturally. This task created a great struggle because the author was fully immersed in the highly theoretical aspects of multiple conceptual models. However, it was this process of working to make that connection that ultimately, resulted in this thesis’ proposal for a multiphase architectural project culminating in the development of Public Information Service Parks located in New York City. The project initially produces modular data centers to manage and store data combined with the prototypical learning spaces to provide locative and accessible learning environments that promote navigation through an urban context and foster experiential learning. However, through collaboration with my professors, it became obvious that the Service Parks needed to add the provision to offer specific urban services, rather than only offering information and education as a service. Designing the Park’s delivery of services such as purchasing subway or event tickets, ordering documents or accessing grades and posted shared class notes would increase the urban valuable of the Public Information Service Park.

Environmental

Art

Academic

Acade

mic

Active Zones

Art

Ec on om

ic

Civic

H] Modified from Source: NY Maps Book

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An Urban Interface: District Portal Activities 74

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Information is a social communicator as well as a power generator for this data center.

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Metropolis Magazine

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N


Next Generation Competition This thesis was entered into Metropolis Magazine’s Next Generation Competition. The winter competition facilitated a narrowing of theoretical direction and mobilized a vision of physical form. This competition asked ‘what is one design fix that can be made now in a designed environment?’ From this question, the author narrowed the options and assessed what current products are available that could support the new typology in an architectural form. The competition proposal addressed an “Educational Datascape” employing a new system of modular datacenters to accommodate management and storage of information within urban districts. This would increase bandwidth, download speeds and 40 percent more energy efficiency than a typical data warehouse primarily located in the suburbs. The Educational Datascape proposal fixes the focus on the innovative usage of data storage units located within inner city streets.

Conceptual Interior Rendering- Urban Interface of a Data Warehouse

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P

A Possible Prototype - District # 08

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Proto. 01 Knowledge Powerhouse: Learning aptitudes could eventually generate power to either physically or mentally drive others to desire more information. The city could then feed off the intellect of spatial collaboration that defines a learning space. These nodal communicative locations network to other learning spaces that can be dispersed throughout the city, state, or global universe. Therefore a specific location could have layers of ribbonized information (i.e. LED screens and technological advancements invigorate social collaboration within education).

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Proto. 02 The placement is within the 18’ sidewalk street width and the intention of this placement is forcing conditions by making the user of the street experience the space by walking through and amongst it. The use of “perspectival spaces” (Holl, Pallasmaa, Perez-Gomez; 2006) emphasizes views surrounding and within urban environments for phenomenal experiences.

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Proto. 03 The location of this prototype is designed as a thoroughfare between city blocks as a means for easing pedestrian transit. Also this provides a public information service park for users of this district.

Exterior Cable Structure

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Proto. 04 This model demonstrates the development of the concept of using an exterior ramp to offers a visual bridge for abstract space. This, embryonically built, conceptual model communicates spatial ideas. An embryo model is a qualitative construct of space that showcases interior spaces that display texture, materiality, color and light (Rosenblum, A.).

DataScapes

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ii

scitamehcS

Stratus/ District “01” - Lower Manhattan City Hall Park Prototype...

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Service Park The design of the Public Information Service Park serves a two-fold purpose to provide data storage through a data center and provide a unique public learning space. The Public Information Service Parks manage information through collecting and dispersing data into the urban context. The data center houses all electronic equipment that processes information through dedicated servers, storages, and networks of communication (EnergySTAR, 2007). Successful design of the data center requires thorough analysis of multiple areas including information technology, computer science, network infrastructures and information management. The data center’s systematic design addresses energy consumption and conservation. The urban data centers reduce heating and cooling loads on existing infrastructures through the employed energy systems. These data centers harvest power by using off-grid technologies, such as solar and wind generation. Data centers produce excess heat gain and designing them efficiently would decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and reduce electricity costs by approximately 4.5 billion dollars a year (EnergySTAR, 2007). In addition, strategically designed data centers will accommodate information management and storage with greater energy efficiency while facilitating the dispersion of information, which will ultimately, decrease data pile up and trafficking that slows bandwidth speeds developing information access challenges. Future building costs could be reduced through the sharing of the data center space and function with businesses in the district, therefore eliminating the need for each business to house there own data center infrastructure. Information service parks act as communicational hubs that disperse information through aerially suspended structures that provide portal access via wireless telecommunication networks. The Public Information Service Parks manage information through the collection and dispersion of data into the urban context. Socially, the Service Parks act as hubs for communication and ultimately facilitate social, cultural, and political connection through an ‘educational filter’. The data stored and serviced at these centers becomes increasingly important to the systematic and strategic design of the overall prototypical learning spaces. Each of the 12 Service Parks offer unique and different information and services according to the district’s unique category. Each center disperses information within a ten block radius. A portal website would require users to create a username and password in order to access district information. Logging in would provide the city with a point for secured entry, as well as data mine and profile what kind of information is being looked at. Since, information and media are only available within that district of the city, it becomes integrated and ubiquitous. Districts could further market the portal access by requiring a certain software program or simply, charging a fee for a login code.

