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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................. 5 BACKGROUND ............................................................................................................... 6 WASTE GENERATION DATA ..................................................................................... 8 METHOD OF DETERMINING WASTE GENERATION FOR WILLIAMSON COUNTY........................................................................................................................ 9 WILLIAMSON COUNTY TOTAL WASTE SURVEY ............................................. 10 WILLIAMSON COUNTY LANDFILL DATA .......................................................... 11 WILLIAMSON COUNTY TRANSFER STATION DATA ....................................... 11 WILLIAMSON COUNTY COMPOST DATA ........................................................... 12 WILLIAMSON COUNTY RECYCLING DATA ....................................................... 12 WILLIAMSON COUNTY INSTITUTIONAL DATA................................................ 12 WILLIAMSON COUNTY, COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL DATA ........................... 15 WASTE DISPOSAL PRACTICES ............................................................................... 17 WASTE COLLECTION PRACTICES........................................................................ 18 RECYCLING COLLECTION PRACTICES.............................................................. 19 RECYCLING CENTERS .............................................................................................. 21 RESOURCES, PROGRAMS, AND FUNDING .......................................................... 22 ILLINOIS ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (IEPA).......................... 22 TIPPING FEE ........................................................................................................... 22 ENFORCEMENT GRANTS .................................................................................... 22 HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE.................................................................. 23 INDUSTRIAL MATERIAL EXCHANGE SERVICE (IMES) ............................... 24 USED TIRE PROGRAM ......................................................................................... 24 ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES (IDNR) .......................... 25 DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY (DCEO) .. 25 ILLINOIS RECYCLING GRANTS PROGRAM .................................................... 26 2 of 52


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RECYCLING EXPANSION AND MODERIZATION (REM) PROGRAM.......... 26 ILLINOIS SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION PROJECT (ISTEP)............................. 27 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES (DOE)................... 28 ILLINOIS COUNTIES SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION (ILCSWMA) ................................................................................................................. 29 OTHER GRANT OPPORTUNITIES........................................................................... 29 WILLIAMSON COUNTY BOARD ............................................................................. 30 STATE’S ATTORNEY’S OFFICE............................................................................... 31 ATTACHMENT A.......................................................................................................... 32 FIFTEEN YEAR UPDATE: MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN ....... 33 GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................................................................ 33 RECOMMENDATION & IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE CONTAINED IN THE ADOPTED PLAN.................................................................................................. 34 SOURCE REDUCTION............................................................................................... 34 RECYCLING AND REUSE ........................................................................................ 35 COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION ............................................................................................................... 37 DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS ....................................................................................... 37 CURRENT PLAN IMPLEMENTATION EFFORTS ................................................ 38 SOURCE REDUCTION............................................................................................... 38 RECYCLING AND REUSE ........................................................................................ 39 COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION ............................................................................................................... 42 DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS ....................................................................................... 42 REVISED IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE ........................................................... 43 RECYCLING PROGRAM STATUS ........................................................................... 44

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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CURRENT NEEDS ASSESSMENT INFORMATION .............................................. 45 NEW RECOMMENDATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATIONS SCHEDULE ........... 47 MUNICIPAL WASTE COLLECTION ....................................................................... 47 SOURCE REDUCTION............................................................................................... 47 RECYCLING AND REUSE ........................................................................................ 48 COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION ............................................................................................................... 51 DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS ....................................................................................... 51

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

INTRODUCTION This report constitutes the fifteen-year update of Williamson County’s Solid Waste Management Plan as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act (415 ILCS 15/I et seq.). The Act which went into effect in 1989 requires counties to implement solid waste management plans designed to recycle 15% of the waste generated in their boundaries within three years of plan implementation, and 25% within five years of implementation. Plans were required to address each county’s waste management needs over a twenty year period, with plan updates being made every five years. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) provides a form to guide counties through the plan update process. Answers to the questions posed in IEPA’s guidance form are contained in Attachment A of this plan.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

BACKGROUND Williamson County’s Solid Waste Management Plan was initially adopted on August 14, 1996. That document was the result of a multi-year planning process coordinated by Greater Egypt Regional Planning & Development Commission. A regional Solid Waste Management Plan was developed for Franklin, Jackson, Jefferson, Perry and Williamson Counties, with specific recommendations made to each separate county. Each County acted alone toward implementation of the plan’s recommendations. Upon adoption of its Solid Waste Management Plan, Williamson County appointed a recycling coordinator who resigned shortly thereafter. No replacement to the position was appointed as a result of budgetary restraints and the lack of an income stream to support the solid waste plan activities. Currently, the Greater Egypt Regional Planning & Development Commission is assisting the Williamson County Board in updating its solid waste plan. To assist in determining municipal waste generation and recycling rates, EPA has developed the following interpretation. A. “For the purpose of calculating municipal waste generation and recycling rates, municipal waste does include: 1) garbage, general household, commercial, and institutional waste, industrial lunchroom or office waste, and landscape; 2) construction or demolition debris from buildings and roads that is not clean construction or demolition waste (clean construction or demolition waste is not considered to be a municipal waste); 3) Abandoned or discarded household or commercial appliances, including white goods or white goods components; 4) waste parts from motor vehicles normally removed as a part of regular maintenance such as tires and batteries; 5) waste collected at a household hazardous waste collection or other waste component collection, such as tires; 6) wastes that are generated, discarded, and collected for recycling; and 7) wastes that is generated and discarded for final treatment (incineration) and for disposal (landfill) or management.” (Available Disposal Capacity for Solid Waste in Illinois, Eighth Annual Report)

B. “For the purposes of calculating municipal waste generation and recycling rates, municipal waste does not include: 1.

2. 3. 4.

5.

special waste, including industrial process waste, pollution waste, and potentially infectious medical waste; ash produced from incinerating municipal waste at a municipal waste incinerator; and special wastes such as liquid used oil from service stations, oil change shops, and the like hazardous waste; earth materials moved or removed during demolition or construction; scrap metal, plastic, wood, or other materials from pre-consumer industrial or commercial operations such as machining, lathe work, tool and die operations and the like; industrial waste that is not generated from an industrial lunchroom or industrial office;

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6. 7.

abandoned or scrap motor vehicles; surplus or donated clothing, or usable or reusable commodities donated or given to charitable organizations, such as Goodwill or Salvation Army; 8. surplus or donated food contributed for human consumption; 9. agricultural waste; 10. sludge generated from treating water or sewage at publicly owned treatment works; and 11. waste that has not been discarded or collected for disposal, such as grass clippings which are left on the lawn.” (Available Disposal Capacity for Solid Waste in Illinois, Eighth Annual Report)

C. “For the purposes of calculating municipal waste generation and recycling rates, recycling does include: 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

re-using or reclaiming municipal waste that has been discarded, collected, separated or processed and returned to the economic mainstream in the form of raw materials or products; composting operations where the waste, once composted, is returned to the economic mainstream or replaces other raw materials or fertilizer, soil conditioner or mulch; applying landscape waste (grass clippings, leaves, tree limbs, etc.) or other municipal waste directly to agricultural land at agronomic rates; Landscape waste that is collected, separated or processed and returned to the economic mainstream in the form of raw materials or products; shredding operations where the waste is returned to the economic mainstream or replaces other raw materials for fertilizer, soil conditioner or mulch; re-using construction or demolition debris for building construction purposes or reuse as road surface materials; using waste for commercial feed for such things as mink farms, swine operations, or fish production; processing waste at a rendering facility for return to the economic mainstream; and processing municipal waste, including white goods, for metal recovery.”

(Available Disposal Capacity for Solid Waste in Illinois, Eighth Annual Report)

D. “For the purposes of calculating municipal waste generation and recycling rates, recycling does not include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

6. 7. 8.

incineration for volume reduction, including the use of burn barrels; incineration for energy recovery; producing or burning refuse derived fuel or tire derived fuel; re-using or reclaiming household or commercial waste components for the same or another use when that waste component has not been discarded; re-using or reclaiming municipal waste, that has not been discarded, collected, separated or processed and returned to the economic mainstream in the form of raw materials or products; waste reduced through source reduction actions or programs, such as lawn clippings left on the lawn; used whole tires, or retreated/remanufactured tires which are sold or re-used; or other automotive or other body parts; and on-site (in-process) industrial recycling.”

