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INTERNATIONAL

BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAMME

2018 - 2019

THE GULF ENGLISH SCHOOL


THE IB LEARNER PROFILE The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world. IB learners strive to be:

Inquirers They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives. Knowledgeable acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines. Thinkers They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions. Communicators language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others. Principled They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them. Open-minded They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience. Caring They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

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THE GULF ENGLISH SCHOOL

risk-takers They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs. Balanced They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others. Reflective They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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GES VISION “Our school seeks to provide a learning environment which is caring, motivating and supportive allowing all cultures within GES community to achieve their personal best and to become global citizens”

GES MISSION

• Promote academic, social, physical and personal development in our students. • Develop our students’ learning skills which will be of lifelong value. • Encourage positive risk taking in our students. • Develop creative skills and critical awareness in our students. • Encourage our students to become aware of and act upon their responsibilities, not

only to themselves and their peers, but also to society in general. • Foster within our students a healthy sense of self-esteem and self-awareness and encourage respect and compassion for others. • Actively promote the preservation and protection of the natural world amongst all students. • Create programs, assessments and experiences that serve to unite the school and celebrate the distinctiveness of each campus community.

GES DEFINITION OF INTERNATIONALISM

• sustainable development, human rights, interdependence and diversity.

be appropriate role models for others. A member of the GES community: • Is knowledgeable of and curious about the wider world and seeks to broaden and deepen understanding. • his/her role and responsibility as a global citizen.

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• Is willing and able to communicate about culture, language and beliefs. • Is prepared to take action and to be an effective contributor. • Respects and celebrates diversity, language, culture and beliefs. • Appreciates multiple perspectives including environmental and economic systems and current global issues. This is shown by: • Partnership links with other organizations. • Twinned school, pen pals. • A service learning programme that shows respect for and commitment to our host country and the wider global community. • International awareness throughout the curriculum, allowing for students to share and value each other’s international experiences and mother tongue languages.

• International extension opportunities which include visits & exhibitions, learning opportunities & competitions, personal development & challenge, higher education offers from a range of international universities.

national days of school nationalities, WWW, Duke of Edinburgh.

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  

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Encourage positive risk taking in our students. Develop creative skills and critical awareness in our students. Encourage our students to become aware of and act upon their responsibilities, not only to themselves and their peers, but also to society in general. Foster within our students a healthy sense of The self-esteem and opened self-awareness andneed for Gulf English School in 1993 to meet the encourage respect and compassion forof study an educational facility that would provide a course others based on the National Curriculum of England and Wales whilst alsopromote offering an Arabic Language and Islamic Actively the preservation andStudies programme of as prescribed by the Supreme Education Council protection the natural world amongst in Qatar. all students. Create From a programs, small beginningassessments in two villas, the and school exhas grown rapidly. Now, occupying purpose-built periences that serve two to large, unitemodern, the school campuses, The Gulf English School has all of the facilities and celebrate the distinctiveness of each required to educate students to a high standard. In 2009, the campus community. school further developed, adding more administrative space,

particular field of knowledge and skills M a n y h o ld a M a s t e r ’ s d e g r e e o equivalent and bring a wide range o experience and pedagogical practice t the school community.

hISTOry Of The GuLf enGLISh SChOOL

a Science Laboratory and ICT, Art and Media studios under the Multi- Purpose Hall.

The Gulf English School consists of Infant and Junior Schools at Primary level as well as a Secondary School. We offer students Pre-School to International Baccalaureate education. We attract and employ international teachers of the highest calibre, all of whom are fluent and competent English speakers and experts in their particular field of knowledge and skills. Many hold a Master’s degree or equivalent and bring a wide range of experience and pedagogical practice to the school community.