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District Scenarios Each district’s Service Park will house a unique category of information and service. For example, District 01’s services relate to government and economics. In addition to offering information on important current legislation issues, the Service Park will offer access to collaborative action groups within the area. The Park will host a “Connect with your Public Official” night to have direct virtual access to an identified official to hear the issues and ask real time questions. Other services offered may include direct access to order legal documents and records such as birth or marriage certificates. An “Investment Strategies Series” could offer a virtual forum to have access to identified experts offering current investing ideas supporting collaborative connection with others through real time interaction. The District 01 Service Park will offer relevant financial education and skill building classes, such as, a child and adolescent financial planning skill development class, credit counseling and bankruptcy courses. A public information education series focusing on current urban issues such as tenant rights and other important urban issues can help individuals and communities resolve urban challenges. The “entrepreneur board” can support up-to-date postings of local business opportunities. Thus the Public Information Service Park can facilitate communities learning about and ultimately mobilizing investing in local businesses. District 05 includes Times Square, Madison Square, Union Square and Midtown . This District 05 Public Information Service Park offers access and service related to the media and fine arts. The Art district educational series may include “Connect with the Artist Night” offering direct virtual access to learn about important upcoming events and issues and allow for real time interaction. The District 5 Service Park could offer access to purchase event tickets to local theaters and exhibits. In addition, competitions and theater casting opportunities could be accessed. The Educational district will offer multiple services to students. Student can access grades or posted student shared class notes. The professors can post syllabus and specified assignments can be emailed directly to the professor or print center.

Information Service Park Entry

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Access Services for Vehicular and Pedestrian Traffic. This is a thorough-way lot and emergency access is available. Mechanical and Electrical Services will be incorporated on-site. Limited Wi-Fi networking services will be available to surrounding buildings to facilitate the design’s goal of social generation through information networking and data storage. There is no vehicular access other than for the diplomatic officials and city government workers. This ambulatory access is intentional to motivate people walking and physically experience their environments. The original locational intention of this educational filter design was to place Informational Service Parks at the entrance or exit of subway transit destinations. This site option was restricted due to excavation limits caused by the below street level transit lines and subway stations. The site location and the educational filter design will remain as originally intended but will be above ground near the subway exit and entrances. St. John’s University

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Master Plan 86

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Master Plan Bits and Bytes. The plan shows an abstract representation of the amount of bits or bytes (pieces of information) are accessible. Each line signifies a new piece of data that is amongst the context. It continually changes.

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Service

88

The design provides a Wi-Fi booster for communication with surrounding buildings at each Public Information Service Park. The range at each individual Park is intentionally limited. The intention of this restriction is to additionally promote the physical navigation through the urban environment by encouraging the users to walk to multiple Public Information Service Parks located strategically in the different districts. The technology will guide the user to the different physical Park sites and offer special information access when traveling between the Public Information Service Parks to motivate the transition experience. The cable network and broadcasting antennas develop a spider-webbed effect from the suspended cables and structural tie bars that extend from the building facade over the street and crawls up other facades of surrounding buildings.

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Abstraction of Active Zones. This diagram shows the spatial activity for the programmatics of data, energy efficient/ ‘green’ systems, network infrastructure, digital media galleries,technology, digital /technical storage, and public amenity. 90

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Activity Gr een T echnology

Network Infrastructur e

Data

Designing Energy Efficient System s

IT Infrastructur e Communication/ Antenna- hotspot locative design

Digital Medi a

Public Amenities

Each programmatic element has a specific spatial definition and activity zone. This diagram shows the location of each programmatic zone.

Tech. Storage

Galle ry

Interior Sketch

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Systems A data center is one of the most heaviest consumers of electricity, HVAC, and lighting.

Building Analysis: -Raised floor in Data Storage/ Server / Media -Containment for increased hot/cool air distribution -Cool/ Hot Aisle- Containment Design

Green Technology Implementation: -Chillerless - “FREE COOLING� (use of fresh air from outside the data center to support cooling system distribution.) Smart Wrap Facade Detail: Use Technology as a Graphic Image Adapted from Source: http://cantilever.files.wordpress. com/2008/07/ex_smartwrap.jpg

- Aerial roof fans for natural ventilation - M.A. R. S. Wind Power Generator (Floats as a balloon through the use of Helium. The wind makes the balloon spin and rotate, thus creating power for the site.