(Available Disposal Capacity for Solid Waste in Illinois, Eighth Annual Report)

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WASTE GENERATION DATA According to U.S. Census 2008 population estimates, 64,628 people reside in Williamson County, up from 61,296 in 2000 and 57,733 in 1990. The Solid Waste Management Plan adopted in 1996 assumed a municipal waste generation rate of 4.47 pounds per capita per day (PCD), for the year of 1995. The population was estimated to be 58,043. Total municipal waste generation for 1995 was estimated to be 47,319 tons. This quantity was projected to remain fairly constant over a twenty year planning period, presented in the initial report. Table 1 Summary of Municipal Waste Generation in Williamson County 1995 Waste Generation by Sector Group (in Tons) Williamson County Population 58,043

Residential Waste

Commercial / Institutional Waste

Industrial Lunchroom / Office Waste

Construction / Demolition Waste

Municipal Waste Generation

Waste Generated

24,999

10,616

4,077

7,627

47,319

Percentage

53%

22%

9%

16%

100%

PCD/PED

2.36

3.76

6.61

0.72

4.47

Source: Greater Egypt Region Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996 Phase I An Assessment of Municipal Waste Needs for the Greater Egypt Region

The 1996 Solid Waste Management Plan also estimated that 70,415 tons of total waste was generated in Williamson County. About 35% of the County’s total waste stream was generated from residential sources, with the remainder coming from commercial/institutional (15%), industrial lunchroom/office waste (6%), construction/demolition waste (11%), and industrial process/manufacturing waste (33%). It is assumed that this estimate continues to be accurate with respect to the number of jobs in each sector group. Table 2 Summary of Total Waste Generation in Williamson County 1995 Waste Generation by Sector (in Tons) Williamson County Population 58,043

Residential Waste

Commercial / Institutional Waste

Industrial Lunchroom / Office Waste

Construction / Demolition Waste

Industrial Process / Manufacturing Waste

Total Waste Generation

Waste Generated

24,999

10,616

4,077

7,627

23,096

70,415

Percentage

35%

15%

6%

11%

33%

100%

PCD/PED

2.36

3.76

6.61

0.72

24.86

6.65

Source: Greater Egypt Region Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996 Phase I An Assessment of Municipal Waste Needs for the Greater Egypt Region

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The number of jobs in each sector group is used to determine waste generation rate in either pounds per capita per day (PCD) or pounds per employee per day (PED). The adopted Solid Waste Management Plan used a 1992 Williamson County Employment Sector Report to calculate the waste generation data. This outdated report was used due to a two year lapse in data availability from the Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES).

METHOD OF DETERMINING WASTE GENERATION FOR WILLIAMSON COUNTY Efforts to estimate the County’s waste generation was undertaken by Greater Egypt Table 3 Regional Planning & Development Commission. These Williamson County Non-Agricultural estimates are based upon data reported by area wide Employment by Sector landfills, transfer stations, recycling centers, waste haulers, and compost centers. To determine the waste Sector 1992 2008 generated by each sector group, the Summary of Total Manufacturing 3380 2285 Waste Generation in Williamson County 1995 - Table 2 Mining/Construction 1710 1259 will be used as the base for all interpolations. Trans/Com/Utilities 1210 1610 Trade 4550 3917 Interpreting the data and recalculating waste generated 460 1797 percentages for each sector group, which is correlated Fin/Ins/Real Estate 2840 9698 by the groups’ increases or decreases in employment Service 4700 3475 overtime, will result in a new estimated percentage of Pub. Adm. 18,850 24,041 waste generated by each group. Table 4 describes which Total employment sectors, from Table 3, represent a specific sector group, their population, and percentage increase Source: Illinois Department of Employment Security, Labor Force Data, or decrease compared to estimates from 1992. 1992 and 2008 Fluctuations in employment and population will directly impact the percentage of waste produced by each sector group. By applying the increased or decreased percentages to the percentage of waste generated in 1995, a new waste generated interpolation percentage will be determined, shown in Table 15. Using the new waste generated percentages to represent each sector group the PCD/PED and total waste generated by each group can be calculated, also shown in Table 15. Dividing the waste generated from a particular sector group by the number persons representing that group (Table 4), then dividing it by the number of days in a year (365 day) and convert it from tons to pounds (multiple by 2,000), a PCD or PED is determined.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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Table 4 Williamson County Non-Agricultural Employment by Sector Groups

Total County Population Mining/Construction, Trans/Com/Utilities, Trade, Fin/Ins/Real Estate, Services, and Pub. Adm. Manufacturing

64,628

Percent Change 1992 - 2008 +11%

21,756

+41%

2,285

-32%

Total County Population

64,628

+11%

Manufacturing and Mining/Construction

3,544

-30%

Sector Group

Population Representation

Residential Commercial / Institutional Industrial Lunchroom / Office Construction / Demolition Industrial Process / Manufacturing

Total Representation

These formulas will provide new totals produced by waste generating sector groups and are based on trends that were established from the research produced by Greater Egypt Regional Planning & Development Commission and CTE Engineers in the initial Municipal Waste Management Plan. The estimated amount of waste generated within the county has fluctuated significantly from year to year. Two main reasons exist for this fluctuation: 1) changes in economic growth deeply impact the amount of waste being generated; and 2) the unknown accuracy of waste generated estimates are shared by most counties and is not particular to Williamson County. For these reasons, the estimated municipal waste generation rate of 8.05 PCD is a plausible approximation. More specific data may be developed given sufficient time and funding. In the next section there are illustrations of the data that resulted from the research and surveys conducted for this report.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY TOTAL WASTE SURVEY Table 5 Williamson County Waste Management Facilities and Services Estimated Waste Received From Williamson County

Facilities Total Waste Surveyed from Landfills

107,810 tons/year

(Southern Illinois Regional Landfill, Perry Ridge Landfill and West End Disposal)

Total Waste Surveyed from Transfer Stations (Herrin Solid Waste Transfer Station, Marion Transfer Station and Ashalex Recycling Collection & Transfer Station)

Total Waste Surveyed from Compost Facilities

91,686 tons/year 1,728 tons/year

(Ashalex Recycling Compost and New Earth Compost Facility)

Total Waste Surveyed from Recycling Facilities (CETI, Fair Street Recycling, Gary’s Metals, Progress Port, T & T Recycling, C & T Recycling, Karco, PLP, Route 37 Collection Center, Southern Recycling Center and Burris Disposal Service)

Total Waste Surveyed from Private Haulers (A-1 Trash, B & B Trash, General Services, Hill’s Southern II Trash, Wayne’s Disposal, and Burris Disposal)

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13,750 tons/year

16,124 tons/year


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY LANDFILL DATA Table 6 Licensed Landfills Serving Williamson County

Landfills Serving Williamson County Marion Ridge Landfill (Marion) Perry Ridge Landfill (DuQuion) Saline County Landfill (Harrisburg) Southern Illinois Regional Landfill (Desoto) West End Disposal (Thompsonville)

Waste Received 2007 (within Illinois)

Waste Received 2007 (Williamson)

Recycled

Tipping Fee

Expected Date of Closer

Pending FAA Review and Action 98,463 tons/year 0 tons/year

53,000 tons/year

No

Closed as of Summer 2007

$27.50

2030

Unknown

2006

204,462 tons/year

54,810 tons/year

No

$33.00

2051

52,523 tons/year

Unknown

Yes

$30.00

2042

Note West End Disposal was contacted but an estimate could not be given. The facility operation state that the amount of municipal waste collected was insignificant for this report.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY TRANSFER STATION DATA Table 7 Licensed Waste Transfer Stations Serving Williamson County

Transfer Station Serving Williamson County

Waste Received 2007 (within Illinois)

Waste Received 2007 (Williamson)

Tipping Fee

Recycled

Landfilled

Ashalex Recycling C & TS (Energy)

300 tons/year

40 tons/year

Herrin Solid Waste TS (Herrin)

54,810 tons/year

54,810 tons/year

$30 per/ton Gate Fee

No

54,810 tons/year

Marion Transfer Station (Marion)

36,836 tons/year

36,836 tons/year

$39 per/ton Gate Fee

No

36,836 tons/year

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No

20 tons/year

20 tons/year


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY COMPOST DATA Table 8 Licensed Composting Facilities Serving Williamson County Composts Serving Williamson County Ashelax Recycling Compost (Energy) New Earth Compost Facility (Carterville)

Waste Received 2007 (Williamson)

Landfilled

756 tons/year

1 ton/year

972 tons/year

21 tons/year

WILLIAMSON COUNTY RECYCLING DATA Table 9 Recycling Facilities Serving Williamson County Recyclers Serving Williamson County Ashalex Recycling C & ST (Energy)

Recycled 2007 (Williamson)

Recycles

40 tons/year

CETI (Carterville)

30.5 tons/year

Fair Street Recycling (Marion)

92 tons/year

Gary's Metals Inc. (Carterville)

6,570 tons/year

Progress Port (Carterville)

124.4 tons/year

T & T Recycling (Hurst)

1,613.2 tons/year

C & T Recycling (Marion)

1,505 tons/year

Karco Recycling (Carbondale)

1,500 tons/year

PLP (Murphysboro)

6 tons/year

Route 37 Collection Center (Benton)

Collection Center for T & T Recycling

Wood and Concrete Electronics, Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Office Paper and Batteries Batteries Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals and Batteries Electronics, Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Office Paper, News Print, Card Board, Plastic #1 & #2, Plastic Bags, Bubble Wrap, Stretch Film, Glass, CDs and Wood Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals and Batteries Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Card Board, Office Paper and Plastics #1 & #2 Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals Batteries Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Batteries and In House Card Board

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Sends To On site (not open to public) Gary's Metal, Southern Recycling, Karco, and PLP

Karco and PLP

Milling facilities and other facilities out of the region Gary's Metal and Southern Recycling Center

Milling facilities and other facilities out of the region T & T Recycling and Milling facilities out of the region

Milling facilities and other facilities out of region facilities out of the region T & T Recycling


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

Southern Recycling Center (Carbondale)

Burris Disposal Service (Carbondale)

768.5 tons/year

1,500 tons/year

Electronics, Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Office Paper, News Print, Card Board, Plastic #1 & #2, Plastic Bags, Bubble Wrap, Stretch Film and Glass Ferrous and NonFerrous Metals, Office Paper, News Print, Card Board, Plastics and Glass

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Metal sent to Gary's, Karco and T & T, all other sent out to respected reprocessing facilities out of the region

Karco, T & T, Gary's Metal and Southern Recycling Center

Note The recycling facilities listed above process more materials in total than what is reported. For the purposes of this report only, the amount of materials reported was collected from the Williamson County area. Several recycling facilities did not have exact figures on materials collected from Williamson County. Only a percentage could be estimated, which was applied to the total amount of material recycled for the area served. The percentage was agreed upon by consensus of the recycling facilities (18-20%).