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INTRODUCTION This book is designed to help you plan your courses for next year and beyond. At The Gulf English School we try hard to ensure that your learning is successful, year after year. The basis of our curriculum is to develop the student holistically, within an English speaking environment, so that students learning experiences can contribute to their academic, physical, emotional, cultural and social development. We are a school which continues to grow very quickly and which is expanding to accommodate the needs of senior students. The school introduced the first year of the International Baccalaureate in the academic year 2005-2006, and in 2008 we introduced the AS level examination for Year 12. In 2014, we also introduced BTEC at Level 3. In Years 7, 8 and 9 we work in National Curriculum Levels. In Year 10 we offer IGCSE courses which have been chosen to best accommodate our students’ particular needs and aspirations. We feel it is important to equip a new generation with the best that education has to offer. We continue to offer Arabic and Islamic Studies at Year 10 and 11 as these subjects are highly valued at our school and have helped to establish its fine reputation. We want the time students spend with us to be a satisfying, broad ranging and challenging experience.

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This handbook gives details of the subjects being offered. A brief description is given about each subject which may be studied. We hope parents and students will carefully examine the subjects and courses offered. Should advice or support from the school be needed, we encourage you to contact us.


TABLE OF CONTENTS Background For Whom is the IB Programme? Entry Requirements The Academic Curriculum

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Group 1 · English A: Language & Literature

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Group 2 · Arabic B · Spanish/French ab initio

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Group 3 · Information Technology in a Global Society · Geography · Business and Management · History

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Group 4 · Physics · Biology · Chemistry

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Group 5 · Mathematics SL · Math Studies SL

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Group 6 · Visual Arts

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· Grading Scheme · Student Excellence · Final Results · School Contacts

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BACKGROUND The International Baccalaureate Organization was founded educational foundation. Its purpose was to facilitate the international mobility of students preparing for university by providing schools with a curriculum and diploma recognised by universities around the world. The IB Diploma Programme is a rigorous two year course necessary to succeed at university. The programme has the strengths of a traditional broad curriculum, but with three important additional features, shown at the centre of the IB circle below.

‘The IB Diploma Programme is a rigorous two year course designed to give students the skills and qualifications necessary to succeed at university.’

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WHO IS THE IB DIPLOMA FOR? The IB Diploma is suited to motivated responsible students with a combination of the following characteristics: Willingness to develop personal study habits, including self-discipline, self motivation, and time management; A capacity for thinking critically and creatively;

An international outlook and genuine concern for others. The IB Diploma programme, while demanding, is open to the average and above average student. It is not an elitist programme for exceptionally gifted students, but a course of studies, either full diploma or

Throughout their studies, students discover that effective learners following an IB curriculum need to be motivated, knowledgeable, strategic in their learning, ethical, compassionate, reflective and socially interactive.

THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK) This is an interdisciplinary requirement intended to stimulate inside and outside the classroom.

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The course challenges students to question the bases of knowledge, to be aware of subjective and ideological biases and to develop the ability to analyse evidence that is expressed in rational argument. ToK is a key element in encouraging students to appreciate other cultural perspectives. The course is unique to the IBO, which recommends at least 100 hours of teaching time spanning the programme’s two years.

CREATIVITY, ACTIVITY, SERVICE (CAS) The IBO’s goal is to educate the whole person and foster responsible, compassionate citizens. The CAS programme encourages students to share their energy and special talents with others. Students may, for example, participate in theatre or musical productions, sports and community service activities. Students should, through these activities, develop greater awareness of themselves, concern for others, and the ability to work cooperatively with other people.


THE EXTENDED ESSAY Each student has the opportunity to investigate a topic of special interest. The essay requirement acquaints diploma candidates with the kind of independent research and writing skills expected by universities. The IBO recommends that a student devotes a total of about 40 hours private study and writing time to the essay. The essay permits students to deepen their programmes of study, for example by selecting a topic in one of their higher level (HL) courses. Or they might add breadth to their academic experience by electing to write in a subject not in cluded in their programme choices.

‘Throughout their studies, students discover that effective learners following an IB curriculum need to be motivated, knowledgeable and strategic in their learning.’

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ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

The IB Diploma Programme is aimed at highly motivated students of average to above average ability. As such the minimum entry requirements for the Diploma course are 5 grades C or above in IGCSE, GCSE, or

2. Interview All potential IB students must undertake an interview before they will be accepted onto the course.

the student. Parents are encouraged to attend these interviews.

language) and a Science. Students not attaining these grades will not normally be allowed to enter the Diploma Programme. Students, who do not sit externally assessed examinations such as those listed above, will be required to undertake an entrance test set by the school.

