Page 1

Gerwyn Evans

MA Landscape Architecture Portfolio Email: cwgargj@gmail.com


Drawing Module


Design Projects 1 (Semester 1) and Digital Communications 1- Camellia Court A small courtyard within the university’s Francis Close Hall campus, it is currently a nonspace; it’s only function being a transitory space for students/staff, and an area where the maintenance staff can store their van. My design sought to not only create a beautiful space for university members, but also raise awareness of the pressures of university life on mental health. The path through the site represents the potential ups and doowns of mental health within university life, both for staff and students. The areas covered by pergolas reflect the ‘downs’, where the area is more shady, and mirrored figures encourage self-reflection. The path here becomes more jagged and geometric also. The ‘ups’ sections have much more vibrant planting, with the mirrored figures becoming small mirrored flowers. The site is to be renamed Camellia Court after the 4 camellia varieties that will be planted in the space.


Design Projects 1 (Semester 2) - St James’ Square - Concepts


Design Projects 1 (Semester 2) - St James’ Square The brief for this project was to create an international youth hostel and youth community centre in St James’ Square. My vision for the site was to embrace the idea of international community, but also to promote taking up art to young people as part of the youth centre. For international community, the main design features are artificial trees along the parkland path that light up in the coulours of various flags, and the hexagonal buildings conected via glass walkways on the roof. In terms of promoting arts, a stained glass wall designed by the youth community would run alongside the River Chelt and would cast a kaleidoscope of colours onto the grass.


Landscape Urbanism (Semester 2) - Gloucester Spectrum The site in Gloucester connects the cathedral with the new Docks development. From my site visit, what stood out to me was the town lacked a vibrancy and colour, which I seeked to remedy through my design. Inspired by Superkilen in Copenhagen, my concept was the idea of creating ‘rooms’ throughout the site that would have their own colour. The colours would be portrayed through street furniture and the planting, to create a memorable and easily recognisable space for locals and tourists alike to use.

Above: My concept map showing the area of each room and also the colour. The function of each room correlates to the meaning/emotion to its colour, for example the colour red signifies energy and passion, so the red room has a stage with sloped grass lawns to watch performances on. Top right: The masterplan for Gloucester Spectrum. The sinous lines that wind through each room and connecting the site would be built to look like thread, inspired by the Beatrix Potter tale The Tailor of Gloucester. Bottom right: This shows a section through the pink room, that has incorporated the new student accomodation development to create a pink corridor planted with Muhlenbergia capillaris and various cherry tree varieties.


Sustainable Technology 2 (Semester 1) - Lightmoor Colliery Wellbeing Centre

Lightmoor Colliery Wellbeing Centre Landform Map

Section A

A berm will be built from any excess soil/spoil from construction elsewhere in the site. It also acts as both a visual and noise barrier from the adjacent road.

A large cycle stop is positioned close to the popular cycling route, and provides a number of services for visitors such as: a bicycle shop, bicycle repair shop, a cafe with al fresco dining, and bicycle hire facilities. Dimensions: 25m x 19m (one floor)

Two wellbeing buildings which are connected by a glass walkway that provides a fantastic view down along the lake. It will provide services such as mindfulness classes, spa treatments, massages etc. Dimensions of each building: 15m x 15m (both have two floors.) First floor floor height: 176.5m.

Ten chalets are pushed into the horseshoe, with small retaining walls between the buildings. First floor floor height: 178.6m.

This wide clearing in the woodland will be used for yoga classes, and feature a specimen tree.

Bridge connecting the chalets to the Wellbeing buildings.

Retaining structure holding back earth from the horseshoe. Path with luminophoric pebbles.

Retaining structures.

A drop-off point for deliveries and services.

Cut and Fill section

Paths diverge and intertwine through the woodland, providing a variety of routes for visitors to enjoy, and encourage return visits.

Concrete vehicle route.

Cycle route.

KEY • • •

Resin-bound gravel pedestrian route.

The earth between the horseshoe and the mound will be retained to create a wider path up to the cycle stop and horseshoe chalets. The gradient of the path has been smoothed out to make it wheelchair friendly.