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY INSTITUTIONAL DATA

WILLIAMSON COUNTY INSTITUTIONAL DATA

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL DATA

WILLIAMSON COUNTY COUNTY AND MUNICIPAL DATA

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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WASTE DISPOSAL PRACTICES The vast majority of the waste generated in Williamson County continues to be disposed of outside of the county at Perry County Landfill (PCL) near Du Quoin and Southern Illinois Regional Landfill (SIRL) near De Soto. A small portion of the waste is disposed of at West End Disposal (WED) near Thompsonville. The possibility does exist for Williamson County’s solid waste to be disposed at other landfills. SIRL is owned and operated by Continental Waste Industries of Illinois (CWI), a subsidiary of Republic Industries, Inc. PCL is owned by GERE Properties, Inc. and operated by Perry Ridge Landfill, Inc. WED is owned and operated by Landfill LLC. Williamson County has a landfill currently being proposed in its boundaries, Marion Ridge Landfill. The proposed landfill would have to importing solid waste from other states and metropolitan areas to be economically viable operate. Current, the landfills serving Williamson County and the Southern Illinois region have substantial capacity for many decades. The development of the proposed landfill is currently on hold pending approval from the FAA and other agencies. However, the future of this facility remains uncertain at this time.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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WASTE COLLECTION PRACTICES Residential waste collection practices have changed significantly in the fifteen years since adoption of the Municipal Waste Management Plan. The City of Herrin remains the only community to collect waste using municipal crews. Most municipalities have contracted a franchise for residential waste removal. The few remaining municipalities allow residents to contract with a private hauler to arrange waste disposal. Most of the communities within Williamson County offer Clean-Up Days throughout the year. Williamson County has organized several Free Dump Days since 2004. Recycling bins were provided by Burris Disposal for these organized disposal days. Franklin-Williamson Bi-County Health Department, Williamson County Highway Department and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency partnered to co-host a free used tire collection event in 2006. Williamson County currently does not require haulers to procure a County license. Most of the municipal waste in Williamson County is collected by two companies: Midwest Waste and CWI. Other Haulers include A-1 Trash, B & B Trash, General Services, Hill’s Southern II Trash, Wayne’s Disposal, and Burris Disposal. Residential waste collection rates have increased somewhat over the past fifteen years. While the monthly collection rate was estimated in the Plan to be approximately $6 to $12/month/household, Residents who privately contract with a hauler for waste can expect to pay $13.25 to $17/month/household. Residents of municipalities under contract to a single waste hauler (franchise) commonly pay $7.10 to $8.25/month/houshold. The residents of municipal crew waste collection are paying $10/month/household. The rate increase of waste collection is contributed to a rise in landfill disposal fees and a general increase in the cost of doing business in the waste industry. Commercial waste collection throughout the county is arranged privately between waste generators and waste haulers. Midwest Waste and CWI collect the bulk of commercial waste in Williamson County. While the Commission does not have data indicating a rise in commercial collection rates over the past fifteen years, such an increase can be reasonably assumed.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RECYCLING COLLECTION PRACTICES Currently seven operators are licensed as recycling facilities in Williamson County. They are CETI, Progress Port Recycling Center, Gary’s Metal, Fair Street Recycling, C & T Recycling, T & T Recycling, and Ashexal Recycling. Karco is also currently planning to locate a facility in Marion. Williamson County in the past has hosted a Free Dump Day were some materials recovered are recycled. Franklin-Williamson Bi-County Health Department, Williamson County Highway Department and Illinois Environmental Protection Agency partner to host a free used tire collection day, once every one or two years. The 2006 event was estimated to have collected 420 tons of tires (30,000 tires) for recycling. The majority of the recycling collection practices are contributed to by individuals, commercial businesses, and institutional efforts. Individual recycling efforts are impossible to measure; but, it can be assumed to be significant. All of the previously listed recycling centers accept limited materials at their drop-off points for the general public. Community Electronics Technology Interface, Inc. (CETI) offers a drop-off or pick-up service for recyclable materials. For a minimal transport fee, based on distance traveled, CETI is willing to serve the entire Southern Illinois Region, from Mt. Vernon to Cairo. Williamson County was recently award grant funding from the Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity. The grant was used to purchase trailers which will be used as staging points for residents to drop off materials to be recycled. A website has been developed to promote awareness and information. Williamson County has five recycling drop-off sites located in Cambria, Carterville, Crainville, Herrin and Hurst. There are four recycling stations located at the Williamson County Airport, Johnston City Fire Department, Williamson County Fire Station #3, and Williamson County Fire Station #7. The City of Carterville has joined efforts with Progress Port Recycling, just north of town. Carterville has moved their recycling bin location to this new facility to control contamination and to offer a more extensive recycling program. The facility offers a limited list of item that can be dropped off, from the traditional metals, paper, plastics and glass to electronics. John A. Logan’s Recycling Program has been active since the adoption of the Waste Management Plan. Tom Hamlin, Recycling Coordinator is in charge of public awareness, performs waste audits, and watches over the recycling drop-off site on campus. Few of the schools in Williamson County currently offer a recycling program or curriculum. None of them are currently receiving state or federal financial assistance or equipment. Two schools have partnered with other organizations (Progress Port and Rotary Club) outside of its in-house organization (Parent Teacher Org.). Landscape Waste collection (leaves, grass, and trees limbs) is not provided for by the County, unless in a case of a disaster. Landscape Waste collection must be arranged with

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individual haulers or Ashelax Recycling Compost. All compost is delivered to either Ashelax Recycling Compost or New Earth Compost Facilities. Demolition Waste collection (asphalt, metal, and wood) for recycling is not provided in the county. Ashelax Recycling has a private demolition recycling center, which is not open to the public. All demolition waste is collected by independent haulers and sent to landfills in the area. Only a small amount of commercial recycling currently takes place in Williamson County. Many large generators of corrugated cardboard, such as retail stores, bale their cardboard on-site. The bales are often back-hauled on company trucks or picked up by paper brokers from outside the county. Some industrial facilities and mid-size retailers recycle cardboard through provider by a number of private haulers. Beyond this there is little commercial recycling collection occurring in Williamson County.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RECYCLING CENTERS Six facilities process and market most of the recyclable materials collected in Williamson County: CETI, Progress Port and Gary’s Metals, all in Carterville; Fair Street Recycling and C & T Recycling, in Marion; T & T Recycling, in Hurst; and Ashelax Recycling, in Energy. Almost all of the recyclables are source separated before they’re delivered to these facilities. Only minimal sorting is preformed on-site. Progress Port is the only facility that does a substantial amount of sorting by hand. Some materials are collected at these sites and transported to other recycling centers in the area for marketing or processing.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RESOURCES, PROGRAMS, AND FUNDING ILLINOIS ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (IEPA) As stated in the Available Disposal Capacity for Solid Waste in Illinois, “The Agency (IEPA) is required under the Illinois Solid Waste Management Act to annually publish a report regarding the projected disposal capacities available for solid waste in sanitary landfills subject to fee requirement in Section 22.15 of the Environmental Protection Act.” This report is a complete source of state and regional waste generation, transfer, composting and recycling facilities. It’s the complete compilation of the data and information obtained by the Solid Waste Management Plans and facility operation reports. In addition IEPA has implemented programs and activities under the Illinois Solid Waste Management Act include 1) the collection of a Solid Waste Tipping Fee and Subtitle D Fee from landfills, 2) grants for the local solid waste Enforcement Program, 3) the Household Hazardous Waste Program, 4) Industrial Material Exchange Services and 5) the Used Tire Program. TIPPING FEE Under the Solid Waste Management Act, the IEPA is authorized to collect a Solid Waste Tipping Fee and Subtitle D Fee from the operator of a sanitary landfill subject to fee requirements from legislation. The annual report defines this billing method to be a sliding scale of quarterly fees to be levied on the basis of annual volumes accepted for disposal by sanitary landfills. Also the language allows for local governments to levy a local solid waste fee after the State fee, to be used for solid waste management purposes. These categories have remained constant since the restructuring of the fees starting July, 1, 2003. Table 12 IEPA Authorized Solid Waste Fees Cubic Yards Received in a Year (Thousands) New Solid Waste Fee New Subtitle D Fee >150

$2.00/ton

$0.22/ton

>150

$0.95/cy

$0.101/cy

100-150

$52,630

$7,020

50-100

$23,790

$3,120

10-50

$7,260

$975

<10

$1,050

$210

Source: Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (www.epa.gov)