Skin Technology: 1. Smart Wrap: This film stores power by the use of the embedded solar PV cells and battery packs. 2. NanoVent: Skin generates power by revolutions caused by the wind.

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Magenn Air Rotor System (M.A. R. S.): Power generates lighting at night through the park sidewalks.

(Upper and Right) Adapted by Source: http://www.magenn.com/

Adapted by Source: http://nanoventskin.blogspot.com/

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Floorplans Eqpt. Rm. Open to Above

Level 1: Servers Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Servers

Storage Racks

Level 2: Data Storage Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0” Open to Below

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Seati

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Ramp Up

Level 3: Digital Media Portal / Cafe Scale: 1/32” = 1’-0”

Level 1:Digital Servers will increase bandwidth download speeds and will benefit the community to bring locals out and socialize with their surrounding communities. There is an information director that will allow users to get their information. This floor will have secured access to where the servers are held. Level 2: Ramped Mezzanine- offers digital storage for users. Contained halls will house storage racks and the necessary equipment for information transfer. Again this will have keypad entries for security purposes. These two levels are the primary functions for an educational filter to network global student ecologies. It also acts as a node of communication for the digital portal gallery/ cafe users. Level 3: The digital gallery/ portal cafes primary use would be for visitors and local consumers to login and access the districts information. The experience starts with the entry and the ramped gallery space eventually eludes the mystery of the portal login cafe. Also the portal cafe has outdoor access to another exterior ramp on the east side of the building. This information service park highlights the systems needed for a data warehouse, but the most important attribute is that it acts as a green roof, cooling the heating capacities.

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Elevations

North Elevation

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South Elevation

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West Elevation

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Sections

The structure traverses through Park Row and Broadway. Train 6 runs directly underneath the District 01 Public Information Service Park by City Hall which houses government/economic information

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Data Storage and Ramp Section. Scale: 1/32”= 1’0”

Systematic Section. Not to Scale

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Data Center: Steel Post & Beam

Gallery Ramp: Steel Frame Weaved Post & Beam

Structural Bearing Wall

Structural Cable and Rod Tie Downs

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Structure The structural cable and tie rods hold the cantilever, as well as add an aesthetic flare for street-goer’s. The data center utilizes regular post and beam construction. The interior ramp to the portal cafe maneuvers beams to give the user a focalized direction.

Interior Ramp Vignette

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Renderings

Stratus 01 The first prototype will be located in District 01 (Tribeca, Civic Center, Battery Park and the Financial District) in Lower Manhattan. Within the gov’t, city hall district this place becomes where you can learn about the city, pay for public services (i.e. parking tickets, library fees, as well as have a meeting ground for the public to commence their feelings/ problems about events or speak up about certain issues. Also this is building acts as a large scaled informative kiosk or ATM. The input, output exchange of information would allow users to access local information or seek out places to venture, through-out the city of NY. The origination of the project revolved around kiosk design and interaction because that was the only relevant connection to how informational architecture can become integrated within an environment. Also, data becomes an invigorating, communal actor portraying Public Information Service Parks (PISP) as urban interfaces. PISP’s focus on environmental factors that make information interactive, promote network opportunities, is inventive, and becomes a nodal prototype.

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Exterior

Powdered Data 106

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The design incorporates a power generation system that utilizes external antenna cabling for Wi-Fi communication to surrounding buildings. The cabling scales up existing facades. Information service parks act as communicational hubs which disperse information aerially (suspended structures that provide portal access via wireless telecommunication networks).

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MetroCard Scenario of Digi Cube

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Digi Cubes Offer a 10’x10’ room rental for multi-purpose use (i.e. classrooms or office space). Inside the cube there are projection walls, a computer station and seating. Some of the cubes affix an office work station. The digi cubes offer services such as buying Metrocards to access the subway and release congestion from the ticket stations below. The digi cubes act as wayfinders throughout the site. One side of the cube displays a graphic logo which acts as a navigator telling users which way City Hall, campus universities,etc.

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Interior The portal login café is programmatically broken down into two uses. The seating arrangements can fluctuate depending on the need for privacy. The café consists of platforms that can be raised or lowered according to a pulley system. This creates multiple levels of communication and allows users to experience the login from a different perspective. This idea is similar to “Dinner in the Sky”.