• A large retention lake with a couple of small, inaccessible islands provide a beautiful view for the nearby chalets and holds water run-off from the woodland.

• • •

Dots indicate pedestrian routes. Dashes indicate vehicle access routes. A mixture of the two means both can use the same road. Dots by themselves are resin-bound gravel paths. Triangles represent concrete. Squares represents timber boardwalks. Circles represent tarmac laid with luminescent pebbles.

Three more chalets. First floor floor height: 186.4m.

Original Site Contours

Section A

2

17

70 car parking spaces have been allocated on site, with the majority being situated on the Eastern edge of the site. All are constructed with permeable paving. A winding, planted footpath connects visitors from their cars to the end of the car park.

178

1

7

17

6

4

5

17

17

17

17

3

17

0

17

9

16

8

16 180

Seven lakeside chalets. First floor floor height: 170.2m.

179

8

177

174

4

17

16

167

168 167

177

177

3

19

0

19

166 178

172 171 170

3

17

17 172 1

175

172 171

Lightmoor Site 1:500 @ A0

173

Main Buildings Concept

185

180 179

The highest three chalets are accessed via this winding path up the mound, with frequent rest stations. As the visitor travels up along a path, the retaining structure adjacent to them gets smaller before becoming flush with the ground when the path curves in on itself.

185

165 180

The Lightmoor Colliery is a difficult site to design on for many reasons, such as the steep slopes, polluted soils, and drainage issues. I decided to design a wellbeing centre in the site, making the most of the contours by having terraced reed-bed systems to treat the contaminated water as it runs down the slopes, and to create a lush woodland trail for visitors to explore. Design requirements: • A well-being centre • 25 chalets for those staying at the centre. • 5 start-up business units that complement the well-being centre and the surrounding economy. • A cycle stop with bike hire, cafe, bicycle workshop, and outside seating area. • A nursery school. • An integrated sustainable drainage system to clean any grey/blackwater and any run-off from the hills. • A suitable number of parking spaces. • Access maintained for any service/ maintenance vehicles.

NORTH

A drop off zone for coaches/minibuses from the local communities reduces the need for car parking spaces, and is a more sustainable form of transport. The nursery will provide day care service for 25 children, and has a drop off zone outside. There are three parking spaces for nursery staff. Approximate dimensions: 30m x 8m (1 floor.)

Row of 5 chalets pushed into the mound, acting as a retaining structure. A small retaining wall links the chalets together. Chalet dimensions across the site: 8m x 4m (two floors). 1st floor floor height: 178.3m.

Cut and Fill Section

Retaining wall behind the Start up units down to the road towards the nursery. The nursery is backed into the retaining structure.

Lakeside boardwalk above wetlands.

Both bodies of water have been manipulated here, with the main lake being shortened slightly to make room for the wellbeing buildings, with the pond has been made narrower and longer. These are the five Start-up units for local businesses, which could for example be used to sell local products and provide artisanal crafts classes. Dimensions: 10m x 10m. Two floors if including the delivery lift from the back.

This bridge rises over the road, connecting the car park to the main site.

The nursery, and deliveries to the cycle stop and start-up units are accessed via this road. Deliveries to the Start-ups are taken up to the store via lifts in the building. Scale on cut and fill is 1:200@A3

Gerwyn Evans/1710936 AD5604 Sustainable Technology 2 Landform A0 Map - Assignment 1 (January 2018)


Lightmoor Colliery Wellbeing Centre Hydrological Systems Map

This is a retention pond for any excess rainwater runoff around the horseshoe. The retention pond slowly releases any overflow water into a small, natural stream channel/bioswale, where it flows down into the retention lake.

The chalets in the horseshoe, the two wellbeing buildings, and the nursery have their waste water channelled to Septic Tank 2, and is then pumped into Reed Bed A for another round of treatment before flowing into the main lake below.

Waste water from this row of chalets and the cycle stop is treated by Septic Tank 1, and is pumped back into Reed Bed B for another stage of cleaning. The water then flows into the retention basin below. The retention basin’s overflow links to filterdrain along the path to the right towards the wellbeing centre buildings.

