Page 1

  A Room in Motion

sponsored by


CONTENTS 02 Introduce  03 Organize  04 Design  09 Propose  17 Test  20 Deconstruct  21 Reflect

1


INTRODUCE The pavilion  is   at  once   solid  and  dissolved.  A  regularized  steel  frame  encloses  a  soft  forest  of  rubber  tubing.  The  architecture  itself  vibrates,  as  you  pluck  and  stretch  it  out  of  shape.  With  enough  vibration,  the  entire  structure  moves  out   of  focus.  The  visitor  is  invited  to  input  their   own  energy  into  the  system,  watching  the  how  a  single   tube  transmits   its  movement  to  surrounding  elements.  You  can  immerse  yourself  in  the  material,  using  the  rubber  seats  or  leaning  back  into  its  web  with  your  body.  In  this  room,  the  vibration  surrounds  you,  and  the  outside world begins to blur away. 

 

2


ORGANIZE Project Manager…………......​ Becca Book Digital Design…………..…..​ Hansong Cho  Digital Design………...………......​ Jiapei Li  Digital Design….……….​ Kevin MacNichol  Digital Design……………….…….​ Ge Zhao  Rubber Prototyping….……..​ Caitlin Magill  Steel Prototyping……....​ Abraham Murrell  Steel Prototyping…………....​ Eugene Ong  Steel Prototyping……..…....​ Edward Palka

3


DESIGN

The many  formal  inventions  that  led  up  to  the  final  proposal  are  linked  by  a  single  concept:  the  structure  must   blur  away.  Experimenting  with  metal  struts  and  rubber  tubes,  each  attempt  strikes  a  different  balance  between  foreground  and  background,  frame  and  infill.  By  working   digitally,  we  were  able to test many scales  and  color  palettes,  in  search  of  an   experience  that  was  both  occupiable  and  animated. 

4


5


Â

6


7


PROPOSE

Building design is a sculptural art, where a  form  is  molded  until  ready  for  the kiln. But  if  a  room  could  respond  to  the  movement  of  our  bodies,  its  walls  would  begin  to  dance. 

This

pavilion

combines

a

rectangular steel  frame  with  a  billowing  gradient  of  taut  rubber  tubes.  With  each  pluck  of  a  chord,  vibrations  ripple  around   the  room.  Patterns  of  rubber  contort  into  elastic   seats,  where  bodies  become  immersed  into  the  material  itself,  as  the   architecture blurs away.   

8


9


10


11


12


13


14


MATERIALS

QUANTITY

P1000T PG 1­⅝” Unistrut Channel (10’ Lengths) 

900 ft 

P1028 X Shaped Flat Plate Fitting 

3

P1031 T­Shaped Flat Plate Fitting 

8

P1036 Flat Plate 90 Degree Fitting (3­hole) 

10

P1380A Flat Plate 90 Degree Fitting (4­hole) 

25

P1045 Z Shape Fitting 

100

P1047 U Shape Fitting 

200

P1068 Ninety Degree Angle Fitting (2­hole) 

20

P1326 Ninety Degree Angle Fitting (3­hole) 

90

P1325 Ninety Degree Fitting (4­hole) 

20

P1357 Ninety Degree Angle Fitting, Braced (3­hole) 

7

P1359 Ninety Degree Angle Fitting, Braced (4­hole) 

7

P2860­10 White Plastic End Caps 

50

P2759 Trolley System 

8

HHCS050119EG 1/2" dia. 1­3/16" Hex Head Screw 

1,400

P1010T 1/2" dia. 13  Thread, Top Retainer Nut 

1,400

HLKW050EG 1/2" Lockwashers 

1,400

5/32” Latex Tubing 

2,500 ft 

15


TEST

The

full

scale

prototyping

was

instrumental in  gaining   a  more  full  understanding  limitations 

of

of our 

the

realities and 

pavilion

design.

Immediately obvious   in  the  prototyping  phase,  we  came  to  understand  the  critical  nature  of  project  management  and  coordination.  Throughout  the  process,  we  struggled  repeatedly  to  obtain  the  correct  hardware  for  our  system,  which  meant  that  our  system  and  joints  could  not  work  to  their  full  potential.  Screws  instead  of  bolts  and  smaller  than  adequate  bolts  made our early mockups prone to extreme  torquing  and  even  hardware  failure  with  screws and bolts breaking. 

   

16


The early  prototyping   process  made   us  become  acutely  aware  of  the  different  ways  the  unistrut  system  is  meant  to  be  joined.  Our  early  designs  were  callous  to   the  orientation  of  the  unistrut  and  the  spacing   of  the  holes  in  the  system.  Once  we  tried  to  mockup  these  designs,  the  appropriate 

joining

orientations

and

methods became  immediately   clear.  The  joints 

became

construction,

cleaner

stronger,

in

their

and

less

susceptible to unwanted torquing    The  scale  of  our  pavilion  was  also   fine­tuned  as  a  result  of  the  prototyping.  Our  original  design’s  short  elevation  was  approximately  10’x10’,  but  was  shrunk  to  7’x6’  after  seeing  the  enormity  of  our  original design.  

  Since  rubber  plays  a  huge  role  in  our  design  and  is  a  challenge  to  represent  accurately  in  digital  software,  the  physical  mockups 

17

were

again

crucial. The 


mockups showed  us  how  much rubber we  really  needed  to  create  the  intended  aesthetic  and  kinetic  effects.  This  meant  evaluating  the  color  pallette  of  our  neon  rubber  and  the  unfinished  unistrut,  the   density  and  rigidity  our  rubber  patterning,  and 

the

kinesthetic

feedback

of

experiencing (Playing  with)  the  rubber  Additionally,  the  process  of  putting  rubber  on  our  system  made  us  very  aware  of the  need  to  fine  tune  the  tensioning  of  the  rubber,  which  meant  evaluating  not  only  how  it  was  strung  but  also  how  often  it  was  tied  off.  With  all  of  this  rubber,   the  tension  which  was  put  on  our  unistrut  frames  become  more  obvious  as  well,  allowing  us to better understand where we  needed  more  structure  and  where  extended back spans would be critical.  

  Overall,  the  prototyping  process  furthered  our  design  immeasurably  and  turned  it  into  a  reality  which  otherwise  would  not  have  been  attained.  It  helped  us  primarily  with scale, detailing, and modularization of  the system. 

18


DECONSTRUCT

The structure  will  be  taken  down  and  put  into  storage   on  Tuesday,  May  17th  by the  following students:    Becca Book  Kevin MacNichol  Jiapei Li  Abraham Murrell    We  plan  to  store  it  in  the  NY­Paris  studio  until  it  can  be  re­deployed   for the Figment  Arts  Festival   on  Governor’s   Island,  on  June  3rd,  by   Becca  Book,  Edward  Palka,  Ge Zhao, and others (pending).     

19


REFLECT

The prototyping  process  was  very  important  in   bridging  the  gap  between  digital  design  and  physical  realization.  It  would  have  been  prudent  to  explore  prototyping   more  strategically  earlier  in  the  semester.  The  first  joint  assignments  for  the  course  were  a  bit  removed  from  our  actual  project  concept,  and  we  regret  that  those  ideas were not able to be better  incorporated  into  our  design.   A  more  interesting  joint  idea could have benefitted  this  project  greatly,  and  at   the  time  we  didn’t 

realize

how

important

that

assignment could have been. 

   

20


21

BLUR INSTRUCTION  
BLUR INSTRUCTION  
Advertisement