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Adapted from Source: http://www.aspsys.com/userfiles/image/apc-hotaisle1.jpg

The data center. Input- Output Functioning. The data storage center contains data on the two lower levels of the Public Service Information Park. The data storage systems act as stacked containers. The data center utilizes regular post and beam construction. The raised floor provides air distribution and utilizes the stacked air effect as a heating/cooling mechanism. This air distribution system allows for hot air to rise, centralize in the middle and then rise again to become released on the upper levels’ offering a ventilated façade or “free cooled”, energy efficient system. The centers’ broadband and service distribution is available on the upper level for portal café users and may be offered strategically to buildings within the districts’ fifteen block radius.

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Sectional

Devise Ubiquity

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Model

Exterior

The underground network

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The inter

This photo documents the angular character of the architecture along with one of the many dusks experienced through the modern strip windows at NewSchool.

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Interior

The interior night lights.

The hot and cold ‘containerized’ separations.

The interactive digital wall, as seen from the lower level of the interior.

Interior of Data Center.

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Site Model

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M.A.R.S. Wind Generators

Digi Cubes

Antenna

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5 skrameR Virtue summed up...

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The La C ey Mentality EXPERIENTIAL

Photo Credit: Gavin Studer

At the start of this thesis process, I intended to devise a network of disembodied learning spaces derived from my process. Given my initial intention, I did not know what the spaces would look like. This intention did not work because it created challenges in the translation to an actual space design. From this challenge, I applied the idea of disembodiment to information with the intention of developing an architecture for data space. The goal focused on demonstrating how a network of spaces could distinctly convey certain information and ultimately drive the architecture through the programmatic design. One main project objective involves the creation of a space that enhances the collaborative spreading of information and, at the same time, mobilizes the creative integration of the information into oneself creating a new knowledge building experience from social connection. Information is abstract, however it can be represented in physical form. With this in mind, I conceptualized a Rhizomatic Collaborative methodology through a process of notation and drawing. I requested students at the NewSchool write or draw some type of information. There were no restrictions. The information received at the school from each individual’s page was deconstructed from its original form and reconstructed into a new combined form to demonstrate a Rhizomatic Collaborative process resulting in a new personal experience with the information. The process occurring between the site, the collaboration and the information acts as a filter. The filter process uniquely breaks the information down into digital data pieces at different levels for each individual through the interaction between abstract information delivered collaboratively at a physical site. Each person digests the informational experience differently. Mobilized through collaboration, the data 122

1 cognitive risk:

emotions associated with complex confrontational experiences

2 orientation frame:

physical surroundings provide cues about how or where people use spaces.

3 order:

the environment is structured according to existing infrastructures, organizational principles, and site forces.

4 possession:

spaces provide motivation by integrating innovation, creativity, technology, and collaboration.

5 stimulate & change:

adaption to the environment by implementing adjustments.

6 heightened awareness / poetic impact:

plays with the minds’ psychology (+ and - aspects considered)

7 contact/ affiliation: 8 retreat/ solitude:

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astructures,

experience is taken in, like a breath, amongst each step and becomes a ribbonized part of our entire being. The intention of this thesis is to question learning environments and provide a solution for two main issues: restrictive environments and emerging problems related to the storage of digital information. The foundational ideas revolved around a kiosk design to provide a current and relevant connection to informational service architecture that is integrated into an environment. Public Information Service Parks, as an urban interface, invigorate the community through the delivery of interactive services and education creating inventive network opportunities as a nodal prototype. This project led me to transpose my knowledge, creativity, persistence, and motivation onto architectural practice and allows me to showcase my passion towards architectural tenacity that ultimately is my workshop of life. Our footsteps symbolically trace our path and my steps forward will involve critically theorizing societal existence in relationship to architectural potentials. The past five years have been crucial to my architectural development. I transferred to NewSchool in 2005 very naĂŻve about the true nature of architecture. I am an academically minded individual. My third year architectural theory course, taught by Alan Rosenblum, sparked my depth of understanding and passion towards uncovering the societal potential of architecture through observation of self and others. Questioning is important to mobilize creative solution generation. As my architectural development progressed, I concentrated on development of my process fourth year, and applied my process in my fifth year.

Thesis was a period of transition. I went through a few stages of ventured independence. Seclusion was necessary because the intensity of thought processing demanded solitude to help focus the defining of the thesis project. Shutting off my phone, becoming “MIA� from everyday typical communication and activity was all part of my process required to foster the bridging of the abstract conceptual ideas into architecture. This past year has been intense. There are no regrets for addressing such a difficult and theoretical topic. This thesis became an expression for how complexity can become conceptually significant and ideological architecture. Post-graduation, I plan to continue development of second and third phase design development and implementation strategy to complete the architectural expression of this highly conceptual project. I plan to pursue my Master of Science in Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture or Environmental Design.