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‘Students, who do not sit externally assessed examinations, will be required to undertake an entrance test set by the school.’


THE ACADEMIC CURRICULUM Students must also follow 6 subjects, one from each curriculum area shown on the hexagon. From these subjects 3 must be taken at higher level, allowing for a degree of specialization and 3 at a standard level, allowing breadth to studies.

Group 6 Visual Arts, or an additional elective course from Group 3 or 4 (*we offer Business Management & Chemistry as our elective courses*)

ACADEMIC SUBJECTS Group 1 English A Language and Literature

‘From these subjects 3 must be taken at higher level, allowing for a degree of specialization and 3 at a standard level, allowing breadth to studies.’

Group 2 French (ab initio), Arabic B, Spanish (ab initio ). Group 3 Geography, Business Management*, Information Technology in the Global Society (ITGS), History Group 4 Biology, Chemistry*, Physics Group 5 Mathematics, Mathematical Studies

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LANGUAGE A HL - HIGHER LEVEL SL - STANDARD LEVEL

GROUP 1 LANGUAGE A: LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE SL/HL Language A: Language and Literature comprises four parts--two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The study of the texts produced in a language is central to an active engagement with language and culture and, by extension, to how we see and understand the world in which we live. A key aim of the language A: language and literature course is to encourage students to question the meaning generated by language and texts, which, it can be argued, is rarely straightforward and unambiguous. Helping students to focus closely on the language of the texts they study and to become aware of the role of each text’s wider context in shaping its meaning is central to the course. The language A: language and literature course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The course is designed to be flexible-

In view of the international nature of the IB and its commitment to intercultural understanding, the language A: language and literature course does not limit the study of texts to the products of one culture or of the cultures covered by any one language. The study of literature in translation from other cultures is especially important to IB Diploma Programme students because it contributes to a global perspective, thereby promoting an insight into the different ways in which cultures influence and shape the experiences of life common to all humanity.

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the interests and concerns that are relevant to their students while developing in students a range of transferable skills. An understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text is combined with an exploration of how that meaning is circumstances of production and reception. The focus underpinning the approach to texts sees the study of the formal elements of each text as only one among several means of establishing a reading. A wide range of factors, including the circumstances of production and reception, and the role of culturally determined reading practices, are seen as being equally important. A wider aim of the course is the development of an understanding of “critical literacy” in students.


LANGUAGE A HL - HIGHER LEVEL SL - STANDARD LEVEL

GROUP 1 ENGLISH A HL & SL Assessment Criteria: Standard Level External assessment (3 hours) 70%

The paper consists of two unseen texts. Students write an analysis

In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on both the literary texts studied in part 3. The questions are the

Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit one written task for external

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4

Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of one

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LANGUAGE A HL - HIGHER LEVEL SL - STANDARD LEVEL

GROUP 1 ENGLISH A HL Students produce at least four written tasks based on material studied in the course. Students submit two of these tasks for external

Higher Level

must be a critical response to one of the prescribed questions for the HL additional study.

External assessment (4 hours) 70%

The paper consists of two pairs of unseen texts. Students write a comparative analysis of one pair of texts.

This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB at the end of the course. Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in

In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on at least two of the literary texts studied in part 3. The questions are the same at SL but the assessment criteria are different. (25 marks)

questions. Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based on part 2 of the course. The mark of marks)

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LANGUAGE B GROUP 2 ARABIC B (Standard and Higher Level)

ASSESSMENT

All texts and questions are in the target language and all responses must be in the target audience.

HL - 6 writing tasks SL - 4 writing tasks

The Language B Course aims to develop powers of expression in a second language. Both the Higher and Standard Level courses give students the opportunity to increase competence in the written and spoken language and also aim to develop their knowledge of the culture and civilisation of Arabic Countries. Students work to broaden their vocabulary, to build a solid knowledge of grammatical structures and to develop their competence at expressing themselves in a range of spoken and written contexts. By the end of the course, students are expected to demonstrate accuracy in the oral and written forms of the language, both in grammatical exercises and in their own essays and speech. Students will need a genuine interest in extending their study life and thinking, and the capacity for learning new ideas and inf ormation. A successful student will need a high level of self-motivation and will enjoy studying a wide variety of texts and discussing them at a high level.