Rainwater that falls on the roofs of the chalets and on the horseshoe are collected into filter drains that flow into Reed Bed A, where it is treated before cascading down the slope into the main lake.

Water in the woodland flows naturally towards the retention lake.

REED BED A REED BED B

Rainwater that falls on the Western side of the mound flows off-site.

SEPTIC TANK 2 RETENTION LAKE This row of chalets and the start-up units have their waste water pumped into Septic Tank 3, where it is then sent to Reed Bed D to be treated again. It then flows into the retention lake. The retention lake has an overflow point that channels excess water naturally on the South-East edge of the site.

SEPTIC TANK 1

REED BED D

All of the parking spaces on site are made from a porous concrete which allows rainwater to be absorbed naturally into the soil.

Body of water

LAKE

This filter drain picks up any rainwater that falls down the Eastern side of the mound, and channels it to Reed Bed C.

Directional flow of water

REED BED C

SEPTIC TANK 3

This row of chalets have their waste water treated in Reed Bed C after initial treatment in Septic Tank 1. Once treated again by the reeds, the water flows into the lake underneath the boardwalk.

A filter drain picks up any rainwater that is not absorbed by planting adjacent to the road where it is channelled back into the retention lake.

Blackwater and greywater from on-site facilities flow into their nearest septic tank. These multi-chamber tanks allow solids to be separated from the water, and in the next chamber go through an initial treatment. What is left is pumped to each building’s respective reed bed, where it is treated further. The water then flows into a large body of water.

Filter drain

Horizontal forced-aeration reed bed treatent

Permeable parking spaces

Source Control

Gerwyn Evans/1710936 AD5604 Sustainable Technology 2 Hydrological Systems Map - Assignment 1 (January 2018)


Lightmoor Colliery Wellbeing Centre Vegetation Strategy Map The telephone wires which currently run through this area will be channeled underground.

Pioneer and scrub species dominate the horseshoe and mound, due to it’s high tolerance for polluted soils. This planting has another purpose - the roots of the pioneer and scrub vegetation will help secure the earth and reduce the risk of landslips.

The vision for the site’s vegetation strategy is to keep the planting as natural as possible, while still giving visitors a vibrant display of plant life. New species will be introduced to the existing typologies to reinforce them, and make the planting more exciting and varied.

Patches of the Oak Woodland are ancient oak, which will be maintained as far as possible, with newer understory plant species being introduced in less ancient areas.

This wide glade contains lawn space where yoga classes can take place, and also contains benches for visitors to stop and relax before continuing through the woodland. The main feature of the glade is a specimen Katsura tree, whose foliage turns to fantastic yellows, oranges, and pinks in the autumn.

The paths and planting through the woodland is designed to limit time spent in complete shade of the canopies.

The large lawn area provides as space for visitors to relax on the grass, particulary in the spring and summer when more visitors enter the site via the cycle path.

The row of wet woodland along the large retention basin prevents people who are staying in the chalets on the opposite side of the river from seeing traffic along the road. Wet woodland is currently on the site around the pond adjacent to the main lake, but it will be expanded.

Key:

Pioneer and Scrub planting along the pedestrian path through the car park provides a more natural route through the car park to the main site.

Oak Woodland

Lawn

Wet Woodland

Wetlands

Pioneer and Scrub

Reed Bed Treatment

Meadow and Grasslands

Cascades of Aubrieta ‘Purple Cascade’

One wet woodland tree such as Weeping willow will be planted on to each of the new islands in the retention lake. Along this winding path up the mound, aubrieta cascades over the retaining structures in a thick mat of green. In bloom this becomes a curtain of small purple flowers.

Wetland along the main lake provides a natural aesthetic, while also cleaning the water from the reed beds of any sediment it may have picked up through water channels.