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Rhizomatic

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c

Collaboration

The concept of collaboration filtered through out my entire process as well as directing a large part of the architectural design. The initial models and drawings incorporated the rhizomatic collaborative process with my peers. The railings and front windows in the Public Information Service Parks physically demonstrate this collaboration. A graphical wall design applied to the railings in the building consists of the visual representation of the art piece that resulted from the rhizomatic collaborative methodology discussed in Chapter 5’s Lacey Mentality section. The random drawings offered an actual exercise in the application of the rhizomatic process. The unstructured randomness of the data offers a collaborative “graffiti” type art that showcases the actual process. The exterior façade along Broadway Street, in New York City, presents interactive data walls. The walls act as digital whiteboards and display information for the public view. The public can participate in this collaborative art experience and the data of 5 people will be reorganized into a new artful data expression. The data wall showcases the drawing with names and dates. The data walls change and rotate the different drawings through out certain time frames. This encourages public engagement with the architecture. The data wall demonstrates the “educational filter” process that occurs with the strategic integration of the site, collaboration and data; the process is then directly and visually demonstrates on the building facade.

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xidneppA

Support/ Documentation...

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The word stratus is derived from the horizontal formation of a ‘stratus” cloud found in our atmosphere. This word relates to my thesis because my design proposal seeks to stratify information creating a cloud like physical and sensory and educational, social experience for any person or users that comes within 15 blocks of the site.

An Educational Filter << The Manhattan 12 Strati >>

<< Lacey Jane Hedegard >>

<< 2010 Undergraduate Dissertation - James Enos >>

This thesis proposes the design of prototypical learning spaces referred to as Public Information Service Parks strategically located in each of New York City’s 12 districts. This project offers a creative solution to two main problems. Firstly, the project addresses restrictive educational environments that decrease learning potential and secondly the project addresses the emerging problems related to the storage of digital information. The Public Information Service Parks serve the twofold purpose to house data on the lower level, and on the upper level, provide a collaborative learning space to mobilize experiential information acquisition. The Information Service Parks serve as an urban interface allowing users to access strategically unique information at each site. The Public Information Service Parks are designed to encourage urban action through interaction. The architecturally designed data center and information network in the Service Parks mobilize information acquisition as a service through an urban interface of ubiquitous information navigation within a ten block radius in New York City. The Public Information Service Parks encourage strategic exploration of each districts unique environmental, social, financial and political issues and facts. The site design is directed at demonstrating the connection of these 12 urban districts through an architectural plan that connects the structures with designated walking paths and virtual information paths. New York City offers 12 districts for prototypical learning space development with multiple University sites, dispersed all throughout the city, offering an architectural placement within a strong urban context. The 12 districts sites offer civic use through the distribution of education as a service at the Public Information Service Parks. Each district’s Park will house a unique category of information and service. For example, District 1, Tribeca, Civic Center, Battery Park and the Financial District relates to government and economics. District 1’s Public Information Service Park will store and offer a wide range of data on elected governmental officials, and the current issues affecting the public and the city. The Service Park can present information on available options for individuals to get involved to help socially mobilize solutions through the collaborative learning site activities. The educational filter concept links design ideas into a single purpose. The educational filter, an architectural solution, embraces the fact that data is proliferating, that learning spaces lack collaboration and that communities need interfaces that activate participation, connection and action. As a locative media project, the education filter design applied to Public Information Service Parks will ultimately facilitate social, cultural, and political interactions thus providing a solution that mobilizes the participation and dispersion of data as a public service directed at building communities. 5’x5’x 4’ Site Model

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The Gala June 18, 2010... Final Presentation Boards for Gallery Exhibition.

Models displayed under 36”x120” strip

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Codes Building Height: Allowable building height- 3-4 stories = 65 feet max (Type II & III Construction).Allowable floor area for Occupancy S- 7,500- 48,000 depending on type of construction. (Type I- 48,000, Type IIa- 12,000 for 5 stories , Type IIb- 7,500 for 3 stories, Type IIIa- 7,500 for 4 stories, Type IIIb- 7,500 for 3 stories) Means of Egress: Ramps- accessible egress requirement equals 1 unit vertical to 12 units horizontally, or an 8% slope. Other pedestrian ramps shall not be steeper than 1 unit vertical to 8 units horizontal. (1:12 / 1:8) Clear ramp width for mean of egress ramp is no less than 36�. Exits-Required 2 exits by code for an occupant load of 1-500. Spaces with means of egress and access in one exit shall not exceed the maximum occupant load of 30- 74 people. Accessibility: 1108.3 Self-service storage facility- total spaces in facility 1-200, minimum number of required accessible spaces is 5%, but not less than 1. Uses/ Occupancies Project has mixed-use occupancies. A: Assembly- gathering together of people for specific purposes such as civic, social, religious functions, recreation, food or drink, etc. occupied by 75 people or more for educational or instructional purposes. B: Business- building or structure that provides for service-type transactions for conducting public or civic services, including incidental storage of records and accounts and limited incidentals of stocks or goods for office use or such purposes. EDUCATIONAL OCCUPANCIES ABOVE 12TH GRADE, ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING, TELEPHONE EXCHANGES, library services not specified in E (EDUCATIONAL OCCUPANCY). Special Use/ Occupancies S: Storage- the use of a building or structure for storage, such as warehouses, storage rooms, freight depots and distribution centers, when not classified as hazardous. U: Utility- not classified by any specific occupancy group (typ. Data/ information center) Access 132