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GROUP 2 SPANISH AB INITIO / FRENCH AB INITIO Standard Level Only For students wishing to learn a new language.

OBJECTIVES

Course description The focus of the ab initio course is on “real” communication.

reading, writing and speaking through authentic materials in French or Spanish. Students will Understand French or Spanish: basic questions and instructions Hold a normal conversation about daily life Understand written texts on a range of topics

The students will be provided with a series of thematic units which will allow them to cope in a number of everyday life situations in a Spanish or French speaking country. A wide range of activities will allow students to practise the 4 skills, listening, reading, writing and speaking. By the end of the course, students will have acquired a general competence in Spanish or French. Moreover, they will be more aware of the cultural differences that

Write messages and postcards etc.

the rest of the world.

Have a better understanding of cultural aspects of Hispanic or Francophone countries and peoples.

The Course Aims

ASSESSMENT The course will be taught at standard level in accordance with the recommended teaching hours of IB of 150 hours. There are 7 different topics. These will be assessed with through a reading exam, writing exam, a written assignment and the speaking exam.

1. To develop the students’ oral and written skills in order to deal with everyday needs in Spanish or French. 2. To introduce to the students the culture of countries where Spanish or French are spoken. 3. To provide a general foundation in Spanish or French so that students will be able to move on to advanced studies in the future. 4. To stimulate the students intellectually. 5. To encourage a positive attitude towards learning Spanish or French. ‘By the end of the course, students will have acquired a general competence in Spanish OR Spanish.’

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THE GULF ENGLISH SCHOOL GrOuP 3 InDIVIDuaLS anD SOCIeTIeS InfOrmaTIOn TeChnOLOGy In a GLOBaL SOCIeTy

‘The widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions about social and ethical issues that shape our society today.’

The DP Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) course is the study and evaluation of the impact of information technology (IT) on individuals and society. It explores the advantages and disadvantages of the use of digitized information at the local and global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of IT within social contexts. Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences, it also considers ethical questions found in the study of philosophy. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis, because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions about our society today. The COurSe aImS: 1. Enable the student to evaluate social and ethical considerations arising from widespread use of IT by individuals, families, communities, organizations and societies at the local and global level. 2. Develop the student’s understanding of the capabilities of current and emerging IT systems and to evaluate their impact on a range of stakeholders. 3. Enable students to apply their knowledge of existing IT systems to various scenarios and to make informed judgments about the effects of IT developments on them. 4. Encourage students to use their knowledge of IT systems and pract cal skills to justify IT solutions for a specified client or end user.

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GROUP 3 INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY (continued)

ASSESSMENT

OBJECTIVES

HL

There are four assessment objectives for the ITGS course at SL and HL. Having followed the ITGS course at SL or HL, students will be expected to:

Written papers 4 hours 45 minutes

1. Demonstrate an awareness of IT applications and developments

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2. Demonstrate technical knowledge of ITGS terminology, concepts, tools and IT systems.

Written papers 3 hours 4. Explain the impacts of IT applications and developments in specified scenarios and analyse the social and ethical signifi cance of them.

An IT solution to a problem set in a social context.

through individually researched studies. policies and developments. 7. Demonstrate evidence of project management in the development of a well organised product to resolve a specific issue. 8. Use IT tools and the product development life cycle to create an original prod uct in consultation with a client.

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GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTION

Geography is a dynamic subject which teaches students about the real world, focusing on interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment, in both time and space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions and examines the processes behind them. Geography is unique because it occupies the middle ground between social and natural sciences. It uses this to examine concepts and ideas, as well as learn skills, from a range of other disciplines. Students will develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas. The Geography course includes both physical and human topics and it embodies global and international awareness in many ways. Key global issues such as poverty, sustainability and climate change are studied. Examples and detailed case studies are considered for each topic at a variety of scales, from local to global.