ENFORCEMENT GRANTS Under the Solid Waste Management Act, the IEPA is authorized to provide funding to units of local government. Grants awarded to these units enabling them to conduct

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inspections of landfills, compost sites and transfer stations. A unit of government may also be authorized to investigate and enforce activities at illegal dumps and solid waste disposals, permitted by the IEPA. The Agency also has the ability to delegate counties the legal authority to inspect facilities on their behalf to conduct solid waste enforcement activities. These grants can only be given to units of local government that have delegation agreements with the Agency and have acquired trained landfill inspectors under the state's certification requirements. “County officials are closer to these facilities so they can respond more quickly to any problems that may arise. The solid waste grants provide part of the necessary resources to ensure compliance of disposal facilities, clean up of open dumps and documentation of enforcement-related actions,” according to Illinois EPA Director Doug Scott.(www.epa.gov)

Funding for the enforcement grant will not exceed 50% of the total program’s cost. Listed below are 3 local governments from the Southern Illinois region that have met the criteria and will receive funding for the fiscal year of 2008. For more information on this program e-mail Ellen Robinson at Ellen.Robinson@illinois.gov or call her at (217) 7829288. Table 13 Southern Illinois Counties Awarded Enforcement Grants 2008 Total Budget

State Share

Jackson County

Grantees

$138,899.00

$78,130.69

Perry County

$73,832.73

$36,170.66

Wayne County

$48,324.00

$28,511.16

Totals

$261,055.73

$142,812.51

Source: Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (www.epa.gov)

HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE IEPA has coordinated one-day household hazardous waste collections that are cosponsored each year in the spring and fall. Historically this program began in November 1989. Since then it has been reported that 262,100 households have participated in 292 events and 53,765 drums of material have been collected and safely disposed. “The Illinois EPA seeks and encourages communities or organizations to co-sponsor household hazardous collection events. If the applicant is not a unit of local government, letters of support are required indicating that the appropriate government units are in support of the program.” (www.epa.gov)

An application is available for printing on the IEPA’s website or you can apply online. The IEPA describes the “process of selection” to be an attempt to serve the whole state of Illinois efficiently and affectively. Below is a quote from the website that defines the process.

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“Applications are accepted each fiscal year, are kept active indefinitely, and are NOT chosen on a first come, first serve basis. Applications are categorized into potential large, medium or small events then ranked by a point system based on certain criteria. Events are selected each spring and fall utilizing the ranking system with the number of collections determined by available funding. The Illinois EPA provides funding and contractor oversight. Co-sponsors provide promotion and advertising, site location and volunteers to supervise traffic control, greet and survey participants and distribute information for the events.” (www.epa.gov)

Citizens are asked to bring hazardous household products that are listed on promotional information distributed by the co-sponsor or a list can be downloaded from the IEPA’s website. For more information on this program, or to obtain an application to co-sponsor a collection in your community, contact the Waste Reduction Unit at (217) 785-8604. INDUSTRIAL MATERIAL EXCHANGE SERVICE (IMES) IMES is a published directory where industries can list both materials that are available and materials that industries are seeking. The directory is published semi-annually and has an estimated 14,000 subscribers nationwide. IMES acts as a medium to link buyers and sellers. To acquire a list of materials, a firm can call or send a fax request to the IMES office. Some clients request to remain anonymous and IMES will not divulge there identity without consent. IMES puts potential user in contact with the generator. Final transactions and transportation of the material is left to the entities involved. Egg shells, dryer lint, and fish waste are some of the untraditional materials listed that have a marketed base clientele. As a viable source for material exchange, IMES is a program focused on serving clients. The program does not have direct involvement with regulatory bureaus or IEPA’s compliance programs. Client files and companies’ needs are protected and are not accessible by these agency bureaus. To receive a copy of the most recent IMES directory, or to be added to the mailing list, call Diane McClain at (217) 782-0450. USED TIRE PROGRAM IEPA and Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) both fund the efforts of the Used Tire Program through the Used Tire Management Fund. Since the passage of the Used Tire Management Act in 1992, Illinois has been nationally recognized as a leader in the management of used and wasted tires. Currently, Illinois generates 12.5 million used tires annually. This market of transporters, processors, and end users is an established network developed and maintained by the two agencies. The primary source for the Used Tire Management Fund is supported by a $1.00 per tire user fee applied to customers on the price of used tires sold for retail in Illinois. Cleanup and regulatory programs have been instrumental in addressing the used and waste tires in Illinois. These programs are implemented and maintained by the IEPA. The management of used and wasted tires in Illinois has two phases. First, the management phase is the regulatory/enforcement phase. It is where IEPA acts as a regulatory agency over generators, transporters, processors, and end users of wasted tires. The objective is to ensure all entities are operating in compliance with applicable statutes 24 of 52


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and regulations. The second phase is where IEPA will remediate tire dump sites and helps co-sponsor cleanup programs. Both programs have been effective due to the Use Tire Management Fund put in place by legislature. Each year approximately 100 tire dump sites are reclaimed by cleanup contractors, including Illinois Correctional Industries (operating under an Intergovernmental Agreement). Delivered tires are processed and blended with coal to produce electricity at power plants. The Agency co-sponsors 20 to 30 county-wide tire collections annually, which have become very popular with Illinois residents. The Agency also has the authority to remove waste tires from dumps and conduct cleanups. It can also seek recovery of costs from property owners unwilling or unable to remove tires that pose an immediate threat to human health and the environment. For more information or to inquire about the Use Tire Program, call Illinois EPA Used Tire Unit at (217) 785-8604.

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES (IDNR) Under the Solid Waste Management Act, IDNR has delegated a Waste Management Research Center (Center) the responsible entity for implementing its obligations. The Center’s Pollution Program is the State of Illinois’ lead project for promoting increased efficiency, environmentally friendly industry techniques and material applications. The program combines direct technical assistance with research activities focused on technology development and implementation to reduce waste. The Center’s staff is well trained with expertise in waste management issues facing Illinois industries and in-plant processes. This enables them to identify numerous problems from the research that could be beneficial to the client. The primary focus of the Center’s funding efforts is industrialbased research identified by the Pollution Prevention Program staff. Other important waste management, resource conservation, alternative energy, sustainability, and environmental issues are encouraged and funded by this program. The Center has provided research fund for the past 20 years to explore waste management and pollution prevention issues of importance to the state of Illinois. Universities, industrial groups, non-for-profit organizations and the consultant community are eligible to participate and receive funding for the program. Waste Management Research Center is the primary source in Illinois for funding waste management research and development. For more information about the Center’s Pollution Program, contact the Waste Management and Research Center at (217) 333-8940 or Bob Iverson at (217) 333-8946.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY (DCEO) The Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity’s Bureau of Energy and Recycling (Bureau) has two divisions that offer programs that promote alternatives for landfill disposal, conservation of resources, and further development of the recycling market. These two divisions are Recycling & Waste Reduction and Communications & Education. Both divisions have developed several programs to provide funding and assistance. The programs are designed to help develop and maintain recycling and waste reduction goals for local governmental organizations, for-profit and not-for-profit

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businesses, organizations, public and non-public schools, colleges, and universities. The programs instituted are the Illinois Recycling Grants Program, Recycling Expansion and Modernization (REM) Program, and Illinois Sustainable Education Project (ISTEP). ILLINOIS RECYCLING GRANTS PROGRAM The Illinois Recycling Program provides technical and financial assistance to communities, businesses, and not-for-profit organizations applicants. The program periodically issues requests for applications to fund traditional (fiber, metal, glass, and plastic) recycling efforts and other efforts recently developed for computer and electronics recycling. DCEO solicits applications for the purposes of increasing the selfsufficiency of Illinois' recycling industry. Also, they solicit applications for the creation and/or retention of employment opportunities, the diversion of post-consumer recyclable commodities from Illinois landfills, and to increase the quantity of materials recycled in Illinois. All grants are required to have a minimum 50% investment match from a separate financial source. For more information on this program, contact Traditional Recycling, David Ross at (217) 782-7887 or David.Ross@illinois.gov; or Electronic Recycling, Sam Al-Basha at (217) 557-5662 or Sam.Al-Basha@illinois.gov. RECYCLING EXPANSION AND MODERIZATION (REM) PROGRAM The REM Program provides an opportunity for organizations and businesses to receive a financial grant to expand their recycling market and waste reduction goals. This grant must be matched by a separate financial source. The focus of the REM Program is to divert materials from the solid waste stream and to conserve natural resources, while improving productivity and to stimulate the state economy. This program has two classifications: Waste Management Modernization project and Market Expansion Modernization project. Waste Management Modernization project provides assistance to improve a business or organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach to solid waste management through modernization activities. Projects involve source reduction activities that prevent the generation of solid waste and waste reduction activities that recycle or reuse industrial by-products or other solid waste materials. (www.commerce.state.il.us/dceo) Market Expansion Modernization project provides assistance to modernize key functions that manufacture recycled-content products or uses recyclable commodities. The purpose is to increase the use of recyclable commodities and to expand markets for these materials. Projects may also involve technical issues that are unique for companies planning to convert their operations to use recyclable commodities in manufacturing or service delivery. (www.commerce.state.il.us/dceo) Levels of service include Assessment Services, Demonstration Services, and Implementation Services. Maximum funding allotments are established for each level of service and are listed below.