Specimen Cercidiphyllum japonicum

Woodland Edge

Gerwyn Evans/1710936 AD5604 Sustainable Technology 2 Vegetation Strategy - Assignment 1 (January 2018)


Sustainable Technology 2 (Semester 2) - Lightmoor Colliery Wellbeing Centre Technical Drawings General Arrangement Diagram Pioneer Planting 

Typar Geocell DT1 508mm depth Erosion control web 

Moss & Co. Iroko hardwood decking  

Geosynthetics RockBox gabion retaining wall    

Pro-teq Starpath Pro luminescent bound paving  

SureSet resin-bound paving   

Vertical flow forced aeration Reed treatment system 

Lindum Festival Turf (LT7) 

In-situ Concrete fill    

Specimen Salix babylonica pekinensis 'Pendula'  

Barlow Tyrie Horizon Loungers with charcoal sling, and charcoal sling sunshade 

Coleford F2 Forest of Dean multi pavers (Double)   

Coleford F2 Forest of Dean multi pavers (Single)   

Concrete retaining wall with Coleford Forest of Dean Multi facing bricks    

Candela cast iron Warrior bollard  

Claydon Architectural Metalworks Nathan seat (with extended legs) 

Claydon Architectural Metalworks Nathan litter bin  

Raised glass walkway that connects the two Wellbeing centre buildings

Marshalls multi flint spar chippings  

Intaspan brushed steel bridge  

Expansion Joint

Marshalls Charcoal Grey square Spring tree grille

 

  

Moss & Co Iroko hardwood sleepers   

Timber footbridge  

Moss & Co Iroko hardwood timber balustrade 

Wetland Planting 


Planting Plan

KEY: Emorsgate EM2 Standard General purpose meadow mixture. Seeds to be sowed at a density of 4 grams/m2. To prepare, remove weeds using repeated cultivation or herbicides, then plough or dig to bury the surface vegetation, harrow or rake to produce a medium tilth, and roll, or tread, to produce a firm surface. Pioneer groundcover grass planting. 80% Anthoxanthum odoratum, 20% Betonica officinalis. To be spaced evenly around the designated planting areas for Foxglove (Dp) and Oxe-eye daisy (Lv).

Prunus 'Accolade'

Betula pubescens

Betula pendula

WDZ - Wetland dry zone: 60% Briza media, 20% Centaurea nigra, 20% Cardamine Pratensis 'Flore Pleno'. Arranged randomly in each planting area. See below plant quantities for each WDZ area.

WDZ Number

Briza media (60%)

Centaurea nigra (20%)

WDZ 1 WDZ 2 WDZ 3 WDZ 4 WDZ 5 WDZ 6 WDZ 7 WDZ 8

58 13 2 5 19 19 12 13

31 7 1 2 10 10 6 7

Ultimate Spread CpFP

0.1-0.5m

0.1m

Container

1.5-2L

n/a

Vegetative method

366

Yellow Flag Iris

Ip

1.5m

1.5m

Container

1.5-2L

n/a

Vegetative method

Loosestrife 'Robert'

LsR

1.5m

0.5m

Container

3-4L

n/a

Vegetative method

53 43

Ta

1.5m

4m

Container

1.5-2L

n/a

Vegetative method

Cardamine pratensis 'Flore Pleno' Iris pseudacorus

Double Cuckoo Flower

Lythrum salicaria 'Robert' Typha angustifolia

Lesser Bulrush

Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly











Standard(light)

  2x

6-8cm

250-300cm

150-175cm

Bagged

n/a

  3

10m

Standard(light)

2x

6-8cm

250-300cm

150-175cm

Bagged

n/a

3

4-8m

Standard(semi-mature)

4x

20-25cm

min 450cm

min 200cm

Root ball

n/a

n/a

Botanical Name

Common Name

Abbreviation

Ultimate Height

Ultimate Spread



Betula Pendula

Silver Birch

Bpe

25m

12m

Betula pubescens

Dowy Birch

Bpu

20m

Prunus 'Accolade'