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‘Geography is a Social Science that examines the manner in which societies live, are distributed and interact with the environment.’


THE COURSE AIMS

COURSE CONTENT

1. Develop an understanding of the interrelatioships between 1. Core content: Patterns and Change people, places, spaces and the environment This section covers 4 topics Population in Transition, Disparities in Wealth and Development, Patterns in Environment Quality and 2. Develope a concern for human welfare and the quality of the Sustainability and Patterns in Resource Consumption. environment, and an understanding of the need for planning and sustainable management. 2. Optional themes These can be chosen from a range of topics including Extreme 3. Appreciate the relevance of geography in analysing Environments, Hazards and Disasters, Urban Environments, contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global Leisure sport and Tourism and The Geography of Food and perspective of diversity and change. Health. 3. HL Extension: Global Interactions This topic focusses on the process of globalisation as the world becomes more inter-connected 4. Internal Assessment: Geography investigation Standard Level students study the core content and two optional themes. Higher level students study the core content, three optional themes and the HL extension. All students complete the internal assessment.

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In addition to the core, HL students are expected to complete breadth to the course.

GROUP 3 INDIVIDUALS AND SOCIETIES BUSINESS MANAGEMENT COURSE DESCRIPTION

main areas: Business Organisations and Environment Marketing Human Resources Operational Management Accounting and Finance These areas are all integrated to provide an overall picture of business principles and structure. This helps students to understand the development of businesses within their own particular environment.

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PURPOSE

The purpose of the course is to provide students with the understanding of business principles, practice and skills. This is achieved through effective differentiated teaching skills and techniques and the visiting of real life business environments, where possible. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

The aims and objectives of the course are to provide the students with a critical understanding of complex business activities. The activities which take place are in a variety of different business environments, where possible The students will be made aware of businesses in a multicultural world and the ever increasing need to be more aware of ethical and environmental issues.


INTERNATIONALISM Throughout the course, businesses which have international ties will be used for case study examples along side local businesses. Students will study global multinational companies and research the issues associated when dealing with different countries and cultures. Students will be made aware of the ever increasing need for businesses to participate effectively in local and world affairs.

For the internal assessment descriptors for assessing criteria will be used for the research project (HL) and the written assignment (SL). The business and management higher level research project and the standard level written assignment judges each candidate in work of other candidates. This is a major piece of work which involves students carrying out their own research and is worth 25% of the ďŹ nal grade.

The Proposed Process and Assessment The course will be taught at both higher level and standard level in accordance with the recommended teaching hours of IB, 240 hours and 150 hours respectively. ďŹ ve

both higher level and standard levels, and a research project for the higher level and a written assignment for the standard level.

pre-issued to the students. ASSESSMENT There are two different methods used for assessing the IBO Business Management course. For the external assessment there are detailed mark schemes

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GROUP 3

Standard Level

HISTORY

The program for standard level falls into two parts:

History is the study of the past and how individuals and societies have impacted on humanity. “Those that do not remember the past are condemned to repeat it” George Santayana. This quote shows the importance of studying History as a discipline. Historians strive to unearth the truth about our past but this is not an easy thing to do. Therefore it is important for us to nurture

NATURE OF THE COURSE

At GES we offer a robust, exciting and engaging history course. This gives our students a better understanding of our world today. Students will develop important skills course were students will interact with historical sources

at our past and communicate this in a wide ranging way.

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1. An outline study of a selection of Twentieth Century topics in world history; 2. An individual in-depth study of a limited subject or subjects approved by the student’s teacher as part of an


COURSE OUTLINE Part 1 Students who study standard level will explore an outline study of a selection of Twentieth Century topics in world history: One prescribed topics: Military Leaders Conquest and its impact The move to global war Rights and protest Conict and intervention Two World History topics: Origins, development and impact of industrialization (1750-2000) Independence movements (1800-2000) Evolution and development of democratic states (1848-2000) Authoritarian States (20th Century) Causes and effects of 20th Century Wars The Cold War superpower tensions 20th Century Part 2 Individual Study (Internal Assessment Component) This part of the course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to study a limited theme or subject in greater depth and to develop and demonstrate their investigative skills which are not necessarily tested in the formal written examination.