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Table 14 REM Program Services and Funding Level of Service

Maximum Funding

Business Waste Assessment Service

$10,000

Assessment Service

$30,001

Demonstration Service

$150,000

Implementation Service

$250,000

Source: Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (www.commerce.state.il.us/dceo)

For more information, contact Mike Motor at (217) 524-0933 or michael.motor@illinois.gov. ILLINOIS SUSTAINABLE EDUCATION PROJECT (ISTEP) The Bureau of Energy and Recycling has taken an integrated approach and has merged the entire energy and recycling education programs into one program, Illinois Sustainable Education Project. ISTEP is made up of several programs, projects, and resources. The focus is on renewable energy, energy efficiency and the process of recycling as key learning examples of resource conservation and environmental stewardship. The ISTEP includes Illinois Zero Waste Schools Grant Program, ISTEP Educational Demonstration Cases, Lights for Learning Program, and Edenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lost and Found. ILLINOIS ZERO WASTE SCHOOL GRANT PROGRAM The Illinois Zero Waste Schools Grant Program is an opportunity for K-12 Illinois schools to implement or expand recycling and waste reduction programs. The purpose of this program is to provide funding to assist Illinois schools in achieving zero waste status. Grants awarded may be used to purchase project related capital equipment such as collection containers, reusable cafeteria utensils, and erasable classroom slates. Applications are solicited for projects in the fall. For general information about the IL Zero Waste Schools Grant Program, please contact Brett Ivers at Brett.Ivers@illinois.gov or (217) 524-5859. ISTEP EDUCATIONAL DEMONSTRATION CASES The ISTEP Educational Demonstration Case is a curriculum for investigating the 4Rs (Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Rethink). This case is packed full of exciting ways to recycle old products into new products, which can save money, resources and energy. ISTEPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s demonstration case provides over 50 items made from recycled commodities, eleven videos that are age appropriate from K-adult, and lesson plans. This resource will become a valuable asset in developing awareness and enthusiasm amongst students. The case may be borrowed for up to two weeks at no charge. To get more information or to reserve a case, contact Susan Nevitt at Susan.Nevitt@illinois.gov or call (217) 785-2863.

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LIGHTS FOR LEARNING PROGRAM Lights for Learning is a fundraiser for schools or organizations. By having students selling energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) the money raised can be used to fund the recycling and waste reduction programs developed by the school or organization. CFLs can last up to 10 times as long as an incandescent bulb while using 75% less energy. This activity promotes awareness and waste reduction. Schools or organizations earn a 50% profit from all sells. For more information on this program, contact Peggy Chamness at Peggy.Chamness@illinois.gov or (217) 785-2765. EDEN’S LOST AND FOUND Eden’s Lost and Found is a new, free, educational four hour PBS series provided by ISTEP. This series showcases four cities across America with extraordinary stories of environmental rebirth and the visionary leaders that transferred the urban landscape. Curriculum based on topics raised in the PBS documentary will examine how these US cities revitalized their urban landscape and improve city life for all. This integrated planning tackles topics including open spaces and public parks, urban forestry, alternative fuels, watershed management, public art, waste disposal, recycling, green architecture, mass transit and more. To order the Eden’s Lost and Found DVD contact Rebecca Enrietto at Rebecca.Enrietto@illinois.gov.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES (DOE) The Department of Energy and Natural Resources, Division or Coal, Nuclear and Renewable Fuels provides an independent and unbiased database for the analysis and forecasting modeling functions within Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels. The Division conducts coal, nuclear, renewable, and alternative fueled surveys and provides analytical products for these fuel industries. The Division also produces independent and balanced short-term forecasts. These comprehensive state-of-the-art surveys are required to meet the needs of DOE legislative mandates and those of the user community. The Renewables Information Team prepares impartial scheduled periodic statistical interpretive reports and technical publications for use in developing policy guidance on current and potential energy legislation. These include, but are not limited to the "Renewable Energy Annual," "Renewable Energy Trends," "Geothermal Heat Pump Shipments," "Solar Thermal Collector Manufacturers," and "Photovoltaic Module/Cell Manufacturers." The Renewables Information Team is responsible for the following renewable energy fuels: biomass, municipal solid waste, wood/wood waste, landfill gas, geothermal energy, geothermal heat pumps, hydroelectric, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, and wind. The Renewable Information Team provides information on U.S. renewable energy consumption, capacity, and electric generation. For more information contact Chris V. Buckner at chris.buckner@eia.doe.gov or (202) 586-6607.

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ILLINOIS COUNTIES SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION (ILCSWMA) ILCSWMA is a not-for-profit professional association for local level solid waste management professionals. Established in 1993, ILCSWMA has been dedicated to provide a forum for networking and information exchange among solid waste professionals in Illinois. ILCSWMA focuses on all areas of local government solid waste involvement, including collection and disposal, recycling and waste prevention, solid waste education and information, and solid waste enforcement. The ILCSWMA organization members include Counties (solid waste agencies, health departments, planning departments, County Boards and Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Attorneys), Municipalities (elected officials, solid waste coordinators and public works departments), and Townships. Affiliated member include state agencies, organizations, consulting firms, engineering firms, colleges, universities, Keeping Illinois Beautiful affiliates, community groups and private companies. Members benefit from quarterly meetings, which promote interaction with other members, tours and featured speakers, legislative updates, and workshops. Two types of memberships are offered Full and Affiliate. Full membership costs $75 annually. This includes membership for the entire organization and the eligibility to vote on ILSWMA organization matters. To get Full membership, an organization must be a unit of local government such as a county, municipality, or township. Affiliate membership is $50 and includes the basic benefits listed above. Affiliates will not be able to vote on ILSWMA affairs. Agencies that are members near the Williamson County area are Jackson County Health Department and Perry County Solid Waste Management. For more information send an e-mail to info@ilcswma.org or visit the Illinois Counties Solid Waste Management Association online at http://www.ilcswma.org/.

OTHER GRANT OPPORTUNITIES Captain Planet Foundation Grant â&#x20AC;&#x201C; promote understanding of environmental issues for student K-12. Source: http://captainplanetfoundation.org/default.aspx Wal-Mart Foundation Environmental Grant - This is a grant for general environmental purposes that can range from recycling projects, planting trees, to clearing nature trails. Source: http://walmartstores.com/GlobalWMStoresWeb/navigate.do?catg=316 or contact your local Wal-Mart store for further information. Best Buy Recycling grant program - Best Buy offers grants to help increase recycling opportunities to nonprofit organizations, cities, counties, or public-private partnerships. Source: http://communications.bestbuy.com/communityrelations/recycling.asp

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WILLIAMSON COUNTY BOARD The efforts of the Recycle Williamson County would not be possible without the continued support of the County Board. The Board funds and sponsors these programs and discusses issues relating to solid waste management in the county regularly.

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STATE’S ATTORNEY’S OFFICE The support of the Williamson County State’s Attorney’s office has also been a valuable resource. They provide legal review of all proposed contracts, ordinance changes, and other legal documents.

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ATTACHMENT A

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FIFTEEN YEAR UPDATE: MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN This section of the fifteen-year update is prepared in accordance with Illinois Environmental Protection Agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan update guidance form. The information contained in this section is in direct response to questions posed by IEPA in the guidance form.

GENERAL INFORMATION Local Government:

Williamson County

Contact Person:

A. S. Kirkikis

Address:

Greater Egypt Regional Planning & Development Commission 608 E. College St. Carbondale, IL 62901

Telephone:

(618) 549-3306

Plan Adoption Date:

14-Aug-96

Re-Adoption Date:

Not Applicable

Plan Update Due:

29-Aug-2011

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RECOMMENDATION & IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE CONTAINED IN THE ADOPTED PLAN Briefly describe the recommendations and implementation schedule for each alternative in the adopted plan.

SOURCE REDUCTION Source Reduction Recommendations

Section of Plan

Comprehensive county-wide education/information programs should be implemented promoting source reduction and recycling.

11.6.2

By July 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 2010

Commercial/Institutional/Industrial generators should seek technical assistance and perform waste audits so as to reduce their waste stream and increase recycling.

11.6.2

None Given

Recycling (and source reduction) programs should be established in the county, municipalities, school and other local government facilities.

11.6.2

By Summer 2010

County, municipalities, and school districts should revise their procurement practices and specifications to promote source reduction and recycling.

11.6.2

None Given

County shall designate a recycling (and source reduction) Coordinator as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act.

11.6.2

By July 2009

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

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Implementation Schedule


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RECYCLING AND REUSE Recycling and Reuse Recommendations

Section of Plan

Implementation Schedule

Comprehensive county-wide education/information programs should be implemented promoting recycling and source reduction.

11.6.3

By J July 2009 – June 2010

At some outlaying drop-off locations it may also be desirable to set-up municipal waste dumpsters to minimize opportunities for contamination of the recyclable material.

11.6.3

None Given

Curbside recycling in Carterville, Herrin, Johnson City and Marion as well as other cities and villages. The service could be provided by the municipality or contracted with private haulers.