Accolade Cherry

PAc

4-8m

Wildflowers Botanical Name

 50-100/tray

 n/a





Anthoxanthum odoratum

Sweet Vernal Grass

Ao

1m

0.1-0.5m

 Plugs

2-3 months

Sept-April

Betonica Officinalis

Bishop's Wort

Bo

0.6m

0.3m

Plugs

50-100/tray

n/a

2-3 months

Sept-April

Briza Media

Quaking Grass

Bm

0.3m

0.8m

Plugs

50-100/tray

n/a

2-3 months

Sept-April

Centaurea nigra

Lesser Knapweed

Cn

0.6m

0.5m

Plugs

50-100/tray

n/a

2-3 months

Sept-April

Digitalis purpurea

Foxglove

Dp

1.5-2.5m

0.1-0.5m

Plugs

50-100/tray

n/a

2-3 months

Sept-April

Leucanthemum vulgare

Ox-Eye Daisy

Lv

0.5-1m

0.1-0.5m

Plugs

50-100/tray

n/a

2-3 months

Sept-April

Myriophyllum spicatum (aquatic) Ranunculus aquatilis (aquatic) Emorsgate Seeds EM2 Standard General purpose meadow mixture

Water Milfoil

Ms

0.1m

1.5m

Clumps

n/a

3

min 1 year

Water Crowfoot

Ra

0.1m

2m

Clumps

n/a

3

min 1 year

Sow Rate: 4g/m2

n/a

1035 431 131 74 136 142 47

Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly Spaced evenly

n/a

27

Spaced evenly

800g mix required

Quantity 1 1 8

Cardamine Prantensis 'Flore Pleno' (20%) 154 35 5 5 50 50 32 35


Construction Detailing

Axonometric: 1:25

Section A-A': 1:25

Section B-B': 1:10


Natural and sucession planting throughout the city Streetscapes designed for all users, not for cars

Habitat variety to encourage biodiversity

An ecologically rich urban future for Bristol

Links between habitats that are less disturbed by humans, and provide safer wildlife corridors

Embracing the presence of water in the city Renewable and nonpolluting transport network

A New Urban Ecology for Bristol: Embracing the Corridors of the City Corridors are a vital part of any ecosystem, and in my opinion even more so in an urban environment. Most of our time travelling through a city like Bristol is along corridors (e.g. roads), but these are also the noisiest, most polluted, and least biodiverse parts of the city. The cause? Cars and motor vehicles. Car engines create noise, they release harmful emissions, and are given precedence within city streets where they take up the majority of the space. Imagine the environmental benefits and potential design space within the city if we were to remove all motor vehicles from Bristol’s streets and implement a renewable energy powered tram network. This is the envisaged urban future for Bristol within this proposal. Based on ecological models of corridor systems within nature, the pedestrian will be able to reclaim the streets from the motor vehicle. The trams would eventually connect all areas of Bristol along vital routes through communities, unifying the city. Side streets that were previously filled with parked cars can now become vibrant community spaces, more shopping streets can be pedestrianised, and multi-story car parks can be replaced with biodiverse pocket park/green spaces. Without cars there would be more room for dedicated cycle routes; much safer than cycling alongside cars currently. Natural and dense planting will give Bristol a wilder, more natural feel, on top of other environmental benefits. Allowing plant succession in the city will not only better represent what occurs within ecosystems, but also reflect the dynamic nature of Bristol and urban life.

Decreased global warming contribution Improved water quality Improved air quality

No car emissions

Decreased urban heat island effect Improved biodiversity More pedestrian friendly Street trees and planting

Removing cars from Bristol and replacing with an electric tram network.

More space on streets (particularly on roads without a tram)

More green space/parks

Improve mental and physical health of society

A healthier, more interesting, and engaging city to live and grow up in

More room for cycle paths

Spontaneous culture/ art/event space/ market space

Increased economic activity

KEY: Links to underpriveleged parts of the city

Encourages cross-class interaction

More inclusive and open society

Environmental benefits Green space potential Societal benefits

Gerwyn Evans


Urban Futures Second Submission An Overview and Explanation of the Physical Model