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HISTORY (continued) Higher Level The program for Higher Level falls into three main parts: 1. An outline study of a selection of Twentieth Century topics in World History; 2. A more detailed study of the history of a major region from approximately the middle of the eighteenth century to the present day; 3. An individual in-depth study of a limited subject or subjects approved by the student’s teacher as part of an Internal Assessment component. Part 1 is the same as Standard level. Part 2 is a regional study. Candidates must study of one of the following regions: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Africa and the Middle East Americas Asia and Oceania Europe.

The main focus of this, is the political, social and economic developments in the region. Part 3 is the same as Part 2 in the Standard Level.

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ASSESSMENT External Assessment Paper 1 Prescribed topic paper (Source based assessment) Paper 2 World History topic essay paper on two topics Paper 3 Region essay paper on three topics from chosen region Internal Assessment Historical investigation of 2000 words on a topic of student choice


GROUP 4 EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES PHYSICS COURSE DESCRIPTION

Ever changing and daring to shock, Physics is the fundamental Science of the Universe. IB Physics is a course designed to explore the physical workings of our Universe. Whilst mathematics is a vital part of this course it is not too heavily orientated towards the theoretical and practical work accounts for 24 % of the ďŹ nal grade. Topics on the SL course include: Mechanics, Thermal Physics, Waves, Electricity and Magnetism and Atomic, Nuclear and Particle Physics. On the HL course there are additional units on: Wave phenomena, Fields, Electromagnetic Induction and Quantum Physics. Options on the course include: Relativity, Engineering Physics, Imaging and Astrophysics. The IB Physics course is an excellent preparatory course of study for any engineering or Science course at University. The ability to analyse and evaluate evidence is a key skill in any walk of life.

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GROUP 4 EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES BIOLOGY

is best developed and understood through personal experience, therefore the emphasis throughout the programme is on providing students with ample opportunities for research and discovery.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Biology is the study of living organisms, applying the techniques and approach of the experimental sciences. This study is undertaken at a variety of levels from the molecular to that of the biosphere, each with its own distinctive approaches and methods. By the end of the course the student should have developed an appreciation of the interactions between these levels, and of organisms as functioning entities within the biosphere. The design of the International Baccalaureate Biology in many countries.

within a global and cultural context using international science journals and news; it will be monitored by the students in the form of a scrap book.

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This also aims to enhance and develop experimental investigative and practical skills. The programme will provide a broad understanding of core concepts in Biology such as to prepare the student for the IB examinations and for successful academic careers in science at university level. Through studying the Biology programme, students will also develop their ability to analyse and evaluate


GrOuP 4 eXPerImenTaL SCIenCeS ChemISTry

The design of the International Baccalaureate Chemistry programme seeks to incorporate recent scientific thinking in many countries. At G.E.S. this will include

COurSe DeSCrIPTIOn

context using international science journals and news.

Chemical principles underpin the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems. The unifying principles of chemistry are developed in a logical way, with laboratory investiga tions providing a basis for this development. In this programme great emphasis will be placed on experimentation and observation to enhance and develop experimental and practical skills. The programme will provide a broad understanding of core concepts in chemistry such as to prepare the student for the IB examinations and for successful academic careers in Science at university level. Through studying the chemistry programme students will information critically and to recognize the limitations of

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aSSeSSmenT

Grades for IB candidates in group 4 subjects will be determined by internal school assessment and external evaluation by the IB organization. The external exams consist of 3 papers, occupying a total of 3 hours at standard level and 4.5 hours at higher level. Internal assessment is based on one experimental investigation carried out independently by students during term 2 of IB2 Ongoing assessment will be done in the form of; unit tests, quizzes, cooperative learning exercises, assignments, homework, notebook, labs, experiments. External assessment (80%) In the form of the IB external examinations at the end of the course. There are three examinations in each subject at each level. Paper 1: Multiple Choice Paper 2: Extended Theory Questions Paper 3: Options Topic Paper Internal assessment (20%) Internal assessment is in the form of an experimental investigation which is marked by the class teacher using criteria supplied by the IB organization. This will take approximately 25% of a student’s time and is evaluated using a set of standards devised by the IB organization.