11.6.3

By Summer 2010

A Material Recovery Facility (MRF) should be established in the county or arrangements should be made to utilize MRF's in neighboring counties.

11.6.3

None Given

County shall designate a recycling (and source reduction) Coordinator as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act.

11.6.3

By Summer 2010

Provision of separate landscape waste collection services should remain a municipal government prerogative subject to local demand.

11.6.4

None Given

Collected landscape waste (if any) should be transported to a licensed composting facility or farm applied at an agronomic rate and in a lawful manner.

11.6.4

None Given

An education/information program, promoting commercial/institutional/industrial recycling and source reduction, should be implemented throughout the county.

11.6.5

By July 2009 – June 2010

Recycling (and source reduction) programs should be established in the county, municipalities, school and other local government facilities.

11.6.5

By July 2009 – June 2010

County, municipalities, and school districts should revise their procurement practices and specifications to promote the re-use of recycled materials.

11.6.5

None Given

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Recycling and Reuse Recommendations

Section of Plan

All business and institutions with more than fifty employees should be required to designate recycling coordinators and phasein source separation of corrugated paper and two or three other materials.

11.6.5

None Given

Major shopping centers should designate recycling coordinators and be required to provide recycling opportunities for their tenants.

11.6.5

None Given

Haulers serving businesses and institutions should be required to collect the source separated materials and make arrangements for processing and marketing.

11.6.5

None Given

All road and street construction projects in the county should include bid specifications requiring the re-use and recycling of concrete and asphalt.

11.6.6

By Summer 2010

Existing scrap yards and scavengers should be encouraged to accept the banned items and recycle them in accordance with current regulation. Efforts should be made to establish a regional white goods demanufacturing facility.

11.6.7

None Given

Target date for 15% recycling goal. Organize workshop for recycling coordinators to discuss program results and identify problem areas.

Implementation Schedule

12.6

By Summer 2010

12.6

By Summer 2010

Establish additional recycling drop-off sites so as to achieve an overall average of one site per 10,000 in population.

12.6

By July 2009

Expand business recycling programs to include smaller waste generating companies and additional materials to be recycled.

12.6

By Summer 2010

Target date for 25% recycling goal.

12.6

By Summer 2012

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

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COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION Section of Plan

Combustion Recommendations

Implementation Schedule

It does not appear that development of a WTE facility is currently feasible in the Greater Egypt Region. This issue should be evaluated in five years when the plan is updated.

7.1

None Given

Incineration is a municipal waste disposal option not recommended at this time due to high development life cycle costs and regulatory uncertainties.

11.6.8

None Given

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS Section of Plan

Landfill Recommendations Municipalities and haulers in the county should continue to utilize the Southern Illinois, Perry Ridge, West End Disposal landfills unless other more economical or more convenient options become available. County should consider development of the proposed Marion Ridge Landfill to serve its long term needs, providing that the proposed facility meets all current environmental and fiscal requirements.

County should also support the development of new landfills or expansions in adjacent counties so as to assure long term capacity and promote more competitive market conditions. If a new landfill is developed in the county tipping fee surtax should be enacted as provided for in the Environmental Protection Act. The maximum levy is about $1.00 per ton. Surtax funds should be used to support source reduction, recycling, and other waste management related programs. Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

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Implementation Schedule

11.6.8

None Given

11.6.8

In 2006, the County Board went on record as being against the development of the Marion Ridge Landfill, citing the location would have a negatively affect on current residents and business development. The Board has proposed an alternative location.

11.6.8

None Given

11.6.8

None Given


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

CURRENT PLAN IMPLEMENTATION EFFORTS (a) Which recommendations in the adopted plan have been implemented? Briefly describe which recommendations were not implemented and the reasons why. (b) Which recommendations in the adopted plan have been implemented according to plan's schedule? Briefly describe which recommendations were not implemented according to the adopted plan's schedule, and attach a revised implementation schedule.

SOURCE REDUCTION Implemented According to Schedule

Source Reduction Recommendations

Explanation (if need)

Comprehensive county-wide education/information programs should be implemented promoting source reduction and recycling.

Yes

July 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 2010

Commercial/Institutional/Industrial generators should seek technical assistance and perform waste audits so as to reduce their waste stream and increase recycling.

Yes, to a limited extent

Some efforts have been undertaken to coordinate the activities of various groups.

Recycling (and source reduction) programs should be established in the county, municipalities, school and other local government facilities.

Yes, to a limited extent

John A. Logan has implemented source reduction practices, such as double-sided copying.

County, municipalities, and school districts should revise their procurement practices and specifications to promote source reduction and recycling.

No

The perception that recycled products cost too much, are of inferior quality, and are not available locally still persist.

County shall designate a recycling (and source reduction) Coordinator as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act.

No

A coordinator was hired, but has resigned and a replacement has not been appointed.

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

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RECYCLING AND REUSE Implemented According to Schedule

Recycling and Reuse Recommendations

Explanation (if need)

Comprehensive county-wide education/information programs should be implemented promoting recycling and source reduction.

Yes

July 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 2010

At some outlaying drop-off locations it may also be desirable to set-up municipal waste dumpsters to minimize opportunities for contamination of the recyclable material.

Yes

The County Earnfare supervisor and workers monitor municipal waste contamination of the recycling materials collected at the drop-off trailers sites as part of their daily municipal waste trash pick-up on County highways and roads.

Curbside recycling in Carterville, Herrin, Johnson City and Marion as well as other cities and villages. The service could be provided by the municipality or contracted with private haulers.

No

None of these municipalities have taken steps to implement a curbside recycling program.

A Material Recovery Facility (MRF) should be established in the county or arrangements should be made to utilize MRF's in neighboring counties.

No

County shall designate a recycling (and source reduction) Coordinator as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act.

No

No action has been taken to establish a MRF, but the two transfer stations in Marion are the primary staging points to establish one. A coordinator was hired, but has resigned and a replacement has not been appointed.

Provision of separate landscape waste collection services should remain a municipal government prerogative subject to local demand.

No

All landscape waste collection is provided by multiple private haulers.

Collected landscape waste (if any) should be transported to a licensed composting facility or farm applied at an agronomic rate and in a lawful manner.

Yes

All landscape waste collected goes to either New Earth Compost Facility or Ashelax Recycling Compost in Williamson County.

An education/information program, promoting commercial/institutional/industrial recycling and source reduction, should be implemented throughout the county.

Yes

July 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; June 2010

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Recycling and Reuse Recommendations

10/7/2009

Explanation (if need)

Recycling (and source reduction) programs should be established in the county, municipalities, school and other local government facilities.

Yes, to a limited extent

Crainville and Carterville have co-sponsored an opening of a new recycling facility and have relocated city recycling bins there. All other recycling and source reduction program have been made by individual efforts.

County, municipalities, and school districts should revise their procurement practices and specifications to promote the re-use of recycled materials.

No

The perception that recycled products cost too much, are of inferior quality, and are not available locally still persist.

Limited

No requirement is in effect. Most of the major businesses and institutions of significant size do recycle, but not to this extent. Aisin Manufacturing has developed an on going zero landfill contribution reduction effort, introduced in 2004. Most shopping center provide for some form of recycling coordinator and recycling opportunities.

All business and institutions with more than fifty employees should be required to designate recycling coordinators and phasein source separation of corrugated paper and two or three other materials.

Yes

Major shopping centers should designate recycling coordinators and be required to provide recycling opportunities for their tenants. Haulers serving businesses and institutions should be required to collect the source separated materials and make arrangements for processing and marketing.

Yes, to a limited extent

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All businesses and institutions that collect and separate materials for recycling make private arrangements for haulers to transport it to a facility that will process and market the recycled material. This is not required.


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

Implemented According to Schedule

Recycling and Reuse Recommendations

10/7/2009

Explanation (if need)

All road and street construction projects in the county should include bid specifications requiring the re-use and recycling of concrete and asphalt.

No

Existing scrap yards and scavengers should be encouraged to accept the banned items and recycle them in accordance with current regulation. Efforts should be made to establish a regional white goods demanufacturing facility.

No

Target date for 15% recycling goal.

No

Organize workshop for recycling coordinators to discuss program results and identify problem areas.

No

Williamson County does not have a recycling coordinator.

Establish additional recycling drop-off sites so as to achieve an overall average of one site per 10,000 in population.

Yes

Expand business recycling programs to include smaller waste generating companies and additional materials to be recycled.

Yes

In 2008, Williamson County was awarded grant funding from DCEO. The funding was used to purchase 4 new trailers to be used as drop-off sites throughout the county. The County has established 9 drop-off locations, meeting this goal per-population. Three recycling facilities have open since the adoption of the plan. Karco is in the process of establishing a new facility in Marion as well.

Target date for 25% recycling goal.

No

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

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The re-use of concrete and asphalt has not been included into the specifications, but it has been noted that subcontractors for the county have re-used 1020% of asphalt in recent projects. Most white goods are processed by privatelyowned facilities in Carbondale and other refurbishing facilities in the area.


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION Implemented According to Schedule

Combustion Recommendations It does not appear that development of a WTE facility is currently feasible in the Greater Egypt Region. This issue should be evaluated in five years when the plan is updated.