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Costs

% of total cost

Cost per S.F.

Total Cost

A: Substructure: 2.8% $9.90 $99,000 A1010 Foundations $3.05 $30,500 A1030 Slab on Grade $2.30 $23,000 A2020 Found. Walls $4.45 $44,500 B: Shell: 26.2% $93.05 $930,500 B1020 Roof Construction $3.50 $35,000 B2010 Exterior Walls $80.15 $801,500 B2020 Exterior Windows $3.45 $34,500 B2030 Exterior Doors $1.25 $12,500 B3010 Roof Coverings $4.45 $44,500 B3020 Roof Openings $0.25 $2,500 C: Interiors: 10.1% $35.80 $358,000 C1010 Partitions $8.55 $85,500 C1020 Interior Doors $2.25 $22,500 C1030 Fittings $0.55 $5,500 C3010 Wall Finishes $7.35 $73,500 C3020 Floor Finishes $7.30 $73,000 C3020 Ceiling Finishes $9.80 $98,000 D: Plumbing: 60.3% D2010 Plumbing Fixtures D2020 Domestic Water Distribution D2040 Rain Water Drainage D3010 Energy Supply D3020 Heat Generating Systems D3030 Cooling Generating Systems D3090 Other HVAC Systems/ Equip D4010 Sprinklers

$214.05 $4.45 $0.70 $1.25 $7.40 $9.00 $9.85 $81.85 $4.95

$2,140,500 $44,500 $7,000 $12,500 $74,000 $90,000 $98,500 $818,500 $49,500

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D4020 Standpipes $0.70 $7,000 D5010 Electrical Service/ Distribution $5.70 $57,000 D5020 Lighting / Branch Wiring $23.25 $232,500 D5030 Communications / Security $48.10 $481,000 D5090 Other Electrical Systems $16.85 $168,500 E: Electrical & Furnishings: 0.0%

$0.00

F: Special Construction: 0.6% $2.25 F1020 Integrated Construction $2.25

$0

$22,500 $22,500

SUBTOTAL

100.0%

$355.05

Contractor Fees (GC, Overhead, Profit) Architectural Fees User Fees

25.0% 7.0% 5.0%

$88.75 $31.05 $23.75

$887,500 $310,500 $237,500

$498.60

$4,986,000

Total Costs

Location Contingency New York

$3,550,500

1.33%

These figures are based from a 2007 U.S. Department of Treasury Report, that imposes data warehousing files for banks and help to prevent fraud. This graph breaks down the fees for the actual data system. These costs would allow for “a system to handle data management while providing access to users through an interface that integrates the data.�

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Terminology Access: the proximal 10-15 block radius within the specified district/ stratus.

Data Storage: an observatory for digital information to house digital records, files, etc.

Aerial: an antenna suspended and protruding into air space.

Digi Cube: 10’ x 10’ possible multi-purpose rooms (classrooms, offices, etc.) and they are available to rent, and creating revenues for the city.

Antenna: transmitting façade appendages that send information digitally through wireless frequency (radio/ airwaves) Cable: electronic wiring signaling when to send messages; structural fasteners; steel strands woven and braided together for structural support. Cellular Filter: See Macrophage Collaborative Knowledge: an approach to learning that enables teamwork. Consciousness: defines a person as conscious if there is ‘an awareness in the state of being and if there is an accurate and chronologic awareness with the self and environment’ (Bloom, et al., 2003). Data: facts, figures, information; Also See Information Data Center:the dispersion of information strategically to mobilize interactive learning, as well as, decreasing data pile up and trafficking that will ultimately slow bandwidth speed and create information access challenges. Data Warehouse: a bank of information, depository

Dispersion: the spreading of information; diaspora of information. District: areas; city neighborhood; community. Educational Filter: an architectural solution that embraces the fact that data is proliferating and that learning spaces lack collaboration and communities need interfaces that activate participation, connection and action. Existential: free, open space, living within the moment. Experiential: emotional connections or desire. Filter: strategically dividing information available at each Information Service Park into district categories. Fragment: a singular element or piece. Futuristic: ahead of its time; a vision sought in the future because the technology is not yet available. Identity: an investigation of one’s self interests. Information: environmental, social, financial and political issues and facts.