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GROUP 4 PROJECT

The group 4 project is a collaborative activity where students from different IB Science (Group 4) subjects work together on a scientific or technological topic, allowing for concepts and perceptions from across the disciplines to be shared. It should “encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the overarching nature of the scientific method�. The group 4 project allows students to appreciate the environmental, social and ethical implications of science and technology. It may also allow them to understand the limitations of scientific study as they progress. The emphasis is on interdisciplinary cooperation and the processes involved in scientific investigation, rather than the products of such investigation.

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GROUP 5 MATHEMATICS MATHEMATICS SL COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly. The majority of these students will expect to need a sound mathematical background as they prepare for future studies in subjects such as Chemistry, Economics, Psychology and Business Administration. The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques. The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on mathematical rigour. Students should wherever possible apply the mathematical knowledge they have acquired to solve realistic problems set in an appropriate context. ASSESSMENT

The internally assessed component, the portfolio, offers students a framework for developing independence in their mathematical learning by engaging in mathematical investigation and mathematical modelling.

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Students are provided with opportunities to take a considered approach to these activities and to explore different ways of approaching a problem. The portfolio also allows students to work without the time constraints of a written examination and to develop the skills they need for communicating mathematical ideas. External assessment is by two 1½ hour examinations. Students’ progress will be regularly monitored by way of end of topic tests and the more formal mid-year and end of year examination cycles.


GROUP 5 MATHEMATICS MATH STUDIES SL COURSE DESCRIPTION

ASSESSMENT

This course caters for students who already possess knowledge of basic mathematical concepts, and who are equipped with the skills needed to apply simple mathematical techniques correctly.The course focuses on introducing important mathematical concepts through the development of mathematical techniques.

External assessment is via two 1½ hour examinations. Students’ progress will be regularly monitored by way of end of topic tests and the more formal midyear and end of year examination cycles.

The intention is to introduce students to these concepts in a comprehensible and coherent way, rather than insisting on mathematical rigor. The main differences between Mathematics SL and Mathematics Studies SL is that Studies focuses more on the real life applications of common uses of Mathematics, such as finance, statistics, probability and more. The internally assessed component, the portfolio offers students a framework for developing independence in their mathematical learning by engaging in mathematical investigation and mathematical modelling. The portfolio for Mathematics Studies is open ended in that students are allowed six months to create a project on any topic that they wish.

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MATH STUDIES SL 37


Portfolio This course does not have the depth found in the Mathematics HL course. Students wishing to study subjects with a high degree of mathematical content should opt for the Mathematics SL course rather than the Math Studies course. A Graphical Display Calculator is required for this course Core topics to be covered are Algebra Functions and Equations Trigonometry Statistics Probabillity Calculus

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ASSESSMENT:

Comparative Study - 20% Independent and contextual investigation exploring artwork, objects and artifacts from different cultures.

VISUAL ARTS HL Over the two years of the IB Visual Arts course pupils will develop deeply personal and independent investigation workbooks. Alongside this pupils will produce a number of studio pieces stemming from their investigations over the course of the two years. There is also a written element of the course in the form of a comparative study.

Process Portfolio - 40% Students select materials which evidences their experimentations, manipulation and refinement using a variety of media from their sketchbook. Exhibition - 40% Students showcase resolved final outcomes in an end of year show.

At the final registration deadline pupils may opt for; Pupils studying further humanities subjects are encouraged to absorb their learning from outside the Art room into their creative investigations and research. Investigation work books may act as portfolio work required for application to Foundation Art degrees or the equivalent.