Yes

Incineration is a municipal waste disposal option not recommended at this time due to high development and life cycle cost and regulatory uncertainties.

Yes

Explanation (if need) No parties have shown any interest in developing a municipal waste incinerator in the county. In a recent disaster temporary sites were establish to incinerate landscape debris. The financial and regulatory uncertainties of incineration still remain.

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS Implemented According to Schedule

Landfill Recommendations Municipalities and haulers in the county should continue to utilize the Southern Illinois Regional, Perry Ridge, West End Disposal landfills unless other more economical or more convenient options become available.

Yes

County should consider development of the proposed Marion Ridge Landfill to serve its long term needs, providing that the proposed facility meets all current environmental and fiscal requirements.

Yes

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Explanation (if need) Most waste generated in the county is sent to Southern Illinois Regional and Perry Ridge Landfills. A small portion of waste generated is sent to West End Disposal Landfill. In 2006, the County Board went on record as being against the development of the Marion Ridge Landfill, citing the location would have a negatively affect on current residents and business development. The Board has proposed an alternative location.


Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

County should also support the development of new landfills or expansions in adjacent counties so as to assure long term capacity and promote more competitive market conditions.

Yes

If a new landfill is developed in the county tipping fee surtax should be enacted as provided for in the Environmental Protection Act. The maximum levy is about $1.00 per ton. Surtax funds should be used to support source reduction, recycling, and other waste management related programs.

No

10/7/2009

In 2001, Jackson County anticipated SIRL would file an application seeking approval of a new adjacent site, which would provide adequate capacity for waste generated in the region for the next 20+ years. Marion Ridge was granted a permit in 2004, applied for renewal in 2009, the County sent formal letters to EPA opposing the renewal. Renewal is pending approval. No formal decision has been made by EPA. Marion Ridge was granted a permit in 2004, applied for renewal in 2009, the County sent formal letters to EPA opposing the renewal. Renewal is pending approval. No formal decision has been made by EPA.

Source: Municipal Waste Management Plan, 1996

REVISED IMPLEMENTATION SCHEDULE The County will continue to evaluate the recommendations which have not been implemented to date. The County reserves the right to implement various policies and practices which it feels are in the best interest of the County at any given time.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

RECYCLING PROGRAM STATUS (a) Has the program been implemented throughout the county? Yes, Recycle Williamson County. (b) Does the program provide for separate collection and composting of leaves? Yes, there is separated collection. No, compost collection has not been implemented in the program. (c) Does the recycling program provide for public education and notification to foster understanding of and encourage compliance with the program? Yes, the program is featured in the newspaper and on local news stations. The articles and reports focuses on the importance of the program, environmental impacts, updates and statistics of the materials collected, and location, time, and date of the event. Also the Recycle Williamson County Committee makes presentations to various businesses, organization, chamber of commerce, and school regarding the program and recycling awareness efforts. (d) Does the recycling program include provisions for, compliance, including incentives and penalties? No. (e) Does the program include provisions for recycling the collected materials, identifying potential markets for at least three materials, and promoting the use of products made from recovered or recycled material among businesses, newspapers, and local governments? No. (f) Provide any other pertinent details on the recycling program. The Recycle Williamson County Committee co-hosts many projects such as Free Dump Day, Adopt a Road, and Free Used Tire Collection Day. Some projects are held several times each year. The growth in participation has spawned more frequently held events.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

CURRENT NEEDS ASSESSMENT INFORMATION The data presented in this section of the report is based upon the availability of resources, updated waste generation data, current facility waste recycling and disposal information, and other available data that was surveyed to determine the results of this report. This information is not required by the IEPA. In a 12 month period between 2007-2008, the total waste generated in Williamson County was estimated to be 123,288 tons/year. This total is reached by combining all the waste generated within the County, which includes all waste sent to the landfill and the materials diverted by recycling and composting. The most currently known population estimate is 64,628, in 2008. This population estimate was used in formulating appropriate rates and PCDs/PEDs. Each sector groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waste generation is directly related by the number of employees in those groups. By re-interpolating the trends established in the initial Municipal Waste Management Plan new waste generated percentages can be calculated. After recalculating the waste percentage of each sector group and distributing the sub-total waste generated amongst them a new PCD/PED rate can be calculated. A summary of total waste generated by sector group is presented on Table 15. Table 15 Summary of Total Waste Generation in Williamson County 2007-2008 Waste Generation by Sector (in Tons) Williamson County Population 64,628 (2008)

Residential Waste

Commercial / Institutional Waste

Industrial Lunchroom / Office Waste

Construction / Demolition Waste

Industrial Process / Manufacturing Waste

Total Waste Generation

Waste Generated

48,082

25,891

4,932

16,027

28,356

123,288

Percentage

39%

21%

4%

13%

23%

100%

PCD/PED

4.08

6.52

11.83

1.36

43.8

10.45

Note The waste generation of 2007 is applied to the most recent population estimate, 2008.

The municipal waste generation rate was determined to be 8.05 PCD. This municipal waste generation rate is justified by similar reports from Jackson County, with a rate of 7.1 PCD generated by a population of 59,612 in 2005; and Jefferson County, with a rate of 5.2 PCD generated by a population of 38,966 in 1999. The total municipal waste generated within the County is estimated to be 94,932 tons. The total municipal waste is determined by subtracting the waste generated by the Industrial Process/Manufacturing sector group, which is not to be considered as municipal waste by IEPA. This estimate has also been compared to Jackson County (77,402, in 2005) and Jefferson County (36,800, in 1999). Tables 16 and 17 present the results of the waste generated and recycled by Williamson County.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

Table 16 Summary of Municipal Waste Generation in Williamson County 2007-2008 Waste Generation by Sector (in Tons) Williamson County Population 64,628 (2008)

Residential Waste

Commercial / Institutional Waste

Industrial Lunchroom / Office Waste

Construction / Demolition Waste

Municipal Waste Generation

Waste Generated

48,082

25,891

4,932

16,027

94,932

Percentage

51%

27%

5%

17%

100%

PCD/PED

4.08

6.52

11.83

1.36

8.05

Note The waste generated in 2007-2008 was applied to the most recent population estimate of 2008. Table17 Williamson County Solid Waste Generation Structure and Distribution

Time Period For This Information:

Calendar Year 2007-2008

Total Waste Generated Per Year:

123,288 tons/year

Municipal Waste Generated Per Year:

94,932 tons/year

Municipal Waste Generated Rate:

8.05 PCD

Total Waste Recycled/Composted Per Year:

15,478 tons/year

Recycling Percentage:

12.6%

Total Waste Incinerated Per Year:

0 tons

Total Waste Landfilled Per Year:

107,810 tons

Note The waste generated in 2007-2008 was applied to the most recent population estimate of 2008.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

NEW RECOMMENDATIONS AND IMPLEMENTATIONS SCHEDULE The County will continue to further implement the provisions of the plan as it sees fit, as well as take on additional projects and programs which were not discussed in the plan. The County will undertake activities based upon the available financial and personnel resources, and the anticipated benefits that may result. The Commission makes the following new recommendations to be undertaken over the next five years. The information and recommendations made in the original Solid Waste Management Plan remain in effect. The fifteen-year update and its recommendations are intended to supplement the original plan.

MUNICIPAL WASTE COLLECTION RECOMMENDATION: Encourage haulers and municipalities to adopt a pay-as-you-throw or volume-based residential waste collection service. ACTION: A volume-based collection services will encourage source reduction and recycling. RECOMMENDATION: Private haulers should be licensed and required to provide periodic reports on their operations. ACTION: Requiring private hauler to be licensed and to login their loads will cut down on the resources needed to track the municipal waste for future updates. The fee acquired from issuing licenses should be use to off set the cost of providing this service; typically licensing fees are $50.

SOURCE REDUCTION Source reduction involves reducing the amount of waste prior to entering the waste stream. Commonly known examples of source reduction activities include practicing double-sided copying (which reduces paper waste) and buying reusable items (in place of disposable items). RECOMMENDATION: The County is encouraged to adopt a recycling ordinance. ACTION: The County should recognize recycling as a valuable, practical, and essential method of waste stream reduction. By finding that Landfill capacity is rapidly diminishing; alternatives to and reduction in the reliance on landfills is vital to the needs of the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residents, businesses, and environment. Recycling of certain solid wastes is preferred to the disposal of these materials. A recycling mandate of certain solid wastes along with other related measures and incentives are needed in order to accomplish the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals in reducing the solid waste stream in this County. Haulers should be licensed accompanied with a material separation plan in accordance with the ordinance. A material separation plan will demonstrate the means, methods, and procedures to separate recyclables from the solid waste stream. Also the licensed hauler shall log and report the total tonnage of solid waste collected in the County, the amount of which is landfilled or recycled, and categorize the received waste by sector group. Lastly, enforcement of violations and penalties must be established. Typically violations range from $50 to $500 depending on the severity and frequency of the violations.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

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RECOMMENDATION: County, municipalities, and school districts should revise their procurement practices and specifications to promote source reduction and recycling. ACTION: Memos, promotional information, and other media should circulate periodically. Foresight and awareness of the relevant times of the year and resource availability should be considered when preparing information. Examples: Christmas paper and box recycling, out of date annual and quarterly fiscal record shredding, and end of the school semester paper recycling. RECOMMENDATION: The County shall designate a recycling (and source reduction) coordinator as required by the Solid Waste Planning & Recycling Act. ACTION: Williamson County Health Department or any other county agency could be designated as the lead agency to coordinate the program. Funds for creating this position could be acquired through the Resources, Programs, and Grants section of this report. RECOMMENDATION: Continue to make strides in providing source reduction education to residents, business, and institutions. ACTION: Promote source reduction activities through various means, including the dissemination of literature and provide appropriate technical assistance to various entities. The Recycle Williamson County Committee continues to make presentations to various businesses, organization, chamber of commerce, and school regarding programs and recycling awareness efforts. Funding and curriculums are available and are listed in the Resources, Programs, and Grants section of this report. RECOMMENDATION: Encourage the establishment of pay-as-you-throw or quantitybased residential waste collection fees. ACTION: Volume based waste collection fees are a responsible method of operating and managing the waste stream that has become more common over the past several years. This approach encourages recycling and ultimately reduces the overall waste being landfilled. The County shall continue to encourage communities and waste haulers to structure their billing rates based upon the amount generated by residents. The County shall offer technical assistance to communities in devising quantity-based rates systems that work to meet their particular needs.