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Information Service Park: serve as urban interfaces allowing users to access strategically unique information at each site. This is to encourage urban action through interaction and allows information to become mobile through an acquisition service on a ubiquitous navigational device. The information is available within a ten to fifteen block radius.

Network: global connection and communication. Perceptual Sensorium: emotional content of experience related to conscious subjectivities. Phenomenology: personal cognitive awareness of the physical environment (Auburn & Barnes, 2006). It is also the multifaceted dimensions of an unparalleled event (Manzo, 2005).

Interaction: face to face communication, a connection.

Place Attachment: emotional desire or feeling to a certain place.

Knowledge: is the actual location of identifiable natural components, within the physical environment (Rogan, et al., 2005).

Place identity: the physicality of location and is the poignant actualization of an individuals’ perception with the natural environment (Rogan, et al., 2005).

Locative: relative location.

Portal: a website that would require users to create a username and password in order to access district information.

Locative Media: information is available only within certain locations. Login: required user name and passcode to access the districts’ information. Macrophage: an immune response that releases other cells to disembody viral infections. With the digestion of the viral information, the macrophage learns and integrates this knowledge with the spread of new information into the body’s overall immune system enhancing the capacity for growth and survival. Memory: enables people to identify with a place in the past, while merging with the present (Manzo, 2005). NanoVent: an exterior building skin that generates power through wind revolution.

136

Public Information Service Park: (PISP) See Information Service Park Prototype: an early rendition; model or example. Place: defines a get-a-way, it is a place to reflect on one’s thoughts, and is the rejuvenator of life. Rhizome: Biologically a rhizome is a natural process and is defined as a type of grass or root that has no ‘one’ direction. The theoretical definition states a rhizome as the un-definable, a point cannot stand alone, and a point is networked to many other points, which essentially become their own lines. The rhizome is constantly changing. It may change direction, striation, or tracing. It is a spontaneous map always fluctuating (Deleuze & Guattari, 1987).

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Rhizomatic Collaboration: random participation from the public to produce a desired effect. Ribbonized:layers of information relative to physical, social, sensory, activation, action and metaphoric paths. Sense of Place:the identified order of location where the cognition and emotions relate (Rogan, et al, 2005). Auburn and Barnes (2006) concur but in regards to one’s self. Smart Device: portable or mobile computerized device that has the capability to access and use wireless networks; i.e. Blackberry, Droid, iPhone, iPad, iPod, etc.) SmartWrap: a thin film that stores power by the use of the embedded solar PV cells and battery packs. Straus: the horizontal formation of a ‘stratus” cloud found in our atmosphere. To stratify information means creating a cloud of physical, sensory, educational, and social experiences for any person or users that comes within 15 blocks of the site. Technology: the transmission of digital information, when information is received it displays the core of existence for that space. Technology impacts communication (Cormier, 2008).

future; the here and now moment. Timeless: defines systematic processes of lost orders within a spatial continuum. Ubiquitous: omnipresent; an everyday norm; common; integrated. Ubiquitous Computing Device: an everyday technological item such a Blackberry, Droid, iPhone, iPad, iPod, etc. Unconscious: a way to abate time. The unconscious is the frozen memories of where time ceases to exist. Urban Interface:an educative space that operates through the promotion of social exchanges. Wireless Local Area Networks: (WLAN) a no wire needed connection between computers and either other computers or devices (i.e. smartphones). Also See Wi-Fi Wi-Fi: the transfer of information through wireless infrastructure to integrate technology within the environment.

Telecommunication: 1. the systematics of transmitting messages. 2. “the science and technology of sending and receiving information such as sound, visual images, or computer data over long distances through the use of electrical, radio, or light signals, using electronic devices to encode and decode the information as signals” (TheFreedictionary.com). Time: the expression with the past, present, and