Summary of Previous Proposal and its Future Development Embracing the corridors of the city was the main theme for the initial proposal, which would be achieved by removing any use of cars thoughout the city and replacing them with an integrated tram network. The space previously occupied by cars would be free to be redesigned for the community’s needs and provide a resilient ecological environment for local wildlife and flora. Transport throughout the city would be replaced with an integrated electric tram network, powered by renewable energy, and reconnecting less-affluent areas of the city to the centre. The lack of motor vehicles would drastically improve the air quality within the city for both human inhabitants, flora and fauna. Streets would be no longer filled with the noise of engines, but quiet electric motors. A revision to this is that the tram network would now be replaced by an underground hyperloop network, providing faster linkages throughout the city, and providing even more open space in the city’s streets that could become new and innovative green space for the population. With the electromagnet powered hyperloop being moved underground, the streets would be completely absent from the sound of vehicles, replaced by the sounds of people chatting, birdsong, and wind rustling through the trees. The focus for this development of the proposal will be on how these new spaces can be used and developed in an environmentally sympathetic manner, enhancing the local ecology and integrating it into city life as opposed to sectioning it off.

Figure 4 Figure 1

Figure 2

The model seeks to identify and represent a number of key aspects from my proposal for reinventing the urban future of Bristol.

The blue indicates parts of the street scape that are for pedestrians.

The pieces of bark I have used are a representation of the city, with the cracks and divots between the bark being the streets and spaces between the buildings. The green-pigmented epoxy resin that has been poured into these spaces represent the potential green spaces that could be developed if cars were no longer permitted in the city. As seen in Figure 3 (the completed model), the different sizes of the bark represent the different scales for looking at and redesigning the city’s ecology. The far left piece is a strategic city-scale view, and the far right-hand bar being a much smaller, street scale view. As the pieces of bark get smaller, the spaces available to enhance the local ecology and create new green spaces becomes more clear and defined, hence the greater amount of green resin visible and able to pool in the cracks. Each individual area of potential green space has its own unique character/climate/ecological nuances, and should be individually designed to cater for these attributes. Trying to lay out an ecological regenaration plan for a city on a strategic scale is unlikely to create a long term and resilient urban ecology.

The green represents areas allocated for cyclists.

Throughout the pouring process I tried as far as possible not to try and control the flow of the resin, so as to emulate the spontaneity of nature, plant succession and cross pollination. The proposal would encourage and allow for plant species to overlap between areas to create blurred lines between ecosystems, as it would happen in a more rural environment. Figure 3

The red indicates areas of the corridor allocated to cars and other motor vehicles.

The above diagram shows an aerial photo from a main road in the town centre of Bristol, with the different allocations of space for motor vehicles, pedestrians, and cyclists highlighted. City planners have shown bias towards the motor vehicle for decades, as seen by how red dominates the Figure 4. With such an importance on reducing emissions in urban areas for the health of the planet, is it not time for pedestrians to seize back control of the city’s streets? If the red was to become blue and green for pedestrians and cyclists, the possiblities for innovative urban ecological design would grow exponentially. The next page shows how different building heights/widths of the street could used to design a variety of streetscapes that are functional and enhance the local ecology.

Redefining the Role of Nature in Cities of the Future


Design Studio Assignment 1: Harbourside Art Quarter Masterplan and DAS The broad concept for the design of the Harbourside Art Quarter is embracing the cyclical tide of the River Avon. The curves and circles throughout the design represent the rise and fall of the tide. It provides a space for community expression and a hub for displaying innovative artwork installations. The Art Quarter adds another cultural destination on the Floating Harbour, linking to the rest of the island via the reinstated railway.

HARBOURSIDE ART QUARTER MASTERPLAN

The site is at high risk of flooding; all of the planting areas (denoted by green areas) on the site act as rain gardens - slowing down water, allowing it to percolate naturally into the soil while filtering pollutants and debris. The rills and angle of the paving funnels water into these gardens, providing cleaner water entering back into the watercourse.

Brunel’s Swing Bridge will be refurbished, creating a safer crossing of the locks that cyclists can also use to travel on towards the city centre and Clifton.

A glass viewing platform provides phenomal views of the Avon Gorge and Clifton Suspension Bridge, as well as visitors seeing the changing tide of the Avon below their feet.