RECYCLING AND REUSE In order to meet the Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mandated 25% recycling rate, the County proposes the following recommendations: RECOMMENDATION: The County is encouraged to adopt a recycling ordinance. ACTION: The County should recognized recycling as a valuable, practical, and essential method of waste stream management. By passing a recycling ordinance the County will have initiated a county-wide recycling program, which will provide a plan for the County to reach itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recycling and sources reduction goals.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

RECOMMENDATION: Continue to make strides in providing recycling education to residents, businesses, and institutions. ACTION: Building off the efforts of the past fifteen years, the County shall continue to undertake endeavors to maintain and develop new objectives to educate people of the importance of recycling and it benefits. Educational materials, presentations, and other such items are effective, but some hand-on technical assistance will be required for those entities needing help in developing recycling and waste reduction projects. Also a list of compiled resources has been developed and is located in the Resources, Programs, and Grants section of this report. RECOMMENDATION: Add additional County drop-off sites based upon the need of various geographic areas and the availability of suitable locations. ACTION: This goal was completed as of 2008. Williamson County was awarded grant funding from DCEO. The funding was used to purchase 4 new trailers to be used as drop-off sites throughout the county. The County has established 9 drop-off locations, exceeding the goal of 1 site per 10,000 in population. The County Earnfare supervisor and workers monitor municipal waste contamination of the recycling materials collected at the drop-off trailers sites as part of their daily municipal waste trash pick-up on County highways and roads. The Carterville/Crainville site offers the presence of on-site monitoring without allocating additional funds, by locating the drop-off site at the recycling facility for after hours. RECOMMENDATION: Curbside recycling in Marion, Carterville, and Herrin as well as other adjacent cities and villages. ACTION: Carterville has the most potential to offer a curbside recycling program. Progress Port has several collection vehicles and could be capable to undertake this project, with appropriate funding and staff. Herrin could provide curbside recycling that could be offered by the municipality or private haulers. Marion is subject to provide this service with private haulers. Burris Disposal offers curbside recycling in Marion and areas within Williamson County not under franchised or municipal waste collection agreements. Many methods of material separation is possible. Source separation is the most economic and could be accomplished by sell color bags at local stores and marked locations, which is one method of charging for the services. Also grants are available to provide funding to acquire recycling container that could be offered to participants. RECOMMENDATION: Continue to work with local governments and waste haulers to improve municipal waste contracts and encourage them to offer recycling services ACTION: Municipal waste and recycling collection contracts often reduce cost to residents. At the same time it can reduce waste vehicle traffic in a community. The County shall work with municipalities and haulers in putting together contracts that can meet the need of both parties, and meet the recycling goals of the County. The County shall expand its efforts to work with communities in improving waste and recycling collection.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

RECOMMENDATION: Provide information and technical assistance to the public and private sector entities to improve their abilities to more efficiently collect and process recyclable materials. ACTION: This goal was completed as of July 2009. The Recycle Williamson County Committee makes presentations to various businesses, organization, chamber of commerce, and school regarding recycling program and recycling awareness efforts. The programs are featured in the newspaper and on local news stations. The articles and reports focuses on the importance of the program, environmental impacts, updates and statistics of the materials collected, and location, time, and date of the event. RECOMMENDATION: Develop a program aimed at increasing commercial recycling. This program may include education, technical and/or financial assistance, and the adoption of a commercial recycling ordinance. ACTION: This goal was completed as of July 2009. The Recycle Williamson County Committee makes presentations to various businesses, organization, chamber of commerce, and school regarding recycling program and recycling awareness efforts. The programs are featured in the newspaper and on local news stations. The articles and reports focuses on the importance of the program, environmental impacts, updates and statistics of the materials collected, and location, time, and date of the event. RECOMMENDATION: The County should monitor the abilities of the recycling facility operations to insure that adequate and increased productivity capabilities are available. If it is determined that the county's needs are not being adequately met, then considerations of developing a county-sponsored materials recovery facility should be undertaken. ACTION: If private sector processing facilities do not keep up with any increased recycling requirements implemented by the County. Then the County should consider the development of a county-sponsored materials recovery facility. The overall goal is to increase the recycling rate to 25% and beyond. If the private sector does not accommodate this goal at a reasonable cost, then the County should give consideration to enter into the processing business. RECOMMENDATION: Continue to develop programs to manage hard-to-handle materials, such as household hazardous waste, tires, white goods, and electronics. ACTION: One-day collection events have been sponsored by the County to help address the disposal of HHW and tires. The County should continue to hold these special collections for problem materials. If periodic collections do not appear to be adequately addressing these items, then the County should give consideration to developing programs which can handle these materials on an on-going basis. Alternatives may include holding more frequent one-day collections, hiring a contractor to perform household pickups, or developing permanent collection locations.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

COMBUSTION FOR ENERGY RECOVERY/ COMBUSTION FOR VOLUME REDUCTION The Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original plan deemed incineration to not be feasible or desirable at that time, but called for a re-evaluation of that recommendation in the scheduled updates. RECOMMENDATION: Fully consider the economic benefits of any proposed incineration or waste-to-energy facility, but do not actively seek out the establishment of such a facility to manage the county's waste. ACTION: The regulatory and economic climate for incineration has not been favorable in Illinois for several years. There is no indication that these circumstances will change and make the establishment of an incinerator more favorable.

DISPOSAL IN LANDFILLS The State lists landfills as the least-favorable solid waste management alternative, though the majority of waste in Illinois continues to be handled in this manner. RECOMMENDATION: Continue to rely on Southern Illinois Regional, Perry Ridge, and West End Disposal Lanfills to dispose of the majority of waste generated in Williamson County. ACTION: The County shall continue to rely on Southern Illinois Regional, Perry Ridge, and West end Disposal Landfills to meet its disposal needs, unless other privately-owned facilities are developed in the county which can provide competitive disposal rates, adequate environmental compliance, and sufficient economic incentives to the County. Williamson County does not intend to actively seek out the establishment of an additional landfill unless it is determined that the County's needs are not being adequately met.

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Williamson County, Solid Waste Management Plan, Fifteen Year Update

10/7/2009

RECOMMENDATION: County should continue to work with Marion Ridge Landfill to come to an agreement on the location and feasible need for the facility. The conditions must meet the needs of the region and adhere to the law and Pollution Control Board Regulations. ACTION: The County shall continue to rely on Southern Illinois Regional, Perry Ridge, and West End Disposal Landfills to meet its disposal needs, unless other privately-owned facilities are developed in the county which can provide competitive disposal rates, adequate environmental compliance, and sufficient economic incentives to the County. In 2006, the County Board went on record as being against the development of the Marion Ridge Landfill, citing the location would have a negatively affect on current residents and business development. The Board has proposed an alternative location. Williamson County does not intend to actively seek out the establishment of an additional landfill unless it is determined that the County's needs are not being adequately met. The following criteria must be met to be considered: 1) the facility is necessary to accommodate the waste needs of the area it is intended to serve; 2)the facility is so designed, located, and proposed to be operated that the public health, safety, and welfare will be protected; 3) the facility is located so as to minimize incompatibility with the character of the surrounding property; 4) the facility is located outside the boundaries of the 100 year flood plain or the site is flood proof; 5) the plan of operation for the facility is designed to minimize the danger to the surrounding area from fire, spills, or other operational accidents; 6) the traffic patterns to or from the facility is so designed as to minimize the impact on existing traffic flows; 7) if the facility will be treating, storing, or disposing of hazardous waste, an emergency response plan exists for the facility which includes notification, containment and evacuation procedures to be used in case of an accidental release; 8) if the facility is to be located in a county where the county board has adopted a solid waste management plan consistent with the planning requirements of the Local Solid Waste Disposal Act or the Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act, the facility must be consistent with that plan; and 9) if the facility will be located within a regulated recharge area, any applicable requirements specified by the board for such areas have been met. Lastly, the county could require the proposed landfill to offer a recycling recovery program, as part of the recycling ordinance.

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Williamson County Municipal Waste Management Plan 10-7-09