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Up to 3 bonus points can be awarded to students based on the overall performance in Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. The maximum score for the diploma is 45 points. aWarD Of The DIPLOma

The GraDInG SCheme Each of the six subjects offered is graded on the following scale: Grade 1 = Very poor Grade 2 = Poor Grade 3 = Mediocre

The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate whose total score is 24 points or above, provided all the following requirements have been met: (a) Numeric grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the diploma (b) An approved programme of Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) has been completed

Grade 4 = Satisfactory

(c) Grades A to D have been awarded for both Theory of Knowledge and an Extended Essay

Grade 5 = Good

(d) There is no grade 1 in any subject

Grade 6 = Very good

(e) There is no more than one grade 2 at higher level

Grade 7 = Excellent

(f) There are no more than two grades 2 at standard level (g) Overall, there are no more than three grades 3 or below,

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(h) At least 12 points have been gained on higher level subjects. (i) At least 8 points have been gained on standard level subjects.

candidate to be guilty of malpractice. A maximum of three examination sessions is allowed in which to satisfy the requirements for the award of the IB diploma.

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HOW TO ENSURE EXCELLENCE IN IB DP STUDIES The IB DP is a demanding programme of study, but well organised students are able to accomplish success and outside of school. A GOOD IB STUDENT:

Works consistently throughout the two years of study. He/she always has something to do. It is recommended that each student do a minimum of 18 hours of homework per week, that is, 4 hours per week for HL subjects and 2 hours per week for SL subjects. Is punctual and maintains an excellent attendance record. Makes a study plan for the coming week/month, anticipating deadlines for essays, assignments and including forthcoming sporting and social activities. Works in surroundings, conducive to thoughtful study, that is, in the library or alone in a quiet, well-lit room, sitting at a desk, without television or loud music.

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Begins studying sooner rather than later in a sustained fashion, uninterrupted by frequent “refreshment breaks,” “emergency” telephone calls, computer games or television viewing; able to study for a set period, take a short break and then return to study. Follows up recent class notes carefully and he/she understands what is being instructed. Class notes are well organized and tidy. Engages in lively discussion and debate with fellow students and teachers, and demonstrates eagerness to ask questions. Works well with the counsellor, teachers and other stu dents. Presents neat assignments that are carefully researched, thoroughly argued and checked for spelling and syntax errors.

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Your IB DP Coordinator will inform you of the exact date and time for viewing your results on line. In July the results will be available on line at http://results. ibo.org use your login details. You should obtain your login details from the IB DP Coordinator. In order to get your login details you will have to hand in a completed Clearance form to the IB DP Coordinator.

If your results are not good enough to get you to any of the universities/colleges that you have applied for then. Global Vision might be able to get you something in the UK, or something in the US or something in Australia. OR you may need to consider an alternative plan.

The actual certiďŹ cates should arrive to the IB DP Coordinator by September. If you are unable to collect them yourself then you will have to notify the IB DP Coordinator as to who will pick them up or where they should be sent. WHAT IS THE NEXT STEP?

If your results are what you needed then inform your chosen college/university and have a good summer vacation. If your results are a little off what you needed contact the university/college anyway - they may take you with what you’ve got so you too can have a good summer vacation.

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RE-REGISTERING Of course you can always register to retake, either in November or next May. If you wish to register for the November examination then the IB DP Coordinator needs to be informed as soon as possible and you will have to pay a registration fee. This will need to be done before July 15th (Only 10 days after your results!). You must contact the IB DP Coordinator as soon as you possibly can if you need to take any examinations. Please note that the November retake is simply that - a retake. There will be no school-time tuition. Registration fee: 800 QAR Subject fee: 600 QAR That bill will need to be paid paid. Your IB CertiďŹ cates or Diploma will be held until payment is made.

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Head of Sixth Form Mr. Daniel Langfield: Daniel.Langfield@GulfEnglishSchool.com IB DP Coordinator Mr. Adnan Vohra: Adnan.Vohra@GulfEnglishSchool.com

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Immigration Building Al Luqta St

Immigration interchange

Markhya Roundabout Al Luqta St

TV Roundabout

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To Education City Qatar Foundation

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The GES IB handbook 2018 - 19  

This is the International Baccalaureate diploma programme guide.

The GES IB handbook 2018 - 19  

This is the International Baccalaureate diploma programme guide.

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