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References Akamai Technologies, Inc. (2010). State of the Internet: quarter 3 -2009 report. Retrieved January 28, 2010 from Akamai: http://www.akamai.com/stateoftheinternet/ AOL, & Universal McCann – UM. (2010). Smart Phone: smart marketing. 360 Creative Team at AOL. Auburn, T., & Barnes, R. (2006). Producing Place: A neo-Schutzian perspective on the ‘psychology of place’. Journal of Environmental Psychology. 26, 38-50. Barry, P. (2007). Genome 2.0: mountains of new data and challenging old views (human genomes and genetic research). Science News. 172.10 , 154 (3). Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London. (2004). ADVANCED VIRTUAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL ARCHITECTURE RESEARCH (AVATAR). An Introduction to Advanced Virtual and Technological Architecture Research. College Organization. Retrieved April 22, 2010, from http://www.avatarlondon.org/ Bloom, F. E.; Beal, M.F.; & Kupfer, D.J. (2003). The DANA Guide to Brain Health: a practical family reference from medical experts. New York, NY: DANA Press. Bohn, R.E.; Short, J.E. (2009). How Much Information? 2009 Report on American Consumers. Global Information Industry Center, University of California, San Diego. Retrieved January 21, 2010 from UCSD: http://hmi.ucsd.edu/howmuchinfo.php Browning, D.; Mundy, J. (2001). Microsoft SQL 2000 Technical Articles: Data Warehouse Design Considerations. Retrieved February 21, 2010 from Microsoft Corporation: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa902672%28SQL.80%29.aspx#sql_dwdesign_archgoals Carolyn, K. (March 2009). Hoagies’ Gifted Education Page. Retrieved June 11, 2009, from The “all things gifted” page: http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/education_quotes.htm Colab. (n.d.). Magenn Power Inc. Magenn: wind power anywhere. Retrieved April 22, 2010, from http:// www.magenn.com/index.php CoreSite Data Centers. Retrieved January 18, 2010 from CoreSite: http://www.coresite.com/ourdatacenters-newyork.php Cormier, D. (2008). Rhizomatic Education: Community as curriculum. Innovate Journal of Online Education. 4, June/ July 2008. Data Center Container Conversion. (n.d.). . Retrieved April 22, 2010, from http://www.containerconversions.com/container-gallery.php?cat=15 Deleuze, G.; Guattari, F. (1987). A Thousand Plateaus: Capitalism and schizophrenia. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press. Deloitte (2009), TMT Predictions 2009; Retrieved January 19, 2010 from Downsizing the digital Attic: http://www.deloitte.co.uk/TMTPredictions/technology/Downsizing-digital-attic-data-storage.cfm Digital Aesthetics | Interactive Manhattan. (n.d.). Retrieved April 22, 2010, from http://www.asomatic. net/2007/01/interactive-manhattan/ Dixon, J.; Durrheim, K. (2004). Dislocating identity: Desegregation and the transformation of place. Journal of Environmental Psychology. 24, 455-473. 138

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Index A

Abstract  11 Access  86 Acknowledgements  Activity  99 Adjacencies  42 Appendix  127

6, 7

B Codes  128 Collaborative Learning  18, 29. See Rhizomatic Collaboration Space  43 Competition. See Metropolis Magazine Conclusion  119 Context  53, 57, 60 Costs  129, 130 Critical Position  12, 13, 14

D

Data Modular Data Centers  Warehouse  39 Dedication  5 Design  65 Digi Cubes  106 Disease. See Macrophage District  72, 101 Scenarios  85

E

Education Environment  19 Pedagogies  31 Satellites  43, 72 Thermometer  40 Zones  49, 72 Elevations  90, 91, 92 Experientials  41, 49 Floorplans

G

Q

I

R

Information  71 Landfill  70 Information Service Park  Introduction  9

72, 73, 84

J

C

F

H

88

38, 75

K

Knowledge Acquisition

122, 123

S 19

L

Lacey Mentality  120, 121 Lebbeus Woods  35 Locative Media  72

M

Macrophage  21, 22 Master Plan  87 MetaDiagram  62, 63 Metropolis Magazine  75, 76 Models Sectional  108, 109, 110, 111 Site  113, 115

N

Naja & de Ostos  36 Network  60 New York  54, 58, 60

O P

Remarks  119 Renderings  101 Exterior  102 Interior  104, 105 Rhizomatic Collaboration  Rhizome  19 Ribbonize. See Naja & de Ostos

Perceptual Sensorium  46, 47 Perry Kulper  33 PISP. See Information Service Park Place  20 Precedents  29 “Pre”Search  27 Process  8, 67, 69 Program  41 Model  45 Project Blackbox  38 Prototypes  79, 80, 81, 82

Schematics  83, 95 Sections  93, 95 Service  116 Site Analysis  53, 54, 55 Site Requirements  56 Spatial  50 Stratus  101 Structure  107 Structured Space  43 Sun Microsystems  38 Synthesis  17 Systems  96

T

Telescopic Information  45 Terms  131, 132, 133 The Hanging Cemetery of Baghdad

U

Urban Interface

V

Virus

36

76

21, 22, 25

W X Y Z

Zones

73, 99

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144

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Thank you for participating in the collaborative nature of this thesis.

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Meta - DATA

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<< End >>

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