An event space on the headland for concerts, performances and art has the woodland and Avon Gorge as a phenomal backdrop.

The existing road system within Cumberland Basin is opressive an dominates the landscape. The slipways off Brunel Way over the Basin will be removed, with motorists turning off on the other side of the Basin. With the roads gone, the area provides much more open space that can be taken advantage of.

The row of trees along the North bank of the Basin screens off the road, reduces noise pollution, and provides SuDs treatment for run-off water.

A raised/floating garden will feature hardy plants that can handle low tide and high tide on the river; adding some colour over the silt.

In order to accomodate for the new water planting and drainage systems, most of the existing vegetation will be removed during construction work. However, there will be a net gain of planting area and density after construction has been completed; the extra greenery will help shield the site from noise pollution, and absorb carbon dioxide from nearby road systems. Furthermore, the lush vegetation will provide new habitats for the local ecosystem; softening the hard industrial landscape. The vegetation typologies used will be water-tolerant river planting and species that are proven for good water filtering properties. Precedent examples can be seen within the Design and Access Statement.

The orange line is the existing contour, with the dark red being the proposed change that makes room for the small retaining wall and the sunken SuDs area.

The hard landscape materiality will be inspired by the industrial and maritime history of the area. Timber boardwalks, pennant stone walls, accents of red Cattybrook bricks in the paving fit seamlessly into the existing industrial features. The eco-house will be retained.

A small section of decking allows visitors to dip their feet in the water and look over the Basin. Two new bridges complete a loop around the Basin.

9m Underneath Brunel Way, the current buildings underneath will be removed to connect the main portion of the site to the headland, and a light art installation will be based in the underpass, illuminating the space.

10m 10m The A-Bond warehouse hill be retained as office space, but enhanced by seating areas and planting which filters any rainwater off the roof.

2 temporary public art installations in the open plaza space will spark the imagination of people from all walks of life. Installations will run for 3 month periods, with at least two sets being produced by local artists.

This sunken area features lush SuDs planting beds shaped like water molecules to soak up and treat surface run-off or flood water on the site. The walls funnel the water towards the bed, and the area is designed to be able to flood. Seating areas are dotted around the planting. The darker green planting represents taller more structural planting, with the lighter green being shorter.

Railway to be reinstated with a new station, creating a sustainable transport link to the rest of the Floating Harbour.

A large outdoor seating area features a canopy shaped like a ship’s sail to provide shade in hotter months

Only buses, emergency services and deliveries will be able to access the vehicle route through the site, with variable height bollards to allow access to buildings where needed.

SuDs education area that showcases the plants suited for rain gardens, how SuDs works, and how it can be integrated at home.

The B-Bond warehouse will be refurbished to house a number of community cultural and economic facilities: restaurant, cafe, art workshops, artist workspaces, gallery, and retail units for local artisanal businesses. A rain garden cleans any roof runoff water.

A boardwalk will be created around the Southern edge of the site, creating a pleasant cycle and pedestrain route along the Chocolate Path.

This wet woodland area screens the plaza from the railway to reduce visual and noise pollution. It features a long bench that wraps around the bottom of the space.

Gerwyn Evans


Planning Studio Assignment 1: Planning Report, Sustainability Analysis and Development Proposals


ArcMap Sieve-Mapping Results

.

My filters required for potential development:

• Within 1km of a railway line. • Within 2km of an A-Road. • Not within an immediate flood-risk area. • Land-Use classed as: Arable Horticulture, Rough Grassland or Improved Grasslands. • Agricultural Land Classification of Grade 3, 4 or 5 (Grades 4 and 5 have a higher weighting). • Slope on landform must be less than 13 degrees.

Legend Site Boundary Railway Lines (old and new) Tramways 2 3 4 5 6 7 0

1

2

4

6

8

10 Kilometers

8

Profile for Gerwyn Evans

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

A portfolio showing some of the work I have completed as part of my conversion course Masters in Landscape Architecture

Landscape Architecture Portfolio  

A portfolio showing some of the work I have completed as part of my conversion course Masters in Landscape Architecture

Advertisement